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Old 05-06-2015, 11:38 AM   #631
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Default Re: News & Articles about Grigor

Rasheed's interview (using Google Translation from Spanish)


Punto de Break.com
05 May 2015


Roger Rasheed: "I changed Dimitrov tennis completely"

We have a wonderful exclusive interview with Roger Rasheed who discusses his pupil Grigor Dimitrov, the mental power and many more interesting things.

When you take a few seconds talking with Roger Rasheed you realize why it has led many players to be the best in the world. Tennis understands as few do and when you pull the interview with him can not help a small smile of how inspiring and motivating it is the words of the Australian coach. He speaks of his player, Grigor Dimitrov and how worked with him to be in the top 10 in the world. Mental power that always used with their pupils and how important is this in the courts. Of young Australians and more. Unmissable.

Rasheed were in the room for players. The coach is looking at some things on your laptop and when he sees me, gets up and shakes my hand firmly and strongly. If impresses on TV, imagine in person. Talk with him is super rich. To take hours and hours. Only for tennis lovers.

How is Dimitrov after his defeat in Istanbul? How to get to Madrid?

It's a tough loss but you have to move on. Now you get to Madrid, new tracks, new tournament, new sensations ... Now just look at the following tournaments.

Dimitrov said he had used up two different rackets in recent months and was trying to find the perfect for him.

Well, you have to evolve with the game. The racket that he was using last year, and he used in previous years is 20 years. With the new racket we are trying to find the one that gives more benefits to his game and has been experimenting with some and appears to be doing well and now have to play a lot with it to fit 100%.

But what is exactly what he is looking for with the new?

The pattern string is different, the head is larger and has more power. The one he used was very old and did not generate enough force to knock.

It is similar to Federer?

The shape is similar to the head but the racket itself is totally different.

Last year he finally managed to enter the top 10 but it seems that still needs a little extra to keep climbing. What do you think he needs?

Enter the top 10 does not mean you change everything. You have to do is repeat the actions that made for a period of time and go step by step. Time. It's all about time. Not everything is like last year rose 30 to 10. Now there are new things, more expectations on my part and his. Just follow developing his game and eventually ranking will match your performance. Right now it's not like we had last year but hey, everything is fine, do not panic.

What do you think should improve your pupil now?

He needs to improve his returns. Dimitrov does not return as Djokovic, Murray and Nishikori, who are best are doing now. The return should improve completely. This will make it better in games. But not only this, there are many more areas. Mentally and physically well. There is not a single area of ​​your game that you are 100% happy.

So it's not one thing, it is a global.

The return is what worries me but every part of his game is in continuous development. Do not make major changes, but develop each.

Why do you think that it is not achieving good results in this 2015 unlike last year?

Racket influences change much. That takes time. Federer took six months to get used to the new racket.

Do you think his extra-sporting life also might be distracting right now with his relationship with Sharapova and all the media spotlight on them?

No, I see him well. I've been away three weeks, I was at home but I see him focused on tennis. About his personal life I can not comment.

What has changed in tennis of Grigor since you started working with him?

(Thinks for a few seconds) Everything completely (laughs). First thing I did was to teach him what it takes to be a top 10. Even what it takes to be a top player, to win Grand Slams and be No. 1. We educated. Once he understood all that, we implemented all the work that must be done and work the physique to become stronger.

So education is before the physical?

Yes, first you have to make him understand what it takes to be up there. You have to know how to use your game efficiently. A player like Dimitrov has many options and needs to understand how to use his game. This was one of the biggest things that I had to teach, how to be a great professional in the track. I changed his style and the way he worked the points, which is something we are working now. But education is basic and is not negotiable.

You changed the style. Before he was more aggressive.

Yes. Now still it is but before the most played at many points. That makes you make more mistakes and chaining many followed makes you go to a match.

A couple of weeks ago, Dimitrov said in an interview that your relationship was a little situation "delicate" . How are you today?

Our relationship? It is perfect.

All right then?

100% good.

Changing the subject a little, worked with Hewitt, Monfils, Tsonga ... you took all the top 10 but when left to work with them, fell in the ranking. You seem to have the formula for success ...

Do I have it? (Laughs).

That seems. Why do you think it went down in the rankings after you?

(Thinks a moment) My pattern of teaching is physical but mainly mental.

People think otherwise, you work more physical than mental.

That's because they don't know me. They see me and think strong and what is not (laughs). A very important part of the player is the physical, then the court, but more importantly, mentally. What most. Most of my work focuses on the mental. Not only in tennis, I also do the same with Olympians and entrepreneurs. And this is another thing that I talked to these players before training them.

Do what exactly?

I train if you are interested in being the best player you can be. If you just want to be a player circuit and being there and not being better every day, I'm not coach for you. I like working with people who want to be the best. And this is my formula. And not only applies to courts, but for all sports. I have worked with other athletes and it worked. But then, one day they get tired of this mental requirement that requires you so much and that change of mentality, not getting up every day and work is what made them fall in the rankings, probably.

Wow!

Yes, an example of someone who works in the mental every day is Nadal. Since I was little so far, always does the same. It has a prodigious mind.

Who do you think is stronger mentally, Nadal or Djokovic?

Rafa, no doubt.

But now Novak is much stronger mentally than the Spanish.

But Djokovic when he was young was not nearly as strong-minded it was Nadal. Young Rafa was very strong thing is that Djokovic has managed to change that and have to give all the credit to Serbian. He has learned to use his mind as a weapon. The mind is the most powerful weapon that exists.


http://www.puntodebreak.com/2015/05/...itrov-completo
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Old 05-13-2015, 12:30 PM   #632
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Interview with Grigor Dimitrov by Gaetta dello Sport
No, it is not easy, poor Grisha. Because always in the sea of fans seeking autographs will find someone shouted out "And say hello to Maria." For Dimitrov is not easy to be a boyfriend of Maria Sharapova because victories on the court are not the only thing people are interested. Under №11 in the world (even reached №8), his nickname is Baby Federer, indicating what his qualities. Grigor gave an extensive interview with the "Gazzetta dello Sport".

