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Old 09-01-2009, 10:47 AM   #1
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Default Forehand Slice Appreciation

Yes, this is a bandwagon thread for the shot of kings.

Sadly, the professionals cannot seem to find a place for it, but at amateur level it is a deadly weapon in my opinion! I find the forehand slice handy for:

1) Perhaps the primary reason, retrieving an angled shot where the running forehand drive is not feasable, or just not a percentage shot. The "squash shot" is vital to make your opponent play just one more tricky ball from a seemingly helpless position. Personally, I love angling this one cross court as your opponent will likely back off having seen you haven't changed grips and expect the lob, leaving them wide open.

2) An approach shot - nowhere near as effective as the backhand slice approach because physics usually prevent you getting the same bite, but hitting across the ball and putting it into the corner to the right-handers backhand I find to be a simple, but amazingly effective play. The ball will fade on them making that running backhand very difficult to time, so expect an easy volley after a good approach.

3) A change of pace / junk - after a long, intense rally what better way to disrupt your opponents rhythm than to dump a floated forehand slice, deep and down the middle. It's the last thing they'll be expecting and can cause a surpring number of unforced errors because they won't be able to resist teeing off on it and badly overhitting.

Anyone else enjoy slicing and dicing your opponent with this unorthodox shot?
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