Why not four different slam surfaces...Enlighten me, no? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why not four different slam surfaces...Enlighten me, no?

The_Nadal_effect
02-15-2007, 01:07 PM
I always wonder that among the four Grand Slams, they have one on clay, one on grass but why two on hard courts, when they could well have come up with maybe another surface for either one of the hard court US, or AO.

I recently read there is a carpet surface in Basel. They could well have had a carpet as a grand slam, no? :sad:
That would make four different surfaces. That'd be interesting.

Another thing is, is there any real difference in cemented surfaces of the US and AO circuits:confused:

Bring home the answers, dudes and dudees!

TheBoiledEgg
02-15-2007, 01:11 PM
there's a HUGE diff between AUS Open and US Open courts.

Saumon
02-15-2007, 01:17 PM
they should play the AO on sand :)

The_Nadal_effect
02-15-2007, 01:56 PM
there's a HUGE diff between AUS Open and US Open courts.

Hi Boiled egg!

Difference in what? Both are hard courts! Cement...isn't it. Except for the fact that one's blue and the other's green.

Is there a difference in bounce, speed? Is one wood and the other cement? I dont get the difference.:confused: Enlighten...

The_Nadal_effect
02-15-2007, 01:58 PM
They should play on sand lol, ...in a seperate island.

Alessia9
02-15-2007, 02:01 PM
Hi Boiled egg!

Difference in what? Both are hard courts! Cement...isn't it. Except for the fact that one's blue and the other's green.

Is there a difference in bounce, speed? Is one wood and the other cement? I dont get the difference.:confused: Enlighten...

Yes, there is a difference in speed. As far as I know the US Open is faster than the AO (I've read this in some articles).

Deboogle!.
02-15-2007, 02:08 PM
Hi Boiled egg!

Difference in what? Both are hard courts! Cement...isn't it. Except for the fact that one's blue and the other's green.

Is there a difference in bounce, speed? Is one wood and the other cement? I dont get the difference.:confused: Enlighten...The Rebound Ace courts of the AO are made from old recycled tires. So the court is rubbery, bounces much higher than the USO, and is significantly slower. For all intents and purposes, they play very differently. You can see it while watching the tennis. Kick serves are quite effective at the AO, it's harder to serve-volley there, etc. the USO is a very fast hartcourt with a pretty low bounce.

So technically they are both "hard court," I don't think they could really get much more different.

BlakeorHenman
02-15-2007, 02:25 PM
I agree... i think there should some time be a grand slam in Asia on Carpet

njnetswill
02-15-2007, 02:41 PM
Steel Courts. They can melt down old cars and make a shiny metal surface. :yeah:

silverarrows
02-15-2007, 02:47 PM
What's the surface they use in Paris? I think it's a good surface for a Grand Slam. What do you think? :confused:

Corswandt
02-15-2007, 02:52 PM
I agree... i think there should some time be a grand slam in Asia on Carpet

Carpet is used indoors, and you can't have an indoors Grand Slam for obvious reasons.

silverarrows
02-15-2007, 03:05 PM
what's the difference of greenset surface(Madrid), Indoor Carpet(Paris), and Taraflex(TMC-Shanghai)?

what surface has the fastest/slowest ball speed?
what surface has highest/lowest bounce?
enlighten... :wavey:

GlennMirnyi
02-15-2007, 03:13 PM
Taraflex = carpet indoor. Paris has taraflex. Minsk's ice rink has taraflex. Basel has taraflex. The fastest surface available on the regular tour.

Greenset is Madrid's surface. A slower kind of synthetic surface, designed to help the Spaniards in Madrid, as it's pretty slow.

Pigpen Stinks
02-15-2007, 04:42 PM
Actually, there's a great surface that I like to refer to as "milk carton crate". It's transparent and snaps together in blocks. It looks and feels just like the old plastic crates that used to be used to carry around milk cartons.

The surface is typically used as a low budget, maintenance free alternative to traditional hard, or black-top courts that tend to crack. Don't let the description fool you, they're really a great alternative for a fourth slam surface.

Forget the fact that with any drop of rain, or even hint of humidity, you'd go sprawling like a drunken sailor on a sheet of ice. Nevermind that once you fall you'd be chewed up like a Jack Bauer interrogation witness. This surface would add a lot of spice to the game.

El Legenda
02-15-2007, 04:46 PM
AO should be quicksand

+alonso
02-15-2007, 04:48 PM
Yeah, I think Greenset is the brand of the surface.
Well Anyways, Greenset builds synthetic pavement. So I suppose it is a bit slower than Indoor Carpet.

a Question...?

Does the Greenset nesessary need to be installed in a closed stadium?

kobulingam
02-15-2007, 05:44 PM
I always wonder that among the four Grand Slams, they have one on clay, one on grass but why two on hard courts, when they could well have come up with maybe another surface for either one of the hard court US, or AO.

