Wertheim [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Wertheim

R.Federer
01-30-2007, 08:01 PM
Instead of new threads for each of Wertheim's pearls of wisdom (Okay, admittedly we diss him but we also inevitably read him), this thread can be updated each time you want to post his stuff.

UPDATE AFTER AO 2007

Here are 50 Thoughts from the 2007 Australian Open, trying to incorporate as many of your questions as possible.

1. Roger Federer -- no surprise -- did virtually everything right winning the men's title without surrendering a set. But what impressed me most was his defense. Time and again, he kept points alive with unbelievable scrambles and shots that neutralized power. Two balls later, he was suddenly controlling the point. Yes, it's early, but this sure bodes well for clay.

2. Just as we all prophesized, Serena Williams won the women's title, beating top seed Maria Sharapova 6-1, 6-2 in a final that somehow managed to be more lopsided than the score indicated. It was so predictable that Serena would resurrect her career (and beat five seeds) -- that only a fool would have dismissed her chances coming in. :lol: (At least he can laugh at himself)


3. Quite a tournament for Fernando Gonzalez, who's Gonzo no more, having harnessed his forehand and dialed back his go-for-broke style. What a performance beating Lleyton Hewitt, James Blake, Rafael Nadal and Tommy Haas and then giving Federer a respectable fight in the final. And if you can YouTube his runner-up speech, do so.


4. When Sharapova lost that heartbreaker to Serena here in 2005, she went on to win her next event. Be interesting to see how long Saturday's "statement match" sticks with her.

5. So I guess we know how much stock to put in that Kooyong final. (Andy Roddick, of course, beat Federer.) On the other hand, it's worth pointing out that all four semifinalists played the Kooyong; so at least it's a worthwhile tune-up.

6. The men's semifinal matches -- Federer/Roddick and Gonzalez/Haas -- were two of the most lopsided matches you'll ever see. And yet because the winner was deeply embedded in "the zone," both matches were thoroughly entertaining. Gonzalez winner-to-error ratio against Haas? 42 to 3.

7. The Bryan Brothers, Mike and Bob, took the men's doubles title beating Jonas Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi in the final. Because the preceding women's singles final was over so quickly, the house was packed.

8. Cara Black and new partner Liezel Huber won the doubles title. The real story of the draw, though, was the losing finalists Yung-Jan Chan and Chia-Jung Chuang -- total unknown wild cards from Chinese Tapei, whose victories included a rout of Zi Yan and Jie Zheng, the second seeds. Still more convincing evidence of the Asian tennis boom.

9. This is what's known in the business as a money quote. Asked about her fitness level following her title, a giddy Serena Williams responded: "I'm definitely in better shape than I get credit for. Just because I have large bosoms and I have a big ass. I swear my waist is 29-30 inches. I swear I have the smallest waist. And just because I have those two 'assets' it looks like I'm not fit. I was just in the locker room staring at my body and I'm like, 'Am I not fit? Am I really not fit? Or is it just because I have all these extra assets that I look not fit.' I think if I were not to eat for two years I still wouldn't be a size 2. No matter how slim I am, I always have this [points] and that [points]. We're living in a Mary-Kate Olsen world. I'm just not built that way. I'm bootylicious and that's how it's always going to be."

10. In the girls' draw, Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia needed a pair of tiebreakers but beat American Madison Brengle in the finals. And amid all the doomsaying about the future of Australian Tennis, an unseeded local, Brydan Klein beat Jonathan Eysseric of France to win the boys event. (Plus, keep an eye on young Aussie Bernard Tomic.)

11. Interesting to see where Martina Hingis goes from here. Another respectable, but ultimately disappointing tournament. It's basically 2001 all over again. Hingis is a joy to behold but simply too power-deficient to compete with the top four. One point augurs well for her soldiering on: her fiancée, Radek Stepanek, is a tennis player too, so it's not as though she's leaving her love at home while she goes to Doha and Montreal.

12. Replay technology and line-call challenges continued its successful run in Australia. It has become a ritual that players look to their box before deciding to issue a challenge. Clearly this is a form of coaching. My take is that it's a) impossible to police and b) relatively circumscribed, so accept it.

13. Nikolay Davydenko spent his off-season on a honeymoon that included daily practices and tournament play. Does his new wife like tennis? "No. But she loves me." And here's the D-man on his apparel endorsement with the French brand Aimess. "Happy, yeah. I get clothes for free for three years. Yeah, happy." We're saving the all-Davydenko mailbag for Sweeps Week. But you can start sending questions now.

14. Losing semifinalist Nicole Vaidisova has tons of power ... and when she planes some of her rough edges, she will win big prizes. But her habit of looking at her box after every point is really detrimental. It radiates insecurity. If I'm on the other side of the net, I'm thinking, "This girl is meat."

15. Speaking of which, at the risk of triggering the wrath of the camp, for the life of me I can't figure out why Sharapova continues to let pops conduct his illegal coaching. (She was fined for coaching yet again this tournament, in what the papers called a "Yuri Fury.") Let's leave aside the moral issues and just look at this with a cold, rational eye. Particularly for a player whose image is worth so much, why continue a practice that undercuts your reputation of fairness and honesty?

16. Serena Williams went overboard with talk of the "haters." You're a transcendent star, a seven-time Grand Slam champ and your ranking slides outside the top 100? You leave yourself open to speculation (criticism, even) about your future, no matter who you are or how extenuating the circumstances. Sorry, dem's the rules. But even her harshest critics have to concede this: she is an exceptionally fair player on the court. No illegal coaching, no fake injuries, no tirades about line calls. This point doesn't get made often enough.

17. Nice-win tournament for Mardy Fish, whose road to the quarters was paved once he took out fourth-seed Ivan Ljubicic in Round 1. Note, however, that Ljubicic has entered 30 career Slams and lost in the first or second round of a major 24 times.

18. Andy Roddick loses six games in a quarterfinal against Mardy Fish. Roddick then wins just six games in his semifinal against Federer. Anyone else suspect that Fish is quietly thinking, "Whew. There but for the grace of G-d go I?"

19. Until Nadia Petrova can convert games like the stinker she played at 6-1, 5-3 against Serena Williams, she will be a Grand Slam also-ran. Astute reader Anna of Springfield noted that Petrova and Kim Clijsters -- both exceptional athletes with unexceptional mettle -- were born a year apart on the same date. Hmmmm.

20. The Abe Simpson rant of the tournament goes to Marat Safin. Continuing his weird (and seemingly one-sided) beef with Roddick, Safin remarked: "He comes with the shoes that aren't even tennis shoes, and he's telling me and I'm professional and I know when it's wet and when it's not wet, and he's telling me it's not wet." Riiight.

21. Australia doesn't really do political correctness. Clijsters rhapsodized about her future as a homemaker, a pair of fans hoisted a banner reading: "Our dishes are dirty too, Kim."

22. Poor Camille (Head of a) Pin. The French journeywoman lost, of course, to top-seeded Sharapova in that 9-7 first-round thriller. Then she drew top seeds Lisa Raymond and Sam Stosur in doubles.

23. Word on the street is that Guillermo Canas wasn't here because his coach forgot to send the entry form. If you stand to back a player coming off a doping suspension, place your bets now on Canas doing well at the French Open.

