Paradorn keeps the faith and talks about plans to bring Rafa to Thailand :) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Paradorn keeps the faith and talks about plans to bring Rafa to Thailand :)

DhammaTiger
10-15-2006, 03:33 PM
"PARADORN KEEPS THE FAITH

Thai tennis star has gone back to basics in a bid to regain his former status on the international circuit

Story by ROBERT DAVIS

Paradorn serves to Oliver Rochus at the Stockholm Open last week. — AFP

The portraits of past champions hang high up on the pine walls of Stockholm's Kungliga Tennis Hallen: Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Stefan Edberg and Paradorn Srichaphan. Paradorn's picture shows a boyish grin, fists raised in triumph with the look of a proud champion.

Today, the smile on Paradorn's face remains, but the innocence is gone. Paradorn Srichaphan has grown up. He is a man now, a seasoned veteran of the professional tennis tour.

At the height of Paradorn Fever, he was flooded with dinner requests from Thai ambassadors, diplomats and celebrities in whichever country he played.

Fans filled the seats to catch a glimpse of the Thai sensation and begged for photographs.

Last week, I stood beside Paradorn as he was walking alone outside the Grand Hotel in Stockholm. A throng of fans was gathered and screaming at the Brazilian football team, who were staying at the same hotel.

''Enjoy it while it lasts,'' Paradorn said to no one in particular with a faint smile. ''It will not last forever.''

Paradorn receives a hero's welcome in 2002 after winning the TD Waterhouse Cup in New York. — SOMCHAI POOMLARD

Strange I thought. The tone of his voice did not sound like a twenty-seven year-old who has earned more than $3m in prize money alone, but more like someone who has ridden the emotional roller coaster of the tennis tour, a young man who has survived the highs and lows of fame.

Paradorn is not bitter at the many people who used to praise his every move and scream for autographs.

Nor is he sarcastic at the many officials and delegates who used to stand beside him at press conferences and ask for small favours afterwards.

Now, many of the same people criticize his tennis, his lifestyle and anything else they can think of. Nor is he cynical about the intended plans to bring Rafael Nadal to Thailand to play an exhibition with another Spanish tennis player.

It has only been three years since the excitement of the Paradorn Super Tour filled the sports pages.

''Rafa is a great player,'' Paradorn said.

''It would be great for Thailand if he came and a lot of kids would be inspired to play tennis if they could see him.''

As the former National Coach of Thailand, I saw first-hand the Paradorn Effect on tennis in Thailand.

Ironically, today it is often not even Paradorn among the headlines. Recently, sponsors such as PTT, Adidas, and Singha have all contributed more money to tennis. Another indirect result from the Paradorn Effect. Much like Bjorn Borg, who started the Swedish tennis boom, so Paradorn created the tennis craze in Thailand.

Now other younger tennis players are developing on the international circuit.

The question on the minds of many of Paradorn's loyal fans is _ does the fire still burn inside him bright enough to compete with the world's best? And more importantly, does he have the motivation to prepare properly, and to undertake the necessary training to compete at the highest level?

While many people doubted his desire, few knew the truth behind the scenes. This past December, Paradorn made a commitment to his fitness and reclaiming his form in tennis.

He worked so hard that many of the players began calling him ''Rocky''. He spent more time on the practice court with his brother and coach Tanakorn, hitting baskets of balls and doing more drills. He left home and went to Europe earlier than normal to prepare for the clay court season.

With every extra training session, his expectations rose. And so did the pressure he put on himself to perform.

Last week, I watched both of his matches at the Stockholm Open, a tournament where he is a former champion (2002) and one of last year's finalists.

The grip-and-rip flashy style that once electrified his fans and placed fear in the hearts of his opponents has been replaced by a more disciplined shot selection, a more patient strategy.

He is learning how to win by playing solid and not just trying to blast his opponents off the court.

Although, this does not mean that he has lost the ability to step up and take charge with an offensive explosion that rocks players off the court.

He showed just that in a fantastic display of firepower against Oliver Rochus in the second round. Down a set and a break in the second, Rochus stepped up to the baseline serving for the match at 5-4. Paradorn dug down deep, summoning up his best tennis yet, and clawed his way back into the match with aggressive body shots that very nearly broke the feisty Rochus in half.

In the second set tiebreak, Paradorn ripped a forehand down-the-line winner on the full run. The crowd roared and Paradorn pumped the air with an uppercut and then jogged over to the crowd and gave high fives to a group of young boys watching from the front row. The lucky boys were all smiles at this act of enthusiasm.