- Grigor, how you deal with stress can have such a connection, that is popular around the world?
I try to talk about it as much as possible less. If you ask me something after the game, I expect to be on my game, win or lose, not my personal life. Otherwise I considered a violation of my privacy.

- This is not easy in a world that is obsessed with social networking.
It is. Today, everybody knows everything about everybody. I fortunately little use social networks. I do not care to read what others say about me.

- Last year in Rome did you come to the semifinal and then all summer seemed to get closer to major in sports. How do you feel now?
The problem is that I am very ambitious and always set very high goals. Of course, so do they and rivals. A form can be improved or declined. Remains one sure thing: you have to work hard to reach the highest level, and to stay there.

- In this tournament the last 10 years won or Nadal or Djokovic. Could this time be different name to the winner?
My. Why not?

- How to win these two?
We are talking about two of the best players in history. This is difficult to achieve. I know I need to improve my performance and my goal is to improve and ranking from last year. Which means that you have to get to the finish. This will be difficult. To win here would be nice.

- Do you like Rome?
Exclusive city. For the short time I have to deal with it during the tournament, very loving.History.

- In the second round Fognini meeting for the third time in a month. You win it twice. What do you think of him?
He manages to be two different people on and off the court. Sometimes the game is weird, but seems perfectly newspaper boy. Above all, he is talented and has the ability to cope with all situations during a match. I respect him a lot.

- Are you afraid that the audience may have a role during the match?
I see no problems. Correctly audience in Italy to support his player. In Rome, the atmosphere is always special. Very nice and always serious when you have to face a rival that fans support.

- The most likely track and women's tennis ... Who will win?
I believe that Maria and Serena are the strongest competitors. With the most experience.Those who can not cope with difficult situations. They are the favorites, but here surprises are not excluded.

- What loves doing Dimitrov, when not part of a tournament?
I know it's hard to imagine it, but I like to stay home. Watch TV. Before I used to ride a bike, but now, with this way of life can not, it is very difficult.

- What would you do if you had not become a tennis player?
It is difficult to say. Maybe something related to sports. My mother is a volleyball player and this is a sport that I like. But I think tennis is in my blood. My father is a coach and was the first to teach me. I remember little of hitting the ball against the wall for a long time every day. I was 3 years old.

- Your father gave you this incredible backhand with one hand?
Yes. He loves this attack. I have not tried other. It was his first goal since it became clear that he would try to become a professional tennis player.

- Outside of tennis, what sport competition excites you the most?
Surely matches NBA. This is a great spectacle. I admire Kobe Bryant and LeBron James. They are outstanding athletes. Incredible champions. I live in Los Angeles and often when I have time, I go in the room "Steypal Sentar4.

- Who is the toughest opponent for you?
Nadal, of course.

- Did you have an idol as a child?
How not to admire Federer? And besides, I have the honor and pride I'm his friend now. As a boy I loved Safin.

- And now?
My favorite tennis player is Grigor Dimitrov.

Translation:
http://grigor-dimitrov-tenis.blogspot.com/

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Old 05-15-2015, 04:09 PM   #633
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http://grigor-dimitrov-tenis.blogspo...cipate-in.html
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:06 PM   #634
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Default Re: News & Articles about Grigor

Some news about his future racquet (from Tennis Warehouse forum)

Here what the OP said :

"Wilson releasing PS97S for Grigor Dimitrov (specs included)
05-13-2015, 09:11 PM

Unstrung specs:

Head size: 97"
Weight: 310g
Balance: 33.5cm
Lenght: 27"
String Pattern: 18x17
Beam width: 19.5mm flat beam

Cosmetics look like the PS97 except the Wilson logos at the throat and W and Pro Staff writing on the head are gold instead of silver.

I have pictures but TW would delete the thread pretty quickly if I were to post them...."

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forum...specs-included
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Old 05-22-2015, 06:03 AM   #635
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FRENCH FRUSTRATIONS
By Sport Magazine @Sportmaguk

SARAH SHEPHARD
DATE
May 21st| 2015

Painful. That’s how Grigor Dimitrov described his first- round exit at Roland Garros last year.
The straight-sets defeat to giant-serving Ivo Karlovic played on his mind for weeks, fuelling his motivation going into the grass-court season.
It turned out to be a useful tactic, with the Bulgarian number one securing his first title on grass at Queen’s before reaching his first Grand Slam semi final at Wimbledon. It is not, however, a tactic he wishes to repeat at this year’s tournament, which begins on Sunday.
“I expect a lot from myself,” he says when we meet in the handsome surrounds of the Monte Carlo Country Club. “In a way it’s a burden, but at the same time I feel like I want to perform at my best every week. I didn’t do well at the French Open last year, so it is one of the tournaments I really want to focus on this season.”
Having high expectations comes with the territory when you have been living with the nickname ‘Baby Fed’ since you were 18 and your girlfriend is a former world number one with five Grand Slam titles to her name. But the 24-year-old’s determination to succeed dates back further than both of these inflictions (because dating Maria Sharapova must be such a hardship).
It was his ambitious attitude that prompted Dimitrov to leave home for a tennis academy in Barcelona at the age of 15, and that later in his career led him to employ Roger Rasheed – a man renowned for pushing players to their physical limits – as his coach.
“I’m never afraid of work,” says Dimitrov with a wry smile, for he knows that if he is to reach the standards predicted of him for so many years, the work has only just begun. And he might find himself similarly motivated for Roland Garros as he did for Wimbledon last year: he crashed out of the Italian Open to Fabio Fognini in the second round last week – with a third-set bagel.

Men’s tennis has been dominated by a select few since you joined the tour. Does that make it hard to stay motivated?
“It’s motivating. I’ve got respect for all those players. At the moment, they’re just better. I hate to think that, but their experience sets them apart. The one thing everyone forgets is that yes, we work a lot and we’re younger – but at the time we are working, they work too. So they never sit on the same level. Everyone thinks that they’ve matched their potential, but no. Developing is part of life. We have to remember that.”

