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Old 02-23-2013, 12:38 PM   #1966
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by alypen View Post
I did wonder, when I heard that they weren't there, if that was a contributing factor. OTOH, did he play that badly in Shanghai?
I think he played very bad in Shanghai but like in Rotterdam, it also seems that he had not practised in previous weeks.

Hard to know the contribution of each factor, probably the lack fo practise was the main one.

But what worries me is that in the long run, I think this family absence may really affect his schedule, motivation and well-being on Tour.
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:43 PM   #1967
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Old 02-23-2013, 10:49 PM   #1968
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

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But what worries me is that in the long run, I think this family absence may really affect his schedule, motivation and well-being on Tour.
That worries me, too. If it is causing problems, then he's going to need to sort it somehow or accept the consequences.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:24 AM   #1969
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Roger Federer: proudly Swiss African

February 22 2013 at 07:55am
By Kevin McCallum

Johannesburg – Around 6km away from where Roger Federer is sitting in an alcove at the Intercontinental Hotel at OR Tambo is the Ciba chemical company in Spartan, Kempton Park.

It was at that company back in 1970 that a Swiss man by the name of Robert Federer met an English-speaking Afrikaans girl called Lynette Durand. They fell in love, moved to Switzerland and 11 years after they met produced one of the greatest athletes the world has ever seen.

In an interview on Talk Radio 702 some years back, Lynette Federer said we should consider her son as a South African as well as a Swiss player. “She said that?” he laughed. I took it a step further. “As your mother once lived in the East Rand, I call you the ‘East Rand’s Roger Federer’? Is that okay?” He sat forward and laughed hard: “You do? okay, okay …”

Federer arrived in the land of his mother’s birth for a short visit this week, a whistle-stop tour to visit one of the pre-schools that benefit from the Roger Federer Foundation. He’s apologetic for being late, the flight from Limpopo having been a little delayed. He was due to fly out later that same night to Dubai for a tournament there, but does not look rushed, dressed in white Nike T-shirt, jeans and running shoes. We start at the beginning, and I point in the vague direction of where his parents would have met in Kempton Park.

“Exactly right here. I used to spend a lot of time here. I’ve been all around South Africa, everywhere from the coast to Kruger National Park. Always enjoyed coming back, no doubt about it. It’s one of the most beautiful countries in the world,” he said. Some 14 000 South African children benefit from his foundation, which has projects in Malawi (6 500 children), Zimbabwe (16 000), Zambia (10 000), Botswana (5 500), Ethiopia (3 200) and Switzerland.

“It’s the 10th year anniversary. We started it on December 24, 2003. It all started at that first project in PE (Port Elizabeth). I was there in 2005. It’s very emotional. I have a strong bond to South Africa because of my Mom. I spent a lot of time here as a kid. Can’t believe I haven’t been here for eight years. I had planned to come back a lot more, but the next thing you know I become this good tennis player and I have to travel all around the world, and so when you don’t have to travel you just don’t. I’m very happy to have made this trip again, to see some friends and family. It was so worthwhile. I know it won’t be another eight years until I come back to South Africa.

“I had a field visit in the Limpopo province. Since 2010 we’ve supported 14 pre-schools, or crèches, I think you call them here. We are going to support 40 in the future, so I went to see two of them. I was speaking to teachers, our partner, Read. We have to have partners because we obviously can’t do this alone. You need the community, the partners to give the best possibly opportunity for the kids. I loved playing with the kids, they were between two and six years old, right in the sort of demographic of my own kids, so it felt really like home a little bit.”

Read, according to the website, “enables the further training of teachers, and provides the schools with material. The teachers are trained how to use resources for teaching children to read and write, and are taught the options of effectively integrating these into lessons.” The Foundation will invest over R8.7-million from 2012-2013 in Read educational development.

“Hopefully in the process, the kids are going to have a better opportunity at school after that, getting good quality pre-schooling. When I come and see these I leave with so many memories, so many pictures. I talk about it with my wife, with my kids, with my friends. Then we start planning the next visit, can we do more?”

As well as the 10th anniversary of his Foundation, the 2013 Wimbledon also marks 10 years since he won his first Grand Slam in London. “I can’t believe it’s been 10 years. I sometimes still feel like a junior, I really do. I talk about the years ‘98 or ‘99 when I made the breakthrough like it was not long ago. Here I am and people are talking about me retiring, and I’m like, ‘What are you talking about? Me retiring?’ I feel like I’m in the middle of my career even though I know that the average retirement age is, what, maybe 31, maybe 33, maybe 36? I don’t know what it is. But as long as I love playing I’ll keep playing. Ten years since my first Wimbledon victory in 2003, jeez, it’s gone by so quickly. I can’t believe it.

