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Old 01-22-2013, 09:21 PM   #252
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Default Re: Djokovic on Armstrong, cycling, doping etc

Quote:
Originally Posted by redshift36188 View Post
Since you seem to know alot about cycling, wasn't it proven that the performance gains during the past 2 decades cannot be explained by equipment evolution and better training and nourishment, alone?
I don't know if you there is any scientific research on the subject, but the introduction of EPO was a game changer in cycling (and undoubtetly in all endurance sports).
The introduction of blood doping added to that and prevented fatigue which used to be usual in the latter stages of a grand tour.

Quote:
If the field was completely clean, would the top guys be the same, or are there actually very good cyclists not doping in a field of dopers (if there is any way to know)?
No, EPO heavily distorted the field. You might have heard of good and bad responers to doping.
I'll have to go a little scientific here, but essentially what EPO does is it increases the hematocrit value of the blood, which is the percentage of red blood cells. Since red blood cells are essential in the oxygen uptake of the body, which is crucial in endurance sports.
So what blood vector doping does, it gives a larger performance boost to athletes with a low hematocrit value. Athletes with naturally high levels of hematocrit (in a more innocent time, we might have called them innocent) have very little to gain by blood vector doping.

So, no. It's a common misconception that "since everone was doing it", the playing field was level. If anything, it heavily tilted the playing field in favor of strong responders to blood vector doping.


Quote:
Personally I don't mind doping in cycling as long as all the ones that matter are doing it, since it allows for more spectacle in the mountain stages.
You're looking at it the wrong way around. It's not those that matter that are doing it, rather you only know the cyclist who dope heavily, because those who race clean finish in the pack (or never got a chance to become pro).
And that's not really fair, is it?
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