The French Open was the only Slam where you failed to improve last year. Is clay your least favourite surface?
“Well, I grew up on clay so I don’t dislike it. But it always takes a bit of time to adjust. That’s the same for everyone. If you’re lucky enough to get a good draw early on in the clay season, then you can get a few matches under your belt and build a bit of confidence. If not, then it’s a bit of a struggle to find your form.”

You must have watched a lot of tennis growing up, with your dad as your first coach. What’s the first match you remember?
“I remember the 1999 Wimbledon final: Pete Sampras versus Andre Agassi. It’s one of my vivid memories – sitting in front of the TV with my dad watching Sampras diving all over the court. My dad didn’t have the opportunity to turn professional, so I guess he transferred all his knowledge and effort into me.”

Did you look up to any one player in particular?
“Not really. I know I resemble some players here and there, but I’ve never tried to base my game on anyone. I always thought I had a different style, a different way of playing and thinking. Early on I was more interested in learning the game than following what this guy does or that guy does. I just did what came naturally to me after that.”

You were just 15 when you left home for the Sanchez-Casal Academy in Barcelona [where Andy Murray also developed his game]. How tough was that experience?
“At the time I didn’t think it was that big a decision, but now I look back and I’m like: ‘Wow. I didn’t know anyone there or speak the language.’ But when you’re in an academy it is easier to fit in because there’s a lot of other kids around and lots of activities going on. Soon enough, though, everyone gets on your case because they know you’re playing well. They start to look at you a little differently. One of the things I’m happy with is that I always kept my composure as a person off the court; I never had my head too high or too low. It was a very good learning process.”

Does that experience toughen you up mentally for life as a senior professional on the tour?
“Not at all. It actually spoils you a little bit because at the academy you know that every day you have to go to this court for practice, then you have to see this fitness coach for that, then you go back to your dorm. Everything is scheduled and organised for you. You don’t have to do anything. On the tour, you’re on your own. You have to get your rackets sorted, book a practice court, find a hitting partner – that puts enormous pressure on you. But, in a way, I liked it. It was good to hang out with other people.”

You have worked with Roger Rasheed for almost two years. Was his focus on fitness a key reason for you teaming up?
“I knew that he was big on fitness but I didn’t know the quantity of it [laughs]. It turned out pretty good, though. I’ve grown my game and I have grown physically, which was important. One of the things I told him before we started working together was that I’m never afraid of work. He was actually laughing at that statement at the time, but I backed it up. It’s pretty simple stuff that has made a difference, and now I’ve reached a level in my fitness where I’m really solid and I know how far I can push myself. In a way there’s no secrets for me.”

What has been your best match of your career so far?
“I would definitely rate my match against Andy Murray last year at Wimbledon [in the quarter finals]. One of the first times you come out on court like that against a player like Andy – he’s the defending champion and it’s his home, so it’s one of those moments you just remember. To be able to go out there and play a match like that was one of my greatest efforts so far.”

Was it a case of rising to the occasion?
“I was just so locked in. I wasn’t bothered by anything around me. Sometimes you have days like that and, when you have them, you have to seize the moment. The scariest part was that I knew it even before the match. I wasn’t nervous or anything. I just went out there knowing that I was going to play well. Some things are just inevitable if you think that way.”

What about the flipside – a match you never want to watch again?
“Against Roger Federer, this year in Brisbane [which Dimitrov lost 6-2, 6-2]. I just played really badly. But I do watch these matches again.
I think you need to. It’s healthy to watch them and learn what you can do or change for the next time.”

What did you take from that particular defeat?
[Laughs] “Never play like that again.”

http://www.sport-magazine.co.uk/feat...h-frustrations

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Old 06-05-2015, 05:52 PM   #636
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Grigor Dimitrov : '500 roses are the most I've ever sent Maria Sharapova at once'

The new pin-up of tennis has a gold Rolex on one arm and Maria Sharapova on the other. But with a world ranking of 10 and a Queens' title to defend, he's proving he has the talent to match.

Grigor Dimitrov remembers well his first visits to the lush lawns of the Queen’s Club in London. ‘I was 17 and staying with friends at the end of the Northern Line. I had no coach, nobody, and took the Tube every morning at 6am. It was an hour and a half to get to Barons Court. I had my Oyster card, and was just a guy with a racket bag, listening to my music.’

That was a junior tournament in 2008. Chances are his fellow commuters barely noticed the lanky teenager in a baseball cap, nodding away to his headphones. Fast-forward to last summer and things were very different. Dimitrov had just triumphed at the Aegon Championships at Queen’s, beating Feliciano López to claim the trophy, and knocked Andy Murray out of the Wimbledon quarter-finals in an imperious display of pace and power.

A Centre Court crowd, including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, murmured in collective appreciation at the thundering serves and lethal backhand slices that have become his trademark. By the end of that match the previously little-known Bulgarian had been adopted as one of our own, with the typically unimaginative British sporting nickname to boot. Arise, ‘Grigsy’, for we were all smitten.

The rise of 'Baby Fed'

It says something about the rapid rise of the current world number 10 that this summer Dimitrov has both defending his Queen’s title and winning Wimbledon in his sights. After beating Murray in 2014 he was knocked out by Novak Djokovic in the semi-finals, but remains convinced that, had he won a crucial fourth-set point, he would have gone on to secure his first Grand Slam. ‘I was playing a future star’ Djokovic admitted.

The memory of ‘Grigsy’ still raises a smile from Dimitrov, even if it is just the latest in a long line of monikers: ‘Showtime’ and ‘Primetime’ for his on-court audacity and flamboyance and ‘Baby Fed’ after Roger Federer, to whose effortless style he is supposedly the heir. But he has also found fame beyond sporting prowess.