“I’ve gotten much stronger physically, obviously, over the years. I’ve adjusted to a more dynamic, physical tennis style that is being played today. The generation that was my heroes or the ones who I was looking up to have all retired, and they were maybe the ones who came into the net a lot more (than players today).

“The game has evolved in terms of the strings, in terms of how dynamic it has become. I never thought it would change the way it has. It’s interesting for me to have to adapt my game to handle the generation of today, as I went to a different school to today’s generation. It’s exciting. I love rivalries, I love these challenges and I hope to play through as many generations as I can.

“In tennis we probably have new generations every five to seven years, a new wave that comes in. I’ve been very fortunate to have been in the game for a long time. I definitely feel like I’m a better player now than 10 years ago. I would have to be otherwise all the practice I do is not worth it.”

He will be taking it a little easier this year than in previous years, taking a few tournaments out of his schedule. Last year was “brutal”, he said, with Davis Cup and Olympics. He’ll be spending more time at home with his family and catching up on practice. At the age of 31 he is still honing his game, still learning. “I’m going to catch up on the practice I missed out on in the last few years with pushing for number one and playing all those tournaments. It’s a long-term plan.”

http://www.iol.co.za/sport/tennis/ro...?#.Seg86x03u-l
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:32 AM   #1970
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Federer plays big brother to village children

By Xola Potelwa | Reuters – Thu, Feb 21, 2013

GOVHU, South Africa (Reuters) - "Big brother Roger," as the village schoolteachers call him, smiles at the small children and asks them to guess which sport he plays.

Most of the bright-eyed three-year-olds have no idea who their visitor is but one, quicker than the rest, pipes up: "You play tennis!".

Delighted, Roger Federer turns his palms up to reveal a badly calloused right hand punished by 23 years of holding a racquet, showing the children the difference from the smoother left one.

There are few parts of the world where the man considered as the greatest ever tennis player and holder of a record 17 grand slam titles is not instantly recognised.

Here, in rural South Africa where he is visiting one of the village pre-schools his charitable foundation supports, the Swiss is unfamiliar to the children but commands their attention and curiosity.

In a small, cool, classroom, the toddlers sheltering from the heat stand with heads tipped upwards and eyes fixed on the towering champion as he hits a tennis ball against a wall, demonstrating how to swing a racquet.

Federer looks composed in the sweltering heat of Limpopo province, on the border with Zimbabwe, even though his bright red shirt, wet with sweat by noon, gives him away.

Deep in the densely vegetated village some 20 kilometres from the nearest paved road, the ground is parched and dust flies into the air as brightly-costumed Venda women dance to entertain their world-famous guest.

"My heart is in South Africa, through my mum," Federer, the son of a Swiss father and a South African mother, told Reuters.

"My mum being from here, me spending a lot of time here as well, I feel most connected to this part of the world."

The Roger Federer Foundation supports 40 pre-schools in the area and spends over $3 million a year on educational projects in South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Ethiopia and Federer's home country Switzerland. Over 50,000 children benefited from the foundation's efforts in 2012 to improve quality education in pre-schools and primary schools.

BROKEN EDUCATION SYSTEM

"When I travelled the world, I definitely saw poor countries, people who told me it was so hard for them to get an education," said Federer, who was visiting two pre-schools in the Limpopo province with his mother this week to mark the 10th anniversary of his foundation being founded.

"I always liked the idea of education because in our world going to school is the most normal thing in the world. We sometimes forget what a privilege it is, to go to school."

South Africa has a broken education system, inherited from decades of inferior education for the majority black population under the apartheid system.

Nineteen years into democracy and the new government is still overwhelmed by the task, with some high-school leavers managing pass rates of only 30 percent.

In this place, a decent education remains beyond the reach of many children and some 80 percent of the community is unemployed, the villiage chief's representative said.

For a man who has earned close to $80 million in prize money alone thanks to his exploits on a tennis court, Federer has never forgotten the value of a good education.

Federer admits he did not always do his best at school, saying: "I used to have many more regrets when I was younger, because I was a bit crazy.

"At school, I wouldn't always learn for my tests as much as I should have. I think that's why today I'm so dedicated to both things, so people don't do the same mistakes as I did, even though I was able to turn the corner in time."

