whats your mentality? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

whats your mentality?

master935
11-09-2006, 06:23 AM
When you play in a tournament what sort of mentality do you have? do you tend to act aggressively? or do you act timid?. I want to know because the last four matches that I have played I have lost and I think it is because I didn't have the right mentality. I think that if I had a more aggressive mentality and constantly went after my opponent(and the ball) I would have won at least some of them.

master935
11-12-2006, 07:16 AM
this post is supposed to be answered not just read, I don't know how it got stickied but it did. So if anyone has an answer to this that would help me out. thanks

$@M
11-12-2006, 10:14 AM
hmmm... tough question i think... I'd say it depends on a lot of factors...

1) your style of play; if you normally play agressive, then going after the shots agressively would suit you.

2) your mood on the day; if you feel you're hitting the ball well that day and you feel in good shape that day, then go for it.

3) your opponents style of play; you need to adapt to how he's playing and the way he came out, if he looks weak, then you might as well take advantage and take it to him.

However, my best suggestion is try not to think too much about anything else other than your own game. Try to concentrate on the each point and how to finish them off... the more you think, the more you're likely to lose your concentration...

hope you find this useful. :wavey:

master935
11-13-2006, 07:18 AM
I don't mean to be rude here but, no it didn't help. Why should I conform to my opponent if he is not doing the same?. If I come out and be really aggressive from the start than wouldn't he start to play defensively? I guess what I'm trying to say is that I tend to do things better when I'm angry, this may not work for you but for me it does, so if I play angry or "aggressively" than I should be able to shake this fear that I have of loosing the point from hitting the ball out, and in doing so start to hit the shots that I should to win the point.

Solat
11-16-2006, 06:37 AM
I don't mean to be rude here but, no it didn't help. Why should I conform to my opponent if he is not doing the same?. If I come out and be really aggressive from the start than wouldn't he start to play defensively? I guess what I'm trying to say is that I tend to do things better when I'm angry, this may not work for you but for me it does, so if I play angry or "aggressively" than I should be able to shake this fear that I have of loosing the point from hitting the ball out, and in doing so start to hit the shots that I should to win the point.

I think $@M's post was very relevant,

but IMHO, there is a difference between angry and aggression on a tennis court, you don't have to be angry to be aggressive and you don't have to be aggressive if you are angry.

if you have a naturally attacking game then being positive in your stroke play should allow a naturally aggressive game, but also the understanding that you will make more errors than someone less aggressive, its a give and take, are you willing to take the risk?

eg. i play serve volley, i am a naturally attacking player, i am tall and movement is a weakness for me so short points are obviously benefitial to me. I understand that i will get passed / lobbed alot and miss alot of shots in an attempt to put pressure on my opponent, however i figure i am going to get free points thru the pressure and i am also going to hit more winners by playing aggressive. Some days when i'm on its hot, when i'm off its horrible, but i like to live by the sword die by the sword.

Some players (hewitt) get angry but don't play more aggressively, they just get more determined to win at whatever cost, doing whatever it takes chasing every ball, grinding their opponent to the ground, do you have the fitness, the attitude and concentration to achieve this?

i think start off the match by playing confidently, use your strengths, hit cross court alot, build up your self- belief to then begin to take the game to your opponent.

xyx
11-16-2006, 07:00 PM
I think it can be an advantage for you when you get angry because then you put all of your power in your own game and that`s the way you play better then... so try it...

RickDaStick
11-17-2006, 01:03 AM
I hit the ball as hard as I can. Sometimes it goes in for a winner and sometimes it hits the back of the fence.

PTR_Professional
11-20-2006, 12:20 AM
Ultimately to excel and be among the best you can be you need a...

champions mentality!

This is where you the player, reach a certain level of your playing standard that the mental skills become as important (if not more!) to your performance as the physical, technical and tactical.

Remember that your mind works most efficiently when told what to do rather than what not to do.

Its crucial to understand the benefits of and know how to correctly visualise, take control of yourself and your performance, control anxiety, goal setting, and behavioural patterns.

As a Professional Tennis coach and Sports Scientist with a Degree in Sports Science. I have worked with many players on mental skills training, nutrition, performance analysis, sports injury, exercise physiology and biomechanics.

If anyone is interested in developing their mental training skills, I provide a very popular course which provides the tools through a personal email counselling, for further details get in contact with me.

Hope this helps

empressdiver
11-20-2006, 06:31 PM
Tennis is an interactive game - which means that winning a close tennis match is an exercise in problem-solving. You and your opponent each have your own relative strengths and weaknesses. Within a player's own capabilities, he needs to adapt to what he finds is working and not working during a match. Clearly, an all-court type of player will have more tools and therefore more flexibility in doing what is necessary to win the match. If a player can only play one style of tennis then his options in dealing with a strong opponent are somewhat more limited.

For most people, problem-solving is best done with a calm, relaxed mindset. A player's focus early in a match, especially against an unknown opponent, should be to evaluate the other player's abilities. This process should be used no matter what level of tennis is being played. Most players in amateur ranks still have technical shot-making weaknesses that can be detected and exploited during a match. At the pro level, a player needs to have a strong all-around game and one killer shot, which then makes the mental part of the game even larger.