DK Eyewitness Guides vs. Fodor's See It Guides [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

DK Eyewitness Guides vs. Fodor's See It Guides

Pfloyd
12-13-2006, 01:00 AM
Yeah, I know. What the heck thread is this? It's way too specfic. So what?

I've always been a person that is interested in learning about other countries. As a result I've recently aquired interests in Travel Guides. However, I do not like your typical travel guides, those that only have written words in them with no pictures.

Fortunatley for me, I discovered that DK books have the perfect guides for mey interests. The eyewitness guides are truly breathtaking, they have amazing images, visual maps, history of each respective country, restaurant lists, among many other neat features. You literaly feel like if you are in the country the book is describing (and showing you).

I became an instant Eyewitness fan. I bought about 10 Eyewitness books about diffrent countries.

I thought that I found the best books for learning about, and traveling to a country.

There are other picture travel guides, but non of them are as good as DK.

Or so I thought. The other day in a local bookstore in Boca Raton, I found out about Fodor's See it Guides. They are also awsome. They have great pictures and are very well organized. The way Fodors displays information on these guides are great as well.

So my question to those that like travel guides is, which of these two do you like best?

Which one would you reccomend?

Deboogle!.
12-13-2006, 01:40 AM
Well this isn't helpful but I was given a Lonely Planet book by co-workers and I really like it a lot, but it has no pictures so I guess you wouldn't...

i'm gonna be in a bookstore right before Christmas doing some charity giftwrapping, I'll check out both of these books and see what I think, maybe I'll pick one up for my trip to europe next year:)

I will say though that I looked up the Eyewitness Europe phrasebook and it looks to be the best one of all. Some of the others leave out major languages or entire regions (like all of Scandinavia?!!?) so I will definitely be buying the Eyewitness one of that, but again this is not helping you much :lol:

Pfloyd
12-13-2006, 01:59 AM
Yeah, go ahead, check both these publishers books, they are great.

And dont worry, your participation is enough :)

Deboogle!.
12-13-2006, 02:04 AM
well thinking about my big trip is the only thing getting me through my final months in school so I will jump on any opportunity to talk about travel ;)

I did a quick look around amazon and I couldn't find a Fodor's See It book that covers more than one place, whereas there is an Eyewitness book for Europe in general that's going to cover all the countries I plan on going, so I guess for me that will be the one I will probably get :)

Pfloyd
12-13-2006, 02:24 AM
Yes, it is true, DK is good for covering whole continents.

But for specific countries both publishers are very good.

Mind you, the DK books that are titled "Europe" or "USA" are interesting, but they don't provide super specfic information on any country, whereas the country specific books are very detailed.

Deboogle!.
12-13-2006, 02:29 AM
Mind you, the DK books that are titled "Europe" or "USA" are interesting, but they don't provide super specfic information on any country, whereas the country specific books are very detailed.Well yes of course :D But I am going to 11 countries and mainly hitting the big cities, so taking 11 books would be kind of :cuckoo: I would rather save room (and weight!) in my suitcase for purchases :angel: :lol: I'll be spending a lot of time in Italy though, more than 1/4 of my trip, so I will look into their guides for there in particular as that might be worth a separate book :)

Pfloyd
12-13-2006, 05:15 AM
:lol:

Yeah, taking 11 books would be a bit too much.

I went to Italy last summer and was a bit dissapointed.

I liked France, even if I only went to Nice and Monte - Carlo.

Please tell me about your expiriences of Europe if you remeber.

Have Fun :)

Deboogle!.
12-13-2006, 04:44 PM
I liked France, even if I only went to Nice and Monte - Carlohehe that's exactly where I'm going to go in France :yeah: Glad to hear you liked it :)

Sure, I'll be blogging from the whole trip and i will probably have a thread here at mtf somewhere for when I'll be able to check in (gonna try to stay at hotels that offer wireless and stuff) :)

TimHenmanFan
12-15-2006, 02:45 AM
I bought both of these books for Paris before I went but ended up only taking the Fodor's see it guide. To me fodor's is much better, it gives much more practical information.

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 03:02 AM
DK Eyewitness books aren't "practical" books, they're 'deluxe' book you keep at home to look at. Fodor's see it guides are good too, but they're different.

For practical purposes, "rough guides" book are the best. They're really excellent.

Lonely Planet doesn't seem really reliable for hostels suggestion. And they seem just plain boring.

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 03:16 AM
For practical purposes, "rough guides" book are the best. They're really excellent.You mean one like this?
http://www.amazon.com/Rough-Guide-Europe-Travel-Guides/dp/1843535114/sr=8-1/qid=1166155939/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8578340-3854465?ie=UTF8&s=books

Looks very interesting. I'd rather have something practical over pretty. I like the Lonely Planet book I was given, it's just got nice capsule things about the types of things i'm interested in, but I am looking for another book for the planning stages, this one looks quite interesting, thanks for the heads up :)

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 03:23 AM
Yes. "Rough guides" really have tons of practical info that I haven't found in other similar books. I just discovered them recently and it's the only travel books I look at now, with DK Eyewitness Guides.

About "Lonely Planet", it seems they recommand bad hostels in occasions. In their defense, hostels often change managements, so it's possible a good hostel turns into a bad one in a very short span of time.

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 03:39 AM
alright I'll definitely check out the Rough Guide then, thanks for the tip!

I guess I don't care about the hostel advice b/c I'm not staying in any hostels :)

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 03:45 AM
Well almost all hostels in the US are complete crap, so I understand Americans aren't really interested. But in the rest of the world, it's usually the first option for people under 30.

For hotels / hostels, it's a must to check on the Internet for reviews, I never trust books. Even expensive hotels can be infested with bedbugs, so it's always good to read a recent review before booking.

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 04:08 AM
Well almost all hostels in the US are complete crap, so I understand Americans aren't really interested. But in the rest of the world, it's usually the first option for people under 30.

For hotels / hostels, it's a must to check on the Internet for reviews, I never trust books. Even expensive hotels can be infested with bedbugs, so it's always good to read a recent review before booking.Well that's not why I'm leery of it. i'm probably going to be traveling alone, and everyone I know and trust has advised me to stay in hotels. Plus, for me it's a really big trip and I want to do it right and I want to stay in normal hotels with air conditioning and all those things; i want it to be special and unforgettable and I want to do it right. I'm doing a ton of research online for sure, that's why I'd rather a guidebook that is good for things like sights and neighborhoods and maps and travel tips and things like that. :)

TimHenmanFan
12-15-2006, 04:12 AM
If you are doing multiple countries than just get the Lonely Planet Western Europe book. You don't want to take too many guidebooks as they will just weigh down on you

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 04:19 AM
oh, yes, i'm only going to take one :) I have the Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring, it was given to me. And I can get books free so I will get one more to help in my planning. i'm a bit of a neurotic planner ;)

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 04:45 AM
Well that's not why I'm leery of it. i'm probably going to be traveling alone, and everyone I know and trust has advised me to stay in hotels. Plus, for me it's a really big trip and I want to do it right and I want to stay in normal hotels with air conditioning and all those things; i want it to be special and unforgettable and I want to do it right. I'm doing a ton of research online for sure, that's why I'd rather a guidebook that is good for things like sights and neighborhoods and maps and travel tips and things like that. :)

If you want to "do it right", staying at hotels is an absolute must yeah.

The number 1 mistake of people travelling in Europe is trying to see too much in one trip. Allow time to just relax and do nothing.

How long do you plan to stay?

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 04:54 AM
If you want to "do it right", staying at hotels is an absolute must yeah.

The number 1 mistake of people travelling in Europe is trying to see too much in one trip. Allow time to just relax and do nothing.

How long do you plan to stay?yeah, I am worried about trying to do too much. But on the reverse, I only have one chance to do this. so I have to try to do as much as possible. 6 weeks or so is what I am currently looking at, I've tried to plan it well so the traveling is logical between cities/countries so that I will have half-days and stuff of rest time worked in.

I have an ambitious plan and I realize it, but it is a purely sight-seeing trip and it's kind of a life goal of mine, so I've just gotta push myself to do it. I'll hand-pick every sight I see and probably plan every single day so I can prevent wasting precious time. All the cities I've picked are ones I really really want to see, so I'm not going to waste time and energy on museums I don't care about or cities I couldn't care less about seeing and stuff, to try to maximize the experience for me :) I plan that every evening after dinner will be relax and do nothing time, plus I'm the type to get a lot of sleep (another reason why staying in quality places is important to me). Luckily for me one of my best friends is from Europe and has traveled all over and she is helping me a lot and giving great advice :)

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 05:02 AM
What's your plan?