The father of twin daughters, Federer added: "I like to be an idol for kids, I do. For me it's important to be a good role model and I live accordingly.

"But I'm not changing for it, I do it because I believe in it and because it is natural."

During his three-hour visit to the pre-school in Govhu, Federer held a captive audience as he read the story of the 'Gingerbread Man' out to the 30 or so children who sat around him.

As his visit comes to an end, Federer leaves with the words of the village school principal echoing in his ears: "If it is possible, please, come back to us again."
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:09 AM   #1971
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http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/0...isNews&rpc=401


FEATURE-Tennis-Federer plays big brother to village children
Wed, Feb 20 2013
By Xola Potelwa

GOVHU, South Africa, Feb 20 (Reuters) - "Big brother Roger," as the village schoolteachers call him, smiles at the small children and asks them to guess which sport he plays.

Most of the bright-eyed three-year-olds have no idea who their visitor is but one, quicker than the rest, pipes up: "You play tennis!".

Delighted, Roger Federer turns his palms up to reveal a badly calloused right hand punished by 23 years of holding a racquet, showing the children the difference from the smoother left one.

There are few parts of the world where the man considered as the greatest ever tennis player and holder of a record 17 grand slam titles is not instantly recognised.

Here, in rural South Africa where he is visiting one of the village pre-schools his charitable foundation supports, the Swiss is unfamiliar to the children but commands their attention and curiosity.

In a small, cool, classroom, the toddlers sheltering from the heat stand with heads tipped upwards and eyes fixed on the towering champion as he hits a tennis ball against a wall, demonstrating how to swing a racquet.

Federer looks composed in the sweltering heat of Limpopo province, on the border with Zimbabwe, even though his bright red shirt, wet with sweat by noon, gives him away.
Deep in the densely vegetated village some 20 kilometres from the nearest paved road, the ground is parched and dust flies into the air as brightly-costumed Venda women dance to entertain their world-famous guest.

"My heart is in South Africa, through my mum," Federer, the son of a Swiss father and a South African mother, told Reuters.

"My mum being from here, me spending a lot of time here as well, I feel most connected to this part of the world."

The Roger Federer Foundation supports 40 pre-schools in the area and spends over $3 million a year on educational projects in South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Ethiopia and Federer's home country Switzerland. Over 50,000 children benefited from the foundation's efforts in 2012 to improve quality education in pre-schools and primary schools.

BROKEN EDUCATION SYSTEM

"When I travelled the world, I definitely saw poor countries, people who told me it was so hard for them to get an education," said Federer, who was visiting two pre-schools in the Limpopo province with his mother this week to mark the 10th anniversary of his foundation being founded.

"I always liked the idea of education because in our world going to school is the most normal thing in the world. We sometimes forget what a privilege it is, to go to school."
South Africa has a broken education system, inherited from decades of inferior education for the majority black population under the apartheid system.

Nineteen years into democracy and the new government is still overwhelmed by the task, with some high-school leavers managing pass rates of only 30 percent.

In this place, a decent education remains beyond the reach of many children and some 80 percent of the community is unemployed, the villiage chief's representative said.

For a man who has earned close to $80 million in prize money alone thanks to his exploits on a tennis court, Federer has never forgotten the value of a good education.

Federer admits he did not always do his best at school, saying: "I used to have many more regrets when I was younger, because I was a bit crazy.

"At school, I wouldn't always learn for my tests as much as I should have. I think that's why today I'm so dedicated to both things, so people don't do the same mistakes as I did, even though I was able to turn the corner in time."

The father of twin daughters, Federer added: "I like to be an idol for kids, I do. For me it's important to be a good role model and I live accordingly.

"But I'm not changing for it, I do it because I believe in it and because it is natural."

During his three-hour visit to the pre-school in Guvhu, Federer held a captive audience as he read the story of the 'Gingerbread Man' out to the 30 or so children who sat around him.

As his visit comes to an end, Federer leaves with the words of the village school principal echoing in his ears: "If it is possible, please, come back to us again." (Editing by Clare Fallon and Pritha Sarkar)
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:10 AM   #1972
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Some stuffs taken from rf.com
==

"dance123" wrote:

I received my copy of "Years of Glory" today, and started reading Roger's interview. He was asked whether he'll write an autobiography, and this was his answer:

"Most recently, I stopped thinking about an autobiography because I felt that everything I experienced is something very personal. It belongs to me, my family, my closest friends. I don't want to share this with everyone. And I don't have any dirty laundry to wash in public. I don't want to write a book simply because that's what people do, or to polish my image."
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:37 AM   #1973
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A really nice interview translated by Vrazkar of rf.com. The interview was conducted in Rotterdam for the Gerry Weber Open. The answer about the 2012 Olympic was very revealing, and that he seems taking 2013 as a year of catching up practice and planning to play more again in 2014 is also very interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vrazkar


A friend on FB told me about this interview and I decided to translate it because it's a nice one.