24. A Page Six-style blind item: Which top player has become so difficult and inaccessible that he allegedly turned down media requests with his own website?

25. One player whose stock has a 'buy" rating: Andy Murray. His five-set battle against Rafael Nadal may well have the match of the tournament. Don't be surprised if Murray is a top-eight seed by Wimbledon. We all know what that means.

26. Jim Courier was excellent as the courtside interviewer. But next time he'll think twice about letting Roddick take the mic and ask questions. After destroying Mardy Fish, Roddick asked Courier: "You're in your mid-30s and aren't married. Do you have commitment issues?"

27. From the coaching carousel: Shahar Peer is working with Jose Higueras. Vania King is with Ray Raffels. Alicia Molik is now with Paul Kilderry, a former doubles specialist (and Pat Rafter mate), who often served as an Australian hitting partner for Serena and Venus Williams. Nicole Bradtke (sister-in-law of Todd Wodbridge and wife of a former NBA player, Mark Bradtke) will coach Sam Stosur. Meanwhile. Mark Merklein, a veteran doubles player known for his fitness, has joined James Blake's team in a trainer/nutritionist role.

28. In the men's draw, six of the eight "round of 16" matches went by the seeding. The only non-seed to make it? Mardy Fish.

29. We hear Marcelo Rios took a wild card in the Vine del Mar tournament this week. Wonder how he felt watching Larry Stefanki (his former coach) help guide his countryman, Gonzalez, to the final.

30. Here's the Sydney Morning Herald's Richard Hinds: "There was more chance President Hilary Clinton would put her husband in charge of the White House intern program than there was of an Australian winning the title." Another Hinds gem: "Assessing Nadal's chances against Federer based on [his first match against Robert Kendrick] is like rating your chances of chatting up Cate Blanchett based on some success with Paris Hilton."

31. One of the sadder sights: Juan Carlos Ferrero, a Grand Slam champ not that long ago, practicing alone and in total anonymity on a back court. Like Paris Hilton's virginity, you fear this guy's mojo is lost, never to be reclaimed. (Take that, Richard Hinds!)

32. Mas Spaniards. I've lifted the seat cushions and checked the basement and haven't found the skeptics who begrudged Tommy Robredo his place at the Shanghai Masters. The Barcelona Bull did himself proud here, reaching the quarters and doing a fine job frustrating Federer.

33. Have we made adequate note of the fact that Brad Gilbert's three charges have been named Andre, Andy and Andy?

34. Confirming speculation, Justine Henin-Hardenne announced that she was splitting from her husband. One of her first moves was to remove the "Hardenne" from her website domain name.

35. Former Illinois tennis coach, Craig Tiley, is now the Australian Open tournament director. He hosted a barbecue for former players who were in the draw: Amer Delic, qualifier Brian Wilson, and Indiana's own Rajeev Ram.

36. Bad luck for Joachim "JoJo" Johansson (the rare Charlotte Simmons reference), who finally recovered from his shoulder injury only to be struck by a nasty case of blisters, forcing him to retire two games into his first match. That's an awfully long trip to make for six minutes of tennis.

37. In keeping with the camp's M.O., Roger Rasheed was something other than a public figure when he coached Hewitt for three years. But after splitting with Hewitt earlier this month, Rasheed served as a capable foil for Jim Courier, doing commentary on Channel Seven.

38. Hewitt's coach during the tournament, Scott Draper, is forgoing a full-time job with Hewitt to try his hand as a professional golfer.

39. Did we hear correctly? Todd Woodbridge is going to be a future contestant on "Dancing With the Stars" later this spring? Can one of our Aussie readers please YouTube this and send the link?

40. Oops, we forgot mixed doubles. Daniel Nestor and Elena Likhovtseva beat Max Mirnyi and Vic Azarenka in the final.

41. Comings and goings: Jane Brown Grimes has officially begun her two-year term as USTA Chairwoman of the Board and President this week and will serve in this capacity through 2008. She becomes the second female chair in the USTA's 126-year history. Meanwhile, sadly, Andrew Rigby -- who merits a lot of credit for the excellent Davis Cup website -- is leaving the ITF. And Benito Perez Barbadillo, who did wonders for Nadal's popularity is leaving the ATP to work for Raffa privately.

42. This marks the one-year anniversary of Nicolas Kiefer chucking his racket across the net during a point and then refusing to fess up, one of the most flagrant acts of poor sportsmanship I can recall witnessing. Kiefer wasn't in Australia, still recovering from a wrist injury that's been bothering him since the French Open. Is karma a bitch or what?

43. Congrats to Danai Udomchoke of Thailand, a first-team all-name player, who beat Ferrero and has taken his country's baton (the Thai stick, as it were) while Paradorn Srichaphan rehabs his wrist. While we're at it, we'd like to take this opportunity to add Djambuli Chakvetadze (Anna's dad) to our list of favorite tennis names.

44. Lost in the mist: Our favorite prospect Juan del Potro had Fernando Gonzalez up 2 sets to 1 before wilting in the heat. Watch for him once clay court season rolls around. Speaking of Argentines, keep an eye on Willie Canas, who's been tearing it up since his doping suspension ended.

45. We'll say it again: one of the great treats of traveling internationally is catching that wacky Richard Quest on CNN International. In one segment, he's talking to a Syrian ambassador. In the next, he's dancing with Twyla Tharp.

46. A tip of the cap to Tretorn for the establishment of a premier series of 22 ATP Challenger Series tournaments. The agreement makes Tretorn the umbrella sponsor of the elite series, and designates Tretorn as the Official Ball of the ATP Challenger Series worldwide.

47. Overheard in the press room. Reporter A: "Anna looked good the last time I saw her." Reporter B: "Chakvetadze or Ivanovic?" Reporter A: "Kournikova. I guess we need to use her last name now."

48. Fernando Gonzalez has an endorsement portfolio that includes avocados. His recipe for an avocado smoothie: half a cup of yogurt, half a cup of milk, half a cup of mango, half an avocado. Add ice and throw in a blender. (And here we thought his ground strokes were a hit-or-miss proposition.)

49. We say it, as we do every year here: we miss Ted Robinson.

50. And we say this every year, too: if there is a more spirited, affordable, fan-friendly, unpretentious sporting event than the Australian Open, it's eluded us.

Have a great week everyone. Oh, one more thing: in no small part because of your persistence, "Tennis" will soon escape the "more sports" ghetto of SI.com and return to the main menu bar. We'll post a regular mailbag next week.

bluefork
01-30-2007, 08:16 PM
Wertheim may say some stupid things, but sometimes I think poster on MTF are a little too hard on him. Obviously it's hard to predict what will happen in tennis, and no one is going to agree on things completely. But he's usually fairly balanced and reasonable in his writing. He's certainly better than guys like Peter Bodo and Matt Cronin.

tennis2tennis
01-30-2007, 08:57 PM
30. Here's the Sydney Morning Herald's Richard Hinds: "There was more chance President Hilary Clinton would put her husband in charge of the White House intern program than there was of an Australian winning the title." Another Hinds gem: "Assessing Nadal's chances against Federer based on [his first match against Robert Kendrick] is like rating your chances of chatting up Cate Blanchett based on some success with Paris Hilton.".