I recently read there is a carpet surface in Basel. They could well have had a carpet as a grand slam, no? :sad:
That would make four different surfaces. That'd be interesting.

Another thing is, is there any real difference in cemented surfaces of the US and AO circuits:confused:

Bring home the answers, dudes and dudees!

CEMENT?

jayjay
02-15-2007, 05:58 PM
AO should be quicksand

Ivan has been playing in quick sand most of the season, no? :)

aramis
02-15-2007, 06:43 PM
I always wanted an indoor slam. Maybe permanently close the roof on Rod Laver Arena and Vodafone? That would be good for players and fans because of the heat. I don't know how it would work on the outer courts, though.

Jimnik
02-15-2007, 07:04 PM
I would love to see a tournament played on ice. Not an ice rink covered with a carpet but literally on ice. That would really test a player's movement.

Outdoor ice - perfect surface for the inaugural tournament in Antarctica.

Mobes
02-15-2007, 07:24 PM
as im sure others have said, RA is nowhere near a traditional HC...not sure its even classed as such...we have 4 slams and 4 surfaces....

David Kenzie
02-15-2007, 07:39 PM
Yeah, I think Greenset is the brand of the surface.
Well Anyways, Greenset builds synthetic pavement. So I suppose it is a bit slower than Indoor Carpet.

a Question...?

Does the Greenset nesessary need to be installed in a closed stadium?

Greenset is just the brand, they don't just make one type of surface. The same goes for Taraflex, Decoturf ...

So yes, you can have outdoor Greenset courts.

David Kenzie
02-15-2007, 07:41 PM
Here is a list of court surfaces officially classified by the ITF.
http://www.itftennis.com/technical/equipment/courts/courtlist.asp

tennisrocks123
02-15-2007, 07:42 PM
Oz and US are pretty differnt

bobrocks
02-15-2007, 07:55 PM
Carpet is used indoors, and you can't have an indoors Grand Slam for obvious reasons.

like....?

Corswandt
02-15-2007, 08:07 PM
like....?

During the first day of the AO, there were 16 courts being used at the same time. There are no indoors facilities that I know of with that many tennis courts, and I'm not even sure that is physically possible.

R.Federer
02-15-2007, 08:26 PM
There are no indoors facilities that I know of with that many tennis courts, and I'm not even sure that is physically possible.
Well, you could imagine building a roof over each of those outside courts with enough space just for linespeople and officials, and a small audience. What is not physically possible?

deliveryman
02-15-2007, 08:35 PM
Hi Boiled egg!

Difference in what? Both are hard courts! Cement...isn't it. Except for the fact that one's blue and the other's green.

Is there a difference in bounce, speed? Is one wood and the other cement? I dont get the difference.:confused: Enlighten...

Wrong.

Essentially, when you get down to the nitty gritty

The AO is played on rubber (rebound Ace)
The USO is played on Hard.

They play very, very, very different.

TheBoiledEgg
02-16-2007, 02:44 AM
During the first day of the AO, there were 16 courts being used at the same time. There are no indoors facilities that I know of with that many tennis courts, and I'm not even sure that is physically possible.

only complex with a few courts is Moscow (6) and they could have space for a few more in the Olympic Arena. (they'd need to play 24/7 to get thru matches with so little courts.


then again they could always put up a Gi-normous Tent over Aus Open complex....... that'd make it indoors :lol:

sodman12
02-16-2007, 04:47 AM
I dont know about you guys but i think a nice hardwood surface would be nice.

neeob
02-16-2007, 06:44 AM
There should be a Grand Slam on Water.

http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=-8183380788103127428

The_Nadal_effect
02-16-2007, 07:17 AM
The Rebound Ace courts of the AO are made from old recycled tires. So the court is rubbery, bounces much higher than the USO, and is significantly slower. For all intents and purposes, they play very differently. You can see it while watching the tennis. Kick serves are quite effective at the AO, it's harder to serve-volley there, etc. the USO is a very fast hartcourt with a pretty low bounce.

So technically they are both "hard court," I don't think they could really get much more different.

Thanks.
That's just the kind of clarification I was looking for. Are you a pro?

johnnylad
02-16-2007, 09:37 AM
Grand slam on an indoor shagpile carpet!