For three years he has been in a relationship with Maria Sharapova, herself a former Wimbledon champion. They are the ‘golden couple’ of tennis, flitting between shared homes in Monaco and Los Angeles, chased by airport paparazzi along the way.

We meet in April at the Monte-Carlo Country Club, the setting for the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters. Dimitrov, who was knocked out in the quarter-finals by Gaël Monfils, arrives wearing tortoiseshell sunglasses, a blue Nike hoodie, shorts, and a gold Rolex watch that sparkles in the Riviera sun. Despite having been practising on court that morning, his white socks and box-fresh trainers are spared even the faintest dusting of clay – and no surprise, this is a man who admits that before each Wimbledon appearance last year he insisted his shorts and T-shirt were neatly pressed.

‘I have to be fully ironed,’ he says. His love of clothes aside, he possesses a fleet of fast cars including a scissor-doored silver Mercedes SLS and, it is rumoured, a blue Porsche 911 Carrera 4S that was a gift from Sharapova. ‘Everything is customised from my watches to my phone. I like my things to be different. I get that I can come across as a show-off but that is part of who I am.’

Such accoutrements and his good looks – all dimples and deep tennis tan – have burnished his reputation as the biggest hunk on tour. Before Sharapova, Dimitrov is widely believed to have been in a brief relationship with Serena Williams. Neither party has spoken of it, although Williams made oblique reference to Sharapova being happy with the ‘guy with the black heart’ during an interview with Rolling Stone magazine in 2013.

Dimitrov, 24, normally also prefers to sidestep personal questions about Sharapova, but when I ask him what he bought for her 28th birthday, which she celebrated the day before we met, a smitten grin spreads and he admits dispatching a mammoth bouquet of red roses to Stuttgart where she was playing in a tournament. ‘Her favourite, mine as well. Sometimes I just go crazy and send her hundreds – 500 is the most I’ve ever sent at once.’

Through all Dimitrov’s bling (he has already earned more than $5 million in prize money while Nike and Adidas have slugged it out over the right to dress him on court) shines an air of unaffected humility. He sits unaccompanied by minders or PRs – a rarity among sports stars – and speaks energetically and thoughtfully throughout our conversation.

‘I have always been the kind of guy to adjust to anything,’ he says. ‘I never cared where I was going to sleep or what court I was going to practise on. Sure I can afford a nice car and a nice place but this is not what brings me happiness. Now you’re on a high and people know you and things like that, but how many people will remember your name once it all stops and the money isn’t raining from the sky?’

Growing up in Bulgaria

Much of this attitude stems from his upbringing. An only child, he grew up in Haskovo, a tough city a couple of hours’ drive east from the Bulgarian capital, Sofia. His mother, Maria, was a teacher and volleyball player; his father, Dimitar, a tennis coach – a little-appreciated sport in a country where the more macho pursuits of football, weight-lifting and wrestling ruled. Aside from the extraordinary success of the Maleeva sisters, who played in the 1980s and 90s and remain the only set of three sisters ranked in the top 10 at the same time, Bulgaria had no tennis pedigree.

Wealth was non-existent in our vocabulary’ he says. ‘I grew up in a really poor neighbourhood surrounded by a lot of obstacles, so to speak. It was just a tough area. It wasn’t easy to walk out on the street. There were always things happening around. It was a mixture of crime and an unsafe environment.’

By the age of three his father had given him his first tennis racket, with part of the handle sawn off to fit his grip. ‘It’s amazing but I remember that moment like it was yesterday.’ His father remains his hero. ‘He taught me everything: how to play, how to think, a little bit about what life was about.’ Even though Dimitar remains heavily involved in his coaching (alongside the Australian coach and fitness guru Roger Rasheed), and is a regular presence during tournaments, Dimitrov insists he is not the sort of domineering parental figure that is an all too familiar sight in the sport.

‘When we were out on the courts I never counted him as my dad, he was just my coach. We had fights, of course. So many times he kicked me out of practice because of my behaviour. He treated me like everybody else. That is one of my biggest assets and has helped me become the person I am. He never spoilt me. He was very clear and straight up with me from an early age.’

Such honesty became apparent when Dimitrov was a teenager, and his father admitted that an education on the cracked concrete courts of Haskovo would take him only so far. At the age of 15 he was sent to the elite Sánchez-Casal Academy in Barcelona, Andy Murray’s alma mater. The Bulgarian from the wrong side of the tracks clashed with the austere daily regime of endless hours of practice.

‘I was being really rebellious, just doing whatever I felt like. I would party non-stop, hang out with friends and was always late for practice. I got expelled from the academy a couple of times – for a lot of things, I can’t say them all.’ He gleefully recounts sneaking back in at dawn, vaulting over the security gates and past the guard dogs. ‘I would say those times were among the best of my life.’ Yet despite the hard-partying, he has never touched a drop of drink, nor smoked a cigarette. ‘I had seen what alcohol did to people.’

Training to become a tennis star

Whatever his youthful indiscretions, it was not long before the teenager was being talked about as a potential star. At a tournament in Rotterdam aged 17 he knocked out Tomáš Berdych, and then took a set off the world number one Rafael Nadal. That same year, 2008, he won the junior title at both the US Open and Wimbledon. Watch old clips of him playing and he drifts effortlessly across the court snapping into shots. There are diving volleys, scooped baseline lobs through the legs and corkscrew smashes from behind the back.

Dimitrov speaks in near-perfect English with the indefinable accent of a life spent on tour. He has lived abroad since leaving home for Barcelona. The globetrotting life – as we meet he is preparing to go to Istanbul – puts an obvious strain on his relationship with Sharapova. They often play on opposite sides of the world and even when the men’s and women’s tournaments coincide, as they do 15 times a year, training keeps them apart. ‘It’s not as easy as everybody thinks; OK, we understand each other and all that but the absence of the other person is sometimes really strong.’