:lol:

MarieS
01-30-2007, 09:02 PM
20. The Abe Simpson rant of the tournament goes to Marat Safin. Continuing his weird (and seemingly one-sided) beef with Roddick, Safin remarked: "He comes with the shoes that aren't even tennis shoes, and he's telling me and I'm professional and I know when it's wet and when it's not wet, and he's telling me it's not wet." Riiight.
:retard:

Deboogle!.
01-30-2007, 09:22 PM
:retard:Not only :retard: but it's incorrect "reporting" - Marat said that about a tournament official, not Andy. But the way Wertheim wrote that one makes it seem like Marat was carrying on against Andy (who backed Marat up in his press conference anyway :lol: ). That's just irresponsible of Wertheim.

Seraphim
01-30-2007, 10:35 PM
18. Andy Roddick loses six games in a quarterfinal against Mardy Fish. Roddick then wins just six games in his semifinal against Federer. Anyone else suspect that Fish is quietly thinking, "Whew. There but for the grace of G-d go I?"

LMAO

MarieS
01-31-2007, 12:00 AM
Not only :retard: but it's incorrect "reporting" - Marat said that about a tournament official, not Andy. But the way Wertheim wrote that one makes it seem like Marat was carrying on against Andy (who backed Marat up in his press conference anyway :lol: ). That's just irresponsible of Wertheim.

I know. It's embarrassing because it looks like he didn't even watch the match :o.

Tennis Fool
01-31-2007, 12:26 AM
Wertheim may say some stupid things, but sometimes I think poster on MTF are a little too hard on him.

Who aren't the MTF hard against? :confused:

Tennis Fool
01-31-2007, 12:29 AM
I know. It's embarrassing because it looks like he didn't even watch the match :o.

Obviously he didn't :p

But this W's blog, not a news article. He's entitled to make mistakes here, and I bet half of MTF has already sent email correcting him.

Sunset of Age
01-31-2007, 12:29 AM
31. One of the sadder sights: Juan Carlos Ferrero, a Grand Slam champ not that long ago, practicing alone and in total anonymity on a back court. Like Paris Hilton's virginity, you fear this guy's mojo is lost, never to be reclaimed. (Take that, Richard Hinds!)


:sad: :sad: :sad:

Tennis Fool
01-31-2007, 12:31 AM
LMAO

Fish would've probaby been a better opponent.

Shabazza
01-31-2007, 12:38 AM
A good read apart from the Marat missquote.

artlinkletter
01-31-2007, 12:42 AM
:retard:

I wanted to e-mail him about this yesterday but I have no clue what his e-mail was and couldn't find it. It was a stupid mistake on his part. But I'm sure the people who read his column are pretty avid tennis fans, and would know that Marat didn't say that towards Andy.

R.Federer
01-31-2007, 12:42 AM
Who aren't the MTF hard against? :confused:

That made me laugh
People here are truly hard on every player. And these guys are mostly the best ones at their profession. While we asses are nowhere near the top in our professions (or we would not have all day to post on this board), but find time to nitpick each and every loss and laugh at them. We SUCK!

Too funny :rolls:

shotgun
01-31-2007, 01:01 AM
Instead of new threads for each of Wertheim's pearls of wisdom (Okay, admittedly we diss him but we also inevitably read him), this thread can be updated each time you want to post his stuff.

Good initiative. :yeah:

I could merge the older threads into this one too...

Deboogle!.
01-31-2007, 02:13 AM
I wanted to e-mail him about this yesterday but I have no clue what his e-mail was and couldn't find it. It was a stupid mistake on his part. But I'm sure the people who read his column are pretty avid tennis fans, and would know that Marat didn't say that towards Andy.But we need to take advantage of every chance to bag on Wertheim that we can get :p

kittens25
01-31-2007, 08:11 AM
19. Until Nadia Petrova can convert games like the stinker she played at 6-1, 5-3 against Serena Williams, she will be a Grand Slam also-ran. Astute reader Anna of Springfield noted that Petrova and Kim Clijsters -- both exceptional athletes with unexceptional mettle -- were born a year apart on the same date. Hmmmm.

This was my favorite one. Petrova should not be let off the hook for yet another mental collapse in a big slam match. Clijsters also showed why she has only won 1 slam despite 5 finals and 12 semis with how she showed up for the Sharapova match despite her great form leading into the event and before the event. Unexceptional mettle is a perfect description of both.

almouchie
01-31-2007, 10:29 AM
Wertheim may say some stupid things, but sometimes I think poster on MTF are a little too hard on him. Obviously it's hard to predict what will happen in tennis, and no one is going to agree on things completely. But he's usually fairly balanced and reasonable in his writing. He's certainly better than guys like Peter Bodo and Matt Cronin.

i actually like cnn's Peter Bodo and Matt Cronin.
but W just comes out with some unexpected comments

almouchie
01-31-2007, 10:54 AM
9. Serena's commment is probably the most honest/blunt comment at the open. many thought she was overweight/ a bit fat, but in the end we know who won that argument.

10. Two years ago this kid (Aussie Bernard Tomic) was talked of in the same bredth as a junior Sampras (in age). a lot is expected of him, hope that doesnt stifle him.

14. Nicole Vaidisova : a future Grand slam winner

15. Sharapova is neither is neither fairness nor honest. i remember clearly a match last year when the return of serve hit her racket & was called long. she didnt even admit it, on replays it was clear it hit her racket.

19. Nadia Petrova (& dementieva) among best (esetablished) players not to have won a grand slam, can they still? if Mauresmo can then...

20. simply Marat Safin

21. Guess who is still bitter about the breakup with lleyton

23. Canas on clay, terrific

24. could this be lleyton?

26. rumours has it he is gay, not totally surprising

31. JCF, i thought he was the spainard who would translate his play/success in other than clays RG win

34. that was fast justine Henin

42. NK one of the worst 'sportsman' i have seen on a tennis court. totally pathetic

44. Juan del Potro , watch out for him, all arond player

45. u have to admit, he is unique (Quest)

47. there are many better versions of Anna on tour, game wise & beauty/charisma as well.

49. who is he??

TENNIs back among the best sports

Deboogle!.
02-07-2007, 06:26 PM
:lol:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/jon_wertheim/02/06/mailbag/1.html

Didn't Marat Safin make that shoes/wet court comment to a referee, not Andy Roddick? His later comment, about the referee smoking a cigar and escorting two chicks, and the righteous facial expression that followed, were priceless.
-- Megan, Indianapolis

Major unforced error by yours truly. Safin made these to (and about) the chair, not Roddick. And, yes, I am embarrassed. Check this link.

R.Federer
02-07-2007, 06:33 PM
Mailbag (with links for youtube)

• Look for the new ATP calendar to include eight Masters Series events: Indian Wells, Key Biscayne, Rome, Canada, Cincy, Paris, Madrid and China. (Hamburg and Monte Carlo get downgraded to economy class.) Players will be expected to play "eight of eight", though, realistically, six or seven will be the norm. The year-end Masters will be held in London. Details to come.

• Thanks to David Nicholas of Liverpool, England, for this link to the best overhead you'll ever see.

• Olivier Mabaya of Gatineau, Quebec, writes: "I have a better answer to this question: 'Where can I get a copy of The Fed-Roddick rout?' You can find it here."

• Thanks (if that's the right word) to Charles Lum of Atlanta for this fashion link.