Paradorn would go on to lose that match in the third set, but he was a winner with everyone in attendance and proved he could still entertain a crowd.

This year Paradorn has won 25 matches, and lost 28. His prize money for the year stands at $425,305. But maybe his biggest reward is not trophies or prize money, but one just as valuable. For Paradorn has learned one of life's greatest lessons _ that hard work alone does not guarantee immediate gratification.

''I have never worked so hard as this past year,'' Paradorn admitted after the loss. ''I know that I am a better person for it, and the pay-off will come sometime.

''I just have to keep believing in myself.''

And so do we."

http://www.bangkokpost.com/Sports/15Oct2006_sport01.php


Choke dee na khrup Khun Paradorn :bounce: I believe in you also :yeah:
On the topic of bringing Rafa and another Spanish player to play an exhibition, I think that will be the greatest boost for Thai Tennis since Paradorn burst into the scene. Vamos Rafa !!!! Chaiyo Paradorn and Thailand!!!

morningglory
10-15-2006, 05:44 PM
yeah... Paradorn is a nice guy...
yet I think the main criticism he received was refusing to have a coach other than his dad for so long... and not much of anything else...

DhammaTiger
10-15-2006, 09:46 PM
yeah... Paradorn is a nice guy...
yet I think the main criticism he received was refusing to have a coach other than his dad for so long... and not much of anything else...

What you are saying is true to an extent. But look at it from another perspective, almost all top coaches are farangs, and I doubt they can understand a thai as much as a paerson knowing how to speak the same language could. I think for a long while Khun Paradorn's English was not fluent. I remember when he was acheiving his best results and winning titles, H.M the King asked him to improve his English. To reinforce the point I just made PBall is not different from other players who prefer their fellow country men or close relatives to coach them. All the Spanish players have Spanish coaches, Rafa has his uncle as a coach and Davydenko has his brother. I don't have to say what both achieved. Also in defence of Paradorn and his dad, is that together they cracked the top of the Atp rankings and won more than one title. That in itself is no mean achievement. Going back to my first point about difficulty with a farang coach, Ia m speaking as a non-Thai, who loves Thailand very much and who has spent over twenty years being associated with Thailand. Until today despite my having an extremely close Thai friend, I still find myself, sometimes in difficulties withThai people due to misunderstanding of cultural nuances. This is not meant as a criticism or is unique to Thailand but is true of every culture and country. Third reason, is that paradorn doesn't have quality players in Thailand to practice with , the only exception is Danai of course. So it's extremely difficult for him to progress in such circumstances.
I am sorry for giving such long winded reply but I am not only am a fan of Paradorn but as you have gathered a lover of Thailand and Thai people as well. So, my opinion on the subject is obviously biased.

Choke dee na Khup Khun Ball:worship:

~EMiLiTA~
10-16-2006, 06:31 AM
"

http://www.bangkokpost.com/Sports/15Oct2006_sport01.php

On the topic of bringing Rafa and another Spanish player to play an exhibition, I think that will be the greatest boost for Thai Tennis since Paradorn burst into the scene. Vamos Rafa !!!! Chaiyo Paradorn and Thailand!!!

Rafa and Nalbandian are playing an exhibition in Hua Hin on new year's eve

an interesting article on paradorn, thanks. i remember when he was playing out of his mind in 2002. he did a lot for asian tennis...hopefully he can get back to that level again

MariaV
10-16-2006, 08:00 AM
What you are saying is true to an extent. But look at it from another perspective, almost all top coaches are farangs, and I doubt they can understand a thai as much as a paerson knowing how to speak the same language could. I think for a long while Khun Paradorn's English was not fluent. I remember when he was acheiving his best results and winning titles, H.M the King asked him to improve his English. To reinforce the point I just made PBall is not different from other players who prefer their fellow country men or close relatives to coach them. All the Spanish players have Spanish coaches, Rafa has his uncle as a coach and Davydenko has his brother. I don't have to say what both achieved. Also in defence of Paradorn and his dad, is that together they cracked the top of the Atp rankings and won more than one title. That in itself is no mean achievement. Going back to my first point about difficulty with a farang coach, Ia m speaking as a non-Thai, who loves Thailand very much and who has spent over twenty years being associated with Thailand. Until today despite my having an extremely close Thai friend, I still find myself, sometimes in difficulties withThai people due to misunderstanding of cultural nuances. This is not meant as a criticism or is unique to Thailand but is true of every culture and country. Third reason, is that paradorn doesn't have quality players in Thailand to practice with , the only exception is Danai of course. So it's extremely difficult for him to progress in such circumstances.
I am sorry for giving such long winded reply but I am not only am a fan of Paradorn but as you have gathered a lover of Thailand and Thai people as well. So, my opinion on the subject is obviously biased.