His parents remain in Haskovo – ‘of course, now living in a better place’ – and when he visits Bulgaria he gets mobbed in the streets. Such fervour is matched only by the swooning ball girls of the Queen’s Club, who regard Dimitrov – the tournament organisers joke – as the tennis equivalent of One Direction. New balls, he tells me, are occasionally delivered with a whispered ‘good luck’. In 2013, while a break of serve down to the Israeli player Dudi Sela, he noticed one of the ball girls sobbing at the side of the court. ‘I told her not to worry, I will get him back’ he says. He did.

Dimitrov has another supporter on the British scene in the shape of Chris Kermode, a former director of the Queen’s Club and now the executive chairman and president of the Association of Tennis Professionals, the sport’s governing body.

He granted Dimitrov a wild card (where low-ranked players are offered a tournament place) at Queen’s in 2009 and 2010, attracting the ire of the British press who claimed it was at the expense of home-grown talent. The pair remain close friends, and when Dimitrov won the tournament last year he presented his racket to Kermode on court.

‘At that moment of victory to still think like that is extraordinary and obviously the measure of the lad’
Kermode says. ‘Grigor has got drive and ambition but holds himself so well.’

But even under Kermode’s patronage Dimitrov says he has had to battle against snobbery from within the sport; the perception that he is ‘just a Bulgarian guy’. ‘It means it’s just a little poor country and what am I doing here, basically. That’s fine with me. I have had the opportunity to change my nationality but I never chose that.’

He admits the carousel of the tour, where one is endlessly pitched into battle against the same opponent, is an exhausting process, and doesn’t count any of his fellow players as close friends. ‘For me after I’m done on the court I don’t think about tennis at all. I like to keep my distance, absolutely.’

'The golden couple'

Sharapova, obviously, is the exception. How, I wonder, did he pluck up the courage to ask her out on a date – aside from her 6ft 2in statuesque figure she is quite clearly as hard as nails – particularly as at that time he was a relative minnow in the game? He reacts with incredulity. ‘Everyone says that. I know when you see her you don’t want to even talk to her but to me I knew there was something behind that. I emailed her out of the blue. I felt we always had this thing for each other.

'We were both in China, me in Shanghai, her in Beijing. I sat down for lunch and saw her playing on television and emailed right away. We started talking a bit, then a month later when the season was over we saw each other and that became that.’

He says they spend their time together as any normal couple would, taking walks, shopping, eating out. ‘Regarding the “golden couple”, in a way I guess it’s inevitable for people to say that but for me – and it may sound very cheesy – she is just Maria. I don’t see her how everybody else does. Other things in life are much more important than that. It’s about the person and how they are with me. She’s the greatest competitor that is still playing the game but that stops right there for me because I feel I’m a much deeper person than all that.’

Sharapova’s professional influence, however, is obvious. For a period, Dimitrov’s youthful promise gave way to the feeling that his progress had stalled. In 2011, after qualifying for his first Grand Slam (the Australian Open), he made it to just outside the top 50, but finished the year ranked 70. By early 2012 he had dropped out of the top 100 altogether. He admits now that he felt the pressure.

In 2013 a pre-match pep talk from Sharapova led to a breakthrough victory against Djokovic in the second round of the Madrid Open, his first over a member of the top five. He has since surged up the rankings. ‘It was just the simplicity of what she said. Sometimes when you go back to basics it is a winning combination. It happened to be that moment.’

He says she also helps keep in check his anger, a vestige of his tough upbringing which he admits has stayed with him in adulthood. ‘I think I have a good temper but I don’t like people crossing me too much.’ This was apparent during a game in Helsinki in 2010 where Dimitrov pushed an umpire – a cardinal sin not even John McEnroe ever committed.

‘Oof,’ he winces at the memory. ‘I’ve seen him since a couple of times and said hello, but he doesn’t really like me. I try to be very respectful anyway.’ Nowadays, his violent outbursts are restricted to breaking rackets, currently at the rate of about 20 a year – a number he regards as an improvement.

Life after tennis

Follow Grigor Dimitrov on the social media site Instagram, as 191,000 (and rising) people do, and you would not immediately guess he was a tennis player. There are photographs of him playing guitar, cycling, jumping into azure oceans and posing by graffiti-covered walls; it all looks like the faintly rebellious construct of a male-modelling agency. Similarly, during the photo-shoot for this interview his eyes light up when he hears he won’t have to pose holding a racket. Instead, he drapes himself, panther-like, over the country club’s sun-bleached walls.

Why, then, his apparent disdain for the sport? ‘For some people it is their life but I don’t see tennis being that for ever. Right now this is my priority and what I want to do. I’m winning and my goals are far ahead but after that I’m done with tennis. I like designing, creating and working on new things. I’ll never be a good tennis coach.’

For now, though, his ambitions are clear: to win that Grand Slam. ‘I’ve already been thinking like this for more than a few years but it’s never easy to make that next step and really jump over the hurdle. Once you find that real good formula you know the results will come. The same thing happened to Andy, for example, Novak, Rafa, too. You see it in their eyes.’

This summer, perhaps, English grass will provide the springboard for similar success. Make no mistake, behind those designer sunglasses the same fire burns.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/ten...Sharapova.html
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Grigor Dimitrov: ´Every time I Step on Grass, I have a Special Feeling´

Grigor Dimitrov emerged as a top 8 player last year by winning the Aegon Classics Queen’s Championship and then went on to reach the semi-final of Wimbledon – breaking through as one of the top tennis players.

Since making his first appearance at Queen’s in 2009, the former junior Wimbledon champion has had a special connection with the place and has been a part of every tournament since his wild card entry 6 years ago.
Speaking at the draw ceremony, Dimitrov contemplated on his feelings for the green surface.

“Every time I come on grass, I have a special feeling, a different connection. The way I move, the way a play, the decisions I make on court… I don’t know why I feel that way, it’s just a feeling that I have since I first stepped on grass.”

“Last year was an unbelievable moment for me. One of the first things I did was ring my dad, and I remember coming out here with him when I got the first wild card, and I said, ‘I like that trophy a lot!’ Next thing you know, I had it in my hands."