Federer: "I used to be a brat."

The tennis super star about the Gerry Weber Open and intimate Olympic moments

Rotterdam. Room 1212, 12th floor. Bel Etage at Manhattan Hotel in Rotterdam. Conference room. Two massive armchairs in front of the panorama windows, rattling espresso machine. Roger Federer, perhaps the greatest tennis player of all time, invites us to a coffee klatch at the start of the ATP tournament in the Dutch port city. Speed dating with a 17 record GS winner. 55 minutes time for questions. The 31-year-old player is interviewed by Patrick Menzel. Federer, who will play at the Gerry Weber Open 2013 in Halle (8 to 16 of June), speaks about...

... his first Gerry Weber Open title 10 years ago: "Now I can already start looking back 10 years ago. The victories in Halle and a few days later at Wimbledon were very emotional and important - a sign about everything that came afterwards."

... his fateful year 2003: "Due to the Gerry Weber Open 2003 I went to Wimbledon perfectly prepared. Well, "perfectly" is something else. After just having lost in the first round in Paris the pressure was extremely high. I had to reach at least the quarters at Wimbledon to make people forget about the defeat. That worked. Then came this incredible consistency. After the double victory of Halle and Wimbledon I knew not only that I could play at highest level for a month but also that I could react well to defeats."

... the pressure at the beginning of his career: "People knew that I was talented. However they were a bit spoiled by Martina Hingis, Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin, Tommy Haas and Nicolas Kiefer who had already achieved so much at young age. I was still playing in the juniors as Hewitt won the ATP tournament in Adelaide in 1998, even though we were at the same age. Hewitt was so strong mentally, Safin - physically. I still had my problems in both departments and was rather the player who needed time, who had to mature and learn."

... his advantage as a late bloomer: "I am glad that I went through highs and lows in the beginning of my career. Thus I have come to appreciate tournament victories and learned that it's not normal to play always consistently."

... his 7th Wimbledon title: "After having played consistently during the whole year, I knew that I had a chance. That's why the title didn't come as a surprise. But when I look back this was perhaps one of the best and most emotional wins. At that age, to become again number 1, to break Sampras's record and to see my family, it was magical."

... five bittersweet Olympic minutes: "I was incredibly-disappointed after my loss in the Olympics final in London. It will never again happen to me to play the Olympics at Wimbledon. While I was waiting for the award ceremony after the match against Murray, someone came into the room and wanted to explain to me the ceremony. I asked him to leave me in peace for 5 minutes. In these 5 minutes I asked myself whether I had to really feel disappointed or proud of the medal. Of course I was depressed but I shouldn't share this with the whole world. So I went out and was happy as a child about the silver medal for Switzerland."

... his charming way to lose: "I used to be a brat. Indeed, I never broke my rackets after losses - not alone out of respect for the company Wilson and my parents. But I was a bad loser and used to cry after losses. At some point I told myself: one can't win everything but one can try everything. As long as I have tried everything, I don't blame myself for losses."

... WTA prohibiting grunting: "It would be good if somebody put a stop on this. All my career I have played without ever grunting and I don't hit the ball all that effortlessly either. So it's possible to do without it."

... Lance Armstrong's doping confession and the dirty stuff in tennis: "It's horrible how much evil a single person has done to so many people. We must fight doping rigorously and aggressively. Therefore more tests should be done during and out of competitions. Consequences are important. Prize money should be returned and tournament wins should be cancelled."

... plans for the future: "This year I'm skipping DC and won't play Miami either. This gives me 4 to 8 weeks time for practicing and for my family. I've hardly had time to practice since the little ones were born. This year I need to catch up on training and get preparatory work done so that next year I can play more again."