• Someone (whose name I've misplaced) sent me this great YouTube clip of Venus Williams. Pretty hard to watch this and not come away with an elevated opinion.

• Speaking of Venus, this from Golf World: "Off the playing surface: PGA Tour player Hank Kuehne and WTAer Venus Williams began seeing each other in December." (Doesn't Golf World know? It's not WTA, it's Sony-Ericsson WTA? What is wrong with some people?!)

• Andrew Friedman of New York City writes: "Now this is crossover appeal. Andrew Sullivan, of all people, linked to this super-slo-mo footage of Federer in action that someone posted on YouTube. Great footage -- among other things, it proves that Fed sure knows how to keep his eye on the ball!"

• In recognition of National Black History month, the International Tennis Hall of Fame Museum will present a new exhibit titled Breaking the Barriers, honoring the achievements of African Americans in tennis. For more information on the International Tennis Hall of Fame Museum, its collections, exhibits and programs, visit tennisfame.com or call 401-849-3990.

• Speaking of tennis and Black History Month, here's a blog item worth your time.

• Rocky of Singapore sends this clip of Roddick's finest ace (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31xaDOaYTKw&NR)

angiel
02-07-2007, 06:58 PM
The ultimate battle
Sampras vs. Federer may happen, but let's set rules

Posted: Wednesday February 7, 2007 10:34AM; Updated: Wednesday February 7, 2007 11:07AM




Jon Wertheim will answer questions from SI.com users in his mailbag every Wednesday.






Everyone contemplates how another Pete Sampras vs. Roger Federer match would run (including Sampras) except Federer! Everyone's intrigued, Sampras thinks he would hold his own. But when we talk about it, we discuss it as if Sampras were dead and the match is beyond the realm of possibility! He's only 35! Theoretically, this hypothetical can be made a reality very easily, no? Why hasn't anyone suggested they play an exhibition?
-- Brad Uy, Honolulu, Hawaii

Good question and I think this match will, in fact, happen quite soon. The problem, if that's the right word, is that neither Fed nor Sampras are money-hogs, and if you start to look at this from their perspective, it becomes less appealing. If Federer wins, so what? He's beaten a man a decade his senior, who's been in repose since 2002, whose feet were recently impaled when he stepped on his son's train.

If Federer loses, it's worse. The WTA is getting hammered regarding Serena Williams' current success, indicting the quality of the rest of the field. Imagine: "Geez, this Federer cat is supposed to the best of all-time, and he can't even beat a guy who hasn't played an ATP match since '02?"

Meanwhile, if Sampras loses and looks silly doing so, it's still more dirt on the grave of his claims to being the G.O.A.T. If he wins, he's thrilled but he might face questions about surface, a premature retirement, etc.

The way I see this working: Pick a fast surface, maybe even grass. Announce the proceeds will go to charity. Make transparently clear in the build-up and in the match itself that it's an exhibition, more a duet than a duel. Maybe as a fun twist, Pete gets to play with Federer's new racket and Federer has to play with Pete's old-school Wilson. Federer wins but there are enough good points that the G.O.A.T. debate intensifies. Good for both guys. Good for tennis. Good for UNICEF

R.Federer
02-07-2007, 07:04 PM
The second sentence, already Wertheim is wrong. I stopped reading there. Federer, not a money hog? Well of course he is otherwise he wouldn't play Dubai while leaving DC out of his schedule.
Pony up the money and Feds will be there, humiliation or adoration notwithstanding.

angiel
02-07-2007, 07:21 PM
The second sentence, already Wertheim is wrong. I stopped reading there. Federer, not a money hog? Well of course he is otherwise he wouldn't play Dubai while leaving DC out of his schedule.
Pony up the money and Feds will be there, humiliation or adoration notwithstanding.


His he a money hog???:confused: :confused: :(

charlie666
02-07-2007, 07:22 PM
13. Nikolay Davydenko spent his off-season on a honeymoon that included daily practices and tournament play. Does his new wife like tennis? "No. But she loves me." And here's the D-man on his apparel endorsement with the French brand Aimess. "Happy, yeah. I get clothes for free for three years. Yeah, happy." We're saving the all-Davydenko mailbag for Sweeps Week. But you can start sending questions now.

Really? Did he sign for it after the AO? Because in Melbourne he was still wearing his white shirts.

R.Federer
02-07-2007, 07:23 PM
His he a money hog???:confused: :confused: :(

Some say that, yes.

Everyone likes money, no question, but is he doing anything different from others in a position to command what he does? I don't think so.

R.Federer
05-24-2007, 06:08 AM
May 23 new mailbag


Should we go ahead and give the title of GOAT to Roger Federer, along with the French Open? I say this because I think Roger's Hamburg win was not just another victory. I think he has overcome the mental block and has gotten the clay monkey off his back. Do you think he is the favorite at the French now? Also, how will this affect Rafael Nadal?
-- Andrea, Richmond, Texas
So one weekend we're confounded by Federer's slump. We're second-guessing his decision to dump hapless Tony (Papa) Roche. We wonder why he doesn't hire a proven expert like Jose Higueras or -- heaven help us -- Mats Wilander to help him navigate these choppy waters. We're questioning his switch in rackets (which, by the way, was from one 90-inch Wilson to another, not to a smaller frame as noted.) The next weekend we're ready to anoint the Greatest Of All Time, based on one win.
Dozens of you wrote about this abrupt plot twist but this was my favorite, courtesy of Patrick Formanes of Bayside, N.Y.: "According to a wire story, numerous tennis journalists are being investigated for the mysterious disappearance of hundreds of crows. German authorities questioned one writer in his hotel. The writer, who begged to remain anonymous, reportedly munched on a crow during questioning. When asked why he was doing that, he tearfully explained, 'Federer beat Nadal on clay.'"

Three points: 1) All credit to Federer for this remarkable turn of events. This is what champions do. Though it obviously wasn't a Slam, last week's win was loaded with significance and does indeed count for something in the GOAT ledger. Chose your cliché: His back was against the wall and he delivered. And apart from that, this was another TMS title on his least favorite surface.
2) That said, no one -- neither journalists nor fans -- ought to be eating crow. Federer has set an absurdly high standard over the past three years. He'd failed to meet it of late, losing four straight events, three of them to players outside the top 20. What were the headlines supposed to say? "Federer loses to Volandri in Rome: This is right where he wants to be heading to Roland Garros!" Unexpected results like last weekend's are why we love sports.
3) The French Open -- and with it, Federer's Ahabian quest for the Grand Slam -- just got a lot more interesting. But I think you still have to put your euros on Nadal. He is the two-time defending champ. The best-of-five format is probably to his advantage. The faster clay is his ideal surface. Maybe coming in fresh off a loss is a disguised blessing. Heart says Federer; head says Nadal.