But a tough road lies ahead for the defending champion who will have his work cut out for him if he wants to retain his crown. Dimitrov has an 18-11 record so far and comes in after a rather poor showing on clay – losing out in the second round of Rome and being eliminated in the first round of the French Open.

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AEGON CHAMPIONSHIPS

June 16, 2015

Grigor Dimitrov

LONDON, ENGLAND

G. DIMITROV/S. Querrey
4‑6, 6‑3, 6‑4


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. What was different today to what happened yesterday?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: It was a different match, I felt, today. Yesterday coming into the match, I felt good but it was just ‑‑I knew we weren't going to finish the match. Deep down I think that was in the back of my head.
I was a little bit like disappointed also that we got in that late, obviously, but what can you do? There were quite a few matches that went pretty long. So for me it was just a matter of, you know, time. And I had to be patient enough to go through the match.
But I didn't play good tennis in the first set even though I started well. I mean, I was down a break in the second, and, you know, I thought to myself, I mean, you know what? Just try to relax a little bit more and try to do like better shots, try to get into the rallies and all that kind of stuff.
You know, I was very calm, which really helped me. I mean, after the first break, I knew that I was on the right track. Then obviously making the second one, finishing for the set, and today coming out was a completely different day. It was warmer, brighter, so everything was just totally different for me.
It was a new day. For me, it was a new match.

Q. Psychologically, how important was that win?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: It was a tough opponent. I think it was just a very tough opponent. Obviously I know Sam for quite some time.
I played him, and I practice with him a lot down in LA, and for me it was just ‑‑I knew what to expect. Pretty much know what to expect from anyone that we are playing against. But I know he really likes that tournament. I know he really likes that kind of surface.
I mean, he was hitting the ball really clean, I thought. I haven't seen him play that well in a really long time.
I was like, okay, well‑‑ you know, of course I didn't like the odds early on, but it was just a new day for me. I woke up, and I thought to myself, well, you know, it's a new day and I can exploit some of his weaknesses. And I think as soon as I started getting the ball back, some slice, and keeping the ball low, that really troubled him on a few occasions. I think that was the match pretty much for me.
Regarding the confidence part? Yeah, I think it was a good win for me.

Q. What's it like coming in as defending champion?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: It's different (smiling). It's different. Especially here. I don't know why. It's one of the tournaments for me that I feel that every time I step on that court, I feel like I own the court (laughter).
It's a really nice feeling to have. I mean, I wish that on every tournament I was playing, but I go way back here, so everything is just so familiar. Everything with me is just so familiar. I think it's just I'm putting less and less pressure every time I come on that court, which should be the other way around, but it seems to work so far.

Q. Would you still feel like you owned the court if you stepped on it in the quarterfinal against Andy Murray? If so, wouldn't you like to?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: Of course, that's my goal. Doesn't matter who I play if I'm going out there to perform and play better tennis, and one of my goals is to really just play better every day, you know.
I don't want to let anything else get in my way for that. Doesn't matter who I play. I know it's a pretty tough field out here. Everyone is playing good, a lot of good guys.
That's the beauty of it. If you get to those kind of rounds, you go out there and give it your best shot.

Q. Is there something extra special about playing the home favorite in their backyard?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: I played him last year. Obviously I played James I remember first round last year. It's never easy, of course. The crowd is going to be behind him and going to support him 100%, but that's the game. I'm sure if you go to play in Bulgaria, it would be the other way around.
So, yeah, I think it really depends where you're at. I think in that particular situation ‑‑and I feel that the crowd is pretty fair, to be honest, especially the English crowd.
I played him last year at Wimbledon, and I felt actually very welcomed. I mean, of course they were cheering and they wanted him to win, but they appreciated good tennis.

Q. Just in terms of, like you said, enjoying it more even though being the defending champion, is there an element of being pleased to win the first round when you come back as defending champion?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: It's always good, yeah (laughter). At least you know you add one more.
Yeah. I mean, it's a different feeling, honestly. It happened to me recently and quite a few times that I have to defend titles, which is a great feeling, but I think that's the beauty of it.
You need to start repeating it, and this is where it all comes down to that. Because at some point you have worked so hard in your life and your tennis that you don't want to be too much up and down, you know. You want to do what you have done and eventually get better.
So if I'm here again to do that, I'm here to do that.

Q. Given how well you played on grass last year, do you think Wimbledon represents your best chance at a major?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: I wouldn't say the best. I mean, you know, in a way I like all the surfaces, to be honest. I don't discriminate any of them. I said that before.
Obviously I didn't play good in Paris again, which was, for me, I think it was one of my biggest disappointments. But, I mean, any other tournament that I play, whether it's going to be on hard court, I feel like I'm putting myself in a good position for it.
But in the same time, you know, the grass court season is pretty short, if you think about it. Even though the weeks are pretty spread out right now, it's just a special event for me, considering that I won the juniors.
So, for me, it's a tournament that I would like to think that's my biggest chance, you know, to win, to win the first slam. But, you know, you never know where it's going to come for me.

Q. Stan won the French juniors and went on to win.
GRIGOR DIMITROV: That's true, yeah (smiling).

Q. You said you were disappointed in the way you played in Paris, but what do you think of Jack Sock and his potential? How do you see him as a player?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: To be honest, I was pretty disappointed with that loss in particular on clay. I mean, I think Jack is a great player. I mean, a lot of things are ahead of him, still a lot of homework to be done, of course.
But, you know, it's hard for me to say, because, I mean, when you're upcoming, in a way, you have nothing to lose and you're free, and I remember the feeling when I was at that age I had absolutely nothing to lose. So the higher seeded player I was playing, the better I was playing, which I totally understand, but to be able to back that thing up every time, this is where it's going to show the most.
I think only he's got the answer for that. But, I mean, I have played him I think twice now? I don't know. I think twice. He's a good player, but, I mean, I'm not going to hide my disappointment from that loss, to be honest. He's going to be pretty dangerous of course on the fast surfaces. He has a big serve and big forehand. Potentially he can be a dangerous player for whoever is out there.