You can always come back, don't forget that. ;) But 6 weeks is fine, some people try to rush an big Europe trip in 2 or 3 weeks.

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 05:07 AM
Well as of now (and it's not for over 6 months away so everything is still tentative)... a couple days in the London area (I've already been, so I just want to hit a couple things I didn't get to see when i was there several years ago), Lisbon, Barcelona, Nice/Monte Carlo, Switzerland (Geneva), Prague, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Brussels, and then about 10 days across 4 cities in Italy before going home.

I've got anywhere from 2-4 nights planned in each city depending on my research and what I think I want to do in each city, but that's adjustable depending on flight schedules and more detailed research that I plan to do over my holiday break coming up next week.

As for being able to come back, I'm not so sure. And it will probably be the only time in my life I can do it alone, on my own terms, with nothing to worry about back home... there are lots of places I want to see that I simply just can't feasibly do without killing myself, but I want to make the most of it as I possibly can and I want to hit the cities that I really really care about seeing.

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 05:15 AM
Nice. ;)

You're not including Paris, or you forgot to mention it?

It seems like a perfect trip. ;) I would add Vienna and a German city to make it absolutely "complete".

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 05:19 AM
Nice. ;)

You're not including Paris, or you forgot to mention it?

It seems like a perfect trip. ;) I would add Vienna and a German city to make it absolutely "complete".not including paris intentionally :) People who know me well and whose opinions I trust with my life have told me that I wouldn't really like it, so, I'm listening to them and I have some other reasons as well. i'm not completely closed to the possibility, but at this point it's not in my plan. I guess what it comes down to is that in each of the cities I'm planning to visit, I have very specific things I want to do/see, and if I were to go to Paris it would just be to go to Paris, and that's not what i'm trying to do with the trip. It's very bizarre, I'm aware;)

I want to go to Vienna so badly. Ideally, I would skip Switzerland to fit it in before Prague. The problem was that I was having trouble finding a way to get there from Nice. But when I have more time and actually start making real solidified plans, I'm going to check it out more thoroughly to make sure there isn't a way somehow :) Funny enough, I was actually just today telling my friend over lunch that what I really wanted was a "complete" trip - to see all the different types of countries and areas and whatnot to try to soak it all in. So we'll see. My parents are going to have a heart attack when they find out what i'm planning :D

Thanks for all your advice!!

Paul Banks
12-15-2006, 05:30 AM
That's kind of funny to not include Paris in such a trip :lol:, but you know, that's good that you don't feel obligated to go to Paris if you're not that interested. What matters is that you follow your interests and what you feel like seeing.

What are the specific things you want to do/see, I'm curious now. :p

Deboogle!.
12-15-2006, 05:41 AM
That's kind of funny to not include Paris in such a trip :lol:, but you know, that's good that you don't feel obligated to go to Paris if you're not that interested. What matters is that you follow your interests and what you feel like seeing.

What are the specific things you want to do/see, I'm curious now. :pI know. I'm weird :) but I would rather have chocolate and waffles and fries in Belgium and see the pretty Bruges than go to another humongous city like Paris just to see a big ugly steel structure or something. I don't care about art, so seeing the Louvre doesn't particularly interest me, and I can practice my french in nice and belgium. I mean, i'm sure paris is fantastic, but I don't have a sentimental connection to seeing it like I do with every city on my list.

Well, I like historical things, castles, buildings/churches, cultural things, interesting neighborhoods, etc. i want to really try to just experience the food and culture and atmosphere of each country by just walking around and stuff, as opposed to trying to go to all the museums or whatever. I want to go to an IKEA in Sweden and have pizza and gelato on the street in Rome and those kinds of things. Besides a few specifics like the Anne Frank House, the Shakespeare things in Stratford-upon-Avon, the San Lorenzo market in Florence, etc., I haven't drawn up a list of things in each place I want to see - that's my goal for my break :) For example, tonight I watched a show on the French Riviera tonight and the woman hosting it was just walking around Nice's old town and it just looked great with the old ruins and little cafes and shops up and down the street, I just sort of want to walk around and experience it all.

I guess it's more of a sentimental trip than anything, a gift to myself for finally finishing school, which is why I want a couple of really good guidebooks to help my planning so that I can try to avoid some of the tourist traps and instead really see what each city and country has to offer.