Nadal is better on clay. Federer is better on grass and hard courts. How about if we add doubles into the mix? Since '04, Federer's doubles record is a tepid 17-16, if I'm counting correctly. Nadal is a solid 50-36. (Federer has played mostly with Yves Allegro, career high doubles ranking 32; Nadal has played mostly with Feliciano Lopez (37), Fernando Verdasco (67) and Bartolome Salva-Vidal (161). And Nadal is 1-0 against Federer in doubles head to head. So if we factor in doubles (which is tennis, after all), how about if we declare a tie overall?
-- Scott Graham, Oakland, Calif.
Thanks for the research; it's an interesting stat. But I think this is limited value. For these top guys, doubles is essentially a lark, a way to get some extra match play and make some cash for their buddies. It's great that the top stars seem to be playing alongside partners again. But I think the results add very little to head-to-head comparisons


More at http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/jon_wertheim/05/22/mailbag/index.html

R.Federer
06-27-2007, 08:47 PM
Okay, confess ---- who is the person who asked Werthei the question about roddick? We know there are many contenders right here on MTF! :lol:



Dude, you should've noted that Rafael Nadal lost at Queen's mostly due to exhaustion. Andy Roddick beat a lesser version of Mardy Fish to win a "cheap title" and you're hyping him up as the second-best on grass? Are you high? Did you not learn your lesson at the Aussie Open? If you stopped hanging out with Pat McEnroe, you'd notice that besides the Fed, there are a lot of players far better and more well-rounded than Roddick: Tomas Berdych, Mario Ancic (when he's playing), Ivo Karlovic, Novak Djokovic, Nadal, Lleyton Hewitt. Who are you demagoguing to? Teenage chicks?
-- Ryan Curleym, Berkeley, Calif.


I must have gotten 50 e-mails similar to Ryan's over the past few days. Assume this was a hot topic on some anti-Roddick message board. Look, I know Roddick is a polarizing figure out there in Fan Land. I know a lot of you see him as a sort of emblem of the United States in general. All force, no subtlety. A smug manipulator of media. A creation of marketing. A Hummer to Federer's Prius. I don't agree but I get it.
But you guys need to get a grip here. We're talking about a two-time Wimbledon finalist who wins the Queen's Club tune-up as a matter of ritual. Go ahead and knock Roddick's results on clay. Assert that Nadal is the superior grass-court player and we can have a reasonable disagreement. (SI.com's Justin Gimelstobargued for Roddick (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/justin_gimelstob/06/20/roddick.wimbledon/index.html) before losing to him on Monday.)
But claim that Karlovic -- whose career record at Wimbledon in 5-4 -- is a better grass-court player than Roddick and you just come across as petty and vindictive.

CyBorg
06-27-2007, 09:45 PM
And Ivo Karlovic loses in the first round.

Congratulations to Wertheim - he wins in an argument with a retard. That he can do.

Jim Jones
06-27-2007, 09:46 PM
Karlovic is definelty not better on grass then Roddick. Looka t his wimbeldon record. :lol:
He prefers to play Gstaad on clay then Newport on grass.

marcRD
06-28-2007, 12:04 AM
Okay, confess ---- who is the person who asked Werthei the question about roddick? We know there are many contenders right here on MTF! :lol:

A croat? (no offense)

R.Federer
07-10-2007, 06:32 AM
WIMBLEDON, England -- Cleaning out the notebook from a wild and wet Wimbledon. Some random notes and thoughts, trying to incorporate as many of your questions as possible.

• So much for the notion that Roger Federer had never been battle-tested. We eagerly await a testicular update from Mats Wilander.

• Rafael Nadal will win Wimbledon one day.

• Love Novak Djokovic, hate the decision to retire in a Grand Slam semi. Nadal could have turned his ankle on the next point. You never know. Then again, the decision says something about his expectations. The underlying message was: There'll be plenty more of these opportunities.

• Build that roof.

• Get blown off the court by Roger Federer and it's demoralizing but not altogether crushing. Too good, mate, you say. Brandish a two-set lead and a third-set service break and fail to come through, as Andy Roddick did against Richard Gasquet, and you're talking about a loss than can stick in your craw for a long time.

• Nice tournament for American juniors. Donald Young took the boys draw, which ought to infuse him with some confidence. Madison Brengle reached the girls' final before falling to Ursula Radwanska in three sets.

• Not saying Young is the next Marcelo Rios, but, man, is he fun to watch. Sick of those mindless baseline bashers? Here's a lefty who slices and dices and comes to the net and -- yes, perhaps by necessity -- prefers angles over power. As a bonus, he's an emotional guy who shows personality on the court.

• If you missed the Tiger Woods-Roger Federer commercial click here (http://www.beam.tv/view.php/60_MyNameIs_NIPP2562_mp1.mpg?TsmbYcHFzR&log=gvpFJnjPHf).

• If Serena Williams was playing "40 or 50 [percent] max," and Henin, the world's No.1 player, "played probably some of her best tennis" and Serena only lost 6-3 in the third set, Serena ought to be thrilled about her performance. Serena does much that is to be admired. She fights harder than anyone else, her sister notwithstanding. She doesn't argue calls. She doesn't throw tantrums. Can't someone in the camp please convey how tacky it is to discredit the opponent and minimize your own performance every time you lose?

• When was the last time all four finalists from Roland Garros made the semis of the next Wimbledon? Long gone are the days when surface specialists ruled.

• Several of you noted this irony: As Pete Sampras went for his fifth straight Wimbledon, his fourth-round opponent was Federer. As Federer went for his fifth straight Wimbledon, his fourth-round opponent was ... a walkover.

• Apart from more sunshine, Chris Clarey and Lisa Dillman, the presence of Andy Murray was sorely missed at this event. Have to think that if he'd won a few rounds, the vibe here would have been a little more upbeat. Murray is scheduled to play at the Los Angeles event the same week David Beckham debuts for the L.A. Galaxy. Note the to the L.A. match scheduler: Don't schedule Murray to play that night.

• Remember when players set a goal of "reaching the second week of a Slam?" By Wednesday afternoon of the second week, there were eight players remaining who had only won two matches.

• Think British writers are allowed more editorial leeway than their American counterparts? Describing Bartoli, one scribe for The Guardian wrote: "Her movement could hardly be more forlornly sluggish if she were picking rice in a field." And here's Guardian writer Steve Bierley: "The height of absurdity came at 1.46pm yesterday when [the tournament announcer] warned: 'Please be advised that there is rain in the Wimbledon area.' No s$%#, Sherlock."

• While most tournament's daily programs are often filled with cliché-riddled pablum -- "Will Roddick serve his way to glory or will Nadal's power be a bitter pill to swallow?" -- the Wimbledon daily program ought to be required reading. Among my favorite lines: "Fortunes have been mixed for Lleyton [Hewitt], what with injuries and patches of indifferent form. But he remains a bonny battler on these premises."

• One of tennis' more, um, mysterious figures, Rafael Font de Mora, again finds himself embroiled in controversy (http://www.tennisreporters.net/blog_wimbledon_062607.html). Regardless of the he-said, she-said, this is a sad story. Not long ago, Anna-Lena Groenefeld was a real talent, firmly embedded in the top 20. Now, still only 22, she's well out of the top 100.

• Christopher M. Jones of West Chester, Pa., noticed that three of Marcos Baghdatis' opponents had the initials N. D. (Nicolas Devilder, Nikolay Davydenko and Novak Djokovic). The interruption in N.D.s was caused by D.N., David Nalbandian. :lol:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/jon_wertheim/07/08/50.things/index.html

martinatreue
07-10-2007, 06:50 AM
100% spot on about Serena, the sorest loser in the sport.

