Last Stand of the Lost Generation: Moya, Haas and Kuerten [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Last Stand of the Lost Generation: Moya, Haas and Kuerten

Eden
03-07-2007, 10:43 AM
Across The Net: Last Stand of the Lost Generation
Posted by Dan Martin on 03.05.2007

Carlos Moya, Tommy Haas, and Gustavo Kuerten are worth watching throughout 2007.

The Sampras-Agassi generation showcased a set of talented and accomplished players. Jim Courier, Goran Ivanesevic, Michael Chang, Michael Stich, Sergei Bruguera, Thomas Muster, and Richard Karjicek all won at least one Grand Slam title. Sampras set many all time records and Agassi won the career Grand Slam when he captured the French Open in 1999.

All of this success left the generation that followed with scant accomplishments. If Patrick Rafter is placed in the Agassi-Sampras generation and if Gustavo Kuerten is placed in the "New Balls" generation, then Yevgeny Kafelnikov's 1996 French Open title, 1999 Australian Open title, brief stint at #1 in 1999 and 2000 Olympic Gold Medal place Yevgeny as the most accomplished player of his generation. YK's career is indeed impressive, especially if one adds his multiple Grand Slam doubles titles, but it pales when compared to Jim Courier's career numbers of four Grand Slam titles and finishing 1992 at #1 in the world. Courier was the 3rd most decorated player of his generation. Thus, the lost generation did not set the world afire with Grand Slam titles or lengthy reigns at #1.

Carlos Moya won the 1998 French Open and was runner-up at the 1997 Australian Open. Moya spent a few weeks in 1999 at #1 and recovered nicely from career threatening injuries by finishing in the top ten from 2002-2004. Had Moya not been hurt in 1999, he likely would have won more Grand Slam titles. Moya is a big guy who moves incredibly well. He was coming into his own when the injury bug hit his career hard. He is 6'3" and has a big serve for a back court player. Moya also has one of the best forehands I have ever seen live or on television. King Carlos helped Spain win the Davis Cup in 2004 and finished the year ranked #5 in the world. Since that time, Moya's results have declined, but he is still considered to be one of the most charismatic players on tour. At thirty years of age, his best tennis is behind him, but Moya has reached two tournament finals (including a runner-up finish this week in Mexico) and one semifinal in 2007. Given that he finished five different years ranked in the top ten in the world, it would be fitting if Moya could have a strong clay court season and make a solid showing at the French Open.

Tommy Haas along with Nicholas Kiefer were expected to step into the big German tennis shoes that Boris Becker, Steffi Graf, and Michael Stich left. Haas has struggled with shoulder injuries his entire career. Haas was trained by Nick Bolleteri, but instead of reflecting the Bolleteri trend of bog forehand, two handed backhand players that started with Jimmy Aires, Aaron Krickstein, Andre Agassi and Jim Courier. Haas has one of the best one handed backhands in recent memory. Haas reached #2 in the world (somehow) in 2002. Haas has likely played his best tennis since January 2006. He pushed Roger Federer to five sets at the 2006 Australian Open, reached the quarterfinals of the 2006 U.S. Open, won three events in 2006, reached the semifinals of the 2007 Australian Open and dominated the event in Memphis last week. Haas won the title without facing a single break point. Andy Roddick, Haas' victim in the Memphis final, stated that Haas could realistically win a Grand Slam title. Haas charged into the semifinals at Dubai this week to take on another guy with a great one handed backhand who speaks German. The result: Roger Federer d. Tommy Haas 6-4, 7-5. Haas may be playing the second best tennis in the world in 2007, but his chances of going further and capturing a Grand Slam hinge on his ability to beat Federer. That may never happen, but Haas has the best chance of the lost generation to add one more Grand Slam to their collective accomplishments.

