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Today 08:02 AM
atennisfan
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat_YYZ View Post


So... announcements to come
He said "in the future", not about current or past suspensions. and "in the future can be a long way off". But this certainly opens the door to the possibility that sometime in the future we will have knowledge about current and past suspensions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat_YYZ View Post
Transcription error by the journalist.... or the ITF president doesn't know the difference between "collaborate" and "corroborate" ??
Maybe the ITF president subconsciously actually meant "collaborate", which makes more sense, knowing how secretive they are and knowing how protective they are of the top players.
Today 06:14 AM
Kat_YYZ
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

From The Guardian:
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/20...y-match-fixing
Quote:
World tennis chief calls for end of secrecy over players who fail drug tests

Players who fail a drug test and receive a provisional ban – such as Maria Sharapova in March – should be named, the International Tennis Federation president, David Haggerty, has told the Guardian.

This would help eradicate suspicions about players who mysteriously disappear from the Tour while the suspension is played out before an official decision on their guilt or innocence is announced.

Marin Cilic is a case in point from the past – when it was misleadingly claimed that he left Wimbledon because of injury, though the ITF accepted his account that he had ingested a stimulant inadvertently – and Sharapova exposed the fallacy of the policy when she held a televised press conference in Los Angeles in March to announce her own failed drug test at the Australian Open in January.

“We’ve discussed the possibility of announcing provisional suspensions, as a way to be transparent as to what’s going on,” Haggerty said. “I think that you’ll see after Wimbledon some announcements because each of seven bodies has to go back to their stakeholders and have formal approval of things. But we understand the importance of transparency. We’re also doing that with the integrity unit; they’ve begun to publish a quarterly report.”

So secretive has the federation had to be to comply with out-of-date protocols that Haggerty could not even confirm in our exclusive interview that Sharapova’s hearing into the ban began in London two weeks ago, and a decision was expected shortly. He would only say: “I really can’t tell you what [the date of a decision] would be but what I can tell you is, generally, it’s about a three-week process from when the hearing occurs until something is published.”

Further anomalies remain, however. Rafael Nadal recently met with little enthusiasm when he asked the ITF to publish the records of all his drug tests, to kill rumours he had been using performance-enhancing substances.

Haggerty said: “Under the rules that we have today he made a statement and we were able to collaborate that statement. I think what will happen in the future with provisional suspensions is it would become known. In theory, then, anything you hear means there is a suspension; if you don’t hear anything, there isn’t a suspension. The challenge is, when you have a set of rules, you have to follow them.

“But now we’re saying, ‘Let’s look at the rules. Are they fit for purpose? Are there ways to adapt them, so that perhaps there is a more logical way for things to be done, could be done?”

In response to the gathering storm of criticism that administrators are not doing enough to fight drug-taking and match-fixing, Haggerty admits the ITF has had to move quickly to save the game’s reputation after reheated allegations on the BBC and BuzzFeed during the Australian Open, three months after he took over the presidency from the Italian Francesco Ricci Bitti, who had been in the post for 16 years.

“The seven stakeholders have gotten together here and understand that integrity is the most important part of our reputation. Zero tolerance is really what we believe in. No player, no administrator, no official is above the law.

“We’ve got six regional associations and 211 member nations and we’ve just got to make sure we do everything we can to keep tennis clean. We want the players to participate, we want fans to believe that what they see on the court is a key sport.

“We want to continue to put rigour into the system, to do more biological passports, to do more out-of-competition testing. We want to protect the clean athletes, and the majority of them are. We will keep more samples for a longer period of time, so, as new testing comes, you may discover some things that you didn’t discover early on. You see that with what the IOC are doing with the Beijing [and London] Olympics. You can always build a better mousetrap, but you have to be open to thinking what you need to do.”

Match-fixing remains the game’s other irritant. Haggerty concedes: “We need to do more with officials, with the players at the pro circuit levels, as well as what we’re doing at the Challengers and the grand slam events. We need to put more rigour into it. We maybe need to invest more funding. We’ve added another investigator, we’ve added another analyst, to try to make it more robust. There has been no request from the TIU [Tennis Integrity Unit] turned down, financial resources, whatever.”
Quote:
“We’ve discussed the possibility of announcing provisional suspensions, as a way to be transparent as to what’s going on,” Haggerty said. “I think that you’ll see after Wimbledon some announcements because each of seven bodies has to go back to their stakeholders and have formal approval of things. But we understand the importance of transparency. We’re also doing that with the integrity unit; they’ve begun to publish a quarterly report.”
So... announcements to come

Quote:
Further anomalies remain, however. Rafael Nadal recently met with little enthusiasm when he asked the ITF to publish the records of all his drug tests, to kill rumours he had been using performance-enhancing substances.

