Useless Marat loses again [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Useless Marat loses again

Vass
03-27-2004, 06:56 PM
No exuses. 7-6 6-7 6-4 Spadea. Congrats! :wavey: :wavey: :) :) :worship: :worship:

Tennis Fool
03-27-2004, 06:58 PM
Yeah, that sucks. Especially after pulling out that 2nd tiebreak. He had 10 more winners but self-destructed on his serve. Well, he didn't do anything last year either.

On to the clay season :)

joeb_uk
03-27-2004, 07:10 PM
i dont know if this right, but i think his AO open final may be a one off for this year. somehow i dont see him going that deep in another slam this year

the cat
03-27-2004, 07:15 PM
Marat needs to improve his ranking. And he needs to play some smaller tournaments so he can get on a roll again. Safin really needs to hold a singles title trophy over his head again. If Marat can win an ATP title before Roland Garros his confidence will grow.

As long as Safin stays healthy he is dangerous. But his inability to keep his good Australian Open form is dissapointing. :(

Bubble
03-27-2004, 07:30 PM
Boils down to one issue... he needs a proper coach... period

:mad: :fiery: :mad:

TheBoiledEgg
03-27-2004, 07:48 PM
improving your rank only happens if you beat journeymen pros like Spadea.

Marat :mad: :rolleyes:
he just cant get it together in tour events.

5 set tennis in slams gives him time to mess about and win.
and here it doesnt.

Marat has to focus and squash these players in 2 sets, but he always makes life harder than it should.

"Why win in 1 hour when i can lose in 3" ??? :mad:

TennisLurker
03-27-2004, 08:05 PM
Spadea news!!!

"He just said on TV that he knew these courts so he knew which way the wind would swirl on important shots and then gave one of those mysterious Spadea smiles!"

VINCE ROCKS!!!

I wish I could rap and be mysterious like him.

COMA
03-27-2004, 08:05 PM
Marat :sad:
WTF was that ??

Fedex
03-27-2004, 08:10 PM
This is just pathetic, Marat :rolleyes: Will you ever get back youre good Aus Open Form????

Kiara
03-27-2004, 08:13 PM
Spadea news!!!

"He just said on TV that he knew these courts so he knew which way the wind would swirl on important shots and then gave one of those mysterious Spadea smiles!"


:lol: I hope that bit of insider info takes him deep into the tournamet :D

Kiara
03-27-2004, 08:24 PM
improving your rank only happens if you beat journeymen pros like Spadea.

Marat :mad: :rolleyes:
he just cant get it together in tour events.

5 set tennis in slams gives him time to mess about and win.
and here it doesnt.

Marat has to focus and squash these players in 2 sets, but he always makes life harder than it should.

"Why win in 1 hour when i can lose in 3" ??? :mad:

I agree, the only best of 3 set matches he's won this year (2) have been against qualifiers, best of 5 give him time to recover from his brain cramps after he loses a set or a tb or whatever. Maybe AO was just a lucky break... :(

whatever it is he needs to get over it cos he needs to defend his points in Barcelona, the Estoril Open is next for him lets just hope he remembers how to play on clay :(

Havok
03-27-2004, 08:38 PM
dare i take joy in this Marta loss??:scared: nah! come on Safin, you're better than this. do better on clay now:D

Iza
03-27-2004, 09:03 PM
Naldo, you're touching! :rolleyes:
Marat is playing BADLY!!!!!!!! I hope it won't be another horrifying season for him!

Havok
03-27-2004, 09:16 PM
Naldo, you're touching! :rolleyes:
Marat is playing BADLY!!!!!!!! I hope it won't be another horrifying season for him!
I actually like Safin's style of play :scared: i was just poking fun at some people here who take pride and joy out of Roddick's loses:o i actualy want Safin to do good, believe it or not:retard:

jrm
03-27-2004, 09:24 PM
Please, give VINCE some credit! Just because Marat lost doesn't mean Vince didn't play good! He beat Roddick this year and finally won a singles tournament!

J. Corwin
03-27-2004, 09:30 PM
too bad for Marat...not too shocking tho

MisterQ
03-27-2004, 09:36 PM
*
V. SPADEA/M. Safin
7-6, 6-7, 6-4

An interview with:

VINCENT SPADEA

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Vince, obviously you had a game plan today and it seemed like you really...

VINCENT SPADEA: I did (smiling)?