... a gilded career end: "In fact with an Olympic gold and silver I'm at peace with myself. But there's still one big goal: Olympic gold in singles. 2016 is no longer so far away. I have often mentioned 2016 when I was asked when I would retire - partly for protection, but also partly out of realistic consideration."

http://www.nw-news.de/sport/gerry_we...?em_cnt_page=1

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Old 02-24-2013, 12:49 PM   #1974
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Old 02-24-2013, 06:43 PM   #1975
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thanks for posting !
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:00 PM   #1976
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I translated the following interview for RF.com and maybe some of you would like to read it in here as well:

„I went through deep, deep valleys“

Roger Federer talks in this interview about his teens, his sudden delight about the Silver Medal in London and his long-term goal Rio 2016.

By Jörg Allmeroth



„In this five lonely minutes I asked myself if I should really be disappointed about the medal or proud of it.”

Roger Federer about his Olympic Silver Medal.
(Picture: Juergen Hasenkopf/freshfocus)


He doesn’t have to prove anything anymore to himself and the tennisworld for a long time. Roger Federer is the owner of possibly record-breaking records in his sport. But tennis still doesn’t let the 31 years old person from Basle go. He says in the interview that he would love to retire with a Gold Medal at the Olympic Games 2016.

Roger Federer, soon your first Wimbledon victory has its 10th anniversairy. How do you look back on this last Federer decade, on ten years at the top of the world?

It is indeed a bit crazy that all this happened 10 years ago. Time has really flown away and I don’t feel as old as I am. Spring 2003 was of course a deciding time for my career, the victory in Halle in Germany, then the victory in Wimbledon thereafter. Those were huge, touching moments.

Before that there were massive doubts about you. After you lost in the 1st round at the French Open 2003 there was the talking about the sloppy genius which squanders his chances. That was a dance on the high wire.

Back then I indeed went into the weeks on grass with a huge pressure. I also expected from myself to reach at least the QF in Wimbledon in order to make up for the slip in Paris. Then it became the fairy-tale of my Wimbledon success, actually the fairy-tale of my entire career. 2003 I was able to show for the first time that I am able to play on an extremely high level for a long time.

You haven’t been one of those infant prodigies who already had spectacular success at an early age. Why did you have so many problems in men tennis in the beginning?

In the scene many knew that I have a certain talent. That meant automatically pressure and produced a massive expectation which even increased because of players as Hewitt, Haas, Safin, Kiefer or someone like Martina Hingis. Those were all professionals who already reached a lot even at an early age. Hewitt already won his first professional tournament when I was still playing juniors tournaments. We are the same age. But I needed my time, much more time than the quickstarters.

In younger years you were known and notorious for your wild temperamental outbursts.

You can say that I was a yob. I didn’t really break my rackets but I smashed them on the court foaming with rage. I couldn’t really handle with losses and disappointments. I often had to cry when I lost at a tournament. I also started arguments with the umpires. When I wouldn’t have been able to handle this lability I would have ended nowhere in tennis. Someday I said to myself: You can’t win everything but you have to try at least everything and stay calm. That’s what I started to do then. This principle is still the same today: When I know that I gave everything I don’t have a problem with losses.

Many of those whiz kids came down to earth with a bang and even ended their careers soon. Was your late breakthrough maybe even a win for you?

For sure. In the beginning I went through many deep, deep valleys. I knew too well how it feels to lose and what bitterness means for a professional. That’s why I appreciate each tournament victory that much until today, no matter where I’m playing.

Does it surprise you that you are still on the Centre Court today – beyond 30, competiting against always new generations of challengers?

I sometimes didn’t felt like losing but I never felt that I didn’t want to play tennis. Tennis is still and time and again this wonderful game which I enjoy like a child. It was never a job for me but more like a lived dream.

But you lived a privileged life during the last years.

Nobody served me those successes on a silver tray. I had to fight hard to turn my talent into victories. Of course everything would have been more difficult with the motivation when I would have stayed in the midfield and had to play on small courts. But so a joy remained, a natural joy about this sport. I can say with a clear conscience: I never had any day in my tennis-life in which I didn’t wanted to practice or play a match. Maybe it has to do with the fact that I escaped serious injuries. When you have to worry about your own body the whole time it feels like you have a veil of mist around your head. A veil of mist which never really disappears.

The life in the tennis circus is exhausting and complex, especially when you travel with family and children. Do you still enjoy the life out of the suitcase?

I’m still curious on the people and the cities I travel to. I still discover new things, surprising stuff, oddities. All of us players have the genes of adventurers in our blood, we are really globetrotters. The Federer family – Mirka, the twins and I – is totally attuned to travelling around the world; my daughters are truly uncomplicated travellers.

Would you still be on the tour without your family?

Probably not. I always had the big wish that we could experience some huge successes together as a family. Therefore Wimbledon 2012 was something special – that we experienced this with the whole family.

Are your daughters meanwhile able to gauge that their father isn’t a normal father?

Yes, a little bit. They still rejoice the most when I have time for them, when we do something together – and not when I hold up a trophy on the Centre Court. There the emotionality comes more from myself of course.

The last year was again a very special one in your later career – with the return to #1 in the ranking and the victory in Wimbledon. Only a few people thought you were capable of doing this.

Since a few years I live with the fact that people in the tennis industry are writing me off and predict: Federer has his best times behind him. I know for myself that I would have this coup still inside me. I played on a constantly high level in the season 2012 and wasn’t perplexed when I won Wimbledon then. The crazy thing is that you don’t perceive that special of those victories in the beginning.

Maybe because in the densely packed schedule book there is barely time for reflection and to celebrate.

Sure, the highlights chase each other. Last year we also had the Olympic tournament. That I was able beyond the 30ies to get back to#1 and to break the record in Wimbledon I will maybe only be really able to appreciate when I have retired one day. Then it will get clearer how extraordinary this victory has been and that is was maybe the biggest victory beside the first one.

Do you regret the missed Gold Medal in London?

I was incredibly disappointed directly after the lost final against Murray as I knew: To be able to play in Wimbledon at the Olympic Games and to have the chance for a Gold Medal will never come back. But then something strange happened: Someone came into the room where I was sitting and waiting for the victory ceremony. He wanted to explain me the ceremony. I asked him to get out as I wanted to have my peace and to have 5 minutes to think about everything. In those 5 minutes I asked myself then if I should really be disappointed or proud about the medal. I said to myself then: You might be in low spirits but you don’t want to share this with the rest of the world. There shouldn’t be those pictures of a disappointed Federer. Then I went out and suddenly I could really be happy about Silver, for myself and for Switzerland as it was the first medal for my home country. To this day I have never felt any touch of disappointment again.

You are playing fewer tournaments this season and also skip the Davis Cup.

2012 was a really tough year for everyone on the tour. I barely had time to practice properly. There was nearly no break. That’s why I catch up on practice now and already prepare in order to be able to play a bigger schedule in 2014. I really have to pace myself as this is the real secret of the success. It will be important not to play a tournament for a few weeks after Indian Wells. That’s when I have to lay the groundwork for the hot spring and summer.

The top class sport was overshadowed in the first weeks of the year from the so-called doping confession of Lance Armstrong. How did you felt about these confessions?

I was sitting exactly 5 minutes in front of the TV in Melbourne and then I turned off this tragic drama. It was just creepy. I’m horrified how one person can do so much malignancies and bad things to so many other people.

Which consequences are there for world tennis? This sport likes to insist on his nearly doping free status.

I want to say the following with large clarification: In this sport you don’t need doping to be #1. I take the responsibility myself; I have proven it to myself over all those years. And it doesn’t have to do with having a lot of talent. To face each talk we have to fight against doping rigorously and aggressively; 100% determinedness is needed. And we have to take clear, drastic consequences: Cash prizes have to get reclaimed and tournament victories cancelled. The punishments have to be felt. I’m going to do everything which is in my power that tennis stays clean.

Another topic in tennis which causes brouhaha is the forbiddance to groan – which mainly happened on the Women Tour lately.

It is like a tick for many. A compulsive habit. But it is good when they put a stop to this groan. We have to watch out that the viewers won’t run anway or that people mock about the players. I have played in my entire career without loudly groaning – despite the fact that I don’t move the ball into the other side that loose. So it really works without this background music.

From where we stand today: Do you have an idea how and where your career could come to an end?

I often mentioned the year 2016 when I got asked about my retirement – partly as protect, partly because of a realistically background. I still have the Olympic Gold Medal in Singles as a goal in mind so I don’t rule out an end in Rio. The strength and the motivation are there for sure.

Original source:

http://www.tageswoche.ch/de/2013_09/...marschiert.htm
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:15 PM   #1977
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Thank you very much, Eden - I'm impressed. I wouldn't want to try translating one of his English interviews into German! Only, one little point, if I may? "Wenn" is usually "if" in English rather than "when"
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:30 AM   #1978
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You are welcome

Thank you for the hint about the Grammatical expression. I know that my English Grammar sucks as I don't really remember any rules anymore which I learned at school a long, long time ago
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:00 AM   #1979
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Very nice interview, thx a lot!!!
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Old 03-06-2013, 03:37 AM   #1980
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thanks a ton, Doris
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