Eden
08-22-2007, 11:20 AM
Here is an article by Jon Wertheim on the Federer-Nadal rivalry:


Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal are as different as two fierce foes could be, but in one thing they're identical: Neither man will take a verbal shot at the other

Tuesday August 21, 2007

The kid assumed he was being punk'd. After a fine freshman season as Florida's No. 1 singles player, Jesse Levine was luxuriating at home in Boca Ratonlast month when his cellphone chirped. An IMG agent was calling in search of a practice partner for Roger Federer, a few days removed from winning Wimbledon for the fifth straight time. Would Levine meet Federer at his training base in the United Arab Emirates? "When I realized it wasn't a joke," says Levine, "I was like, 'Yup. That works for me.'"
Levine spent 10 days in Dubai hitting tennis balls with the greatest player on Earth and eating lavish meals and relaxing in a swank hotel. "It was pretty sweet," he says.
Why would Federer fly a college kid halfway around the world to train with him? While it was never explicitly stated, Levine knew damn well why. He's a lefthander and thus could simulate the play of No. 2-ranked Rafael Nadal.
So it goes when you're embroiled in a rivalry. At the U.S. Open, which begins in New York City on Monday, Federer and Nadal will be on opposite poles of the draw. Yet if form holds -- as it has at the last two Grand Slam championships -- the two men will be drawn to each other like magnets and will come together on the final Sunday. Serbia's Novak Djokovic has made inroads recently, beating both Nadal and Federer at the Rogers Cup in Montreal, but otherwise the world's top two players have simply hijacked the men's game. One or the other has won the last 10 Grand Slam titles and 21 of the last 28 Masters Series tournaments. In the process they have fashioned what may well be the most gripping rivalry in all of sports.
Federer-Nadal (Roger-Rafa to everyone in the Kingdom of Tennis) meets all the prerequisites we usually set for a rivalry. There are clashing games, divergent personalities, swings in momentum. In tennis as in boxing, styles make fights. Federer, a righty, is an artist, capable of executing any shot in the book -- and many that aren't. He's so smooth that he sometimes seems too proud to use mere power to win a point. Nadal, a lefty, plays violent tennis, pounding the ball and at the same time lacing it with so much spin that his ground strokes tend to bounce like kick serves. Other players uniformly refer to him as "a beast," but they mean it as a compliment.
By virtue of their consistent winning, Federer and Nadal meet often -- another requirement of a thriving rivalry. Since 2004 they've faced off 13 times, only one fewer than Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe, the men's tennis rivals against which all others are measured. What's more, the Roger-Rafa dividing lines have recently blurred. At first the duo seemed to have reached a détente in which Nadal ruled the clay and Federer lorded over every other surface. But in May, Federer snapped Nadal's streak of 81 straight clay-court wins and then made him sweat in the French Open final. Returning the favor, Nadal pushed Federer to a fifth set on the latter's choice surface, grass, in a spellbinding Wimbledon final. "He puts me under immense pressure whenever and wherever we play," says Federer. "But I do the same for him."
The contrast in their personalities isn't quite as stark as the fire of McEnroe versus the ice of Borg, but Federer and Nadal do have disparate personas. Federer, 26, is a worldly polyglot who just filmed a segment with the PBS talk-show host Charlie Rose. Nadal, 21, is a quintessential jock whose idea of formality is removing his sweat-saturated bandanna. At the Wimbledon final, after they met at the net for the coin toss, Nadal sprinted to the baseline, recalling Pete Rose dashing to first base after drawing a walk, while Federer went over to his chair and meticulously removed the cream-colored blazer he had worn onto Centre Court.
Further amplifying their rivalry: You can pull up a stool and stay past last call debating their respective merits. The Swiss Mister has won 11 majors to Nadal's three. He's the more complete player. He has held the ATP's No. 1 ranking since early 2004 and next week will eclipse Steffi Graf's record of 186 straight weeks in the rankings penthouse. Yet the Rafaelites will counter that the Spaniard leads Federer in head-to-head meetings 8--5 and has amassed more rankings points than Federer in '07. Nadal's winning percentage in tournament finals, 82.1, is the best in the Open Era, suggesting unparalleled mental toughness. (Federer's is 75.4.) And though Nadal has fewer major titles, he has more than Federer had at age 21.
Don't, however, expect Federer or Nadal to join the discussion. And here's where their rivalry is different from most: There's not a trace of animosity in it. Each man is relentlessly deferential toward the other, dispensing more props than a Broadway stagehand. Says Nadal, "To me he is the best player." Says Federer, "Trust me. I know how good Rafa is."
Hear them gush like this and it becomes apparent that they're not so opposite after all. They were both raised in traditional European families that regard ego as a major character defect. Federer's modesty is as characteristic as his silken backhand. (He spent part of his last Christmas break visiting an orphanage in India.) But Nadal's no prima donna either. At the French Open the two-time defending champ was spotted sweeping the clay courts when he was done practicing. "We're no better than anyone else," says his uncle and coach, Toni Nadal.
Classic rivals Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova became fast friends. Once, before they met in a Grand Slam final, one of them had her period, and together they scoured the locker room for a tampon. While Federer and Nadal aren't quite at that point yet (and not simply because neither menstruates), unmistakable warmth passes between them. When they crossed paths last week in the locker room of the Cincinnati event, they casually slapped five. It might as well have been a secret handshake. They are acutely aware that they're members of an exclusive club, that each benefits from having the other around. "He pushes me to be better," says Nadal. "I think every [athlete] needs that."
In May, Federer ventured to Nadal's home island of Mallorca to play an exhibition on a court that was half grass and half clay. Federer noted that Nadal had played in his hometown, Basel, before. "Now," he said, "I have the opportunity to play at his place." Earlier this month, after the Rogers Cup, Nadal was unable to get a flight out to the next tour stop, in Cincinnati, so Federer invited him to ride in his private plane.
It all makes for strange times for tennis fans. Rivalries tend to cleave public opinion. Who in his right mind roots for North Carolina and Duke, for the Yankees and the Red Sox, for Hillary and Rudy? These deep divisions give the matchups emotional texture. Yet in the case of Federer-Nadal, it seems entirely reasonable to cheer for both. In fact, for most of us, it feels forced to summon dislike for either.
Though recent history suggests that Federer-Nadal XIV will take place at the U.S. Open final on Sept. 9, it's no sure thing. Federer is the three-time defending Open champ, but Nadal has never been beyond the tournament's quarterfinals and is susceptible to being outhit on hard courts -- all the more so given his recent wrist and knee injuries. Their hegemony is also being challenged by the third-ranked Djokovic. In fact, if the 20-year-old Serb keeps improving at his recent pace, we'll have this to ponder: Is there such a thing as a tri-valry?

Source: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/jon_wertheim/08/21/us.open0827/index.html?section=si_latest

R.Federer
08-22-2007, 04:18 PM
Well written overall except for some trivia that could have been excluded without missing the point


Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova became fast friends. Once, before they met in a Grand Slam final, one of them had her period, and together they scoured the locker room for a tampon. While Federer and Nadal aren't quite at that point yet (and not simply because neither menstruates), unmistakable warmth passes between them.

:rolleyes:

FedFan_2007
08-22-2007, 04:44 PM
God, Roger just get it over with already, marry Rafa, your sweet sweet Love.

Castafiore
08-22-2007, 05:11 PM
In fact, for most of us, it feels forced to summon dislike for either.

Wertheim obviously doesn't get the MTF newsletter.

cmurray
08-22-2007, 05:15 PM
God, Roger just get it over with already, marry Rafa, your sweet sweet Love.

:sobbing: Its beautiful, isn't it?

l_mac
08-22-2007, 05:16 PM
Wertheim obviously doesn't get the MTF newsletter.

:haha:

That's what i thought when I read this last night.

ReturnWinner
08-22-2007, 05:19 PM
we should create a thread about Peter Bodo too :unsure:

azinna
08-22-2007, 05:43 PM
Yes, a pretty well written piece, though many Rafatards naturally dislike Fedtards, and vice-versa, because they're so different in appearance, demeanor and playing style. And I don't think an absence of ego is at work in either player. In fact, I think their politeness to each other is rather forced, at times even tactical: Rafa continues to pile on the pressure by maintaining that Federer is "the best, he's #1" while showing up on the court with full belief in his abilities to take out Federer whether he's in-form or out, on any surface. And Feds started off trying to "nice" the boy into worship (as he has done with most all the others on the tour), found that it didn't work and has over the past year let the Polite Guard slip a few times to reveal the ego most all great champions have....

FedFan_2007
08-22-2007, 05:50 PM
Yes, a pretty well written piece, though many Rafatards naturally dislike Fedtards, and vice-versa, because they're so different in appearance, demeanor and playing style. And I don't think an absence of ego is at work in either player. In fact, I think their politeness to each other is rather forced, at times even tactical: Rafa continues to pile on the pressure by maintaining that Federer is "the best, he's #1" while showing up on the court with full belief in his abilities to take out Federer whether he's in-form or out, on any surface. And Feds started off trying to "nice" the boy into worship (as he has done with most all the others on the tour), found that it didn't work and has over the past year let the Polite Guard slip a few times to reveal the ego most all great champions have....

So RFK is right. He is the Ego King after all.

THE LIGHT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> :wavey: :wavey:

Castafiore
08-22-2007, 06:05 PM
THE LIGHT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> :wavey: :wavey:
That joke is getting really old.

Sunset of Age
08-22-2007, 07:43 PM
Yet in the case of Federer-Nadal, it seems entirely reasonable to cheer for both.

Glad somebody finally seems to notice that besides me. :angel:

selyoink
08-23-2007, 05:48 PM
Wertheim has picked David "Pics" Ferrer to make the semis at the US Open.

Adler
08-23-2007, 05:58 PM
I like the word 'trivalry'

ChinoRios4Ever
09-08-2007, 05:33 AM
Wertheim has picked David "Pics" Ferrer to make the semis at the US Open.

BUMP :p

Wertheim :worship::worship::worship: :devil:

Federer vs Haas
Djokovic vs Ferrer

3 out of 4... and Haas lost in the QF, too close

selyoink
09-08-2007, 05:53 AM
BUMP :p

Wertheim :worship::worship::worship: :devil:

Federer vs Haas
Djokovic vs Ferrer

3 out of 4... and Haas lost in the QF, too close

Yes in the end his predictions were pretty good. I thought he had predicted Blake but either way he would've been wrong. He also did pretty good with his surprise women's semi-finalist in Szavay who lost in QFs.

Stensland
09-08-2007, 06:01 AM
who is this wertheim guy?

Winston's Human
09-08-2007, 06:05 AM
who is this wertheim guy?


Wertheim is the tennis writer for Sports Illustrated.

NYCtennisfan
09-08-2007, 06:32 AM
Respect.

uglyamerican
09-08-2007, 08:06 AM
Wertheim did claim (incorrectly) that Vassallo-Arguello was not ranked high enough to make the main draw of the US Open, when discussing the Kolya shenanigans case.

tennisrocks123
09-08-2007, 04:28 PM
werheim, is BLAH

Merton
09-08-2007, 04:39 PM
Every dog has his day.

R.Federer
09-10-2007, 10:08 PM
The fans came in record droves, the rain didn't come at all, the top seeds won and the Djoker got away. Cleaning out the notebook from a generally excellent 2007 U.S. Open.
• Roger Federer won the men's title again, playing well when he had to. This Greatest Of All Time (GOAT) discussion is in danger of becoming moot.
• Justine Henin -- and it's no longer Hardenne, Dick Enberg -- finished off a convincing two-week Federer impersonation when she beat Svetlana Kuznetsova in the women's final.
• After deploying all the right moves during the first six rounds, Novak Djokovic couldn't catch a break in the final. But saying that he captured the public's affection during this event would be an understatement.
• Though the threadbare "bottom half" of the women's draw lived down to expectation, credit Kuznetsova with winning six straight matches. Still, consider this: she won $700,000 as the runner-up and she only had to beat one top-30 opponent along the way.
• Awfully nice tournament for David Ferrer. He doesn't play the prettiest tennis, but he grinds, hustles and never quits. Hard not to admire the guy. One could say the exact same thing about Nikolay Davydenko -- at least while there's been no guilty verdict on these match-fixing allegations.
• The good news for Andy Roddick: he was able to summon perhaps the best tennis of his life -- much better than when he won the title four years ago -- for his quarterfinal match against "Darth Federer," as someone in his camp facetiously called him. The bad news: he was still unable to win a set.
• Speaking of which, I'm not sure I can recall watching a higher quality women's match than Henin-Venus Williams. The women's game took a beating this tournament, from round one through a lackluster final. But I thought it was largely undeserved. The women's matches committed that cardinal American sin: they didn't look good on television. The majority of the matches were fine, it's just that the featured night matches were usually unsightly blowouts.
• Speaking of hard to recall ... the men's doubles draw was memorably weird. The Bryans lost early. So did Jonas Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi. Mark Knowles and Daniel Nestor faltered in the final Grand Slam together. Most of the top seeds lost early. In the end, Julien Knowle and Simon Aspelin took the title.
• The women's doubles draw was also mottled with upsets. Nathalie Dechy (playing her 47th consecutive Major!) and Dinara Safina won the title beating Yung Jan Chan and Chia-Jung Chuan in the final.
• Ricardas Berankis of Lithuania, best known as Roger Federer's practice partner, took the boys' title. Kristina Kucova of Slovakia beat Agnieszka Radwanka's sister, Ursula, in a third-set tiebreaker to win the girls' event.
• Max Mirnyi and Victoria Azarenka beat Meghann Shaughnessy and Leander Paes to win the mixed doubles. Speaking of Shaughnessy, we're wishing a speedy recovery to Meghann's cousin, Alise, who suffered a concussion when she was elbowed by a rude fan.
• As much as we try not to conflate Venus and Serena Williams, it ought to go acknowledged that, on the heels of little sis' debacle, Venus was exceptionally sporting after her loss to Henin.


Rest at : http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/jon_wertheim/09/09/50.things/index.html

njnetswill
09-10-2007, 11:48 PM
I saw him for the first time on USA during the US Open. Is it me or does this guy have no charisma whatsoever? He looks like a jerk you just want to punch in the face. :shrug:

PamV
09-10-2007, 11:53 PM
What Serena debacle is he talking about?

R.Federer
09-11-2007, 12:12 AM
What Serena debacle is he talking about?
She attributed her loss to "lucky shots" from Henin and generally not giving any credit to Henin.