Gustavo Kuerten, if counted among the lost generation, is their standard bearer. Kuerten won the French Open in 1997, 2000 and 2001. Kuerten, known as "Guga", finished 2000 ranked #1 in the world and beat Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi back-to-back in order to claim that ranking. At Indianapolis in 2001, Guga was fresh off of a masterful victory in Cincinnati and looked to be solidly #1 in the world. Guga reached the Indianapolis final and looked to be a legitimate contender for the U.S. Open despite his clay court-only reputation. Due to weather, Guga had to play the semifinals and finals on the same day. He had done the same thing one week earlier in Cincinnati. Guga defeated 2001 Wimbledon champion the semifinals and faced Patrick Rafter in the finals. Guga hurt himself early in the first set and defaulted. Still he headed into the U.S. Open as the #1 seed with many good hard court results under his belt. Kuerten worked his way through to the quarterfinals of the 2001 U.S. Open, but struggled to do so. In the quarterfinals, Yevgeny Kafelnikov dominated a listless Kuerten. News slowly emerged that Kuerten had a bad hip. Such injuries are deadly in tennis due to the torque one produces by rotating the torso when hitting both forehands and backhands. Guga has had multiple hip surgeries and tried to come back several times. Despite beating Marat Safin at the U.S. Open in 2002, winning the 2002 Brazil Open and defeating Roger Federer at the 2004 French Open, the result of each comeback has always been negative in the long run. Recently, Kuerten won his first ATP level match in over 12 months. If Guga can rediscover his old form, he could be a major factor in Paris. This will likely take over one year of consistent tour play. If Guga can stay healthy and build confidence in 2007, look for him to make one last run on clay in 2008. Like Moya, Guga is charismatic and a fan favorite. It is good to have him back, but one must wonder what his career would have looked like had his hip not broken down.

Source: http://www.411mania.com/sports/other_sports/51453/Across-The-Net:-Last-Stand-of-the-Lost-Generation.htm

oz_boz
03-07-2007, 10:49 AM
Lost generation dominated by older Agassi and younger Hewitt when Sampras faded.

EDIT: Haas *1978, borderline mid 70. I'd put him in the around 80 generation.

CmonAussie
03-07-2007, 10:50 AM
##
...
*Kuerten`s my favourite among these>>> but he`s the least likely to make any noise again><!!... It would take a near miracle for him to even win an MM clay event again.

*Moya should have won Acapulco last weekend & that may have been his last chance to win a title><.. If the cards fall right for him he may be able to reach the QF at FO & possibly reclaim a Top-20 spot in the rankings..

*Haas is playing some of the best tennis of his career!.. In terms of form he`s right up there with a chance to win a Slam if FED weren`t around.. However Tommy is also a headcase & if the opportunity presented itself he`d probably choke in the QFs or SFs again><... Still I think he`ll finish Top-10 this year!

R.Federer
03-07-2007, 05:04 PM
Tommy, well I would say he belongs to this generation if Ljubicic and Blake do.

amierin
03-07-2007, 05:23 PM
Very interesting read. I agree with it.

Isn't Ljube younger than Blake?

jazar
03-07-2007, 06:31 PM
guga rules. tough draw this week, but once he gets back on clay with the matches under his belt...

marcRD
03-07-2007, 06:56 PM
Kafelnikov didnt win as many grand slams, master series, master cups or titles as Guga, neither did he end any year as nr1 in the world. How can you explain Kafelnikov beeing more succesfull than Guga?

Hagar
03-07-2007, 10:05 PM
It is good to have him back, but one must wonder what his career would have looked like had his hip not broken down.

EXACTLY!!!

I don't understand how anyone can compare Guga to Moya and Haas. A healthy Guga is simply a higher level than these two.

Peoples
03-07-2007, 10:13 PM
The mediocre generation

RonE
03-07-2007, 10:15 PM
Kafelnikov didnt win as many grand slams, master series, master cups or titles as Guga, neither did he end any year as nr1 in the world. How can you explain Kafelnikov beeing more succesfull than Guga?

I suppose the one thing in Yevgeny's favour would be the fact that his all-round best results in slams is better than Guga:

They both won the French, both made the Wimbledon quarters but Yevgeny won the AO in which Guga always struggled and did make two USO SF appearances while Guga never got past the quarters.

But yeah, I agree that on the whole Guga did win more big titles (Yevgeny never won a TMS believe it or not!), won a TMC which Yevgeny also failed to do, finished a year #1 and stayed at the #1 spot considerably longer than Yevgeny.

Kolya
03-07-2007, 11:44 PM
Kafelnikov had to play Sampras and Agassi at their peaks, it was really tough for him to win the big titles. He did win 4 GS doubles titles.

IMO, Guga was a bit luckier to play a faded Sampras (who was still good) and an older Agassi, when Guga was younger and peaking.

Kolya
03-07-2007, 11:52 PM
Kafelnikov didnt win as many grand slams, master series, master cups or titles as Guga, neither did he end any year as nr1 in the world. How can you explain Kafelnikov beeing more succesfull than Guga?