Haggerty said: “Under the rules that we have today he made a statement and we were able to collaborate that statement. I think what will happen in the future with provisional suspensions is it would become known. In theory, then, anything you hear means there is a suspension; if you don’t hear anything, there isn’t a suspension. The challenge is, when you have a set of rules, you have to follow them.
Transcription error by the journalist.... or the ITF president doesn't know the difference between "collaborate" and "corroborate" ??
05-29-2016 06:29 AM
atennisfan
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by scoutreporter View Post
Do you guys believe in silent bans?
Cilic had silent ban in 2013.
05-29-2016 12:37 AM
Jon Snow
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by -Evita- View Post
Ernests Gulbis on doping in tennis:



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/sp...-misdeeds.html
Got some new respect for Captain Gulbis.
05-29-2016 12:33 AM
scoutreporter
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Do you guys believe in silent bans?
05-28-2016 11:22 PM
mugahi
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Dope testing is causing too many injuries.
05-28-2016 06:00 PM
Chris Kuerten
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by -Evita- View Post
Ernests Gulbis on doping in tennis:



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/sp...-misdeeds.html
Just goes to show how deep the omerta goes when it comes to doping, even a normally outspoken and insightful guy like Gulbis resorts to spouting inane nonsense. Not even the top players take such an extreme stance
05-28-2016 09:09 AM
atennisfan
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by -Evita- View Post
Ernests Gulbis on doping in tennis:



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/sp...-misdeeds.html
I thought Gulbis was stupid already, but this just confirmed I underestimated the level of his stupidity.
05-28-2016 09:00 AM
-Evita-
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Myrre View Post
For someone who had Canas as trainer this statement is hardly surprising.
Are you saying he's doping? Or that he's lying about thinking that others aren't doping?
05-28-2016 08:57 AM
Sunflowerseed
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophicalarf View Post
The difference presumably is that Sharapova admitted she took it after 1/Jan. Other athletes are claiming they stopped taking it months before and are being allowed some leeway as a result.
The leeway is presumably that they can claim that they stopped taking it before the ban.

Of course, it begs the question, why did they no longer need it? Have they found a replacement heart medication? Or are they admitting they took it for a legal, if morally dubious advantage?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Method Man View Post
That 1 mg thing is BS. Povetkin tested negative for Meldonium 3 times in early April then tested positive for less than 1 mg in late April (according to his promoter). You can probably get the effects you want just from taking the tiniest amount.
That sounds dodgy. If the drug is banned on 1st January, you might be able to claim that it's taken longer to leave your system than expected, but if it's not in your system, then the concentration appears to increase, what happened? Either they took more after the ban, or there is a problem with the testing. If the 'negative' tests were simply below the limit of detection for those labs?
05-28-2016 08:55 AM
Myrre
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by -Evita- View Post
Ernests Gulbis on doping in tennis:



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/sp...-misdeeds.html
For someone who had Canas as trainer this statement is hardly surprising.
05-28-2016 08:47 AM
-Evita-
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Ernests Gulbis on doping in tennis:

Quote:
To be honest, I think tennis is really clean. It’s my honest opinion. I know, myself, how I felt when I was playing well. It seems to most of the players, even, that it’s impossible to play day after day: five sets, five sets, five sets. But when you’re fit, when you did your work, you are physically able. You are physically so strong that you’re able to continue in crazy circumstances. Like Novak and Rafa, or Stan, in Australia when they play these marathon matches. People are able to do it. It’s not necessary that if somebody did his work and somebody practiced more than you, you have to go and accuse somebody that they cheated. They just did it better. This is my opinion; I honestly don’t think that somebody in tennis cheats with this.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/27/sp...-misdeeds.html
05-19-2016 12:01 PM
Method Man
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Kuerten View Post
Apparently it had to do with the amount she tested positive for, which was less than 1 mg. So yeah, that falls under the leeway. Then again, only Russian sources thusfar.
That 1 mg thing is BS. Povetkin tested negative for Meldonium 3 times in early April then tested positive for less than 1 mg in late April (according to his promoter). You can probably get the effects you want just from taking the tiniest amount.
05-19-2016 11:50 AM
Chris Kuerten
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

Apparently it had to do with the amount she tested positive for, which was less than 1 mg. So yeah, that falls under the leeway. Then again, only Russian sources thusfar.
05-19-2016 10:49 AM
philosophicalarf
Re: Doping in Tennis Thread (No accusations without proof. Wada IC report published)

The difference presumably is that Sharapova admitted she took it after 1/Jan. Other athletes are claiming they stopped taking it months before and are being allowed some leeway as a result.
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