Q. Is there something about the French Open you haven't quite figured out?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: I guess, I guess. I'm accepting tips. I swear to God it's been two years in a row. I don't know what wrong I am doing there, but it's just weird. I'm completely honest with that.
I even spoke to my coach. It's just something that I'm not happy with there. I don't know what to say about it, you know.
It's been funny how two years in a row I played the same court and I played the same way. I'm fascinated by it, to be honest. I was thinking, you know, should I cry about it or ‑‑so I have mixed feelings, to be honest.

Q. Maybe you need to bottle the pressureless feeling you have here and take it to Paris.
GRIGOR DIMITROV: There you go. I have it with me (holding up water bottle). Yeah.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports
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AEGON CHAMPIONSHIPS

June 18, 2015

Grigor Dimitrov

LONDON, ENGLAND

G. MULLER/G. Dimitrov
6‑4, 7‑6


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How would you assess your game on grass today?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: Well, yeah, I mean, I don't think I'm playing bad tennis at the moment. I just am doing a lot of good things on the court which really don't discourage me to play.
Tough match today, of course. I'm just going to stay positive. Wimbledon is coming up. I'm going to have good time to get ready.
Yeah, everything is going to be ‑‑I think everything is going to be fine for me.

Q. Does it hurt more losing as a defending champion?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: It always does. It always does. It's just a tough ‑‑of course, it's a tough loss for me, but I give credit to Gilles. He played a good match. Very solid serving.
You know, it was just very close. I mean, I think I was striking the ball pretty good. I got quite a few break points that I didn't convert.
I think that's about it. It's just about that small shift that I'm going to need.
Yeah, it's of course never easy when you lose your title, but that's part of the game. I'm going to have quite a few days to get ready for Wimby, and, yeah, I'm sure I'm going to turn things around.

Q. What will you be doing between now and Wimbledon?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: I think I'm just going to probably rest a little bit. I think it's good to let the body recover. First week on grass it's always a bit intense on the body. You're a little stiff every day.
I'm just going to get a little bit of a rest and just get out on the practice court and just keep working.
I mean, this is pretty much the best thing I can do right now. There's not much else to think about. I've just gotta go out there and perform. I felt I have been quite unlucky in the past weeks with a lot that has been going on, and it's something that actually, you know, I accept and I need to fight through.

Q. A lot of the big guys struggled here. How do you explain that?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: As I said, it's never easy. It's first week on grass, and it's just you have dangerous players.
As I said, I mean, look at the draw. It's just full of players that can actually play good on grass. Good servers, good serve and volleyers. If you're not in a good rhythm, it takes one or two points to turn everything around.
Same thing happened with me today. I felt I had quite a few break points in the first set, I felt I was striking the ball well. I felt everything was going according to my plan. But just one or two points turned everything away from me, and that made a difference.

Q. How would you compare your loss today with the French Open first‑round loss? Would you say you're more disappointed?
GRIGOR DIMITROV: I don't want to say more disappointed. It's just not easy losing, especially on a tournament that you know you're going to play good and you have good success out here and you're feeling good.
It's just a shame that I had to go down that way again, but as I said, I'm very positive. I'm happy what I'm doing on the practice court and I'm staying healthy.
I mean, this is just a good, solid base for me. You know, one of the biggest tournaments is around the corner.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports
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TENNIS.COM


Dimitrov's Dip

FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2015 /by STEVE TIGNOR


There’s no place like home, they say. But what happens when home—in this case, a player’s favorite tournament—isn’t quite as welcoming as it once was? What if it’s not enough to cure that player’s ills or jump-start his season, the way it has in the past? On the men’s side, we’ll have two chances to find out the answer very soon. Like Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros earlier this month, Grigor Dimitrov couldn’t use the Aegon Championships at Queen’s Club, which has been so good to him over the years, to turn his disappointing 2015 around.

Dimitrov is Bulgarian, but the tournament in London has always treated him like a native son. In 2009, he was given a wild card by the director at the time, Chris Kermode, who was impressed by Dimitrov’s run to the Wimbledon junior title the previous year. The 18-year-old made good on that vote of confidence by winning a round and showing off his Federer-esque brand of tennis to the assembled British press. In 2014, Dimitrov won the title at Queen’s, went on to crack the Top 10, and, at Wimbledon, reached the first of what seemed sure to be many Grand Slam semifinals.

For most players, the Aegon is just a tune-up for the Big W down the road, but Dimitrov had dreamed of holding the famously immense silver trophy at Queen’s.

“Last year was an unbelievable moment for me,” he said at the draw ceremony this week. “One of the first things I did was ring my dad, and I remember coming out here with him when I got the first wild card, and I said, ‘I like that trophy a lot.’ Next thing you know, I had it in my hands.”

And while his title defense in 2015 got off to a rocky start—he dropped the first set to Sam Querrey in his opener before coming back to win in three—Dimitrov still sounded pleased to be back at Queen’s.

“It’s one of the tournaments for me that I feel that every time I step on that court, I feel like I own the court,” Dimitrov said. “It’s a really nice feeling to have. I mean, I wish that on every tournament I was playing, but I go way back here, so everything is just so familiar.”

This time, though, familiarity wasn’t enough. The 11th-ranked Dimitrov would lose his next match, to 32-year-old, 48th-ranked Gilles Muller. Despite the age and ranking disparity, the loss wasn’t a shock. Early exits have been the norm, rather than the exception, for Dimitrov recently. At 24, just when he should be entering his prime, he has slipped back out of the Top 10. The loss to Muller left him with a 19-12 record for the season, and this was the second title he had failed to defend. The last time it happened, in Acapulco in February, Dimitrov lost 6-0 in the third set to Ryan Harrison. It was an early sign that we might not see the same rising young star that we had seen in 2014.

