On-court stamina [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

On-court stamina

Macbrother
03-25-2007, 08:06 PM
Recently I started jogging to improve endurance and overall wellness, and got up to around 4 miles/day 3 days/week. However, I noticed during league matches after a grueling two sets or so I still find myself struggling with extreme fatigue; professionals playing at a much higher intensity over five sets seems almost unimaginable. Anyone have any tips at specifically targeting and increasing stamina on court?

Dougie
04-03-2007, 08:44 AM
Recently I started jogging to improve endurance and overall wellness, and got up to around 4 miles/day 3 days/week. However, I noticed during league matches after a grueling two sets or so I still find myself struggling with extreme fatigue; professionals playing at a much higher intensity over five sets seems almost unimaginable. Anyone have any tips at specifically targeting and increasing stamina on court?

Jogging is a good exercise, but tennis is very different from running. You can increase your endurance by running, but I would advice you to do some sprints, too, for example. And maybe build your leg muscles at the gym. Then again, I don´t know shit about workouts, so I might be totally wrong. Just some thoughts...

Action Jackson
04-03-2007, 08:51 AM
What type of build do you have?

Tennis is a combo of speed/endurance. You need the endurance for sure, but also need to have the fast twitch muscles working with give you power and speed.

How serious do you want to be? Get on a court and sprint across the baseline from the doubles alley to the doubles alley doing shuttle sprints. For example run to the side as you would hit a forehand and then run to the corner in preparation for a backhand.

If jogging on a treadmill at the gym, then change the resistance level and the speed at regular intervals which might be hard initially, but it works well for the body, go a bit faster, then slower.

If you are outside and live in a hilly area, then use the landscape to your advantage and do hill sprints.

Got to work everything for tennis, the shoulders, the back, the hips, the legs as a unit. The thing is you need speed and power, but also endurance, so a mix of weights and running will help, as you won't put on too much bulk, unless you need it.

richardsonc
04-03-2007, 08:03 PM
I think to be better at tennis by cardio, the best is sprints, and short distance, because in tennis you go side to side, forward to backward, just short distances right? So why train to run a marathon? I think its awesome to be quick and whip across the court to snag that angle shot he thought he pulled on me. :D

Bobby
04-04-2007, 07:28 AM
I think to be better at tennis by cardio, the best is sprints, and short distance, because in tennis you go side to side, forward to backward, just short distances right? So why train to run a marathon? I think its awesome to be quick and whip across the court to snag that angle shot he thought he pulled on me. :D

You need both speed and endurance. That's pretty obvious, isn't it?

Action Jackson
04-04-2007, 08:55 AM
You need both speed and endurance. That's pretty obvious, isn't it?

Not to everyone.

Kolya
04-23-2007, 03:46 AM
For a bit of variety in training, play some squash.

misspetebadly
04-25-2007, 09:42 PM
I have good results mixing light/medium weight workouts with bike sprints ... I have a course and try to beat my previous time, which ends up being only about 15 minutes. Because the course is flat and hilly, it simulates the start/stop nature of tennis, with the hills being absolutely grueling and the other sections good for keeping heartrate up. Plus, the ride clears your head, and there's something to be said for that.

If I weren't working so much, I'd do 2 bike sprints a week and a single all body weight workout, in addition to tennis, but of course I end up running out of time somehow. But when I do it, it really works.

Good luck.

Angle Queen
04-26-2007, 08:20 PM
Practice like you want/need to play. Don't just "hit" with someone. Play two or three full sets. All the running and weights might help...but nothing can replace doing it like it's supposed to be done. Over and over.

Aerion
04-27-2007, 11:12 PM
I like hitting with my husband. We hit and play hard sets. ;) BTW I have never ever accepted the doubles lines. If we're playing/hitting singles, we both use the singles lines. :eek:

Of course I realize he's not playing to his full potential. lol

kensan
04-28-2007, 11:50 PM
I've been doing the routine in a book endorsed by Todd Martin and the USTA, called Power Tennis Training. It's a pretty tough workout.

MisterQ
04-28-2007, 11:54 PM
I like to hike up my endurance with a courtside coffee. :lol:

FluffyYellowBall
05-03-2007, 10:03 PM
Good answers from GWH and Dougie

I started to go to the gym only last year and i was forced to do so but it REALLY made a difference! Im 6 foot and quite thin so if it made a difference with me, im sure it will help u. Even if u can jog 4 miles, u need to build your core muscles to help with ur shots once youre in position. I noticed that because when i was younger, i could get in position to hit the ball but sometimes didnt make the shot..

I also skip (with and without a rope) You can do that at home..

Also try explosive footwork/fitness. As GWH said about increasing/decreasing resistence and incline on a treadmill, u can do that while ur running. Every few minutes, sprint for 5-10 secs.

Hope this helps

FluffyYellowBall
05-03-2007, 10:04 PM
I like to hike up my endurance with a courtside coffee. :lol:

Thats the WORST thing u can do while playing sports!!

Burrow
05-13-2007, 01:47 AM
Id advise you to do some interval training. For example, change the intensity, if you want to run 4 miles, run in a jogging pace, then run a little faster, not too fast, as over 4 miles you may feel fatigue due to your current CRE level. Then run slower again. You could also make it more like a game situation by changing direction, running in zig zags to help agility. You could do drills round a court, like doing short sprints from tramline to tramline and baseline to the net. Time yourself, and each week compare to keep a record of how effective your training has been.I would also do some weights, I do quite alot of weights, heavy weights to gain bulk, low reps. You could do some lighter weights, but over a longer period of time to help local muscular endurance, combined, by doing this you will improve stamina and muscular endurance, so you should be able to play longer without your skill level dropping, but better. Over 6 weeks at 3 days a week you should feel better.