Kalfenikov - 26 titles, 0 TMS, 2 GS, 0 TMC, 1 OG
Guga - 20 titles, 5 TMS, 3 GS, 1 TMC, 0 OG

CyBorg
03-08-2007, 12:41 AM
Sampras' generation was terrible 97-98. Pretty much everyone was going down hill - Becker, Ivanisevic, Chang, Courier, Agassi. But around 92-96 it was a lot of fun. Thankfully Agassi made a big comeback in 99.

CyBorg
03-08-2007, 12:43 AM
Kalfenikov - 26 titles, 0 TMS, 2 GS, 0 TMC, 1 OG
Guga - 20 titles, 5 TMS, 3 GS, 1 TMC, 0 OG

Kafelnikov has a gold medal to boot. Too bad he was a big-time choke in Masters Cups.

BlakeorHenman
03-08-2007, 01:27 AM
Very interesting read. I agree with it.

Isn't Ljube younger than Blake?

They both turn 28 this year... Ljubicic in May I think. So theyre pretty close to the same age.

Bad Religion
03-08-2007, 02:26 AM
The mediocre generation

... Says a Gonzo`s fan :haha:

General Suburbia
03-08-2007, 05:22 AM
The mediocre generation
Compare to today's "I am Fed's bitch" generation.

Mimi
03-08-2007, 05:25 AM
they should include Ferrero as well :wavey:

trixtah
03-08-2007, 05:29 AM
who the hell is Jimmy Aires? no, seriously, I don't know :/

Action Jackson
03-08-2007, 05:33 AM
who the hell is Jimmy Aires? no, seriously, I don't know :/

Hahahahaha

oz_boz
03-08-2007, 08:28 AM
Compare to today's "I am Fed's bitch" generation.

Fed >> Guga
Hewitt ~ Kafel
Safin > Moya
Roddick > ToJo
Ferrero > Costa

Early 80s gen > mid 70's gen.

marcRD
03-08-2007, 09:13 AM
Kafelnikov had to play Sampras and Agassi at their peaks, it was really tough for him to win the big titles. He did win 4 GS doubles titles.

IMO, Guga was a bit luckier to play a faded Sampras (who was still good) and an older Agassi, when Guga was younger and peaking.

Yeah, but the AO GS he won he pretty much didnt face anyone at all. He faced no one in the top 10, Todd Martin in QF was the only one ranked top 20 at the time.

He only faced hardcourt players to win his RG title. Guga won his 3 grand slams in style against the greatest clay court players (including Kafelnikov all 3 times). Kafelnikov was more the one to fill the hole when the big stars failed to deliver in grand slams.

liptea
03-09-2007, 02:18 AM
i love all of them.

they were not the lost generation. they were just too pretty to play real tennis.

angiel
03-09-2007, 03:44 PM
i love all of them.

they were not the lost generation. they were just too pretty to play real tennis.


What kind of tennis do they play?????:rolleyes: :p

lorenz
03-09-2007, 04:50 PM
Nice thread

2moretogo
03-09-2007, 05:09 PM
Sidebar, TTC is showing the 2001 final of the Rome Masters...

Guga v. Ferrero... sigh.

CyBorg
03-09-2007, 05:34 PM
Yeah, but the AO GS he won he pretty much didnt face anyone at all. He faced no one in the top 10, Todd Martin in QF was the only one ranked top 20 at the time.

He only faced hardcourt players to win his RG title. Guga won his 3 grand slams in style against the greatest clay court players (including Kafelnikov all 3 times). Kafelnikov was more the one to fill the hole when the big stars failed to deliver in grand slams.

It's true. Fat Eugene wouldn't even sniff the semis of a grand slam in today's game.

guga2120
03-09-2007, 05:38 PM
i certainly would love to see Guga do something great in the next few months, especially on the clay.



finished 2000 ranked #1 in the world and beat Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi back-to-back

I remember watching that he beat both of them on a fast indoor court, he was so good before he got hurt.

BlakeorHenman
03-09-2007, 07:37 PM
This is the era in which I first began following tennis week-in, week-out. It makes me really sad to see their these guys are ending their careers even though I wasn't particularly a fan of either individually.

EDIT: Not so much ENDING their careers of course, but you get it...

Burrow
03-09-2007, 09:18 PM
I agree, pretty much same point of view as I have.