Ferrero Forever
02-16-2007, 09:51 AM
The Aus Open really should be played indoors. I know it's totally different indoors, but either move the Aus Open to a different season (and even then there's no guarantee that it will be much cooler, because Melbourne can have all the elements in one day, and I love it in Janurary coz I'm off school) or either make it indoors because making the players compete in 40 degree temperatures is awful. And that extreme heat rule is awful, because its a waste of money for the fans, and it would stuff the players around heaps, as well as the fact that if players begin their match they must continue it, which leaves most players to finish their match in extreme heat. The outside courts really can't be helped, and it would be stupid to have the 2 main courts indoor and the others outdoor, but man it gets so damn hot. Anyway theres really nothing that can be done, so no point complaining about it, the tournament rocks so we can all put up with the heat.

madmanfool
02-16-2007, 10:13 AM
Thanks.
That's just the kind of clarification I was looking for. Are you a pro?

lol, it's called common knowledge, everyone who knows a bit of tennis knows that.:rolleyes:

Corswandt
02-16-2007, 01:18 PM
What is not physically possible?

Davydenko winning Wimbledon.

The_Nadal_effect
02-16-2007, 01:39 PM
lol, it's called common knowledge, everyone who knows a bit of tennis knows that.:rolleyes:
Hi
Oops...I'm really dubious :confused: about the technical bits of tennis. Thanks. Anyway, I was thanking Deb! Are MadMan fool and Deb the same user:confused: :D

madmanfool
02-16-2007, 02:20 PM
Hi
Are MadMan fool and Deb the same user:confused: :D

Off course not

The_Nadal_effect
02-17-2007, 07:24 AM
Off course not

NOW, I'm sure they are. Dont worry...wont tell;)

DrJules
02-17-2007, 07:50 AM
Playing so many major matches at the Australian Open indoors at times makes it appear a semi-indoor event.

In many ways ideally you want an indoor grand slam, a clay court grand slam, a grass court grand slam and hard court grand slam. That would test provide the most diverse test for players encompassing all the surfaces and conditions. Currently players strongest indoors do not have a grand slam level event.

BlakeorHenman
02-17-2007, 03:44 PM
I dont know about you guys but i think a nice hardwood surface would be nice.

Carpet is used indoors, and you can't have an indoors Grand Slam for obvious reasons.

true, never thought about that for some reason

BigAlbinoDonky
02-17-2007, 08:43 PM
Yeah there should definately be a Grand Slam played on a surface of dog crap. Oh wait, we already have the French.

The Freak
02-18-2007, 01:28 AM
Indoor ice courts for the AO.

The_Nadal_effect
02-19-2007, 07:02 AM
In many ways ideally you want an indoor grand slam, a clay court grand slam, a grass court grand slam and hard court grand slam. That would test provide the most diverse test for players encompassing all the surfaces and conditions. Currently players strongest indoors do not have a grand slam level event.

Even if there were an indoor hardcourt grandslam, it would not be any different from the outdoor hardcourt grand slam, surface wise.

I would have expected one hard court, one clay, one grass, and one carpet.
But the reason they have two hard courts, I presume is that carpet like clay is slow surface. Besides US and AO are different in pace and bounce.

:)
Tennis on ice:rolleyes: ! Can't imagine RAfa skating any more than he already is.:wavey:

refero*fervens
02-19-2007, 07:46 AM
Carpet is fast ;)

The_Nadal_effect
02-19-2007, 01:32 PM
Carpet is fast ;)

:kiss: Thanks. If it is fast, then what's preventing the ATP board from converting either US or AO into carpet?:confused: :confused:

refero*fervens
02-20-2007, 05:18 AM
:kiss: Thanks. If it is fast, then what's preventing the ATP board from converting either US or AO into carpet?:confused: :confused:

I think it was mentioned, but carpet is an indoors surface, and it would be difficult to hold an indoors Grand Slam - think of such a complex! :D Ideally you would want to hold the Slams on diverse surfaces, but at the moment the AO and USO are pretty much adequately differentiated though both are 'hardcourt', through bounce, speed, etc. Two hardcourts atm are fairer than two of anything else.

Here's something you might be interested in:

The worlds major tennis tournaments are timed according to the weather conditions throughout the year. Tennis is a summer game. Play starts in the dry Australian and Asian summer in January, later it moves to Europe and America as spring and summer approaches in the north.

There are four different surfaces that tennis can be played on: grass, clay, ‘hard’ and carpet. These vary the game of tennis, and respond to the weather in different ways. Carpet is only used undercover and ‘hard’ surfaces can normally be wiped down and then blown dry quite quickly. However clay can take only a certain amount of rain before it becomes heavy and play begins to slow down. Then covers must be drawn over the court if the rain looks like it is going to be heavy. .

Grass is the most sensitive of all playing surfaces to the weather. Even a fine drizzle makes a grass court slippery and dangerous. Playing on wet grass would also damage the surface too. The weather or atmosphere influences a grass court even on days when it does not actually rain. A generally damp, overcast or humid day would mean the grass is slightly damper. All surfaces get slower as they get wetter. Wet grass means the ball also has less bounce, even slightly less bounce would mean more tiring bending of the knees.

and the rest of the link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/features/sport_leisure/tennis.shtml

:wavey:

Hope I helped somewhat!