If Thursday’s 6-4, 7-6 (5) loss to Muller wasn’t as awful as his exit in Acapulco, it still didn’t offer much hope for improvement in the near future. No surface demands better play on big points than grass, and Dimitrov couldn’t come up with it. Serving at 4-5 in the first, down set point, he misfired on a routine forehand. And in the second-set tiebreaker it was Muller, who is hardly a match for Dimitrov from the back court, who took the initiative with a lightning-strike forehand down the line for a key winner. For all of Dimitrov’s varied talents, it was Muller’s lumbering lefty force that won the day. On the final point, Dimitrov slipped on the turf and had to watch helplessly as the ball slipped past him. It was that kind of afternoon, and it has been that kind of year.

“I felt I have been unlucky in the past weeks with a lot that has been going on,” Dimitrov said, “and it’s something that, actually, I accept and I need to fight through.”

“Same thing happened with me today,” he continued. “I felt I was striking the ball well. I felt everything was going according to my plan. But just one or two points turned everything away from me, and that made a difference.”

Dimitrov didn’t elaborate on what, exactly, has been “going on” with him, and how he has been unlucky. But he did say in March, after his loss in Acapulco, that he was struggling to implement changes to his game.

“A little bit difference since I have been working on a lot of things,” he said. “I think it just takes a bit of time to really find the rhythm. My game still needs to improve a little bit more, needs a bit of a polish up. Usually it’s very tough when you break a habit to come out there and play under the circumstances...It’s never easy to change it right away.”

It’s safe to say that Dimitrov is still trying to find his rhythm. His one-handed backhand, as much of a pleasure as it can be to watch, has always been a relative liability—at the very least, it makes it easy for his opponents to decide where to go against him. While there haven’t been any obvious changes to his strokes or strategies, there has been a noticeable dip in Dimitrov’s outward intensity this season. Last year, as his ranking ascended, he looked fired up, a man who was destined for better things. This year, as that ascent has stalled, he has looked emotionally flat during matches, and almost resigned in defeat.

At Queen’s, Dimitrov hinted that, after his breakthrough 2014, he has tried to take a more professional, “been there, done that” approach in 2015.

“You need to start repeating it,” he said of his title defenses, “...at some point you have worked so hard in your life and your tennis that you don’t want to be too much up and down. You want to do what you have done and eventually get better.”

Judging from his results so far this season, Dimitrov might want to start acting like he hasn’t been there and done that quite yet. In retrospect, it probably wasn’t a great sign when he closed out his 2014 by declining the chance to be an alternate at the World Tour Finals in November, even when he was already in London. The step from Top 10 to Top 5 is the hardest of all, and only an insatiable hunger is going to get you there.

It’s also possible that, in the future, Dimitrov might benefit from hearing a new voice. His coach, Roger Rasheed, has been instrumental in motivating him and taking him to the Top 10, but few coaching relationships last forever. As I’ve mentioned before, if Dimitrov wants a “polish up,” as he says, Paul Annacone, who mastered that art with Pete Sampras and Roger Federer, is nearby in Los Angeles.

But fist-pumps and tactical tweaks will only take him so far. Is Dimitrov and his throwback style destined to be one of the casualties of the Big 4 era? You can never say never. As recently as 2013, many of us thought the same thing about Stan Wawrinka; if there’s one thing the 30-year-old Wawrinka has shown everyone on the ATP tour, it’s that patience is a virtue. But Dimitrov will never have Wawrinka’s blistering, hit-my-way-out-of-anything pace, especially with his one-hander. And while his game has plenty of flash, it doesn’t lend itself to the physical grind that separates the Slam champs from everyone else these days. Even Muller had the power advantage over him in Queen's.

Dimitrov has tried to remain positive in his press conferences.

“I don’t think I’m playing bad tennis at the moment,” he said on his way out of Queen’s. “I just am doing a lot of good things on the court that really don’t discourage me to play.”

He says that while he’s disappointed with his early loss there, he’s happy to have the extra practice time before Wimbledon. He’ll need it: Dimitrov isn’t defending a title, but he’s defending something just as big, a semifinal run at a Grand Slam and the ranking points that come with it. The thought seemed to give him pause on Thursday.

"I'm just going to stay positive," he said. "Wimbledon is coming up. I'm going to have good time to get ready. Yeah, everything is going to be—I think everything is going to be fine for me."

Dimitrov's best chance may be to pretend that last year never happened.

http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2015/.../#.VYRiE_ntmko
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An audio interview

https://audioboom.com/boos/3325564-d...d-of-wimbledon

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Grigor Dimitrov is now a registered trademark in Bulgaria

The best Bulgarian tennis player Grigor Dimitrov already owns a registered trademark for his name for the territory of Bulgaria. The registration of the mark was published in the Bulletin 05/2015 of the Patent Office. According to the information this trademark covers the following classes: 25 (clothing and sports equipment and so on.), 35 (business management, advertising and so on.) and 41 (education, sports and cultural activities and so on.).With regard to the registered trademark, its future commercial use can be carried out only with the express written consent of the tennis player.

http://intellectualpropertyplanet.bl...egistered.html
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Old Today, 01:54 PM   #643
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Default Re: News & Articles about Grigor

Grigor Dimitrov: first round

Grigor Dimitrov talks to the media following his 6-3, 6-0, 6-4 win over Federico Delbonis


Q. I want to know if you are going to play in the tie against Luxembourg.

GRIGOR DIMITROV: I still don't know. Still don't know about that. Hopefully if everything goes well, and according to my schedule, I think I will decide pretty much last minute. Nothing is sure till the end.

If it fits with my schedule, I will definitely have that and come over.

Q. So you still have to play one tie for the Olympics.

GRIGOR DIMITROV: We'll see. As I say, it's always tricky with Davis Cup. If it interferes with your schedule and what you've got to do, it's always tricky, but, I mean, I can play next year, as well.

So if you think about it ‑‑ or later in the year. So it's just a tough decision to make right now.

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/news/...rst_round.html
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