The 2004 DC Thread is Now Retired [Archive] - Page 6 - MensTennisForums.com

The 2004 DC Thread is Now Retired

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snaillyyy
11-30-2004, 05:23 PM
Thanks again Deb :wavey:

and nothing quite like a closeup :rolleyes:

Deboogle!.
11-30-2004, 05:31 PM
HAHAHA That pic is funny. But nice to see him smile I guess :p

Another article before I go to class :o
========

U.S. will need patience in Davis Cup final

Stephen Wade / Associated Press
Posted: 24 minutes ago



SEVILLE, Spain - Andy Roddick is known for his explosive play. He'll need patience, too, in the Davis Cup final against Spain.

Playing on red clay in front of a record crowd, Roddick may need to turn down his power when the best-of-five series starts Friday at the Olympic Stadium.
"We're not going to be able to just hit through these guys in a five-set match," said American captain Patrick McEnroe, who is trying to lead the United States to its first Davis title since 1995. "We're going to have to do some of that, but we're going to have to play smart."

Roddick, Mardy Fish and doubles partners Mike and Bob Bryan are underdogs. They would be the favorites any place but Spain - and on any other surface.

"We know the Spanish are very tough at home," McEnroe said. "But I think if we can win here it will make it all the sweeter in probably the toughest place to play away from home."

Roddick has a 12-0 career record against all members of the Spanish team - Carlos Moya, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Tommy Robredo and Rafael Nadal. But only one of those wins came on clay. Fish is 4-1 against the Spaniards.

Playing in their third final in five years, the Spaniards are relying on the crowd, the clay and a balanced lineup. Spain has won the Davis Cup only once - in Barcelona four years ago. The United States has a record 31 Davis Cup titles, but hadn't reached the final since 1997.

Spain picked the southern city of Seville for the final because the sea-level venue reduces the Americans' power. The temporary clay-court setup has been configured to hold 26,600 fans.

"It will be a very humbling experience to play in front of that many people," Roddick said Tuesday. "Having said I need patience, I will still have to play my game and do what I do well. I have to stick to my weapons, which is hitting big shots."

Moya and Ferrero are former No. 1-ranked players and French Open champions. No. 5-ranked Moya is sure to play singles. Ferrero is in doubt, however, after a season that has included chickenpox, broken ribs and wrist problems. He is currently nursing a blister on his right thumb.

Jordi Arrese, one of the three Spanish captains, won't announce his lineup until Thursday's draw. Robredo is ranked No. 13 and is coming off a strong season. Ferrero is ranked No. 31, and 18-year-old Nadal is No. 51.

"They (Americans) are not going to change their style of play," Arrese said. "We have to make them run for a few more balls, make the rallies longer. One thing is for sure, playing on clay is their handicap. They don't have great results on clay and they're not as good away from home."

Asked how much he would bet on a Spanish win, Arrese replied: "I would bet anything on us winning - except my wife."

The Americans are counting on Roddick and the Bryan twins, who are 4-0 in Davis Cup play since joining the team just over a year ago. A victory for Fish would be a bonus, and probably seal an American victory.

"We've all got pretty good records against the Spaniards and hopefully we can carry that over," Fish said. "But it's tough to look a lot at records. You kind of throw everything out in the Davis Cup."

Spain has spent about US$1 million (?755,000) to install the clay court inside its 60,000-seat Olympic Stadium, which hosted the world track and field championships in 1999. The stadium has a roof, but the sides will be open, giving it an outdoor feel.

Each day's attendance is expected to break the record for a "sanctioned" tennis match.

The existing mark was set in 1954 in Sydney, Australia, when 25,578 watched the United States defeat Australia in the Davis final.

Several exhibition tennis matches have drawn bigger crowds. The 1973 match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs in the Houston Astrodome drew 30,472.

"I've only played a couple of times before 23,000 fans, and that was in the U.S. Open," Ferrero said. "A crowd that size you really notice. You go out trying to play like always, but with size of the crowd - and this time a home crowd - it can make you nervous."

Bob Bryan said the crowd might even help the Americans.

"It's the biggest crowd any of us will ever play in front of," he said. "It will make the match that much more special and pump everyone up that much more."

Golfnduck
11-30-2004, 06:57 PM
I'm sooo pumped for Davis Cup!!!! Should be exciting to watch on tv. I hope all the boys step up their games.

Havok
11-30-2004, 07:13 PM
:eek: He actually shaved.:lol:

Deboogle!.
11-30-2004, 07:32 PM
it's so polite of all these reporters to edit out all of jcf's "you knows". (:

:spit: :haha: :haha: :haha:

Deboogle!.
11-30-2004, 07:39 PM
yeah, it's lunch break and a few of us are going to break down criminal law... so, no MSN at lunch today. sowwies

smucav
11-30-2004, 07:43 PM
On that note, can anyone confirm the following? I did not see the 2002 DC. Was the Houston crowd really as rude as the Spaniards made it out to be? If so, that's a shame.

I don't remember the crowd cheering that much one way or the other. All of the U.S. wins were completely one-sided so there wasn't very much tension at all. The only close match was A.CORRETJA (ESP) def. P.SAMPRAS (USA) 4-6 4-6 7-6(4) 7-5 6-4. I don't remember the crowd booing Corretja after he started making a comeback. I think it was the opposite: a deafening silence fell upon the crowd after Pete squandered a two set lead on grass to Corretja.

http://www.daviscup.com/ties/tie.asp?tie=100002883

MisterQ
11-30-2004, 07:51 PM
I don't remember the crowd cheering that much one way or the other. All of the U.S. wins were completely one-sided so there wasn't very much tension at all. The only close match was A.CORRETJA (ESP) def. P.SAMPRAS (USA) 4-6 4-6 7-6(4) 7-5 6-4. I don't remember the crowd booing Corretja after he started making a comeback. I think it was the opposite: a deafening silence fell upon the crowd after Pete squandered a two set lead on grass to Corretja.

http://www.daviscup.com/ties/tie.asp?tie=100002883

Ironically, the current USA team should look to Corretja's victory as inspiration this year. Anything can happen regardless of the surface, even something as crazy as that.

andyroxmysox12191
11-30-2004, 08:07 PM
thanks for all the pics and articles :kiss: i'm hoping this is gonna be a good and close one :)

tangerine_dream
11-30-2004, 08:43 PM
Thanks smucav :)

Seeing as how I am so awesome at predicting these things (just look at all the wealth I've accumulated in vcash!) I am predicting that Spain will win, 3-2. Andy will win one match (not sure if it'll be against JCF or Moya but whatever...), the Bryans will win theirs, and Mardy, poor Mardy, will lose both of his. :o

Still. At least we made it to the finals :banana: and even though we're not great on clay, I would be surprised if it were a total blowout 3-0 (I don't think the dead rubbers would be played; the hostile audience would leave too bad a taste in the Americans' mouths).

Golfnduck
11-30-2004, 08:48 PM
I'm predicting a 3-2 win for the US. I feel like I'm out on a tiny little twig for this one, but I'm sticking to it. I think the Bryans will win a close match, and Andy will win both of his (since he beat Henman and Safin back to back, I think anything is possible).

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 01:23 AM
Another pic of the "yankis" LMAO

Golfnduck
12-01-2004, 03:24 AM
Andy must have seen something strange. Or a reporter asked another dumb question :smash:

rue
12-01-2004, 03:36 AM
it's so polite of all these reporters to edit out all of jcf's "you knows". (:


:haha: :haha:

superpinkone37
12-01-2004, 03:38 AM
hahah that picture is pretty funny. well, actually most of the recent DC andy pics have been pretty hilarious :lol:

thanks for all those articles and pictures you have been posting Deb :kiss:

and yay, im so excited for DC! well, im freaking nervous too, but i seriously need to see some tennis. anyways, i may or may not be "sick" on friday, because its not like im sick a lot and my mom wouldnt really care i dont think lol

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 02:20 PM
The boys went to the US Consulate in Spain today :) Maybe one of our wireimage hookups will get us the pic hinthint ;)

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 02:53 PM
Hot off the press :cool: lol

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041201/i/r3770843401.jpg

Very cute getup Andy. The I'm from the 'hood look - that'll scare the other side!!!

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041201/i/r799324541.jpg

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 02:53 PM
Deb, I :hearts: your new av but it's kinda depressing because they look defeated, you know? It looks like Mardy's saying to Andy, "I don't know if I can do this," and Andy's saying, "I don't know if you can either, why the hell are you on this team, man? You are dragging us DOWN!!!!!!!"

Well, maybe not. ;)

And who's dropping hints again? :angel:

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 02:55 PM
*looks around* :angel:

btw tangy, I didn't get a package from you..... *hopes she didn't send it*

Socket
12-01-2004, 02:56 PM
I don't remember the crowd cheering that much one way or the other. All of the U.S. wins were completely one-sided so there wasn't very much tension at all. The only close match was A.CORRETJA (ESP) def. P.SAMPRAS (USA) 4-6 4-6 7-6(4) 7-5 6-4. I don't remember the crowd booing Corretja after he started making a comeback. I think it was the opposite: a deafening silence fell upon the crowd after Pete squandered a two set lead on grass to Corretja.

http://www.daviscup.com/ties/tie.asp?tie=100002883
That's my recollection, too. Jordi Arrese is just trash-talking to pump his team up, that's all.

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 02:58 PM
btw tangy, I didn't get a package from you..... *hopes she didn't send it*

Why are you hoping I didn't send it yet? :scared:

Hi Socket! :wavey: Check out my Lleyton av. ;)

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 02:59 PM
Hi Socket!! :wavey:

Tangy, because if you sent it last week before the holiday and I still haven't gotten it yet, that's cause for concern.... LOL

More pics from today...

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 03:02 PM
yeeeeaaahhh, check out the bubble butt in pic 2 :hearts: :drool: yum :lick: :lol: :angel:

oh, and the other pics are great too, thanks Debs :kiss:

I love the last pic of Andy with the kids. :D

Here's an article trying to downplay Spain's chances of destroying the US. Please. Who are they kidding? Even a sick JCF could beat Andy on clay.

Ferrero the Weakest Spanish Link in Davis Cup Final
December*01,*2004

While the Spaniards remain the overwhelming favorites in the Davis Cup final versus the U.S. on their home red soil this weekend, the Americans can keep hope alive -- the slight crack in the Spanish armor is Juan Carlos Ferrero.

The Americans could easily get whitewashed 5-0 as they did in their last Davis Cup final appearance at the hands of Sweden in 1997. But if Roddick draws Ferrero on day one, and the Bryans win the Saturday doubles, the U.S. could be looking at a 2-1 lead entering Sunday.

Now wait a minute, you say. That's crazy talk.

Ferrero would have to have his worst day, and Roddick his best, for the American to record a best-of-five set win over a former Roland Garros champion.

And such a Spanish nightmare could very well happen.

"He has always beaten us, but on fast surfaces," said Ferrero of Roddick's record against Spaniards, speaking to the sports daily Marca. "Now we will be on clay, which is our surface...He is a complicated player for us. I have only played him once, and I lost, in the 2003 final of the US Open."

Ferrero began the year strong with a semifinal at the Australian Open (l. to Federer) and a runner-up effort at Rotterdam (l. to Hewitt), but beginning in April the Spaniard was struck with what would become a series of injuries and illnesses that stole his confidence and left his game in shambles. After a devastating second-round loss at Roland Garros, Ferrero advanced only once out of the second round at an event during the remaining five months of tour play.

His loss at the Masters Series-Madrid in October to the unheralded Luis "Me So" Horna convinced Ferrero that his regular-tour season was over, and his time would be better spent preparing for the Davis Cup final on the welcoming red clay.

Adding to Ferrero's crisis of confidence is a late-season switch to a new racquet, which has turned out to be a not-so-easy transition at that. But now with some substantial time on the clay practice courts, the wiry "Mosquito" says things are coming around.

"I have been training for more than two weeks on claycourts and have been working especially hard on building up my resistance so as to last five sets which has included weight sessions in the gym," Ferrero said. "In the last few days I have toned it down a stage so I won't be tired in the games. Before I was mentally tired and needed a break, to play more would not make much of a difference in the rankings and it was more important to prepare myself for the Davis Cup. I am now feeling a lot better with my new racket and have more confidence."

The super-slow-engineered court and the low altitude of Seville will further aid Ferrero, but it is hard to believe the former No. 1 could shake off his worst year by simply hitting the treadmill and practicing with a new stick. Ferrero's problem is in his head. The pressure of 26,000 screaming Spaniards and facing an opponent (in Roddick) he has never beaten will add to the grand test of Ferrero's mental state on day one.

Unless of course he draws Mardy Fish, with the No. 2 American putting up a 0-1 claycourt win-loss this year, after going 4-6 in 2003 on the dirt, and 4-3 in 2002 (at the challenger level).

Ferrero has already this week alluded to the pressure of playing in front of the home crowd.

"I've only played a couple of times before 23,000 fans, and that was in the US Open," Ferrero said. "A crowd that size you really notice. You go out trying to play like always, but with size of the crowd -- and this time a home crowd -- it can make you nervous."

Ferrero reportedly has yet another problem to deal with after a week's worst of claycourt practice -- a blister on his right thumb.

It remains to be seen whether Roddick can maintain his trademark swagger in front of a record crowd for a pro tennis event estimated at 26,600. The Spanish Tennis Federation has spent approximately $8 million on the event as a whole, including constructing the covered claycourt.