Choke dee na Khup Khun Ball:worship:

Ali! :wavey: :hug:
Shamil Taprischev has on many occasions said Marat needs a Russian coach who understands his mentality fully (as no foreign coach could) and the example with Volkov seems to prove him right.

DhammaTiger
10-17-2006, 08:35 PM
Ali! :wavey: :hug:
Shamil Taprischev has on many occasions said Marat needs a Russian coach who understands his mentality fully (as no foreign coach could) and the example with Volkov seems to prove him right.

yes, I agree with you Volkov seems to prove Shamil and may I say me right on this point.

I just hope Paradorn does well in Madrid even though he is playing one of my favourite players tomorrow. Even if Paradorn loses to Gonzo, I just hope hie plays well enough to get back his confidence for next year. Choke dee na khup P'Ball :yeah;

sawan66278
10-17-2006, 08:53 PM
Whenever I watch Paradorn, I always feel like he could have accomplished a great deal more :sad: ...his game is a joy to watch...

i love paradorn
10-17-2006, 09:31 PM
Yes, I pray that he achieves the results he did in 2002. But, he hasn't resorted to his old gunslinging style that got him into the Top 10. Remember, in 2002, we were all saying that in order for him to achieve the next level, he needs to play more patiently. Well, look where it has gotten him now.

DhammaTiger
10-17-2006, 10:28 PM
Yes, I pray that he achieves the results he did in 2002. But, he hasn't resorted to his old gunslinging style that got him into the Top 10. Remember, in 2002, we were all saying that in order for him to achieve the next level, he needs to play more patiently. Well, look where it has gotten him now.

I think you are right to a point, however, I having learned to play patiently is good over all too. I think the way forward for P'Ball is to find a happy medium,where he can use both styles to unsettle his opponents. don't you think that would be more effective?
Anyway good luck to him tomorrow. Choke dee na khup Khun Paradorn :worship:

KaxMisha
10-17-2006, 10:58 PM
"

http://www.bangkokpost.com/Sports/15Oct2006_sport01.php


Choke dee na khrup Khun Paradorn :bounce: I believe in you also :yeah:
On the topic of bringing Rafa and another Spanish player to play an exhibition, I think that will be the greatest boost for Thai Tennis since Paradorn burst into the scene. Vamos Rafa !!!! Chaiyo Paradorn and Thailand!!!

I sure hope Paradorn finds his best tennis again. I though that he might have done it again when he beat Nalbandian and reached the semi of a TMS earlier this year, but apparantly, I was wrong. Paradorn's tennis is just breathtakingly beautiful. His backhand is amazing. His forehand is great. His court speed is virtually unmatched. He's got it all. It's really hard to see why he isn't doing better than he is at the moment. I was fortunate enough to see him live at his peak, defeating Rios for the Stockholm Open title in 2002 and I'm telling you - if he finds that level again, he is a easily a top ten player. On another note, his English back then was flawless, just like it is now. He does like to say "you know" a whole lot, though. ;)

DhammaTiger
10-18-2006, 03:46 PM
I sure hope Paradorn finds his best tennis again. I though that he might have done it again when he beat Nalbandian and reached the semi of a TMS earlier this year, but apparantly, I was wrong. Paradorn's tennis is just breathtakingly beautiful. His backhand is amazing. His forehand is great. His court speed is virtually unmatched. He's got it all. It's really hard to see why he isn't doing better than he is at the moment. I was fortunate enough to see him live at his peak, defeating Rios for the Stockholm Open title in 2002 and I'm telling you - if he finds that level again, he is a easily a top ten player. On another note, his English back then was flawless, just like it is now. He does like to say "you know" a whole lot, though. ;)

I agree with everything you have said, but on being fluent in English, well it's debatable. Remember that English is not his mother tongue, and secondly, you will find very few Thais to be fluent in a second language. But I don't want to get into this because it's not relevant to his game. In his match with Fernando, I was neutral, because I like them both very much. In the first Paradorn was dominating and had four set points which he squandered because he wasn't patient enough. I am glad he won the second set, but it must have been quite turnaround as Fernando had broken him twice. Unfortunately, I had to go to my office and missed the closing part of the second set and the third set completely. I guess Paradorn should now seriously work on his meditation because in the earlier part of this year it helped him a great deal when he reached the semis in Indian Wells.
Choke dee na khrup khun Paradorn for next year :hatoff: