What is with Labadze?!! [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

What is with Labadze?!!

Horatio Caine
03-17-2004, 07:06 PM
What is with Labadze and beating former and current top 20 players?!! He has taken out Arazi, Carlos Moya and Agustin Calleri!! Is he a threat for a shock semi - final place?

Racket88
03-17-2004, 07:15 PM
Didn't he beat Agassi once?

Last year or in 2002.

alfonsojose
03-17-2004, 07:17 PM
He still hasn't lose his high Nandrolone levels ...

:haha:

Anyway, congrats to him ;)

Horatio Caine
03-17-2004, 07:17 PM
yeah he did - Shanghai 2002 i think. I have never seen him play and don't know his strengths but i am taken aback by his success this week. That is considering the fact that when he played players like Gasquet at the start of the year he was losing 6-0 6-2 etc.

TennisLurker
03-17-2004, 07:28 PM
He is a lefty with a good serve, he has a two handed backhand and he is a baseliner.

From the baseline he hits no winners, but he amkes almost no unforced errors,and he is very hard to break when he serves those lefty first serves to the backhand of his opponent.

Scotty5
03-17-2004, 07:59 PM
... not sure I agree with the previous post. I watched Labadze take out Moya at Indian Wells, and he was going for broke quite often on his groundstrokes in that match (though it's the only time I've ever seen him play). He did hit quite a lot of winners--especially forehands down the line--but also framed a few, and missed several by a lot.
Congrats to him for pulling it together often enough to win some good matches this week.
Now to check Nitsanh's ranking update, this should make for a big Labadze jump.

Lee
03-17-2004, 09:24 PM
Is he the guy fined for tanking a match last year?

Chris Seahorse
03-17-2004, 11:18 PM
I saw Labadze play Spadea at the Roland Garros last year. He is as Tennis Lurker says a baseliner (at least on clay) with a two handed backhand and but he is not at all conservative. He hits the ball incredibly hard, i'd say as hard as anyone I've ever seen. He basically aims to overpower his opponent from the 1st shot. If his opponent manages to keep the ball in play for more than 4 strokes he will attempt to hit a ridiculous winner. Sometimes they fall in, sometimes they don't. He is VERY streaky and can go very hot and cold in the same match. At times he can be unplayable. Other times he can't put the ball in play for his life. I checked his stats for his match against Chela at the Austalian open this year and he hit 55 winners to Chela's 15. He also made 58 errors compared to Chela's 16. That's the kind of player he is. A little like Gonzalez without the imagination, flair or variety. Joachim Johansson or Philippousis when he was younger and less prone to going to the net would also be reasonable comparisons. Personally I prefer watching players who player with a bit more touch and flair but for those who like hardhitters he is definately one to check out.

TennisLurker
03-18-2004, 12:31 AM
he playerd very different today, not very riskyQ. I read a couple years ago that you were a very risky player. In this match you were very patient. Have you changed your approach to tennis, maybe because of the chess?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No. I am a very risky player. But the difference between two years ago and now is that two years ago I was not thinking, I was not trying. Maybe I was lazy or mentally not so strong.
Now I just -- I'm fighting for every ball. When I see stupid to hit, why not to play one more time over the net, then I get a chance and I hit. I'm just doing it like this. I just try to keep more balls in the court. When I get a chance, hit, think a little bit.
As you see, it's working pretty good, so I don't want to change it.

Horatio Caine
03-18-2004, 12:34 AM
I'll be shocked if Labadze negotiates his way past Blake.

Sjengster
03-18-2004, 12:36 AM
Their record is 2-0 to Labadze, once in a challenger several years ago and the second time last year on American hardcourt in the second round of Memphis - he won in straight sets.

rassklovn
03-18-2004, 12:47 AM
I remember when Labadze came out and smashed Agassi, Baldy didn't have a clue what hit him that day.

Labadze is not rubbish, though I could see him just as easily losing 6-0, 6-1, though I don't want this to happen.

shaoyu
03-18-2004, 12:59 AM
Sounds like another Gonzalez. But Gonzalez learned to mix it up with some finesse or at least trying, I am sure someone else would pop up and play like aggressive without bound ...

Lee
03-18-2004, 02:53 AM
I read someone said that Labadze is another talent player that need to keep his head straight.

Masto22
03-18-2004, 03:49 AM
It was Shanghai 2001... Then Agassi defeated him twice...
I can´t believe today match

Action Jackson
03-18-2004, 03:55 AM
It was typical Calleri and yes I could believe that match. I have seen too many like that to be surprised now.

Domino
03-18-2004, 04:09 AM
Well Labadze was eventually going to do well. He did make the Wimbledon Juniors finals the year Federer won, and has the serve to give most players a hell of a lot of trouble. He doesn't have much variety in his game now, but give him a couple of years, he could crack the top 20.

Action Jackson
03-18-2004, 04:12 AM
Well Labadze was eventually going to do well. He did make the Wimbledon Juniors finals the year Federer won, and has the serve to give most players a hell of a lot of trouble. He doesn't have much variety in his game now, but give him a couple of years, he could crack the top 20.

Just like Fish is going to crack the top 10 and do well on clay?

No doubt Labadze has talent and can hit the ball very well, then again it depends on how much is he is prepared to work and also get the right coach to help get the best out of him.

He needs to be consistent to make the top 20 and one tournament result doesn't mean that he has achieved consistency.

WyveN
03-18-2004, 04:40 AM
never seen him
so is this a fluke or can he become a steady player?

Pretty interesting that he is from Georgia, not exactly tennis heavyweights

Action Jackson
03-18-2004, 04:44 AM
Here is the Labadze interview from Indian Wells.

IRAKLI LABADZE

March 17, 2004

Q. You appeared to be having a lot of problems with the sun in the beginning, double-faulting three times in your first service game. What did you do to adjust?

IRAKLI LABADZE: I don't know. You know, last two matches, I've been playing in the night, so I had no problems with the sun. So today was like pretty new for me, the sun.
I guess I got used to it slowly, slowly. My eyes got used to the sun, so it was better. Still was bothering me, but not as much anymore to make three double-faults again.

Q. How did you do against Blake when you played him?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I won. I played him twice. Once was three, four years ago at challenger, once Memphis last year. I won both times.

Q. Your bio says at the age of eight you took four months of chess lessons.
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes. I'm pretty good, too.

Q. Has your insight into chess tactics helped you on the tennis court?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No, I don't think so. I mean, chess is just good to think. It makes you think. You know, your brain is working. I think it's always good for any sport.

Q. Do you think there are any similarities between tennis and chess? One is a mental game, one is a physical game.
IRAKLI LABADZE: I really, really think it helps because when you play, you know, you losing, you quiet, you just try to think. I think this works.
In tennis, you do the same thing. You are more calm. Because I was three weeks injury, and I was really playing maybe 10 games a day for three weeks every day. I come here, and I didn't even throw the racquet. Before I was going nuts on the court.
I think it's helped me, the chess, really helped me.

Q. Who did you play with?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I play on the computer.

Q. I read a couple years ago that you were a very risky player. In this match you were very patient. Have you changed your approach to tennis, maybe because of the chess?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No. I am a very risky player. But the difference between two years ago and now is that two years ago I was not thinking, I was not trying. Maybe I was lazy or mentally not so strong.
Now I just -- I'm fighting for every ball. When I see stupid to hit, why not to play one more time over the net, then I get a chance and I hit. I'm just doing it like this. I just try to keep more balls in the court. When I get a chance, hit, think a little bit.
As you see, it's working pretty good, so I don't want to change it.

Q. Does Georgia have a Davis Cup team?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes, we do. We are in the second group now. We just moved from third to second. We playing right after Miami against Italy in Italy.

Q. Is there much tennis interest in Georgia?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No. 1 and No. 2 is like 700. There's pretty much no tennis except me.

Q. He'll play with you in Italy, the No. 2?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, he'll play with me in Italy. It's difficult with the money there. Not so much opportunities like the people have in any other country, no? That's it. Otherwise we have a lot of talented players.
Now since we have a new president, improving and everything coming new, hopefully in any sport we going to have like any other country.

Q. How did you get started?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Well, my father, he was a soccer player, football in Europe. He got injury, then he quit football. Then he start to play tennis, because his friends, they were playing tennis. He was 33 years old when he first got the racquet. He learned tennis in one year. He was playing really, really good in one year, in the amateur level, with friends.
All the coach told him, "You learn so quick, you are so talented, your son should be really talented, so you have to bring the son to play tennis."
Pretty much my father wanted me to play tennis since I was born. I open my eyes, I see my father with tennis racquet.

Q. Do they ever travel with you?
IRAKLI LABADZE: He was always traveling with me until I was 18, 19. He was like living with me. I was living two years in Germany, three years in Tampa. He was always with me, all the tournaments. Now he just coming sometimes. Now I'm big man, no?

Q. Where do you live now?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I live now in Austria, Vienna, for two years already.

Q. How many languages do you speak?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I speak English, German, Russian and Georgian, which is different language, too.

Q. Quite different from Russian?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Russian and Georgian is like French and English.

Q. You appear to have a great serve. Helps to be left-handed, right?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I would say my game is pretty much based on the serve because if I serve well, then even if I don't play baseline, I feel I'm still can win. And I feel I still can improve in the middle of the game.
If I don't serve well, automatically my baseline game gets worse because I lose my confidence. Serving last four matches pretty good, so let's not talk about my serve.

Q. Still had you a match point, but he made a great return off your serve.
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, because when he did return down the line, I thought this was going wide. I already wanted to scream. It was in.

Domino
03-18-2004, 05:32 AM
Does anyone ever read everything I post? I said in a couple of years, not one tournament result, GWH.

Action Jackson
03-18-2004, 05:33 AM
Does anyone ever read everything I post? I said in a couple of years, not one tournament result, GWH.

You forgot I am illiterate, so there you go we are even. He won't do it in a couple of years either.

Domino
03-18-2004, 05:36 AM
I remember someone telling me the same about Fish (Entering the top 20 by the end of last year-"He wont do it for a couple more years"). That was Roddick himself in Australia last year when I had a chance to speak with him.

Domino
03-18-2004, 05:37 AM
Though, he is a major idiot.

Action Jackson
03-18-2004, 05:42 AM
Though, he is a major idiot.

A memorable moment we actually agree on something.

Labadze lacks consistency and he would need two years of solid results before he could consider making the top 20, there are better outside the top 20 who have had two reasonable seasons and not make it.

Just like I said about Fish, I am sticking to out and no amount of propaganda from you is going to change that view. It's about time he came up with some results in Slams.

Yes, I think Labadze has a major chance against Blake but whether he does it or not I a not sure.

WyveN
03-18-2004, 11:35 AM
Q. Who did you play with?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I play on the computer.


I don't think he is talking about computer games ;)

azza
03-18-2004, 12:27 PM
He is a lefty with a good serve, he has a two handed backhand and he is a baseliner.

From the baseline he hits no winners, but he amkes almost no unforced errors,and he is very hard to break when he serves those lefty first serves to the backhand of his opponent.

WTF :rolleyes: :rolleyes: hits no winners by ass i watched him today vs Calleri his a very agressive player has a big forehand a nice backhand and great serves

No winners my ass :retard:

alfonsojose
03-18-2004, 05:57 PM
Nice butt, anyway .. ;)

jtipson
03-18-2004, 06:00 PM
Men's butts. Ugh.

tangerine_dream
03-18-2004, 06:05 PM
Damn, his ass is almost as big as Marat's. :eek:

Chloe le Bopper
03-18-2004, 11:34 PM
Marat doesn't have a big ass. Is this some more of your oh so funny "sarcahsm"?

sigmagirl91
03-19-2004, 12:44 AM
Ass, tangy, what ass does Marat have? If you can consider "pancake" ass-worthy, then suit yourself....

tangerine_dream
03-19-2004, 02:07 AM
Marat doesn't have a big ass.

IMO, he does. :)

¿esquímaux?
03-19-2004, 05:59 AM
IMO, he does. :)


@$$ size is in the eye of the beholder ;)

sigmagirl91
03-19-2004, 11:01 AM
And whoever beholds Marat's ass with their eyes, will see that he has none....

alfonsojose
03-19-2004, 12:42 PM
Marat has no ass. And Labadze has a great butt, firm, "juicy", but not that big .. mm .. I hope he keeps performing that good, and keeps his physical shape :devil:

Pea
03-19-2004, 10:49 PM
I'm glad he's finally broken thorugh!! Goo Irakli!!

silverwhite
03-20-2004, 09:20 AM
THE MODERATOR: Irakli advances to his first career ATP semifinal. He's the first left-hander to reach the semifinals here in Indian Wells since 1998, when Marcelo Rios and Greg Rusedski played in the final here.
Q. Can you believe what's happening to you this week?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No, I don't believe. I'm afraid I'm going to wake up and I'm still playing for my first round.

Q. Why has it suddenly come right this week?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I really have no idea. I really never -- I never thought that I can be semifinalist, you know. That's -- I don't know. I have no words, you know.
I just came. I knew that I can play good, you know. Sometimes I'm not really confident. Play good, I can lose maybe ten rounds first time, first ten rounds in a row, then suddenly play like semis or quarters. But then also I can make quarters in tournament like this. So many good players. I don't know.

Q. You just won $106,240.
IRAKLI LABADZE: Man, I'm going to go ride in my car (smiling).

Q. What is the previous highest purse you have won?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Me?

Q. Yes.
IRAKLI LABADZE: I don't know, six and a half dollars (smiling). I don't know. I think my biggest check I got was $24,000 US.

Q. Where was that?
IRAKLI LABADZE: It was in St. Petersburg. I lost first round singles, final doubles.

Q. You ought to be really good with tactics since you're such a good chess player. Different games?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah. I don't know. Play like all of these matches, I played really -- I was surprised with myself. You know, they told me to play like this and I was playing like this. Usually I'm not handling this, you know. I play one set and then I lose it. Until I go back to the same tactic, I'm in the shower already, lost the match. So now I'm in the shower, but I'm in the shower as a winner.

Q. Did you try to scout Henman in his match in the thought that maybe you might be playing him? Did you watch the Henman match?
IRAKLI LABADZE: A little bit, yeah. But I watch it not because I said I'm going to play against him next match and I have to see in case I win how he's playing. I was just watching because it was in the locker room on and I look up a couple of games.

Q. Have you watched him play much?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No.

Q. Know much about his game?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No, I don't know much about his game, no. I know he's playing serve and volley, that's it. But you all know this, too.

Q. I know you're from Georgia, but the Russian girls are doing fine, and Russian tennis players aren't.
IRAKLI LABADZE: Russian?

Q. Russian girls, they're advancing, at the top. The Russian boys are not right now.
IRAKLI LABADZE: I mean, Russian boys, there are couple good players. Safin, he was No. 1. I don't know. You know, Russian boys have a little bit more crazy, you know. That's why? I don't know. I have no idea. We have opposite, you know. Girls cannot play in Georgia, so I don't know.

Q. Has Metrevili had any involvement with you at any stage?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, it was two years ago in summer on the clay court, Monte-Carlo and Casablanca, three weeks he helped me out. Otherwise, that's it, because he's working with the Russian television.

Q. How do you sort of come through in tennis in Georgia? Is there much help that you get from the national association or what? Did you do it all yourself?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No, it's really difficult there because Federation, I never got the help from the Federation. They never even paid me one trip even to Russia, you know. Never gave me even free tennis ball before. So I was lucky that my father, you know, had some money, and he risk. He thought that I can be a good player, you know. So he risk the money, and we went to Germany, we practice there. Then I won some tournament, so I got the sponsor after finally.
And, yeah, my father had some money. Because if you have no money, your own money to travel, is not possible to make it. Because we have a lot of talented players, and you don't see them because they have no money. And the Federation doesn't give them money.
Now maybe it's getting better, they pay one, or two or three tournaments. But it is nothing. We don't even get 1% help of what any other country gets.

Q. I shouldn't need to ask this, but are you in the Davis Cup?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes, I think so, yeah. I was yesterday (smiling).

Q. Which division are you in?
IRAKLI LABADZE: We are in the second division. We're playing against Italy right after Miami.

Q. Do you think your performance here will help tennis in Georgia?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes.

Q. Bring more interest?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes, you know, because I was like long, long time ago, somebody played semifinal Super 9, since Alex Metrevili, I think he played. He was in the final Wimbledon, but I don't know about a Super 9.
THE MODERATOR: He was a little before Super 9, Alex Metrevili.
IRAKLI LABADZE: I'm bad with history, so...
It's really, really -- it really helped to other players because now they think even Georgians can play tennis.

Q. What subjects did you like in school?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Oh, I liked mathematic and, how you call it, geography. I hated the rest.

Q. When did you start playing?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I was -- well, first time I went to the tennis club, I was seven years old almost, six and a half. But I was three years old, four years old when my father, he moved the sofas from the living room, and I was playing with a (soccer?) ball in the living room. He has still on the camera when I was playing. "Move your legs. Move your legs."
"No, I don't want to move my legs."
"No, move, move." Pretty much playing since the day I born.

Q. There was a point in the first set where I thought I saw you climb up the umpire's chair and say something in his microphone.
IRAKLI LABADZE: He turned the microphone off. Can you believe this? It's unbelievable. He gave me a code violation because I kicked the ball out. I don't know what happened. I was complaining because the ball boy, when he took the balls, he was running back to his place. When I toss the ball, the chair umpire usually has to say, "No, wait, stop." It was two times he didn't say nothing. I saw with one eye. Then I stopped. When you do this, your concentration -- you lose concentration a little bit. That's why I throw the ball out when I lost the game.
I told chair umpire, "You have to do this." He gave me the code violation. So I took the microphone and I wanted to say, "Code violation to you." The problem between my code violation and his code violation is that we get fined, he don't get fined. That's the difference.