"It will be a very humbling experience to play in front of that many people," Roddick said Tuesday. "Having said I need patience, I will still have to play my game and do what I do well. I have to stick to my weapons, which is hitting big shots."

While oddsmakers are calculating the number of sets Fish will get bageled, the American is optimistic on his chances.

"We've all got pretty good records against the Spaniards (on hardcourts) and hopefully we can carry that over," Fish said. "But it's tough to look a lot at records. You kind of throw everything out in the Davis Cup."

The Spaniards, who have already thrown out Fish as a threat, now focus their strategy on the big-hitting Roddick and the French Open champ Bryan brothers.

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 04:07 PM
Bad practice, Andy? Or bad pizza? :scratch:

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10612011648.spain_us_tennis_davis_cup__jj10 6.jpg
U.S. tennis player Andy Roddick holds his destroyed tennis racket after he smashed it during a training match against his teammate Mardy Fish in Seville, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2004.

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10812011656.davis_cup_final_jj108.jpg
American tennis player Andy Roddick hits a tennis ball with a baseball bat during his training in Seville, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2004.

Not crazy about this tennis boy in the hood look....
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20041201/capt.sge.kwz28.011204163909.photo00.photo.default-373x279.jpg

MOYA: RODDICK WILL HAVE FEET OF CLAY

Carlos Moya is in confident mood as Spain complete preparations for their Davis Cup final clash with the United States.

And he is convinced that the clay court the Spanish have prepared in Seville will allow him to turn the tables on the thunderbolt serve of American ace Andy Roddick.

Roddick has a 100 percent record over the members of the Spanish Davis Cup team, having won 12 matches against Moya, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Rafael Nadal and Tommy Robredo.

However, in Seville, the American is going to have to play on a specially prepared clay court, which to some extent is going to limit the effectiveness of his rocket serve.

"Roddick has always beaten me on fast courts and in the United States, in what are the best conditions for him," said Moya in Diario AS.

"All of that is going to change here, this is the Davis Cup and it is over five sets," he added.

Moya feels he has been unlucky to lose against the American in their previous meetings.

"You could say that in two of the matches he beat me in, he won by a miracle. In those matches, I was serving to finish the match and I was within one or two points of beating him.

"It wasn't to be, but I hope that will change now," he said.

Moya has an extra incentive for wanting to win this time around, especially after injury kept him out of Spain's only other Davis Cup triumph in Barcelona four years ago.

"I had bad luck with injuries all that year. I was out of action for six months with a back problem which meant that I missed the Sydney Olympics and also the Davis Cup final," he said.

"When I saw the team had won the final I got it into my head that one day I would have to win it as well.

"We lost in Australia last year, but we proved that anything was possible and now we are favourites."

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 04:20 PM
LOL I just saw the pics... love that he's having good practices :rolleyes: But are practice matches with Mardy really the best way to prepare? He's better off practicing with Vinny, someone who's actually capable of running around the court and getting balls back!

And I still am :scratch: why they have actual baseball bats... today's aluminum, I see... it's just funny/odd LOL

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 04:27 PM
I'm sure they have the bats around to beat off Vinny if necessary.

Socket
12-01-2004, 04:29 PM
Hi, tangy! Hi, Debstah! :wavey: Cute av, tangy! :worship:

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 04:32 PM
tangy! :haha: :haha:

Socket, nice to see you 'round these parts ;)

Yahoo has added more pics from the AP - an action shot of the racquet-smashing :o and a closeup of the baseball... wrong sport, dude!!!!

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 05:15 PM
"Dammit Mardy, I told you I wanted pepperoni on my pizza!"
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10912011712.davis_cup_final_jj109.jpg
American tennis player Andy Roddick smashes his racket during a training match against his teammate, Mardy Fish, in Seville, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2004.

*"Don't even think of breathing on my pizza, Vinny."
*edited due to Carly's inspiration below ;)
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041201/i/r2817283687.jpg

snaillyyy
12-01-2004, 05:19 PM
Deb and Tangy thanks for the articles and pics :kiss: :hug:

Lovely smashed racquet Andy :rolleyes: ..did Vinny get to close to the pizza :p

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 05:40 PM
more baseball.... I still don't get it though :rolleyes:

star
12-01-2004, 05:48 PM
What is it about baseball you don't understand?

I think they do it to relax and have fun.

J. Corwin
12-01-2004, 05:49 PM
Andy better not have smashed that racket cuz he was losing to Mardy on the clay! :eek: ;)

star
12-01-2004, 05:49 PM
and you posted getty images! I am SO going to report you.

:haha: :haha:

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 05:53 PM
huh??? :confused: star, you've lost me :awww:

Oh, the reason I'm confused about the baseball is why they're using actual bats. Usually they do it with unstrung racquets and that's part of the humor of it.
===============

Davis Cup World Group Final Preview

12/1/04 3:37 PM
By Jason Brown, USTA.com


Seville, Spain – As Spain and the United States begin their quest to be crowned the top tennis nation in the world, Captain Patrick McEnroe and the United States Davis Cup team arrived in Andalusia on Saturday afternoon to prepare for the World Group Final.
Following the calm respite of the Thanksgiving recess, a long-standing tennis record is about to fall – Andy Roddick and his band of American brothers will play the weekend series, Dec. 3-5, in front of the largest single audience in the history of tennis for a sanctioned match.

The Estadio Olympico, a 60,000-seat arena that has been used in the past by the Spanish to showcase many of their biggest sports’ events, including soccer and track & field, has been outfitted for the final with a $1 million roof, and customized with practice courts on both ends of the stadium.

“To play in such a big stadium is impressive,” said McEnroe, who during his tenure as team captain, has righted a difficult transition period from a veteran team consisting of Andre Agassi, Michael Chang, Jim Courier, Todd Martin and Pete Sampras to a youthful, exciting new generation of stars.

Gelling quickly by identifying playing roles, displaying close-knit chemistry, and a real desire for Davis Cup play and bringing home the crown, Roddick, Mardy Fish, Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan have been McEnroe’s lasting legacy – at least, until his first Davis Cup final as captain begins this Friday.

“With over 25,000 people here, it’s going to be amazing,” said McEnroe. “Our guys are excited. We know it’s difficult and that we are the underdog, but we feel good about getting here early and being as prepared as we can.”

"Obviously clay is difficult for us, but we know that going in. It favors the Spanish. We feel pretty good and have plenty of time to prepare.”
While the United States are decided underdogs playing on their least-favorite surface, and the courts being talked about as “slow” this week after the initial practice sessions, their ace, 2003 US Open champion Roddick, is a stellar 12-0 against the Spanish quartet: Carlos Moya (3-0), Juan Carlos Ferrero (1-0, 2003 US Open final), Tommy Robredo (7-0), and Rafael Nadal (1-0).

“It helps to have confidence but at the same time that most of those wins have come on a hard court or grass, so he knows that this is going to be the toughest one for him,” said McEnroe.

“He’s worked extremely hard in the last month physically to really play a tough long match. That’s what we have to do. Even a straight set match here on the clay is going to be a tough match physically. We can’t expect to roll through any match. He helps that he’s beaten. But it doesn’t mean that much for this weekend.”

Joining McEnroe’s foresome that swept Belarus in the semifinals is tour veteran Vince Spadea serving as an alternate, along with a pair of promising young junior practice partners, Wayne Odesnik and Alex Kuznetsov.

Also quick to point out that for as glamorous as his undefeated mark is against the Spaniards, so few of them have been contested on clay, Roddick understands that he will be in for a long fight in his two singles matches on Friday and Sunday.

“There’s a definite adjustment to be made,” said Roddick, 2-0 in the World Group Semifinal against Belarus, with straight-set wins over Vladimir Voltchkov and Alexander Skrypko.
“I’m going to have to show more patience this weekend. But that being said, I still have to play my game and have to do what I do well.”

While patience has never been a trademark of the second-ranked player in the world’s game, his firepower most certainly is.

Namely – the punishing service game in excess of 152 MPH and blistering forehands from the baseline.

Roddick has arrived in Seville loose, anxious to play and ready to do whatever it takes to bring home a United States’ victory.

“I don’t think about what I have to do to win,” said Roddick, who will likely face either fellow 2004 Tennis Masters Cup participant Carlos Moya or 2003 US Open runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero in the first rubber, depending on the outcome of the draw ceremony on Thursday.

“Our team has to win three matches. If I can be a part of that, that’s great. If I lose both my matches and we win, I don’t care. It’s about the team. It’s not about me here. With that said, I’d like to get us off to a good start on Friday.”

McEnroe’s second singles match-up is another matter entirely.

While staunchly sticking with Fish on the team roster, the US captain gave a late invitation to Spadea, who is arguably better suited to clay-court play than Fish.

At the team press conference on Tuesday, McEnroe said that “the answer is I haven’t definitely made the decision yet” on second singles, but with Fish notching an important four set win against Max Minryi in the semifinals, it would be difficult for McEnroe not to give the rising American an opportunity to succeed this weekend.

With all things being equal, the talent level on each side similar, the weekend series could very well come down to the doubles match on Saturday, which would favor the Americans.

The Bryans, Bob and Mike, just captured their second straight Tennis Masters Cup doubles championship in Houston a few weeks ago, are strong playing on all surfaces, and aren’t afraid of any situation.

The Spaniards will counter with Rafael Nadal and Tommy Robredo. At first blush, singles players, but following a compatible partnership at the 2004 US Open and the Summer Olympic Games in Athens, are a new-found force to be reckoned with.

“Our biggest goal when we turned pro in 1988 was to be on the Davis Cup team,” said Bob Bryan, responsible for the clinching win against Belarus that sent the US into the final against Spain.

“When Patrick picked us last year, we were really excited and we wanted to make a statement there so that he would have confidence in us. I feel like winning the Davis Cup would be the biggest moment of our career, even bigger than a Grand Slam title. Winning it for Mike and for myself, the team and our country, it would be the best thing you could do.”

With the draw on the slate for tomorrow, the anticipation builds with just two more days to go until the first match.

star
12-01-2004, 05:58 PM
Didn't you read about not posting Getty pics?

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 05:59 PM
um.. no.... I just read the Andy forum pretty much..they should post something like that on a sticky on all the forums.

RodFan08
12-01-2004, 06:00 PM
Thanx for the pics:) Sorry I'm a little late. What's with Andy breakin' raquets. I mean he doesn't do it in matches, but in practice:rolleyes:

star
12-01-2004, 06:02 PM
um.. no.... I just read the Andy forum pretty much..they should post something like that on a sticky on all the forums.

You would think at least on GM. That's what they did at WTAW.

RodFan08
12-01-2004, 06:03 PM
Didn't you read about not posting Getty pics?

Where does it say that? Wtaworld has something like that aswell, but that's just for the general messages thread.

tangerine_dream
12-01-2004, 06:03 PM
From what I know, WTA is no longer allowed to post Getty images or articles from Tennis Week.

But MTF is not held to the same standards as WTA. ;)

bkm, it's better that Andy bust his racket and get the frustrations out now during practice instead of in front of 20,000 Spaniards who'll boo him off the court. :rolleyes:

star
12-01-2004, 06:04 PM
It's a thread in some place... can't remember the name... the same place where they put the requests for name changes.

Amanda said it was the rule here as well as wtaw

RodFan08
12-01-2004, 06:04 PM
You would think at least on GM. That's what they did at WTAW.

Yeah, but at Wtaworld u can post Getty images in player forums

star
12-01-2004, 06:05 PM
ummmm not if they catch you. :)

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 06:07 PM
bkm, he and Mardy played a practice match today... he's been known to break racquets in practice before. I'd rather him get his anger out during a practice than during a match lol. If he breaks a racquet on Friday with that crowd, he is screwed. he has GOT to keep his cool, which considering he is usually at his fieriest (uh...? LOL) at DC, this is going to be tough for him.

as for Getty... I still don't see anything on this board and I even went to GM... if they don't want us to post the Getty pics they have to tell us somehow lol. I mean I don't care, I just want to share the pics with everyone else but yeah, they have to tell us somehow lmfao... and I don't think most people just peruse the name changes thread looking for news... well at least, I don't.

edit: LOL Tangy, great minds :p

RodFan08
12-01-2004, 06:07 PM
bkm, it's better that Andy bust his racket and get the frustrations out now during practice instead of in front of 20,000 Spaniards who'll boo him off the court. :rolleyes:

True, I didn't think of it that way. He should get it out of his system now

star
12-01-2004, 06:20 PM
bkm, he and Mardy played a practice match today... he's been known to break racquets in practice before. I'd rather him get his anger out during a practice than during a match lol. If he breaks a racquet on Friday with that crowd, he is screwed. he has GOT to keep his cool, which considering he is usually at his fieriest (uh...? LOL) at DC, this is going to be tough for him.

as for Getty... I still don't see anything on this board and I even went to GM... if they don't want us to post the Getty pics they have to tell us somehow lol. I mean I don't care, I just want to share the pics with everyone else but yeah, they have to tell us somehow lmfao... and I don't think most people just peruse the name changes thread looking for news... well at least, I don't.

edit: LOL Tangy, great minds :p

It's not the name change thread. lmfao It's a separate thread. It even has the name Getty Images in the thread. Sorry if I wasn't clear about that. It's just in the same general area where the name change thread is. BugsErrors and Questions.... that place. lmafo

star
12-01-2004, 06:23 PM
Anyway, I was just having a laugh.

Post as many getty pictures as you like. I don't care. I thought it was funny.

Deboogle!.
12-01-2004, 08:02 PM
Ok so I just read an article that says Andy and Carlos will play Friday... that's not possible, is it? I thought the teams' #1s always play the first match on Sunday???

Havok
12-01-2004, 08:14 PM
Those shoes look better and better everytime I see them. They're sort of soccer-ish but not really, must find them.:)

Havok
12-01-2004, 08:35 PM
Ok is this pic not the coolest shot ever.:cool: It's awesome, photographer must be pretty happy after snapping this shot.:)

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10112011404.davis_cup_final_jj101.jpg

star
12-01-2004, 09:43 PM
Ok is this pic not the coolest shot ever.:cool: It's awesome, photographer must be pretty happy after snapping this shot.:)

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10112011404.davis_cup_final_jj101.jpg

That's great!

The shorts are a nice length too. :)

Golfnduck
12-01-2004, 09:56 PM
Very nice picture!!!

k-rod83
12-01-2004, 10:00 PM
do we know if the OOP is out yet?

Nishy
12-01-2004, 10:16 PM
Thanks for all articles and pics, Deb.

"bubble butt" is funny. Tangy, I like this expression.

Roddick has a 100 percent record over the members of the Spanish Davis Cup team, having won 12 matches against Moya, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Rafael Nadal and Tommy Robredo.This is amazing. But this record might be stop... But I still hope he can beat claycourter on European Clay.

Golfnduck
12-01-2004, 10:20 PM
Hopefully he'll be able to get at least one win and the Bryans can win their match.

superpinkone37
12-01-2004, 10:44 PM
Not crazy about this tennis boy in the hood look....
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20041201/capt.sge.kwz28.011204163909.photo00.photo.default-373x279.jpg



LOL!! in the words of my sister, andy is gangster pimpin' :lol: (or at least trying...lol)
thanks for all these awesome pictures and articles you guys have been posting :) im still confused about the bat and everythign, though it is pretty funny. maybe during the matches they will give us a little info about that in the commentary. and wait...andy will play moya on friday? *confused*

Golfnduck
12-01-2004, 10:50 PM
LOL!! in the words of my sister, andy is gangster pimpin' :lol: (or at least trying...lol)
thanks for all these awesome pictures and articles you guys have been posting :) im still confused about the bat and everythign, though it is pretty funny. maybe during the matches they will give us a little info about that in the commentary. and wait...andy will play moya on friday? *confused*
LOL!!! Andy is gangster pimpin'!!! DEATH!!!

andyroxmysox12191
12-01-2004, 11:00 PM
:haha: danielle(or 's sister!)!!
and wow that IS a nice shot :hearts:

J. Corwin
12-01-2004, 11:49 PM
Ok is this pic not the coolest shot ever.:cool: It's awesome, photographer must be pretty happy after snapping this shot.:)

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041201/capt.jj10112011404.davis_cup_final_jj101.jpg

It was me who took that pic. :cool: ;) ;)

He's in a perfect stance. :)

MisterQ
12-01-2004, 11:55 PM
Nice work, jackson. :clap2: ;)

superpinkone37
12-02-2004, 12:35 AM
It was me who took that pic. :cool: ;) ;)

He's in a perfect stance. :)

good job jace :yeah: i knew you were a brilliant photographer :)

;) ;) ;)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 12:36 AM
k-rod, we'll find out whether Andy is the first or second match tomorrow (Thursday)

Yea! I saw that JCF pic this morning and was just :eek: it's GORGEOUS!!!!

Here are some articles :)

==========

United States face heat in Spain
By Mark Hodgkinson in Seville
(Filed: 02/12/2004)



Patrick McEnroe, the United States captain, said a capacity 26,600 crowd at the Davis Cup final "is going to be crazy". But the Spanish audience who will greet the Americans tomorrow are not just expected to set the record for a sanctioned tennis match. It will also be volatile, mad and deafeningly partisan.

Andy Roddick, who leads the American team, took the view yesterday that it would be "a humbling experience" and how he deals with the intense atmosphere at the Estadio Olimpico could be key if the visitors are to win their first title since 1995. "We know what we're up against," McEnroe said.

If the Americans have done their homework they will have watched tapes of the 2000 final in Barcelona, where Spain lifted the Davis Cup for the first time. The vanquished Australians complained about the unsporting behaviour of the crowd, saying that any time they struck a winner the entire stadium jeered and whistled.

The suspicion in Barcelona was that many in the crowd were football fans who had never been to a tennis event, and that could again be the case down by the Guadalquivir River. The organisers had to add extra seats because of the demand for the final, which will be played on a temporary red-clay court.

Comments from the Spanish co-captains, Juan Avendano and Jordi Arrese, have already raised the stakes. The pair reheated the controversy of the two countries' last meeting, in Houston in 2002, a quarter-final tie in which the hosts were accused of a lack of sportsmanship.

"They treated us very badly there," Avendano said. Arrese added: "I have never been treated as badly as we were treated in Houston. They acted as if they were the kings of the world, the people at the club were awful towards us and the American team did nothing to stop it."

The record for a sanctioned match was set 50 years ago in Sydney, where 25,600 watched the United States defeat Australia. The 'Battle of the Sexes', an exhibition match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, attracted more than 30,000 to Houston in 1973.

==========================
=========================
===========================
Tennis: Roddick's got the groove for his first Davis Cup
Christopher Clarey International Herald Tribune
Thursday, December 2, 2004


SEVILLE, Spain In the picturesque, picaresque heartland of flamenco and elaborate Easter processions, there is a tradition of singing in the streets, and Andy Roddick is fitting right in this week as he prepares for the most daunting tennis task of his young life.

Whether it's walking into a news conference, a practice session or the lobby of the American team's hotel in Seville's historic center, Roddick has been crooning to himself or anyone who doesn't mind listening.

Wednesday's choice of accompaniment on his iPod was Dave Matthews, but Roddick, this man-child of his generation, is also a thoughtful young athlete with a taste for repartee, and when the earbuds came off, he quickly shifted tracks to the Davis Cup final against Spain that begins here Friday on slow red clay.

The odds and the projected crowd of 26,500, which would be an all-time record for a sanctioned tennis match, will be against him and his teammates/fraternity buddies. But Roddick, unlike some American tennis stars past, clearly gets a charge out of his sport's premier team competition, and he has clearly decided to embrace this mountain of a final, no matter how steep the climb looks from below with two former French Open champions, Carlos Moya and Juan Carlos Ferrero, in the Spanish lineup.

After all, playing a determined Spaniard on clay can't be too much tougher than playing Roger Federer on anything.

"I really have taken to the whole thing," said Roddick, a distant No. 2 behind Federer in this year's world rankings. "This final is probably the biggest challenge I could be faced with as an individual, and the same thing goes for our team. I think we are really kind of relishing the opportunity. Nobody expects anything of us, and we'd love to go in and prove people wrong."

The most likely path to an unlikely American victory would be paved with victories from Roddick in both his singles matches. Though the chest-bumping Bryan twins, Mike and Bob, are among the world's very top doubles teams, the United States' likely choice as second singles player, the Olympic silver medalist Mardy Fish, is no clay-court master with his still-improving forehand and still-questionable endurance.

But then Ferrero is still questionable himself, having suffered through a miserable season by his standards. The good news for the Spaniards is that they have two able relievers in teenage sensation Rafael Nadal and Tommy Robredo, who are scheduled to play doubles together.

Roddick has a combined 12-0 singles record against all four Spaniards. The rub is that only one of those victories came on clay. "I think there's a definite adjustment to be made; I think I'm going to have to show more patience this weekend," Roddick said. "But at the same time, I have to stick to my weapons, which is hitting big shots."

Though Roddick is 22 and the United States has not won the Davis Cup since 1995, this will not be Roddick's first final. In 1992, when he was 9, he and his family traveled from their home in Austin, Texas, to Fort Worth to watch Jim Courier, Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras and John McEnroe play in the final against Switzerland.

"The first day I think we split matches, but all I remember is the damn Swiss cow bells," Roddick said. "So my oldest brother, Lawrence, and I ran around town to find air horns, and the next two days we were going nuts, and it was just amazing, and they ended up winning. It was probably the best Davis Cup team ever assembled. Sampras and McEnroe weren't even playing singles, so it was a pretty special experience, and one of the cooler things was talking to Jim Courier about it a couple years ago and him telling me that he remembered the air horns."

Roddick is the one playing through the din these days, but that three-day indoctrination into the noisy, nationalistic delights of Davis Cup has stuck with him.

"To be honest, I never thought at age 13 or 14 that I was going to be a Davis Cup player, but I always had that memory," said the relatively late-blooming Roddick. "And then when it actually came to fruition, I was beside myself, and now to be the most experienced Davis Cup player we have is kind of surreal. But I think the fact that I remember that experience as a fan and a young kid being there actually keeps it somewhat real for me."

Roddick's singles record since his debut in 2001 is 14-3, with two of those losses coming in the 2002 semifinals on clay against the French at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. This will be a similarly grand stage with one difference. Because of the unstable early December weather in Seville, the Spanish elected to erect a temporary steel roof over their clay court.

The roof is more of a solid cover (air can still flow underneath), and though Roddick's first reaction to the slow court was to call it "a sandbox," the roof could shield Roddick's big serve and forehand from the wind and other distractions.

"The roof takes away a lot of variables," he said. "I actually like the way the court is playing right now; it's really clean and true."

Those were not the adjectives to describe his play in his most recent match, a semifinal loss to Lleyton Hewitt in the semifinals of the Masters Cup in Houston last month in which he lost - speaking of surreal - the last 20 points. What Roddick did not explain at the time is that he felt a twinge in his leg during that rout.

"He made six errors in two sets, so that probably had a lot more to do with it than my leg did," Roddick said. "But I got back home and was able to treat it and continue to treat it, and I feel great."

Now comes the trickier part, and when it ends, he and Fish and the Bryan brothers plan on taking a bus trip through the middle of America, beginning in Minneapolis and ending up in Mobile, Alabama, with some stops for tennis exhibitions along the way.

"I was sitting with one of my agents in February, and we were trying to think, 'How do you get tennis to people who don't know a lot about it and show them it's not just this country-club sport?"' he said.

"So we're going to be stuck on a bus with each other for five days. They bought the TV rights to it, so they'll be filming us the whole way, so it should be a laugh if nothing else. You'll see us. We're going to be like brothers: laughing one minute and yelling at each other the next."

And how much more of a laugh would it be with Dwight Davis's shiny silver cup along for the joy ride? "Oh geez!" Roddick shouted. "That would be nice, very nice."


============================
================================
============================

Band of Brothers
By Eleanor Preston

Take a Spanish clay court, two former French Open champions, and thousands of noisy, flag-waving Spaniards, and you have a recipe to put off even the hungriest of visiting Davis Cup captains.

Luckily, Patrick McEnroe has the stomach needed to take his young squad to Seville in December for the USA’s first Davis Cup final since 1997. More than that, he is actually excited at the prospect.

“We’d have loved to have played at home, but I really look forward to the challenge of going to Spain. When I looked ahead and saw the draw I was excited about going there for the final,” said McEnroe, whose team beat Belarus in the semifinals in Charleston this past September.

“We know that they’ve got a great team, one of the best teams in the world, if not the best team, but we’re going to prepare well and give it a shot. I think it will be a tremendous challenge and a tremendous chance to do something amazing. The Bryan brothers have won the French Open; Andy Roddick has won tournaments on clay. When we go there we know we’re going to have to play great clay court players, but it will be indoors and I think that will help us a little bit, because you can serve pretty big indoors too.”

Roddick can handle that end of things, and while his clay court record in Europe does not inspire optimism—a first-round loss at the French Open in May bore testimony to that—he has won two titles on American green clay and one in St. Poelten, Austria, in 2003.

The presence of Juan Carlos Ferrero, who will be looking to salvage a disappointing year, and Carlos Moya won’t make the USA’s job any easier; however, favoritism is worth little in Davis Cup.

McEnroe has built a squad bonded by friendship and a shared goal, which made a refreshing change from the years of individual superstars like Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi and their will-they-or-won’t-they attitude toward Davis Cup. Roddick, Mardy Fish, and the Bryan Brothers—the likely lineup for Spain—have all been stalwart in their devotion to playing for their country.

“Patrick came on board and right away made it known, okay, I want to go with the young guys, I kind of want to get something going,” Roddick ex-plained. “We were kind of at a standstill as far as Davis Cup was concerned. We had some guys who wanted to play, some guys who didn’t, some who wanted to play here and there, and he said, okay, I’ll go with the young guys who really want to play, and now it’s paying off a little bit.”

The USA’s last Davis Cup trophy came, courtesy of Sampras and Com-pany in 1995 against Russia on European clay. Roddick admitted he didn’t remember much about it, but he knows he and his band of brothers have the opportunity to match the achievements of that win and set a mark for the future.

“It’s a different era and a different generation, and I don’t think there are any ties that are still connected between this team and that team,” Roddick said. “But it would be nice to erase that one because we hear it a lot.”

McEnroe is likely to select Fish as Roddick’s cohort in singles, with the Bryans testing out their unbeaten Davis Cup record in the doubles. As ever in Davis Cup, that middle point could come in very handy, especially as Spain has plenty of depth in singles with Rafael Nadal and Tommy Robredo on the bench, but cannot boast a settled doubles pairing.