Q. You tell me. Did you?

VINCENT SPADEA: Well, yeah, obviously I had a game plan. Every time I go out to play, I have a game plan. This one just had to be a little bit more specific. I tried to execute it as well as possible because I was playing a player who has a lot of weapons and he has a lot of raw power that he doesn't allow you to make a lot of errors or leave room for error in your game plan.

I just wanted to make sure I served well, kept the ball deep even though the wind was real tricky out there. I was trying to keep some balls to his forehand so at least, you know, he won't get grooved on his backhand because he has that screaming-down-the-line backhand and that can really hurt you and put you on the run.

Obviously, his serve is a huge weapon.

So my return, I just wanted to try to stay aggressive on, at least show him that I wasn't afraid of it.

Q. Can you just talk about what it means to beat him here. He's been off to a really good start this year, too. Just also with the Davis Cup situation up in the air, just all those things together, what a win like that at this time means to you.

VINCENT SPADEA: Well, it's just a great win, because, you know, I was up a set and I was up a break, and, you know, he's a champion. He's not a player who gives you a lot of room. I kind of gave him some room to breathe. I was even up in the tiebreaker a little bit, and kind of I thought I was a little too aggressive, which is not a bad thing. So that kept me positive for the third set.

And to pull it out when he was serving that well, it looked like it was gonna be another tiebreaker if I could have kept holding serve because he was just starting to ace me and really step up his service games.

But coming off a tough, long match with James Blake and, you know, having a day to rest and then coming back for a good win like this is just great timing after the momentum I had from Scottsdale and just overall how my year's starting to evolve a little bit.

But Davis Cup time is coming up, like you said. That just puts my name more in the open to be chosen or just to see what the captain, you know, has in mind.

But at least I know confidently that, you know, I'm doing my best for myself, and at the same time, if I was to represent my country, I would, you know, prove worthy with the results that I'm having right now.

Q. Let's talk about that momentum for a second. You seem to be a player that thrives more on momentum than other players. How does it feel in your body right now, when you get in tight situations? Do you feel more loose?

VINCENT SPADEA: Yeah, you feel more loose. You feel like there's -- there's like a necessary way to win, and even though you might feel nervous, you might feel like maybe playing tentative, you know, like, the game theory is to hit the ball aggressively, use the weapons that, you know, you've been working on, and to -- and just to go out and do that instead of hoping or playing not to lose, which are natural things that come into your mind right away.

So basically, you know, the win in Scottsdale, you know, derived from something like that, where I knew that in crunch time if I wasn't aggressive, if I wasn't going for the shots that I know I have, then I probably would have lost there. That kind of carries over into more wins when you have that mentality in tight situations especially.

Q. And was the Blake match good practice? Did you find yourself almost in the exact situation today?

VINCENT SPADEA: The Blake match is just very strange. He was up. We had a long tiebreaker, we had a long rain delay. It was a crazy wind. I mean, very abnormal even for Key Biscayne.

It was just a real kind of ugly tennis, I thought, for like a little -- for just at least a set or so.

And, you know, I found myself down a set and he was serving for the match. So it was kind of one of those things where I kind of escaped, you know, dodged a bullet there.

But, you know, I have to give myself credit for not giving up in the last couple points and yet, you know, he was ready to outplay me throughout the match until that happened.

So, you know, basically I'm happy that I got through that. It made me tougher for matches like this, you know. At least gave me tiebreaker practice.

Q. How about overcoming that overrule on matchpoint? Even Marat said it was clearly in.

VINCENT SPADEA: Is that what he said?

Q. Yeah. Is that mental toughness?

VINCENT SPADEA: Yeah, it's that inner confidence, just that underlying feeling that, you know, I'm not going to worry about putting the blame on somebody else if I lose this match. I'm going to go out swinging. I thought he had a bad call, you know, against him earlier in the match. Things like that.

So if you're going to be fair to yourself and fair to the match, you know, you sort of -- I mean, even if that was an unfair call and it was a pretty tight situation. But I got over it. I probably would have said something to him afterwards if I had lost the match, you know, probably just to be a little bit more selective of when he overrules. Because even though I did win the match, that probably still wasn't necessary to overrule on the far sideline, especially when the -- I told him, a lot of umpires themselves, the wind is interchanging so much. It can go from being one gust in one direction to the next. The ball is really not just in or out until it's actually landed, contacted the surface. It can give you a different illusion.

Q. Win or lose, you never seem to have any easy matches. Why is that? What do you make of that?

VINCENT SPADEA: Well, I don't know. I just feel like, you know, I got to play better after I win the first set. I have to improve more things.