Q. Do you do that often on the court? Are you a bit of character? Do you like to let your personality show?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, I mean, I like to have fun. I think it's a little boring just to be very serious and play, you know. I think people, they like it. I'm sure they like it. This is who I am. This is my way of having fun, you know. It's not just you go and play three sets like a robot. You want to enjoy and you want to make people enjoy.

Q. Why do you think you always beat Blake?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I don't know. Because he's American (laughter). No, sorry.
I don't know. Right after the match in the locker room, my friend ask me. "You play him three times, you won against him three times." I don't know, because he don't like lefties. I don't know. You have to ask him, you know.
I always have -- I'm always having a tough match. Is not one of the players that you say, "I want to play." He's definitely one of the players that I say, "I don't like to play him too much," because he's really good player, he's not making too many mistakes.
I don't know. In the end, I guess I was strong. Against him, I'm always strong in the head. He has the bad luck.

Q. Can you go on court tomorrow thinking, "I've got nothing to lose"?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yes, of course. You know, it's my first semifinal and I really have nothing to lose. Tim is a very, very good player, he has great results. He been winning these tournaments already. I just go out and try to do my best. I win, I win. I lose, I lose. I have no pressure. I'm really happy with my result. Of course, I would like to do better, but I'll just go and do my best. I have nothing to lose.

Q. The minute the match was over, what goes through your head?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Through my head?

Q. What are you thinking?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I don't know. I don't know. I -- I don't know. I cannot answer. I was not thinking nothing.

Q. Was it a big sense of relief? Looked like sheer jubilation and celebration.
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, you know, when I won, I was like, "This is not true." Even when I had the match point, I was like, "Is this match point?" I looked at the score board two times. "Is match point?"
When I won, I don't know. I was very happy, you know. Usually you scream or you do something. I was so happy, I couldn't do nothing. I was shocked. I couldn't even talk.

Q. Have you ever met Goran Ivanisevic?
IRAKLI LABADZE: Yeah, I met him two years ago in Miami. Yeah, he told me I can play good tennis, good player. So I have to make a lot of physical work, you know. So he's one of my favorite players, you know, because he's also crazy on the court little bit. I really liked to watch him.
Agassi, I really like his game. He's my idol. But to see like three-set match for me is impossible. I can see three-set match for example Ivanisevic and McEnroe play. These are one of the guys I like to watch. He's not playing as much now. I'm sure when everybody watching him, they having fun. So that's why -- I don't act because he act like this. I don't know.

Q. Did you play a lot of different sports when you were younger or just tennis?
IRAKLI LABADZE: No, I played soccer, you know. But just with the kids, you know, in the neighborhood. That's it. Nothing else. When I went to States when I was like 16, 17, and I played a lot of basketball there. Because, you know, in States, basketball. So I played a lot of basketball there. But no other sport, except chess, but I don't think chess is sport.
I'm sorry about "Americans." Was a joke.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

:lol:

TheBoiledEgg
03-20-2004, 10:09 AM
what an interview......... great answers :lol:

go Irakli........ time to do some "Chicken Plucking" ;)

lsy
03-20-2004, 12:06 PM
It was really nice to see his reaction after he wins. Hugging friends on his stand, covering his face looking so emotional...

I can see why many always like to cheer for the underdogs sometimes.

MisterQ
03-20-2004, 01:03 PM
It's a nice story. funny interview! hope this doesn't spark a war with Georgia. :lol:

MisterQ
03-20-2004, 01:05 PM
labadze

Aurora
03-20-2004, 01:10 PM
aaaaaaaaaw, it's hearthwarming to see someone so happy!

Guilles' grl
03-20-2004, 01:57 PM
Aww I wish I had stayed up and watched this match :( I bet it was awesome. But it was like 12 a.m. over here and I was just too tired. I've never heard of this guy, never seen him play. I really regret missing this match! Can't wait to see him against Henman.

¿esquímaux?
03-20-2004, 03:43 PM
Oh, you missed a question from the interview :shrug::

Q: Mr. Labadze, how do you keep that ass i shape?
IRAKLI LABADZE: I do lots of Buns'o'steel and I drop it like it's hot to keep the members of menstennisforums happy.

Aww thanks Irakli, didn't know you cared :lol:

Pea
03-20-2004, 04:48 PM
Wow, that interview was hilarious!^_^

CooCooCachoo
03-20-2004, 05:04 PM
That interview was really nice to read. It made me like him a lot, since I have never seen him play, so I have never had a chance to get an opinion on him.

alfonsojose
03-23-2004, 03:23 PM
His ass is quite good but i saw his match against Blake and he looks kinda fat. His knees looked like Myriam Casanova's. But maybe that's the secret. His power could come for his huge ass and legs. ;)