Little wonder McEnroe and his men are smacking their lips in anticipation.

superpinkone37
12-02-2004, 12:55 AM
thanks Deb!! :kiss:

that road trip/exibition match thingy sounds like a lot of fun :)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 12:59 AM
yeah it does! I wonder how we'll be able to see it on tv. I bet it's gonna be nuts.

i'm glad he's ok with the way the court's playing... takes away one of his excuses :p

and that was the first I had heard about his leg during the Lleyton match. I guess it might explain why he suddenly moved so shitty. But he got it taken care of ASAP and that's all that matters.

superpinkone37
12-02-2004, 01:15 AM
oh yeah, i forgot to say something about his leg in my first post. that was the first i heard about it too. but at least that is all taken care of now and is not an issue :)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 01:22 AM
couple more pics

LOL @ his face

http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/photo-galleries/04-DavisCup-Finals/12-01-dvsfnl/images/12-01-dvsfnl-01.jpg

http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/photo-galleries/04-DavisCup-Finals/12-01-dvsfnl/images/12-01-dvsfnl-06.jpg

superpinkone37
12-02-2004, 01:24 AM
hehehe :lol:

Golfnduck
12-02-2004, 02:43 AM
Andy does make some very interesting faces when he is volleying.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 03:07 AM
Americans are underdogs … but rabid
Roddick: "None of us have won a Grand Slam title this year,
so we really want to compensate for that'

By Matthew Cronin, TennisReporters.net

FROM THE DAVIS CUP FINAL IN SEVILLE, SPAIN – It's been a very satisfying year for US Davis Cup Captain Pat McEnroe's rapidly evolving team. Andy Roddick has been nails at No. 1 singles and the Bryans brothers are undefeated in doubles.

But really, the Dec. 3-5 final against Spain on slow red clay at the Estadio Olympico in Seville is its only huge test. If the US can win this tie, it will be the biggest upset they've pulled in a final in 31 years, when they shocked Australia in Melbourne.

Certainly, the US' win over Russia in Moscow in 1995 on clay was huge, but Pete Sampras led that charge and he was then in the midst of becoming the greatest player ever. The US doesn't have such a player on the team this year.

Almost no one expects the US to win this coming weekend. Spanish captain Jordi Arrese went as far to say, "I would bet anything on us winning – except my wife."

Most of the planet expects the slumping Mardy Fish to drop both his matches, leaving Roddick very weighty task of taking down dirt ball giants Juan Carlos Ferrero and Carlos Moya, and the Bob and Mike Bryan having coming through against the ever-improving doubles duo of Tommy Robredo/Rafael Nadal.

"Andy and the Bryan brothers haven't even lost a set yet (in a Davis Cup match) this year. We're extremely confident in that aspect," Fish said. "We don't have to beat them in an entire tournament. We don't even have to win five times; all you need is three points."

But three points isn't like netting three free throws. It means winning three matches on a surface the US has been flat out awful on since 1999, when Andre Agassi won Roland Garros. Plus, Ferrero is feeling better than he has all year. The former No. 1's body is no longer aching, his form in practice against compatriot Moya has been top notch and he's now used to playing with his new Head racket. That spells trouble for Roddick, who will very likely have to face off against Ferrero on Friday in what is the critical match for the US.

The two have faced each other once before, in the '03 US Open final, a contest Roddick handily won. But that was on a fairly slick Ashe Stadium where Roddick was very much at home, not on murky quicksand in front of 26,000 nationalistic Spaniards. When Roddick foiled Ferrero, he was at the top of his game. While the No. 2 player is certainly capable of raising his level again, Roddick's poor showing against Lleyton Hewitt in the Tennis Masters Cup semis a week and a half ago leaves a lot to be concerned about.

AMERICAN HAVE CRUSHED THE SPAINARDS
Roddick is 12-0 against the members of the Spanish team. However, only one of those wins came on clay. Fish is 4-1 against the Spaniards. That's why there is reason to hope.

"It is going to be cold conditions. The clay is going to be slow and they are going to have 23,000 of their closest friends there. So, definitely the cards are stacked against us," Roddick said. "But there'll be no surprises ... we know what to expect."

Just because Ferrero says he's feeling spry and confident doesn't mean that once he gets on court in a love match, he'll find his form again. He's doubted his shots and his staying power all year long. That kind of confidence doesn't come back in an instant; it arrives after weeks of matches. That's why if Roddick takes down Ferrero, there's reason to think that Spain's "G-3" coaches – Juan Avendano, Jose Perlas and Arrese – could call on the teenage Nadal for Sunday. Moya has not been lights out this year either, but he's certainly played better than Fish and is a much more accomplished player on clay.

If the court at the Estadio Olympico is as slow as the Americans say it is, the US is in for a very long weekend. Neither Fish nor Roddick are as steady as Ferrero and Moya and although than can match them in the firepower department, they are going to have exhibit the type of patience never seen from them before on dirt. They are going to have to get very creative and play their guts out.

"It's pretty slow and the ball is not bouncing very high and seems to be staying pretty low," said McEnroe. "We are going to try and get used to the clay. We have to play our game and adjust slightly to the court surface and our strategy for the Spanish players who like to play on clay. We're not going to be able to just hit through these guys in a five-set match. We're going to have to do some of that, but we're going to have to play smart."

Bob and Mike Bryan campaigned for a spot on the team for two years and this year McEnroe saw fit to give them a shot. But, that was only after they won a Slam and became an elite team in 2003. After a mini-slump this summer, which was somewhat due to an injury sustained by Mike, they recovered, winning the tennis Masters Cup. But, without question, when McEnroe named them to the team, he saw the '03 Roland Garros champs capabilities on clay. He saw this match looming, which is why they have to grab the critical third point for the US to succeed. "This is going to be the biggest match of our lives," said Bob.

The only member of the team who can be fairly satisfied with his overall year to date is McEnroe because he did what was expected to: get his team to the final. Outside of Davis Cup, none of American players have had year to jump up and down about. This victory would give them a reason to throw a ticket-tape parade, which is why the tie will be much more competitive than it looks from the outside.

"None of us have won a Grand Slam title this year," Roddick said . "So we really want to compensate for that and come up with something special at the end. Davis Cup is just so special that this is going to be a great occasion whatever happens, but the difference between winning and losing will be pretty huge. To win the Cup for the States with this young team we have would be just awesome."

snaillyyy
12-02-2004, 11:19 AM
Maybe it is just me but I am surprised at this :eek: :eek:

Draw for the Final: Nadal Gets the Nod
Draw from Seville:

Friday 3 December - 1200 hrs (1100 GMT)
Carlos Moya (ESP) v Mardy Fish (USA)
Rafael Nadal (ESP) v Andy Roddick (USA)

Saturday 4 December - 1600 hrs (1500 GMT)
Rafael Nadal/Tommy Robredo (ESP) v Bob Bryan/Mike Bryan (USA)

Sunday 5 December - 1200 hrs (1100 GMT)
Carlos Moya (ESP) v Andy Roddick (USA)
Rafael Nadal (ESP) v Mardy Fish (USA)

Black Adam
12-02-2004, 11:47 AM
i think team usa will be 1-1 or 2-0 on first day so no worry guys.

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 11:47 AM
Well... I'm not... somehow I knew Andy wasn't going to face JC... Oh well...

Neely
12-02-2004, 11:59 AM
Then Ferrero must be really not fit enough to go... otherwise they would let him play, I think...

thelma
12-02-2004, 12:00 PM
Go Andy in DC! ;)

snaillyyy
12-02-2004, 12:20 PM
Well... I'm not... somehow I knew Andy wasn't going to face JC... Oh well...

Renata!!!! :wavey: welcome again, do we know you :haha: only kidding :hug: :hug:

I am still kinda surprised, Andy playing Nadal makes me nervous...I just want DC to get started LOL!!!

Neely
12-02-2004, 12:22 PM
i think team usa will be 1-1 or 2-0 on first day so no worry guys.
2-0 for the Americans :rolleyes: ... pretty optimistic... I would be glad if they won a match or maybe a singles and doubles match just to piss off a few people :lol: all those who have nothing else to do than just to hate ;)

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 12:26 PM
Renata!!!! :wavey: welcome again, do we know you :haha: only kidding :hug: :hug:

I am still kinda surprised, Andy playing Nadal makes me nervous...I just want DC to get started LOL!!!

Each time I post you guys welcome me :rolls:
Anyway chill out... As long as Andy does his best out there it's ok for me :)

Natasc
12-02-2004, 01:18 PM
Damn, Ferrero should play!!
So, somebody know the hour of the match?
Good LUCK Andy!! You can beat him!!

ps: The coach (Jim) said that spanishs are teh favorites to that title :fiery:

k-rod83
12-02-2004, 01:30 PM
what scares me is if its 2-2 on sunday...its down to mardy...to win it...on the CLAY!!

lol....maybe its just me but i would andy to play last then cos i feel he could with the pressure more.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 01:44 PM
It's not going to be 2-2, not with Nadal playing. and really, I'm not that surprised. Every article mentioned that JCF was questionable. And Nadal has pulled out amazing things in DC, I am not surprised at all.

Lest we not forget that when he started to find his groove, he was giving Andy trouble at the USO in that third set.

I really feel badly for JCF... he really wanted to play :(

Oh and whoever asked the time, Andy's match is second, play starts at noon in Spain... so.. around 2:30pm Spain time, or so?

Interview w/Andy (http://www.daviscup.com/shared/medialibrary/audio/mp3/DC_3509_mp3.MP3)

From the article at the DC Site:

Nadal appeared delighted by the prospect of playing in front of 27,200 spectators on Friday (600 more tickets were made available to the city of Seville today), despite having only made his Davis Cup debut in the first round this year against the Czech Republic. He also lost his only previous meeting with Roddick, in the second round of the US Open this year, 60 63 64.

“It is absolutely no problem for me. I wish there would be 10,000 more spectators tomorrow. I’m happy about that,” said Nadal.

Roddick meanwhile admitted to feeling surprised that the Spanish had picked Nadal.

“Personally I was expecting to play Ferrero. You know, that being said, we have a lefty practice partner, one of the youngsters, I’ve been practising with him a little bit this week, just in case.”

So it appears to be advantage Spain after the draw, as Moya will open the tie, something the Spanish said they were happy about. If Moya beats Mardy Fish as expected, the pressure will in many ways be off for Nadal as he steps on court.
=========

Pics from draw ceremony

http://www.daviscup.com/shared/medialibrary/image/gallery/DC_3516_gallery.JPG
http://www.daviscup.com/shared/medialibrary/image/gallery/DC_3517_gallery.JPG
http://www.daviscup.com/shared/medialibrary/image/gallery/DC_3519_gallery.JPG

HAHAHAHA the look on Nadal's face

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041202/i/r4256915421.jpg
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041202/i/r935951692.jpg
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041202/i/r406799958.jpg
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041202/i/r4193271222.jpg

I don't know why they cut this off like this lmao
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041202/capt.jj10412021302.davis_cup_final_jj104.jpg

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041202/i/r4206974870.jpg
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20041202/capt.jj10612021235.davis_cup_final_jj106.jpg

Fish, Roddick Set for Davis Cup Final

1 hour, 42 minutes ago

By STEPHEN WADE, AP Sports Writer

SEVILLE, Spain - American Mardy Fish will play Spain's Carlos Moya on Friday in the opening singles match of the Davis Cup final.


America's top player, Andy Roddick, will face Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal in the second match of the best-of-five final on clay at Seville's Olympic Stadium.


"He has a lot of game," Roddick said. "He hits the ball a ton and he's very competitive and in an atmosphere like this, he's going to get the crowd going."


Nadal, 18, was a late replacement for Juan Carlos Ferrero, a former No. 1 who has been struggling with illness and injuries this season.


"Personally I was expecting them to play Ferrero," Roddick said. "But they have four very capable singles players and that's one of their strengths."


Spanish captain Jordi Arrese said Nadal was picked for "tactical and technical reasons."


"Juan Carlos Ferrero isn't in perfect form and Rafa has been great and he's left-handed which gives the Americans something different to deal with," he said.


Fish, ranked No. 37, has a 2-1 record against No. 5 Moya, but none of his wins were on clay. Roddick, the world's No. 2-ranked player, beat Nadal in straight sets at this year's U.S. Open (news - web sites).


"Certainly he's favored," Nadal said of Roddick. "He's No. 2 in the world and that's on any surface."


Saturday's doubles will pit American twins Bob and Mike Bryan against Nadal and Tommy Robredo.


In Sunday's reverse singles, Roddick will face Moya and Fish will play Nadal.


The team captains can change the lineup an hour before the match.


The surprise of Thursday's draw was the selection of Nadal, Spain's lowest-ranked player at No. 51. However, the hard-hitting left-hander has been clutch in the Davis Cup.


Nadal, the youngest Davis Cup player in Spanish history, won the deciding fifth match against the Czech Republic in February. As a late replacement for Moya, he won the clinching match in the semifinals against France.


Spain is considered the favorite, playing on a slow, red clay surface before an anticipated record crowd of 26,600. Spain is appearing in its third final in five seasons. It won its first Davis Cup title in 2000, defeating Australia in Barcelona.


The United States is trying to win its first title since 1995. The Americans have won the Davis Cup a record 31 times, but this is their first appearance in the final since 1997.


Spain has spent about $1 million to build a covered clay court inside its 60,000-seat Olympic Stadium. Despite the roof, the sides of the venue will be open giving it an outdoor feel.





Organizers expect the largest crowd ever to attend a "sanctioned" tennis event. The existing mark was set in 1954 in Sydney, Australia, when 25,578 watched the United States defeat Australia in the Davis Cup final.

Several exhibition tennis matches have drawn bigger crowds. The 1973 match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs in the Houston Astrodome drew 30,472.