I am a big fan of Serena's but I would be the first to admit she does have a problem with giving credit to opponents. Maybe that's what she really truly believes, that she cannot be beat except if she plays poorly and if the opponent gets lucky. But I can completely see how it comes off as ultra arrogance.

Maxpowers
09-11-2007, 02:26 AM
I lost respect for him when he defended equal prize money saying something like "just because the men are out there longer they shouldn't get more money. Maybe you should look at the number of shots per rally, then the woman would be better." Does he know anything about tennis?

The men don't just happen to play longer, the rules state they must play best of 5 while the women play best of 3. It also isn't some kind of subjective measurement as to who is better; the men hit harder, run faster, and have better shots. You could put the worst player in the men's draw against the top player in the women's draw and the worst male player would win. I could probably beat some of the low ranked women, while the men's game has a ton of depth. Even the guys playing challengers are incredible.

R.Federer
09-11-2007, 03:44 AM
Well, I have never heard a very convincing argument for equal pay yet. I have heard some arguments, such as equality in the workplace etc. Not saying they're good arguments.

One argument which has logical resonance but fails to apply in tennis is the idea that one doesn't pay less for a 4 hour movie than one does for a 2 hour one. Again for obvious reasons this does not apply very well, but it is somewhat logically sound.

Eden
12-11-2008, 10:32 AM
And the 2008 Baggies go to ...

Jon Wertheim > TENNIS MAILBAG

Rafael Nadal and Dinara Safina provided the games best individual years
Roger Federer is back to climbing up Mount Sampras after U.S. Open win

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/si/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/12/09/2008.baggies/nadal.jpg
It was an exhausting year full of wins for Rafael Nadal, who took home Wimbledon and French Open titles.

Few folks are likely to describe 2008 as a gilded year. Oh, for the days, when "bailout" was something done to a wayward rowboat, homes were worth more than mortgages, and Iceland was best known as a quirky (and solvent) vacation destination. Fortunately, tennis was there to provide us with diverting entertainment and some welcome escapism. The sport up to its usual tricks this year, serving up jarring plot twists (Justine Henin, the top WTA player, abruptly retiring), relentless melodrama, and enough mutually destructive in-fighting and finger-pointing to shame the post-election McCain and Palin camps.

In the end, though -- and it's ever thus -- order trumped chaos and the year was marked by excellence. Rafael Nadal beat Roger Federer in the Greatest Tennis Match Ever Played, and finally wrested away the top ranking. Forever answering those pesky questions about his mettle, Federer recovered to win the U.S. Open, salvaging his season and putting his assault on Mt. Sampras back on schedule for 2009. The Williams sisters continued to triumph in their unconventional way, each winning another Major. Tiny Serbia lay claim to three of the world's top ten players.

Because "Tennis off-season" might be the biggest oxymoron this side of "team of mavericks," we only have a few hours to squeeze in this 2008 awards show. (Only two more weeks to the 2009 Chennai Open!) But before dispensing gifts to our winners, a rare detour into sappiness. This is a cut-and-paste from years past but the sentiment holds: If you get half as much pleasure (guilty to be sure) from reading this column as I get from writing it, we're all doing pretty well.

Your questions and observations are, reliably, thoughtful and informed and passionate, and please know that every last one -- even the ones wishing me incurable athlete's foot -- are read. Think of this as a sincere invitation to belly up to the bar in '09 and we'll do it again.

The votes have been certified by PricewaterhouseCoopers and Jack Valenti. The envelopes please for the 2008 Baggies. ....

Player of the Year, Men:

Had Rafael Nadal somehow managed to have won the U.S. Open, he would have compiled the most decorated men's season in the Open Era. As it was, he won the French Open for the fourth straight time, took an Olympic gold in Beijing, beat Roger Federer in the epic Wimbledon final and finished with the top ranking. Vamos, indeed.

Player of the Year, Women:

The top of the WTA resembled nothing so much as a revolving door, what with the incumbent (Justine Henin) quitting, the heiress apparent (Maria Sharapova) unhealthy, and the four Majors providing us with four different winners. The indefatigable (and blessedly candid) Jelena Jankovic deserves much credit for finishing at No.1. But, working on the assumption that the MVP must have won at least one Major, the vote here goes to Venus Williams. She not only won Wimbledon yet again but backed it up by taking the year-end Championships title.

Newcomer of the Year, Men:

Marin Cilic: Croatian Sensation cracks twenty-five before his 20th birthday, thereby edging out Kei Nishikori and Ernests Gulbis.

Newcomer of the Year, Women:

Caroline Wozniacki: A very good Dane -- if not a great Dane -- eighteen-year-old started the season outside the top 50 and finished near the top 10.

Comeback Player of the Year, Men:

Robin Soderling: Swede recovers from wrist injury and finishes season at No. 17.

Comeback Player of the Year, Women:

Anna-Lena Groenefeld: After two years in the abyss, former top 20 player is on the way back to where she once belonged.

Coach of the Year, Men:

Toni Nadal: If his English were better (or, alternatively, our Spanish were better), we'd be calling him the Yoda of Tennis.

Coach of the Year, Women:

Oracene Williams: Another multiple Slam year for Williams mere.

Most Improved, Men:

With a tip of the cap to symmetry, we declare a tie between Juan Martin Del Potro and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga: They finished 2007 at spots 42 and 43 in the rankings respectively. They finish 2008 at No. 9 and No. 6. (Honorable mention: Andy Murray, up to No. 4.)

Most Improved, Women:

Dinara Safina: No longer "Marat's sister," she finished 2008 as the top Russian. Which is saying something.

Doubles team of the year, Men:

Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic: A pair of Belgrade natives were Grade A in 2008.

Doubles Team of the Year, Women:

Cara Black and Liezel Huber: Who said there were no consistent WTA winners this year?

Edward R. Murrow Journalism Award:

The intrepid reporter at the Indian Wells event who posed this question to Andy Roddick:

"Andy, what is going on, if you don't mind, in the love department? You know, you've got all these pretty little kitty girls in the tennis skirts and they're going to come and oogle and ogle you and give you the little winky."

Match of the Year, Men:

Nadal d. Federer, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7, 6-7, 9-7. Wimbledon final. Enough said.

Match of the Year, Women:

Though the reasons are totally understandable, the Williams-Williams encounters simply lack the required tension to warrant MOY consideration. We'll go with Serena Williams beating Jelena Jankovic, 6-4, 7-5, to win the U.S. Open final.

Quote of the Year, Men:

Roddick on Novak Djokovic's litany of injuries. Let's go the video tape.

Quote of the Year, Women:

Jankovic on losing the Miami final despite the star-studded crowd:

"I had all these actors when I was returning...I was thinking that one of them (Woody Harrelson) was in that movie "White Men Can't Jump." I was feeling when I was playing that match that White Girls Can't Play, you know?"

Agent of the Year:

Just kidding.

So long, Farewell:

Justine Henin, Monica Seles, Alicia Molik, Clarisa Fernandez, Lindsay Davenport (?), Gustavo Kurten, Felix Mantilla, Jonas Bjorkman, Etienne deVilliers, Arlen Kantarian, USA's coverage of the U.S. Open, Barry Lorge, Lennart Bergelin, Davide Sanguinetti.

Source: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/12/09/2008.baggies/