But, I mean, I've won, you know, several matches this year straight sets. You know, my first two matches in Scottsdale I won pretty convincingly in straight sets. My first -- I beat Saretta last week 6-3, 6-2. I beat a couple guys in Auckland, New Zealand. I beat one guy 6-1, 6-2.

I don't know how factual that is. But I think if you look at some great champions, you find more than 50 percent of their matches are probably won in three sets. It's actually a good sign that I'm coming through when I really need it. It's like not everyone's just like, you know, Serena Williams (laughter).

Q. Have you talked to Patrick at all?

VINCENT SPADEA: I haven't seen him. I talked to him in Indian Wells for a second. Just friendliness. Nothing specifically in that direction.

You know, I don't know how to address that subject, you know. There's been times, a couple -- I think at least two times where I was ranked in position to be selected, and this is going way back, before Patrick was even captain, so the process of selection is not directly, you know, towards the rankings or towards just some technical factor.

I think the Olympics and there's a World Team Cup tournament, they do do that. So most likely, I have a good chance of being on those teams. And this one is just a little bit more of a feel thing, which is, you know, in their own right.

Q. Are the Olympics in your mind at all when you're thinking about ranking? Would that be a possibility? It would go by ranking. It wouldn't be Patrick's decision?

VINCENT SPADEA: I played in the Olympics in 2000. I think it would be a great opportunity if I could make the top four again. I would definitely go. The timing between the US Open and the Olympics I think is a little bit close, but regardless, I would have to look exactly at the weeks but I would be thrilled to go and do something like that. If I was gonna be selected ranking-wise.

Q. What would it mean to you to play Davis Cup?

VINCENT SPADEA: It would mean a lot. I never played a live rubber. I played a dead rubber in Spain. That was my only time, I was with John McEnroe. To play a live rubber and be a part of the team now would be a great thrill, because, you know, the team is kind of a new type of, you know, generation, and, you know, if I could somehow get into that, you know, mix, that would be -- it would show all the hard work that I've been doing to get back.

Q. The way things are going for you now, do you feel like you deserve to be on the Davis Cup team?

VINCENT SPADEA: You know, I've won two rounds here, you know. I haven't, you know, won Wimbledon or anything. I don't think there's an overwhelming fact that says I undoubtedly, you know, should be on it.

But at the same time, there aren't that many Wimbledon champions that are probably going to be selected. So that tells you that if I wasn't going to be, then I should or would have been as close as you could come.

But I feel like I deserve a chance, if it's not this tie, maybe I'll be ranked even higher for the next tie.

Q. How does this process affect, or does it, the relationship between maybe you and some of your peers or some of the people that would be...

VINCENT SPADEA: How does this what?

Q. Does it affect at all, I don't know how your relationships are with the other players, does it affect the guys that are close to being chosen, does this whole process...

VINCENT SPADEA: I don't think there's too much of a competitive feel there. There's no animosity or any kind of, you know, friction that, you know, we're worried about, you know, somebody getting snubbed and somebody just being named to the team.

Obviously, it's a great prestige and it's a great honor to play for your country so we're all trying to play our best.

I think the United States players now have a little bit better of a camaraderie than what it's been in the past. So it's good to see people are more encouraging. So if anything, it's much better and there wouldn't be any kind of issues with someone being selected or not.

Q. Today was a match where you had to be mentally tough from the start. You knew you couldn't lose your serve. You were. When you see him throwing a racquet, screaming, whatever, do you feel like, "I've got an edge now"?

VINCENT SPADEA: I mean, slightly. But he comes back and plays a solid point. There wasn't like there was that many holes to break open when he was doing it. It wasn't like it was at 40-love or I was up a break and he was starting to throw points away.

It's one thing if he starts to concede some points. I think he did it once the whole match. But for me to go out for two hours and 45 minutes and lose serve once and to play at a high level in that capacity of, you know, there's a big crowd and a lot of, you know -- it's an important match for me. Obviously, he didn't look like he was trying to lose. So it was a good situation for me to be right there, even winning or losing.

Q. What do you see as the advantages and disadvantages of playing without a coach like Federer is, and have you ever gone without a coach?

VINCENT SPADEA: That's just -- I don't think I've ever gone without a coach. I've always been with somebody at a tournament. I don't know exactly what the situation is. There might be somebody with him; I don't know if his girlfriend's his coach. I don't know if he's stated anything. Because she's a tennis player.

But, you know, obviously, whatever is working for him. You don't change a winning game at this point. He's played unbelievable tennis for the last year, and it seems like he's playing as good or better. It seems like his results get better.

So, you know, obviously, you don't want to, you know, change the offensive coordinator at that point.

Q. In general, for players, what would be the pluses and minuses of going without a coach?

VINCENT SPADEA: I think back in the old days, nobody had a coach. You had legends back then. So who's really to say what the right situation is? You know, it's not like it's a team sport where you have to direct, you know, several different people. So, you know, he's confident in what he's doing. He learned a lot from maybe his past coach. And maybe he's talking to somebody over the phone or, you know, whatever system he's working with.

But I think it's an advantage, whatever he's doing. I don't know if it's gonna turn out to be a trend at this point. Probably, you know, need some more convincing towards, you know, the rest of the fields.

But at this point, he's doing a good job to start one.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

MisterQ
03-27-2004, 09:36 PM
*
V. SPADEA/M. Safin
7-6, 6-7, 6-4

An interview with:

MARAT SAFIN

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Marat, please.

Q. Even if you lost today, did you play a pretty good match of tennis?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah, but I'm not satisfied definitely with my performance today. I should have won. Unfortunately, wasn't my day today. Luck wasn't on my side. I had chances; I couldn't take them.

So that's why Vince, he was all the match there, and he deserve to win.

Q. When you woke up in the morning and you saw such a strong wind, what was your first reaction?

MARAT SAFIN: No, it's the conditions that you have to accept. I mean, if you want to win. There might be a big change in the weather. Like it's not gonna be so windy for the rest of the week. Also the draw is different. Nalbandian, he withdraw.

So it's a little bit open. You have a lot of chances. This kind of matches, you just have to win no matter what, the way you play, even if you play bad.

Q. What did Vince do that really bothered you? It seemed like you were not passing him well at the net. Was that more you or him?

MARAT SAFIN: It's not like he was serve and volleying. He was just playing on the baseline, try to be solid. I couldn't take my chances. That's the problem. I had my chances in the first set on the tiebreak, a lot of breakpoints, and whenever he had the chance he took it so...

Q. Now that the match is over, the overrule on matchpoint, you're standing right over the ball. In or out?

MARAT SAFIN: It was in. But is the same way, it could be on his side and could be overrule. So it's nothing. I have to give him point. It could be other way around, right?

Q. You had a play on the ball as well?

MARAT SAFIN: Well, I'm not shouting at the umpires to say that the ball is out. I was playing and I was like, I was there. I didn't make anything just to show that the ball is out, so...

Q. When you get into a tight situation in the third set, because he had a three-setter already, does Vince have an advantage?

MARAT SAFIN: No, it has nothing to do. Is just the situation. It's who gonna take the first advantage, you know, the first two points of the game. And if it's 30-all, so of course I'm gonna be a little bit tight because it's like two points away from -- one point away from matchpoint and I can lose it. He knows this, he knows that it's like very important point. So you have to concentrate as maximum as you can. And with a little bit of luck, with a decision that you make, sometimes you have to go for it. He went for it, and he deserve it.

Q. Does Vince return your serve as well as any player?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah. But sometimes he was like -- a few games he was returning well and then sometimes he was trying to defense. So basically, it's okay. I mean, you can play with him. It's not like he making winners all over the court without giving you a chance and he doesn't put too much pressure on his serve.

On his second serve, yeah, but it also depends the way he serve, how short he can serve, and also with these conditions, for one side the ball is -- the wind is blowing. So it's gonna be -- the ball's gonna be shorter. And then he attacks.

But also he went to defense straightaway.

Q. Do you have any recommendations to Patrick McEnroe as to whether Vince should be playing Davis Cup?

MARAT SAFIN: He's old enough to decide by himself (laughter).

Q. What do you need to reach your best level?

MARAT SAFIN: A little bit of confidence, a little bit of luck. I take my chances that I didn't take the past four weeks. I had chances in all my matches, and I just couldn't take them. Something is missing. Maybe is a little bit of luck, maybe is a little bit of decision in my shots and be more aggressive or be more sure. Confidence.

Q. Your shots...?

MARAT SAFIN: The backhand is okay, forehand. But it also matters when I get to the point you have to make the shot, when you have to make down the line or when you have to make short cross-court, you need to have the confidence to do that shot.

Q. Do you think it also could just be the winning feeling, because you come into tournaments and have to play great players right away, so you have no time to build up?

MARAT SAFIN: Well, I cannot blame anybody to the draws they have. Of course I don't have the best draws of my life, but this is the situation. But also it happens to them. I don't think they would really like to play against me. But somehow they are beating me. So we are both in the same situation.

Q. You're playing doubles with Mark Philippoussis. How did that pairing come about? Have you ever played with him before?

MARAT SAFIN: I never played with him. I was looking for my partner because I was supposed to play with Nicolas Escude. He got injured. I was looking around for somebody who was gonna play doubles. He was looking also. So we decided to play, no.

Q. Do you play doubles more for practice, for fun?

MARAT SAFIN: It's kind of a practice. It's also -- it's more than practice. Of course if you win, it's more than a practice. But it's great. It feels great.

But mostly, it's because you can practice your volleying, you can improve serve, return, so just not to forget how to play tennis.

Q. So at one point you went to throw your racquet because you're angry, then you didn't. The next point, you said, "The heck with it," is that something you felt like you needed to do?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah... Just sometimes you need to do it because you cannot -- because you are boiling inside and you really feel that it would be maybe - I don't know, just improve something. Because you cannot, because you are making mistakes and have the mistakes and you are really trying your best and it's not working this way, your way.

So you cannot anymore. I couldn't. So that's why I had to throw the racquet. In a way, it helped me.

Q. You were down 3-0 in that second-set tiebreak. It seemed like...

MARAT SAFIN: No, I come back. I come back. But didn't do anything special for me.

Q. Was there anything that surprised you about his game since it's your first time playing him?

MARAT SAFIN: No, nothing surprised. I was expecting him to play this way, be solid from the baseline, aggressive on return, serve not bad but not really unbelievable so they cannot giving you any chance on his serve.

But he's very solid player. He has a lot of experience. He knows how to play. He knows where to be at the right moment, the right place, the decision he is making. He's a clever, clever player.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

*

Deboogle!.
03-27-2004, 09:58 PM
ok I really like what Vince has to say about Davis Cup... if he is picked to play I will be happy.

tangerine_dream
03-27-2004, 10:13 PM
:haha:

Tennis Fool
03-27-2004, 10:14 PM
Poor Marat. No bragging or funny stuff. Sounds sad. His confidence is shot.

Mr. Man
03-27-2004, 10:20 PM
:haha:
:haha: :haha:

TennisLurker
03-27-2004, 10:35 PM
[QUOTE=MisterQQ. Vince, obviously you had a game plan today and it seemed like you really...

VINCENT SPADEA: I did (smiling)?

[/QUOTE]

I bet that smile was RAHR! :cool:

WyveN
03-28-2004, 12:55 AM
Perhaps the AO result may hurt him in the long run. Marat may have thought he was further along to being back on top then he actually is and hence has not trained as hard post AO

heya
03-28-2004, 01:26 AM
At least this loss isn't as bad as the AO turdy mess/Scottsdale choke.

MisterQ
03-28-2004, 02:20 AM
hmmm, Nick Bolletieri's prediction was right on:

Men’s Matches

M. Safin vs. V. Spadea

This is a MUST see match. *Safin’s entire approach to the entire game has matured. *He plays very aggressive and often controls the center of the court. *Spadea goes up and down but he has finally accepted his ability to play the game. *His return of service and pounding groundstrokes make him very dangerous. *The Miami area will cheer for Vince to win this match. *Prediction – An upset, Spadea in three sets.

JeLuliA88
03-28-2004, 04:07 AM
I'm starting to think the aus open final was fluke... he just doesn't seem to be able to pull through in those close matches.

Deboogle!.
03-28-2004, 05:37 AM
I'm starting to think the aus open final was fluke... he just doesn't seem to be able to pull through in those close matches.


Hmmmm I disagree. I think he's still finding his way back... he's going through peaks and valleys along the way, the AO was a very high peak and he's in a bit of a valley. I think it's way too soon to say that he will stay in this slump for a very long time, considering it's really only been what? 6 weeks?

WyveN
03-28-2004, 05:41 AM
I think best of 5 sets suits Safin much more as he is always going to have a set here or there that he throws away, it hurts him far more in best of 3. Safin has made quite a few 2 sets to 1 down comebacks.

~EMiLiTA~
03-28-2004, 06:33 AM
Hmmmm I disagree. I think he's still finding his way back... he's going through peaks and valleys along the way, the AO was a very high peak and he's in a bit of a valley. I think it's way too soon to say that he will stay in this slump for a very long time, considering it's really only been what? 6 weeks?

I totally agree...I think it was because no one expected him to start 2004 off with such a bang and so suddenly everyone's expecting big things of him right from the start and that's just not possible at the moment. It will take ages for him to settle down into a proper rhythm...he'll have many ups and downs...let's just hope there are more ups than downs and that this crap phase he's going through at the moment doesn't last much longer!

silverwhite
03-28-2004, 06:41 AM
Q. What do you see as the advantages and disadvantages of playing without a coach like Federer is, and have you ever gone without a coach?

VINCENT SPADEA: That's just -- I don't think I've ever gone without a coach. I've always been with somebody at a tournament. I don't know exactly what the situation is. There might be somebody with him; I don't know if his girlfriend's his coach. I don't know if he's stated anything. Because she's a tennis player.

How many times do they have to ask this question? :rolleyes:

J. Corwin
03-28-2004, 09:53 AM
cool interviews...I need to check them out more often lol

Experimentee
03-28-2004, 04:01 PM
Too bad for Marat, he has so much talent but he didnt take his chances that time :sad:
Blake's loss to Spadea doesnt seem that bad now.

Leo
03-28-2004, 05:28 PM
Whate a shame.

Vince is playing like he wants to make Davis Cup badly. He may be the best bet to play #2 singles behind Roddick, considering how up and down all the young Americans are. You never know what you're going to get with them.

Deboogle!.
03-28-2004, 06:06 PM
He's not just playing like it, he's talking like it too. He's mentioned it in his press conferences... he's never played a live DC Rubber and wants to BADLY. I like pretty much all the young guys better than him, but it's just looking more and more like he really deserves the chance.

Leo
03-28-2004, 06:21 PM
Didn't he play a live Davis Cup match in 2000, losing to Ferrero in Spain on clay? Or maybe that was dead...

Kiara
03-28-2004, 06:30 PM
Didn't he play a live Davis Cup match in 2000, losing to Ferrero in Spain on clay? Or maybe that was dead...

lol that was DEAD ;) they were 0-5 to spain :o

Deboogle!.
03-28-2004, 06:33 PM
Didn't he play a live Davis Cup match in 2000, losing to Ferrero in Spain on clay? Or maybe that was dead...

yea he said in his press conference he's never played a live rubber and they asked Andy about him being on the team too and he also commented on the fact that he'd never played a live rubber, so yea must've been dead :)

Antwerpen
03-28-2004, 08:30 PM
Am I the only one that thinks he talks about "luck" too much in interviews.
It's almost like he depends more on having luck during a match than on his abilities to play tennis.
:( not a good sign at all
Come on Marat you have an amazing talent, don't waste it! Believe in yourself !

Aurora
03-28-2004, 09:02 PM
You're not the only one who thinks that Antwerpen, go check the Maratforum and you'll find all sort of whining about the luck-thing. Ugh!
Let's get burning on clay!

maratski
03-28-2004, 09:18 PM
I like the title of this thread. It's very appropriate! :(

There is no new, matured Marat. All I see is a guy who behaved well for three weeks and is back to his old self again. No proper coach and an attitude. He's very talented and knows it, but just doesn't seem to realise that you can't be great and dominate just on talent alone. I get the impression he comes on court and thinks:"I'm Marat Safin, one of the most talented players on tour, winner of the USO, blasted Pete of the court in no time, and will beat this opponent today like it's a piece of cake."
That's just a bunch of crap and without a game plan, good strategie and proper coach it won't happen. I know the confidence isn't entirely back yet, but I don't think it's that big of a factor right now.

Get that through your thick head Marat :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

By the way all credit to Vince and all the others who beat Marat lately cause they've all given him chances to beat them and he didn't take his chances.

Tennis Fool
03-28-2004, 09:51 PM
At the end of the year we will all be laughing at ourselves over these posts, better yet, we won't even remember them.

maratski
03-28-2004, 09:56 PM
I wish......

J. Corwin
03-28-2004, 10:17 PM
Oh I'll remember. ;)

Kiara
03-28-2004, 10:32 PM
he'll win the last slam of the year, and finish the year at number one and make us all eat our words ;)

Denise
03-29-2004, 03:02 AM
ohhhh Maratik!!! :sad: :sad:

yeah, Marat will gonna win the last slam, and finish the year as the number 1 and everyone who doubt he could get it, will eat alll the damm words, lol :D

jrm
03-29-2004, 01:49 PM
:help: to all Marat's delusional groupies