Roddick has a 14-3 singles record in Davis Cup play since joining the team in 2001 and has not lost a set in six Davis Cup singles matches this year.

Fish won the silver medal at the Athens Olympics. He has been a Davis Cup player since 2002, holding a 4-4 record.

The Bryan brothers have yet to lose a set in Davis Cup play.

Heavy rain fell on Wednesday and Thursday in usually sunny Seville. There is a 40-percent chance of light showers on Friday, while sunny skies are expected over the weekend.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 01:52 PM
Listen to the audio at the DC Site - he says it's the best week of practice he's ever had on clay and that he feels fine on the court. We. Shall. See.
=============
Americans Rely on Team Spirit for Davis Cup Final
Thu Dec 2, 2004 09:33 AM ET

By Ossian Shine
SEVILLE, Spain (Reuters) - Facing a battalion of sturdy Spanish baseliners and a partisan, vocal crowd, the United States will rely on team spirit as it fights for the Davis Cup this weekend.

A tight-knit unit, the Americans go into the match as rank underdogs on the slow red clay of Seville's Olympic Stadium but are hoping their teamwork can prevail.

"It's no secret that we all are pretty close," world No. 2 Andy Roddick told reporters on Thursday. "That's been said a million times. But I think it's even more satisfying that we've had one common goal for the last couple years.

"Now we're here together and actually to have the opportunity to compete for the title means a lot to us.

"This has been our focus as a team for the last couple of years as far as going with the young guys and stuff. Now we're here and now we just have to try to take the next step.

"We're all happy to be here and doing it together."

U.S. coach Patrick McEnroe acknowledges his team will be up against it, but says they are all well prepared.

"I think we're underdogs," McEnroe said. "I mean, playing away and playing a very tough Spanish team... they're obviously playing on their best surface. I mean, there's no secrets there. It's not our best surface.

"But at the same time we've prepared, and we feel we're as prepared as we can be. We certainly feel going into each match that we can win it.

"We have guys that really have grasped the team concept of what Davis Cup is and felt that that was important. I haven't really honestly had to do too much because they're all such a positive group of guys that really want to play and support each other.

"We just have to focus on what we do. It's still played on a court, the dimensions are the same, et cetera. But, you know, as you hear from the guys, they've been preparing mentally for it for a while.

"I think we're excited about it. I mean, what a chance, to play in front of this many people in a Davis Cup final. It's a pretty amazing experience.

"So we're going to enjoy it, but we're also going to try to do the best we can do to help us win the match."

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 02:06 PM
ok so, there's an article in a Spanish paper that says why Andy was breacking racquets yesterday.... Vinny was beating him in a practice match. He was so upset that at 6-4 2-0 PMac stopped the session to calm Andy down. And it seems that yesterday was the big day when the teams scout each other out, so the Spanish team was watching...

all I can say is... oh. my.


Anyway I'll try to stop replying to myself
==========

Roddick ready to end barren Davis decade
12-02-2004, 14h55

SEVILLE, Spain (AFP) - A barren decade of Davis Cup competition will come to an end on Sunday for the United States - if Andy Roddick has his way.

Not since 1995 have Team USA lifted the title, when a certain Pete Sampras sent Russia packing almost single-handed with two singles wins and teamed with Todd Martin in the doubles to complete a 3-2 win over Russia.

Two years later the boot was on the other foot as Sampras suffered an opening-day injury in Gothenburg as the American contingent ultimately slid to a 5-0 whitewash at the hands of Sweden.

By Friday evening, in contrast, 22-year-old Nebraskan Roddick expects the US ship to be still very much afloat on the damp red clay of Seville's Olympic Stadium after what he hopes will be a win over 18-year-old Rafael Nadal, selected Thursday ahead of the not fully fit Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Roddick thrashed Nadal at the US Open earlier this year in the pair's only meeting to date - but on clay and with 26,000 Spanish fans rooting for the hosts, the world number two accepts the context this time could hardly be different.

"In an atmosphere like this he's obviously going to get the crowd going," said Roddick of his young rival.

"I just need to focus on this match because, obviously, the surfaces are different.

"The circumstances are a complete 180 from the US Open," said Roddick, desperate to go out with a bang crown at the end of a season which brought titles in Indianapolis, Queen's, Miami and San Jose - but no Grand Slams.

Roddick has beaten Spain's four Davis Cup stars 12 times in 12 meetings and is 6-0 in the competition this year.

But the downside this week is the clay which torpedoed his hopes in the semi-final against France two years ago, the American losing both his singles rubbers at Roland Garros.

Roddick brushed off his concerns, however, on Thursday.

"It's slow, but it's nothing ridiculous. It's not as powdery or slippery as Roland Garros," said Roddick, who will have to hope he gets to grips much better this time with a surface that Nadal and Sunday's opponent Carlos Moya know so well.

Spain and the United States have fallen out politically in recent months, primarily over the conflict in Iraq, which Madrid's Socialist government elected last March bitterly opposed.

The decision of Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero to withdraw Spanish troops from the war theatre within weeks of taking office angered Washington and saw bilateral relations take a tumble.

With 26,000 Spanish tennis fans primed to cheer on their compatriots, having done their utmost to unsettle Australia four years ago in Barcelona, Roddick said he had a good idea of what awaits his squad.

"I don't know if you can prepare for 26,000 people, but at the same time we've known about it. Subconsciously, we've been preparing for it mentally for a couple of months now," said Roddick, insisting that he will come out firing on Friday after Moya first goes up against Mardy Fish.

Heavy rain has fallen across much of Spain since Wednesday - and, in similar vein, Roddick expects in the next three days to end the US Davis Cup drought.

-======================
========================
========================

Americans Ready to Prove Themselves Against Spaniards

12/2/04 1:47 PM
By Matthew Cronin, special to USTA.com

SEVILLA, SPAIN – It could have been U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe pulling a draw ceremony surprise on Thursday, one day ahead of the Davis Cup final, but it turned out to be Spanish captain Jordi Arrese who surprised everyone by naming teenage hotshot Rafael Nadal as the number two singles to face top American Andy Roddick on Friday.
American number two Mardy Fish will face Spanish number one Carlos Moya in the opening contest, but the talk of this ancient city is the second contest between Roddick and Nadal, and whether Spanish captain Jordi Arrese overplayed his hand by sitting former Roland Garros champion Juan Carlo Ferrero.

While Ferrero has been bothered by blisters on his hand, he says he has since recovered. But Arrese isn’t convinced that Ferrero’s hand would survive Roddick’s nuclear blasts, so he’ll go with the flashy and immensely talented kid they call "Rafa." That gives the U.S. a huge opportunity to at least go into Saturday doubles tied 1-1, because although Nadal has a better record on clay courts than Roddick does this year, his big match experience isn't even close. Plus, the 18-year-old Nadal will have to come back on Saturday to team with Tommy Robredo in the doubles against the powerful Bryan Brothers, and then might have to play Fish in the fifth and deciding rubber on Sunday.

"I’m not that surprised," said McEnroe. "Nadal obviously has a great future, has a lot of energy and can play well on clay. But it’s going to be difficult for Nadal to play a tough singles match on Friday and then come out an play a great doubles match. He’s certainly young and fit, but that’s asking a lot. He’s going to have to play a very physical match with Andy, who’s been playing great and is extremely fit and focused."

At the US Open, Roddick scalded Nadal in straight sets on hard courts behind a huge serve and booming forehand. But the quick lefty went toe-to-toe with Roddick from the baseline during the third set of that contest. The court at Estadio Olympico is slow, shaded, and according to Roddick, is "gritty." The American knows he’ll have to throw a lot more punches to wear the kid down.

"He’s got a lot of game," Roddick said. "He hits the ball a ton and is very competitive. In an atmosphere like this, he’s going to get the crowd going. Davis Cup might work well for him. I need to focus on this match because the surfaces are different. The circumstances are a complete 180 from the US Open."
Ferrero was none too pleased about being benched, but the last thing Arrese wants to see is his hands beginning to bleed deep in a third set. He’s hoping that Moya will thump Fish, which will take a lot of pressure off the youngster Nadal, who can then play footloose and fancy free.

"Its going to be very hard, but I am ready," said Nadal, who won the fifth and deciding match against the Czech Republic in the first round back in February. "Roddick is very good, but I have been training well and feel very good. I’m feeling a little nervous, but that normal for someone in this situation."

Roddick had a frustrating day in practice on Wednesday and Fish hasn’t played up to par this fall. But both of them are capable of winning long groundstrokes rallies as long as they don’t hit themselves out of points too early. The key will be how long they are willing to wait to go for their money shots. Fish owns a 2-1 record against Moya, but the two have never faced each other on clay. However, Fish did take a five-setter from Moya at the 2003 Australian Open, which will give him a little confidence going into the match.

"One of the toughest things about playing on clay is that you have to be a little more patient than on the faster courts we’re used to," Fish said. "We’re well aware that we’re probably going to have to stay out there a long time. Mentally and physically, it’s pretty grueling. We came into this tie knowing the task and what we have to accomplish."

Regardless of what happens on Friday, the U.S. is counting on the Bryans to come up huge in the doubles. It’s the only match the U.S. is legitimately favored in. As the world’s number two ranked doubles team and former Roland Garros champs, the Bryans have much more experience than Nadal/Robredo. The California natives were weaned on Davis Cup and say this is their biggest moment.

"I think so," said Mike. "When we came on tour, we wanted to win Davis Cup. This is probably the biggest competition. It would really make us happy to win this one. This is huge. We could put our rackets down and be happy if we won this. This is probably the biggest moments of our lives. And we're going to give it hell."

There are multiple scenarios in which the U.S. could come away with a victory, but the fact is, at least one of their singles players is going to have to play the best clay court tennis of his life for the U.S. to win it all. Fish is going to have to deliver on all those backhands down the lines that he missed in the Olympic final, and Roddick is going to have show remarkable agility around the net and stymie Nadal’s attempts to punch holes in his backhand. The last time the U.S. played a significant tie away from home on clay was more than two years ago, in the semis against France. They competed hard, but were clearly overmatched on the red dirt.

"The [clay court] record is not good, but it’s a different team now than the one that lost in France," Roddick said. "We've all been ready for this. We’ve known it for a couple of months now. The Bryans won the French Open on clay, so they’ve obviously had success. Basically, its up to Mardy and I to pick it up and prove ourselves on clay."

A victory here by the U.S. team would rival that of the last American squad to win the Davis Cup title, the 1995 squad that shocked Russia behind Pete Sampras. That veteran team went in with a willingness to get down and dirty and came out on top. This young team has to do exactly the same thing. The 27,000 fans that are expected to scream for the home team on Friday won’t be giving them any quarter.

"We’re a slight underdogs, playing away against a very tough Spanish team," said McEnroe. "They are playing on their best surface. It’s no secret that it’s not our best surface. But we’ve prepared as well as we can. We’re going into each match thinking we can win it. Playing our first three matches at home has been a good draw. But coming to Spain to pay the final is a great challenge. It would make it sweeter to win here in one of the toughest places to play."

Neely
12-02-2004, 02:15 PM
oh my god, that doesn't sound good if Spedea has driven Andy nuts like this... :rolleyes:

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 02:17 PM
Ummmm Neely.... did it sound good anyway? LOL!!!!!!

k-rod83
12-02-2004, 02:23 PM
they could be playing mind games on the spanish....make them think that andy sucks..lol...lets hope so anyway!

Black Adam
12-02-2004, 02:39 PM
2-0 for the Americans :rolleyes: ... pretty optimistic... I would be glad if they won a match or maybe a singles and doubles match just to piss off a few people :lol: all those who have nothing else to do than just to hate ;)

my point is it would be marvellous if mardy could shock carlos don't ya think so ? :D ;)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 02:43 PM
it would be marvelous... but hell would also have to freeze over :lol:

tangerine_dream
12-02-2004, 02:51 PM
Hell already froze over when the BoSox beat the Yankees and then went on to win the World Series. ;)

Maybe when pigs fly? :scratch:

Poor JCF must be hurting to not be playing. I was looking forward to seeing him play. But the thought of a Nadal/Andy rematch after their contentious USO match is making me drool. :devil:

Mardy goes first? Playing Moya? We're already in the hole. :o

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 02:55 PM
yes, that's it! When pigs fly, it is!

Natasc
12-02-2004, 03:30 PM
Hey, who will play first?
And, what time will it be the matchs?

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 03:58 PM
like we said said, the matches are at noon local time tomorrow. I don't know what your time zone is, so you have to figure out when that will be for you. I know it's 3am here in Los Angeles. Mardy and Carlos will play first, then Andy and Rafael will follow.

So if I can't post Tennis Week articles here, can I post the links? LOL

One about Spadea, kind of interesting: http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11853&bannerregion=

http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11852&bannerregion=

There are also some nice pics at Getty, Mardy's wearing a Beckham shirt and there's a funny one of Andy pinching his nose.

Here's the article from the Spanish paper that talks about Andy at the practice against Vince. http://sevilla.abc.es/sevilla/pg041202/prensa/noticias/Deportes/Tenis/200412/02/SEV-DEP-016.asp

Maybe someone who speaks Spanish better than Babelfish can give a better translation lol

tangerine_dream
12-02-2004, 04:07 PM
Spanish translation: "We win!"

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 04:08 PM
LOL!!!!!!!!!!

Here's Bob Larson's preview (written before the draw was released)... he's always interesting I find
=======

Men's Look Forward: Davis Cup Final
The goal, this week, seemed to be to mess with the Americans' minds.

That started, of course, when the Spanish decided to play on clay. That messed with more than the mind; it messes with the footwork. But the Spanish have fired a few other broadsides, e.g. they've been saying that Andy Roddick has to win both his singles matches for the Americans to have a chance. An interesting gambit, since it puts more pressure on Roddick -- but also puts more pressure on Mardy Fish to prove himself.

And the Spanish have some problems of their own. Carlos Moya is in good form this year, and he showed at the Masters Cup that he's healthy. But what about Juan Carlos Ferrero? And what about the doubles? Odd as it sounds from a nation that once boasted the Sanchez family, Spain for years has been about the most inept doubles nation in Davis Cup. And the Americans have the Bryan Twins.

Of course, that also means that they have no genuine third player to play fill-in singles if Roddick takes one of his patented clay tumbles. Bob Bryan is their presumed #3; the lefty half of the Twins has consistently been ranked higher -- if "higher" really means anything for two guys who never made the Top 100. But Bob's only ATP match this year was as a wildcard at Memphis, where he lost to Wayne Ferreira. He played only one other event, earning 8 points; he is currently ranked #797 in singles. Mike isn't even trying in singles any more. If Roddick or Fish goes down, that's that as far as those singles matches are concerned.

The Americans have managed their own flashes of controversy -- as, e.g. when Vincent Spadea argued that he is the #2 available singles player, well ahead of Fish, and deserved to be on the team. (An argument echoed by a number of in-the-stands critics.) You could certainly argue that the American team should have picked Spadea over Fish from the beginning. It's hard to make that case now, though, since it would disrupt the team. Roddick and Fish and the Bryans took the Americans this far, after years of falling short of the final; if nothing else, they have good team chemistry.

What they don't have is clay results. Fish has never made a clay final; this year, he lost first round at Houston (to Bogomolov), winning only four games, and then withdrew from Monte Carlo; he didn't play another clay match, making his comeback at Halle.

Roddick of course has done better in his career, winning Atlanta in 2001, Houston in 2001 and 2002, and St. Poelten in 2003. He also made the Rome semifinal in 2002. But he lost the Houston final this year to Haas, pulled out of Monte Carlo, lost first round at Rome, skipped Hamburg, and then lost second round at Roland Garros to Olivier Mutis. He's the top American clay player mostly because the Americans don't have any alternatives.

Dirt is obviously no problem for Carlos Moya; he won Acapulco and Rome this year. Juan Carlos Ferrero is another matter; he made the semifinal of Valencia (just about his last decent result of 2004), but went easily at Monte Carlo to Alex Corretja (who needed a wildcard to get in), missed Rome, pulled out of Hamburg, lost second round at Roland Garros, lost his opener at Gstaad, and didn't play any other clay matches. Eventually, he felt so disgusted with his results that he quit playing.

Plus he now has a blister on his hand. You have to wonder how many other things he can dream up to have go wrong. He says he's fine, but what else is he supposed to say?

He isn't even Spain's #2 any more. Tommy Robredo is. And Feliciano Lopez is third (though he's not as comfortable as the others on clay, and his strengths play into the Americans' stregths, and in any case he is not on the best terms with some of the others). Ferrero is the Spanish #4! If the Spanish were picking a team solely with an eye to this year, they probably should have picked Robredo for #2 singles, with Fernando Verdasco or someone to play doubles. But, of course, Ferrero is the best Spanish player when he is on. The Spanish probably think they can win on clay, and by playing Ferrero, they keep him happy for when they need him in future.

They're probably right, too. In terms of thinking about outcomes, we can probably assume that Moya will beat Fish, and that the Bryans will win the doubles. That means the Spanish need to win two of the other three matches.

And, it should be pointed out, they're playing at home, at a specially refitted stadium, somewhat similar to Hamburg, with a roof over the court but the spectators exposed to the elements. In December, with the winter weather rolling in. Cold clay indeed (did the Spanish know that that's a synonym for death in English?).

That's apart from the expected 26,000 or so fans, listed as the largest crowd ever for a "sanctioned" tennis match (ITF, ATP, or WTA). You can't stack a deck much more than that, other than making the Americans play with wood racquets or something.

As of this writing, the draw has not been released, and it is still possible that one team or the other will make a substitution. If there is a change in the lineup (currently, for the U. S., Roddick and Fish in singles, Bryan/Bryan in doubles; for the Spanish, Ferrero and Moya in singles and Nadal/Robredo in doubles), we'll let you know.

Natasc
12-02-2004, 04:10 PM
Hey Deb
Which time in Spanish watch the match will be so?

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 04:12 PM
I'm not sure what you're asking but the matches start at noon time in Seville. Are you in Brasil? I think that's three hours behind, so that would be 9am in Brasil. But I'm not sure.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 04:52 PM
more piccies

It was nice of Andy to share his seat with Cousin Vinny since they didn't have one for him :lol:

http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/photo-galleries/04-DavisCup-Finals/12-02-dvsfnl/images/12-02-dvsfnl02.jpg
http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/photo-galleries/04-DavisCup-Finals/12-02-dvsfnl/images/12-02-dvsfnl07.jpg
http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/photo-galleries/04-DavisCup-Finals/12-02-dvsfnl/images/12-02-dvsfnl08.jpg

Natasc
12-02-2004, 05:11 PM
I'm not sure what you're asking but the matches start at noon time in Seville. Are you in Brasil? I think that's three hours behind, so that would be 9am in Brasil. But I'm not sure.

Thanks Deb :worship:
The Sport channel don't show nothing about the match tommorow yet. I just know they will pass, but I don't make any idea about the time.
Damn, don't even the brazilian site said something about this :fiery:

Golfnduck
12-02-2004, 05:18 PM
I hope the US can win one match tomorrow, and I'm hoping that Andy beats Nadal. I also hope that Mardy can at least make Moya work, or best case scenario, Mardy wins. If Mardy does win, hell will freeze over and the Red Sox will continue to beat the Yankees. I can hope.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 05:21 PM
Thanks Deb :worship:
The Sport channel don't show nothing about the match tommorow yet. I just know they will pass, but I don't make any idea about the time.
Damn, don't even the brazilian site said something about this :fiery:

You're welcome, DC is kinda confusing for sure. I don't know what the Brazilian schedule is - maybe Renata is lurking around here and she can help you :)

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 05:35 PM
I'm here LOL!!!

Well... For who lives in Brazil... SporTv will be showing all five matches live... For us tomorrow it starts at 9am with Mardy vs Carlos and then Andy vs Nadal... Hope that helps :)

Golfnduck
12-02-2004, 05:37 PM
Renata posts again!!! :eek: *falls over and dies* Lovely to see you in Duckyland. :wavey:

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 05:37 PM
See, I knew Renata would come to the rescue!

OMG That was your 10th post?? STOP THE PRESSES!

snaillyyy
12-02-2004, 05:42 PM
:yippee: :woohoo: :aparty: :bowdown: Renata is back again!!!!! :devil:

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 05:43 PM
See, I knew Renata would come to the rescue!

OMG That was your 10th post?? STOP THE PRESSES!

:wavey: :devil:

Natasc
12-02-2004, 05:59 PM
Hey Renata, right?
Which hour will pass Andy's match?
..here in brazil of course, the damn of Sportv don't said anything yet!! :fiery:

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 06:15 PM
Hey Renata, right?
Which hour will pass Andy's match?
..here in brazil of course, the damn of Sportv don't said anything yet!! :fiery:

Hello there :)
Yeah I'm Renata lol Well... As I said right above andy's match is the 2nd one so it follows the match between mardy and carlos that start at 9am our time. Sportv will be covering all matches live, assuming they were saying it during the TMC... ;)

Natasc
12-02-2004, 06:29 PM
Hello there :)
Yeah I'm Renata lol Well... As I said right above andy's match is the 2nd one so it follows the match between mardy and carlos that start at 9am our time. Sportv will be covering all matches live, assuming they were saying it during the TMC... ;)

Obrigada Renata ;)

You are the first brazilian that I see here :lol:
Also a Andy's fans!! Great.
Well, I see more brazilians in WTAworld, but at the most they are guys, you are the first woman that I see here.
That's forum is amazing with great peoples!! Very different of brazilians forum :rolleyes:

See ya guys :wavey:

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 06:34 PM
LOL!! Yeah... I thought I was the only brazilian all around but then I saw you were here as well ;) Nice to know there are other people here in Brazil that like Andy :)

Golfnduck
12-02-2004, 06:38 PM
Tytta's 13th post!!!! OMG!!!! :eek:

Natasc
12-02-2004, 06:38 PM
LOL!! Yeah... I thought I was the only brazilian all around but then I saw you were here as well ;) Nice to know there are other people here in Brazil that like Andy :)

Hey, I was thinking...the Andy's match will start very LATE here. Damn!!!
With the Masters of Madri the matchs are good, now this shit will happen...hum...that's sounds to me like my mum will not sleep friday...heheheh, I need watch this match!!

k-rod83
12-02-2004, 07:05 PM
it starts at 11 am in the UK on sky sports..

Tytta!.
12-02-2004, 07:09 PM
Tytta's 13th post!!!! OMG!!!! :eek:

LOL Jen... I'm getting there ;)

MissPovaFan
12-02-2004, 07:09 PM
it starts at 11 am in the UK on sky sports..

Yay I can watch it after Uni then :)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 08:13 PM
Roddick vs. Nadal could be key to U.S.-Spain Davis Cup final
- STEPHEN WADE, AP Sports Writer
Thursday, December 2, 2004


(12-02) 12:57 PST SEVILLE, Spain (AP) --

Three months ago, Andy Roddick swept Rafael Nadal 6-0, 6-3, 6-4 in the second round of the U.S. Open.

Don't expect it to be that easy when Roddick plays the 18-year-old Spaniard in the Davis Cup final Friday. This time, the match is on clay. And Nadal will be cheered by an expected record crowd of 26,600 at Olympic Stadium.

"He has a lot of game," Roddick said. "He hits the ball a ton, he's very competitive, and in an atmosphere like this he is going to get the crowd going."

Roddick and Nadal play the second singles match of the best-of-five series between Spain and the United States. The host's top player, 1998 French Open champion Carlos Moya, faces Olympic silver medalist Mardy Fish in the opener Friday.

"Hopefully I am going to win my match and give (Nadal) confidence, going on the court leading 1-0," Moya said.

In Saturday's doubles, twins Bob and Mike Bryan should have the edge over Nadal and Tommy Robredo. In Sunday's reverse singles, Moya is slated to face Roddick, followed by Nadal vs. Fish.

The lineups for Saturday and Sunday can be changed up until one hour before the matches.

Roddick is the key for the Americans as they bid for a 32nd Davis Cup title -- but first since 1995. Nadal, meanwhile, is lined up to play three matches as Spain tries to win only its second championship.

Nadal was a surprise pick Thursday ahead of former No. 1 and 2003 French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero.

"Certainly Roddick's favored," Nadal said. "He's No. 2 in the world -- and that's on any surface."

Nadal, a free-swinging left-hander, is the Spanish roster's lowest-ranked player at No. 51. But he's been clutch in Davis Cup play.

Nadal, the youngest Davis Cup player in Spanish history, won the deciding fifth match against the Czech Republic in February. As a late replacement for Moya, he won the clinching match in the semifinals against France.

"Of course I'm surprised to be picked," Nadal said. "I'm excited, and of course I feel nervous, as anybody would in this situation. Really, I wish there were going to be 10,000 more fans."

Ferrero has battled chicken pox and broken ribs in the worst season of his career. He's the only Spanish player back from the 2000 team that beat Australia for the title.

"If I close my eyes, I want to see myself on the court on Sunday," Ferrero said.

Spain has won 11 straight Davis Cup matches at home. The last time the Americans played in Spain on clay was in 2000, when a team headed by Todd Martin lost 5-0. The Americans lost to France 3-2 on clay two years ago in the semifinals.

"The record (on clay) is not good, but it's a different team now," Roddick said. "Basically, it's up to Mardy and me to pick it up and really prove ourselves on clay."

Roddick is 12-0 against all members of the Spanish team, but only one win was on clay. He's 14-3 in the Davis Cup and hasn't lost a set this season.

Fish is 4-1 against the Spaniards, but of none of those matches was on clay. He's 4-4 in the Davis Cup.

U.S. reserve Vince Spadea is ranked 19th to Fish's No. 37 but was passed over by captain Patrick McEnroe.

"Patrick went with his gut feeling, and we'll see how the chips fall," Spadea said.

Spadea said he expected the matches to be "slow, slow, slow-motion."

"They have to be prepared to play 21/2 hours," he said.

If Roddick wins twice, the Americans should take the title. The Bryan brothers are coming off a Masters Cup title and are 4-0 in the Davis Cup, where they've yet to lose a set.

tangerine_dream
12-02-2004, 09:21 PM
I'm too anxious and excited about the DC match; I've been goofing off on the web for half the day today. :tape:

I still don't know what to make of the switch-to-Nadal tactic. Some seem to think it's good for the US and some say it's not. Isn't Nadal supposed to be really good on clay? I don't see how Andy can win. Andy lost to Mutis on clay so why would anyone think that Andy will suddenly become awesome and beat down Nadal in front of Nadal's home crowd? Nadal now knows what kind of firepower to expect from Andy, which won't be so powerful on the clay anyway.

zoltan83
12-02-2004, 09:24 PM
Is it Nadal so good on clay? I know that it's a spanish but he has a game which is more dangerous on hard, no? (i don't see him playing often :confused: ).
And the last time (only time :confused: ?) they faced together, Andy won easily.

Of course that this match will probably not be easy but Andy can win.

MissPovaFan
12-02-2004, 09:25 PM
Here are the following players which both Andy Roddick and Rafael Nadal have LOST to on clay this season...

NADAL

Gaston Gaudio
David Ferrer
Olivier Mutis

RODDICK

Tommy Haas
Guillermo Canas
Olivier Mutis

andyroxmysox12191
12-02-2004, 09:54 PM
I'm gonna try sneaking onto MTF when we're at the computer lab around 12-ish. it's the only time i'll be on the computer. the matches should be close to ending at that time right?
Deb did you want a translation to that article? :D This is where my skills come in (not MY spanish speaking skills cause I don't know THAT much yet lmfao)

Roddick, better with the bat that with the racquet
Roddick lost the nerves al to be crushed by Spadea

SEVILLE. Instructive the penultimate day of training resulted. The hour of the beginning of the end goes being approached and it put on the verge of some and other goes remaining in evidence. Yesterday two quite illustrative and antagonistic situations were produced of how lives themselves the preparation and nerves in one they free themselves and another edict.

In the morning session they were measured in an exciting one partidillo Carlos Moyá and Juan Carlos Ferrero. It was an intense collision in which the two first Spanish swords were delivered in depth. They played to break the ball, without reserves and with very few errors. The ball ran them of wonder. Its right went loaded of explosives. The services of Moyá awoke the echo of the empty stadium of The Monastery.. In the afternoon, desperate because him left nothing, Roddick, number one American, desperate because did not leave him nothing on the central trail of the stadium of The Monastery, destroyed racquets until the captain of the American team, Patrick McEnroe, decided to suspend the training.

In the morning session, in one of the steps, camouflaged middle, Patrick McEnroe took notes and one must suppose that began to be disturbed before the extraordinary level shown by Moyá and Ferrero. The first one set it was aimed «Charlie» for 6-3. It had been a sleeve of training, but had been disputed to a wild rhythm. The to shoot did not want to continue, but Juan Carlos insisted. It should desire a revenge. Already is known its enormous competitiveness. They arrived at an agreement and they decided to dispute a second one set, but beginning since a hypothetical one 2-2. It it was noted Ferrero, very motivated and removing better and better and harder, with a final scoreboard of 6-3, although in play really disputed was a 4-1 for the Valencian one.

The illusion, concentration and level of demand of the Spaniards had its compensation in the training vespertino of the Americans.

Mardy Fish, that had been working in the morning, was presented with the hands in the pockets, like recogepelotas of Vincent Spadea and Andy Roddick. They intended to dispute an exacting and hard encounter, but soon was verified that was not the day of Roddick. The American star did not give a blow well. Spadea, the «sparring» of the American team, crushed al «striker» of Nebraska. A 6-4 and a 2-0 it carried Spadea when Patrick McEnroe decided to interrupt the training. Its number one had lost the nerves and there was itself loaded several racquets. It was desperate, was being demoralized to marches forced and had strayed the composure. Patrick calmed him. It it was carried al lawn that remains free between the courts of training and the Central trail. A bat of baseball gave him and the kid recovered the smile. It began to bat and to send balls to the steps and was again happy. Above all when they appeared for the herb Robredo, Nadal, Feliciano and Verdasco and they began to play with him -certainly, enough badly-.

The day evil reasons of Roddick, that carried three days playing and removing as the angels, they are being analyzed for the Spanish team and the conclusions aim at the humidity.

It can be a mere coincidence, but not one must rule out the question. All the night and good splits in the morning was raining in Seville. The trail, very I live and rapidita the previous days, has slowed down enough and the balls wet weigh a lot more and they throw away enough less. Some conditions that do not go anything well al style of play of Andy and that, according to the forecasts, they will be maintained more or less equal to Sunday.

Keys for the drawing

Today at eleven o'clock in the morning, in the Stadium of The Monastery, the drawing of the end will be celebrated.

The Spanish team is determined: Moyá, of one; Ferrero, of two; Robredo and Nadal for the double one, and possibilities of change for Sunday.

The American team does not seem so clear. The possibility that Spadea replace Fish as number two grows, although in the Spanish team do not they believe that happen. Roddick will be the number one and the Bryan will dispute the double one.

yeah i put it through the translator lol

Chloe le Bopper
12-02-2004, 10:07 PM
Here are the following players which both Andy Roddick and Rafael Nadal have LOST to on clay this season...

NADAL

Gaston Gaudio
David Ferrer
Olivier Mutis

RODDICK

Tommy Haas
Guillermo Canas
Olivier Mutis
Nadal missed the entire proper clay season. His clay results this year were based on the tournaments following Wimbledon, and he wasn't even in proper shape until the end of the summer. He played with pain for a while during his comeback. I'm not excuses his losses, just pointing out that his clay record this season is almost totally irrelevant.

tangerine_dream
12-02-2004, 10:13 PM
Thanks for the translation, Mani :kiss: I sure would love to read about this incident from an English-speaking paper. :lol:

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 10:42 PM
Is Nadal good on clay?? He's been mentioned in the same sentence as "Future Roland Garros winner" since I've started to hear his name being thrown around. YES, Clay is for sure his surface (but he's shown the world that he's definitely gonna be a force to be reckoned with on all surfaces as he continues to grow up and mature.). Andy is in big deep dogshit. And he would've been against a healthy Ferrero too. There are pros and cons for each for Andy. Ferrero would've been lacking in confidence, Nadal might be nervous... but I don't see him winning, I just simply do not. Call it pessimism or realism, it just depends on the side of the coin you're looking at.

But, obviously, I'm more than open to Andy showing me wrong. He said "Mardy and I have to show we can step up on clay" - ok let's move that past lip service and go out and do it. If you do, I'll be first in line to give big props. Andy did say today that, while the surface is slow, it's not as slippery and stuff as the RG surface. Maybe that might help him just feel more comfortable on it, who knows. He's had many solid days of practice, he says he's prepared and in great physical condition, so the only reason he should lose is if he is out-played.

Obviously, by his anger level against Vinny in practice, he was unhappy with his own play. Andy doesn't usually get that cranky if he's just being outplayed, only when he feels like HE is doing something wrong - especially in practice, from what I myself witnessed. So hopefully he worked that out in the practices and can play his best tomorow - I don't think he's ever been in a mental state where he COULD play his best on clay. Now is as good a time as any to start :)

Couple articles from the BBC
-------

Roddick 'must play to strengths'

By Paul Birch

Jim Courier says Andy Roddick must play to his strengths if the United States are to overcome Spain in the Davis Cup final on Seville's clay.

Former Davis Cup star Courier told BBC Sport the US team must not worry too much about the surface.

"Andy has to play the way he would play on a hard court and not try to over adapt to the surface," said Courier.

"He needs to use his weapons, his serve and his forehand, to try and dominate the play."

Roddick opens against 18-year-old Rafael Nadal, and Courier believes the American must stay on the offensive.

"Once he gets on defence they will jerk him around until he eventually gets out of position," said Courier.

"He has got to play his game at a very efficient level and limit his errors."

Courier, who helped the United States win the Davis Cup in 1992 and 1995, is aware the US face a huge task to win the trophy.

"It's going to be challenging for us clearly as we have a surface disadvantage," he said.

"The thing we have to hope for is that they are lacking in confidence.

"If they are playing at their peak we are going to need the very best performances from our players to even stand a chance."

Despite Spain's home advantage, Courier believes that the pressure a record crowd of 26,000 can create may work in America's favour.

"The X-Factor here is how the Spanish deal with the home pressure because sometimes that can work against you," Courier said.

"They've got a great record at home but let's see how they handle it."

Courier has made no attempt to hide his own ambitions of taking over the reins as US captain when Patrick McEnroe decides to call it a day.

McEnroe recently signed a contract extension until 2006, but Courier hopes the prestigious role will pass to him next.

"Pat's done a great job forming this team and getting the young guys in but it's pretty well known that should they be looking for another captain I would be very interested in throwing my name into the hat.

"We have a very good group of young players coming out of the juniors so we have some good things going right now in American tennis."

======================
========================
=========================

US eye Davis Cup upset in Spain

The United States believe they can cause an upset by beating Spain in the Davis Cup final after the hosts chose to drop Juan Carlos Ferrero.
Carlos Moya opens play against Mardy Fish at 1100 GMT on Friday, with Andy Roddick then taking on Rafael Nadal.

And with Mike and Bob Bryan favoured in Saturday's doubles against Nadal and Tommy Robredo, the US are optimistic.

US captain Patrick McEnroe said: "We have a great opportunity here to show what we can do."

The clay surface and a record crowd of 26,000 fans mean Spain start as favourites, and Moya is expected to beat Fish in the opening match.

"Hopefully I can win that match to give Nadal confidence to go on court with us leading 1-0," said Moya.

The 18-year-old Nadal will need all then help he can get against world number two Roddick, who is not worried by the surface.

"It's slow, but it's nothing ridiculous," said the American. "It's not as powdery or slippery as Roland Garros."

And Roddick is unworried by the daunting atmosphere of Seville's revamped Olympic Stadium.

"To be honest, I don't know if you can prepare for 26,000 people," he said. "I don't know if you can simulate that in practice. But at the same time we've known about it.

"Nothing this week has come as a complete surprise to us. We knew going in that it was probably going to be this court, this way, this many fans.

"So subconsciously we've been preparing for it mentally for a couple of months now. Hopefully that will help us through."

And Roddick will not underestimate the threat of Nadal, who is one of only four men to have beaten Roger Federer in 2004.

"He has a lot of game," said the American. "You know, he hits the ball a ton, and he's very competitive.

"In an atmosphere like this, he's going to get the crowd going. I think Davis Cup might work well for him."

For Nadal's part, the Mallorcan admitted he was not expecting to take Ferrero's place in the singles.

"I am surprised by this as well," he said. "And I am a little bit nervous which is not surprising considering a match like this."

The team captains can change the line-up an hour before the match and Ferrero has not ruled out returning for Sunday's singles.

"Of course I want to see myself on the court on Sunday," he said.

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 10:48 PM
and, of course, the always-interesting view from the London Times
======

Spain and US braced for Davis Cup battle
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent in Seville



ARMED with a shiny baseball bat and facing Andy Roddick’s infamous knuckle ball in a post-practice laugh-in, Rafael Nadal took three swishes and connected only with the mist his breath left hanging in the air. Today, when the players face off in a Davis Cup final rubber that will help to define the rest of their careers, we can expect a haze of middle-of-the-sweet-spot bludgeoning the like of which the sport has not seen.
Nadal, one of only six players to have beaten Roger Federer this year, does not know the meaning the phrase “holding back”, and Roddick, the Wimbledon finalist and world No 2, is hardly known for his lack of power. As 26,000 patrons in this attractive city make their way to the Estadio Olímpico, where one corner has been turned into a mini Roland Garros (plus a roof), they are thinking of one match.



Nadal is a surprising choice. Although Juan Carlos Ferrero has endured his worst year — loss of form, niggling injuries, untimely change of racket manufacturer and a plunge to No 31 in the rankings — as a former French Open champion and glorious clay-court performer, he had been expected to lead his country’s assault on the Davis Cup final. “I know I could,” Ferrero said yesterday, “but they don’t think so.” “They” are Spain’s captaincy triumverate of Jordi Arrese, Juan Avendaño and José Perlas, and if Spain lose this final, “they” may be stewed in their own paella. No one, though, not even Roddick at his most optimistic, expects the United States to win for the 32nd time and the first since Pete Sampras was carried, cramping violently, from the court in Moscow after spilling everything in the opening match of the 1995 final against Andrei Chesnokov, of Russia, before returning to help to win the doubles and clinching the cup in the fourth rubber by beating Yevgeny Kafelnikov.

Such courage beyond the simple fluttering of the Stars and Stripes is required for the Americans to emerge victorious here. Mardy Fish has played one match on clay all year, the fast red surface in Houston, and won only four games against Alex Bogomolov Jr.

Perhaps Bogomolov might be a better bet here, but Fish is a good friend of Roddick, he fits the scene well and Patrick McEnroe, the US captain, admires his ability. But sending him out first today to face Carlos Moyà, another Roland Garros champion, is not the friendliest thing to do to the chap. The fact that he wore a Real Madrid shirt with the No 23 of David Beckham in practice suggests that he is prone to indiscipline.

Who knows, maybe he will emerge heroic on Sunday and be carried shoulder high, as Ferrero was in Barcelona four years ago after he had led Spain to their first victory in the championship. A sighting of Javier Duarte, the Spain captain four years ago, reminded one of the unsavoury behaviour his antics helped to provoke. It must be hoped that should such overheating of emotions recur, the officials will take strong exception. This could be an extremely testing final occasion for Mike Morrissey, who, with Gerry Armstrong, has kept British umpiring in the forefront of the sport for the past decade.

Nadal is a feisty teenager, whose uncle, Miguel Ángel Nadal, was an uncompromising centre back for Barcelona. Roddick gives ground to nobody. Bob and Mike, the Bryan twins, who have not lost a Davis Cup rubber in four family doubles, have a special chest-thumping reaction to winning points that could inflame things. They say that this event leaves others in the dust — “you walk out in the grand slams after this and they are a bit flat” — but, then, doubles still means something in the Davis Cup.

This has the makings of a tumultuous, tempestuous final. Roddick says that he has been thinking only of this from the moment the US defeated Belarus in September to qualify. That may have something to do with why he collapsed, losing the final 20 points, against Lleyton Hewitt in the Masters Cup semi-finals two weeks ago. His body was in one place, his mind was somewhere else. For the US to win this championship on Sunday, the team have to be truly united. They certainly look it.

Golfnduck
12-02-2004, 10:53 PM
Great article, thanks for posting Deb!!!

superpinkone37
12-02-2004, 11:13 PM
wow thanks for all these articles Deb :)

ok so yeah i am like way late on all this but it wasnt until i started reding this thread not too long ago that i realized nadal was the new singles player. hmmm, its gonna be a cold day in hell tomorrow while my nadal-lovin' cousin and i watch the match. i dont know if i would rather nadal or ferrero play andy, there are pros and cons to each. but yeah, i wanna be able to watch these "live" without knowing the score, but i highly doubt i will be able to do that.

oh well. im really excited for tomorrow, but then again im really nervous, and im convincing myself the US doesn't have much of a chance. this would be the perfect time for andy to prove me wrong though...;)

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 11:34 PM
Oy, there's a blurb on a spanish site that Mike has tendonitis in a knee and what they translated as gastroenteritis. lovely!

Deboogle!.
12-02-2004, 11:51 PM
OMFG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! the 2005 DC tie in March is in CARSON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This might require skipping a day of class :angel:

Danielle! We gotta go!
----------
Carson, California selected to host first round of '05 Davis Cup

SEVILLE, Spain -- The U.S. Tennis Association picked Carson, Calif., to host a first-round 2005 Davis Cup match against Croatia on March 4-6.

It's the first time since 2000 that Davis Cup tennis will be played in California.

"We will be playing before some of the most knowledgeable tennis fans - and sports fans - in the world," U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe said.

His team faces Spain starting Friday in the 2004 Davis Cup final.

AP NEWS
The Associated Press News Service

Natasc
12-03-2004, 12:13 AM
Yeah great pots Deb, I agree with "am&a": "deb, maybe you should work for the POST office"..he he he
Unhappily I am very lazy and I read fast :sad:
Hehehe, see ya ;)

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 12:30 AM
hehe, I'm just glad I can help :)

Here's from the Guardian in the UK - they talk about Vinny outplaying Andy and Mardy... oh boy, this is going to be fun.
=========

Americans sink or swim with Fish

Stephen Bierley in Seville
Friday December 3, 2004
The Guardian

"Take a hard hat and a pair of ear plugs," was Lleyton Hewitt's laconic advice to the United States team before they set off for the Davis Cup final against Spain. Amid heavy security, with an extra 2,000 police drafted in and restrictions on air space over the city, the climax of the sport's leading men's team event will start unfolding today in front of more than 26,000 chanting, cheering and jeering Spaniards.
In 2000 Hewitt was a member of the Australian side that was beaten 3-1 in Barcelona amid scenes straight out of Camp Nou. Hewitt's double faults were applauded and any sign of annoyance, petulance, or over-exuberance by the Australian players was greeted with ear-piercing whistles of derision. Small wonder that the US captain Patrick McEnroe, brother of John, yesterday warned his players to "tone down" their reactions on court at the Olympic Stadium.

"We have to assume we are going to get some bad calls but we have been preparing mentally for some while," said McEnroe. "I mean, what a chance to play in front of so many people. It's going to be a pretty amazing experience."

The US, who won the last of their 31 Davis Cup finals in 1995, will begin as the substantial underdogs. However, Spain sprang a small surprise yesterday morning with the decision to play the 18-year-old Rafael Nadal in the opening singles against Andy Roddick, rather than the 2003 French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Both Nadal and Ferrero have been injured for much of the year, with the Spanish captain Jordi Arrese believing that the teenager currently has a narrow edge in match fitness. Ferrero, who clinched Spain's first Davis Cup final win four years ago with victory over Hewitt, expressed surprise at the decision, although he may well replace Nadal for Sunday's fifth and final match against Mardy Fish, the Americans' weakest link, should Spain need to win it.

Nadal, who suffered a broken bone in his left ankle during the spring, is a prodigious talent and Arrese, in conjunction with the other Spanish coaches, may be hoping that his left-handed, all-action, big-hitting game could upset Roddick and help Spain secure a 2-0 lead today. At worst he could run Roddick close and tire him substantially. (uh, what? He has a day off before having to play Moya... he's in great shape...and also, Andy has a very nice record against lefties. Not that this means much, but I don't think Nadal's being a lefty would have anything to do with why he might win lol)

The teenager, despite being ranked nearly 50 places below Roddick, seemed undaunted. "Obviously it's going to be a tough match but this week I have been training very well," Nadal said yesterday.

"I think I will have more options on clay and, if I play at my best level, I will have a chance or two."

Not that the Americans were altogether unhappy. "Obviously Rafael has a great future but he's going to have to play a very physical match against Andy and then he's due in the doubles with Tommy Robredo the next day," said McEnroe. "It's a tough ask for him."

The US are banking on a victory tomorrow from their doubles pairing of the brothers Bob and Mike Bryan, the current world champions and former winners at Roland Garros, and will surely need Roddick, the world No2, to win both his singles.

If Nadal, who has already won two crucial Davis Cup singles rubbers this year, against the Czech Republic and France, beats Roddick today, then the tie may be as good as over.

McEnroe has obstinately stuck by Fish, who will play the opening singles this morning against Spain's No1 Carlos Moya, the 1998 French Open champion. Fish, ranked No 37 in the world, has apparently not won one practice set since the Americans arrived here and lost the only competitive match he played on clay this year.

He is, however, a close friend of Roddick, which has clearly swayed McEnroe's decision. Vince Spadea, who was drafted in late and then not selected, much to his displeasure, is a better clay-court player but is regarded as something of an oddball and does not fit in with the youthful gung-ho camaraderie of Roddick, Fish and Los Bryans.

But Spadea's clay-court acumen has underlined Fish's shortcomings during practice this week, while Roddick, whose own backhand and volleying limitations are amplified on clay, smashed two rackets in frustration on Tuesday as Spadea outplayed him. (aha, see, here we go. TWO rackets. Lovely. You better have gotten all the bad playing and frustration out of your system then, or you're a dead duck (pun intended), not that he wasn't basically that anyway lmfao)

It is possible that Fish may startle everybody by beating Moya today. McEnroe, who certainly believes he can, will be delighted if proved right. Independent observers believe that by ignoring Spadea the US captain has made a significant error.

Golfnduck
12-03-2004, 12:53 AM
I'm sure Andy will play better tomorrow. He could have just been trying out new stuff and getting frustrated. I'd rather him break all the racquets he wants in practice, but not during a tournament. I think we all agree on that. Maybe Cousin Vinny was having an awesome day, who knows.

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 01:25 AM
Oh, I'm sure he will. Andy has bad practices and breaks rackets all the time, with far lesser players than Vinny (I mean, he'll do it when he's just hitting normal with Brad). He (well, usually) gets pumped up for matches that are important to him, and I think this is the ultimate for him this year. But Mardy's not as far along, I'm not sure if it's the same for him quite yet. Well, it'll all become clear by the time I wake up tomorrow morning I guess lol

So who's gonna come out here and stay with me and go to DC? ;):D

Jennay
12-03-2004, 01:36 AM
Oh, I'm sure he will. Andy has bad practices and breaks rackets all the time, with far lesser players than Vinny (I mean, he'll do it when he's just hitting normal with Brad). He (well, usually) gets pumped up for matches that are important to him, and I think this is the ultimate for him this year. But Mardy's not as far along, I'm not sure if it's the same for him quite yet. Well, it'll all become clear by the time I wake up tomorrow morning I guess lol

So who's gonna come out here and stay with me and go to DC? ;):D
Send me plane tickets, DC tickets, pick me up at the airport, drive me there, take me in your apartment :smoke: K, I'll be there (:

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 01:37 AM
um............. I'll pick you up at the airport :)

Jennay
12-03-2004, 01:38 AM
um............. I'll pick you up at the airport :)
:ras: I would do all the rest for you ;)

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 02:01 AM
OMFG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! the 2005 DC tie in March is in CARSON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This might require skipping a day of class :angel:

Danielle! We gotta go!
----------
Carson, California selected to host first round of '05 Davis Cup

SEVILLE, Spain -- The U.S. Tennis Association picked Carson, Calif., to host a first-round 2005 Davis Cup match against Croatia on March 4-6.

It's the first time since 2000 that Davis Cup tennis will be played in California.

"We will be playing before some of the most knowledgeable tennis fans - and sports fans - in the world," U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe said.

His team faces Spain starting Friday in the 2004 Davis Cup final.

AP NEWS
The Associated Press News Service

OMFG!!!! we are soooo there!!!!! seriously, i really wanna go to this. let me know if you get more info on it :)

MisterQ
12-03-2004, 04:07 AM
hey y'all, is tomorrow's noontime ESPN coverage live?

i'm rather excited to watch this spectacle! :bounce:

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 04:10 AM
No, it's 6 hours tape delayed :(

and to whomever I told it was on ESPN2, I was wrong :( Sorry :(

Carito_90
12-03-2004, 04:25 AM
I'm getting it live :hearts:

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 05:10 AM
awwww lucky you :ras: ;)

i wish i could watch it not knowing the outcome, but i know i wont be able to do that

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 05:15 AM
A few late articles
-----------------
Tampa's Fish Gets First Shot At Spain
By WHIT SHEPPARD Tribune correspondent
Published: Dec 3, 2004

SEVILLE, Spain - The odds are long, but in a year that has seen the Lightning emerge from obscurity to drink from Lord Stanley's Cup, who is to say the U.S. team can't overcome heavily favored Spain this weekend to claim its first Davis Cup title since 1995?
The draw for the final was held Thursday morning at the Estadio Olimpico de la Cartuja, the site of the tie on red clay. Tampa resident Mardy Fish's name was drawn first, and he will launch U.S. hopes against Davis Cup veteran and 1998 French Open winner Carlos Moya. The two have played three times previously, Fish winning twice, most recently in a second-round hardcourt match at the 2003 Australian Open.

``I've been waking up early here and getting used to the possibility of playing first,'' said Fish, 22, a silver medalist at the Athens Olympics in August. ``I'm excited to get things off to a good start for us.''

Today's second singles match will pit world No. 2 Andy Roddick against Spain's Rafael Nadal, who at 18 years, 185 days, will become the second- youngest player, after Germany's Boris Becker, to play singles in a Davis Cup final. Roddick beat Nadal in straight sets in their only previous match, a second-rounder in early September at the U.S. Open.

``He's got a lot of game,'' Roddick said of Nadal. ``He hits the ball a ton, and he's very competitive. In an atmosphere like this, he's going to get the crowd going.''

The unbeaten Bryan brothers, Bob and Mike, who are 4-0 in Davis Cup play, will face the Spanish duo of Nadal and Tommy Robredo in Saturday's doubles competition. Nadal and Robredo won a crucial match in Spain's semifinal win in late September over France.

Barring a 3-0 sweep or any unforeseen changes or injury pullouts, Sunday's reverse singles matches will pit Roddick against Moya, and Fish against Nadal.

The two countries have met six times in Davis Cup play, most recently in 2002 during a 3-1 U.S. quarterfinal victory on grass in Houston. In 2000, the Spanish crushed the visitors 5-0 on clay in Santander in the semifinal round before going on to win Spain's lone Davis Cup title, defeating the Australians on clay in Barcelona. None of the players on the current U.S. squad was a member of the losing 2000 team.

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NEW ERA: Davis Cup started anew at Joel in '01
Winston-Salem Journal

It has been a little more than three years since Patrick McEnroe brought the U.S. Davis Cup team to Winston-Salem for a tie against India in October 2001.

That was "only" a relegation match, one the U.S. had to win just to qualify for the 2002 World Group round of 16, but it proved to be a landmark occasion on at least three fronts.

McEnroe registered his first victory as Davis Cup captain, after succeeding his famous brother, John, the previous winter. Andy Roddick claimed his first two Davis Cup singles victories, in his debut as the U.S. team's No. 1 player and anointed top gun. And a new era in American Davis Cup tennis, the post-Agassi, post-Sampras era, began in earnest.

So, tennis fans who filled Joel Coliseum that weekend can take a special, personal interest in this weekend's 2004 Davis Cup final between the U.S. and Spain, which will start today in Seville, Spain.

This will be the United States' first appearance in a Davis Cup final since McEnroe took over, a chance to win the Cup for the first time since 1995.

Many would consider the Americans heavy underdogs, with the Spaniards playing on their favorite clay surface and with an expected crowd of 26,600 at Estadio Olympico giving them the ultimate home-court advantage. It'll be the largest crowd ever for a sanctioned tennis event, meaning the largest crowd ever except for the Billie Jean King-Bobby Riggs debacle at the Astrodome in 1973.

The last time the teams played on Spanish soil, in the 2000 Davis Cup semifinals, Spain won 5-0.

But some aren't discounting an upset.

Roddick has never lost to any of the potential Spanish singles players - Carlos Moya, Juan-Carlos Ferrero or Tommy Robredo - on any surface and has a combined 11-0 record against them. He has been pointing toward this weekend for months, as a way to salvage the year after failing to win a Grand Slam title.

Mardy Fish, who'll play second singles, is 4-1 combined on all surfaces against Moya, Ferrero and Robredo. And the doubles team of Mike and Bob Bryan should be favored in their Saturday match against Robredo and Rafael Nadal.

"With over 25,000 people, it's going to be amazing," McEnroe said recently before flying to Spain. "Our guys are excited. We know it's difficult and that we are the underdog, but we feel good about being as prepared as we can. Obviously clay is difficult for us, but we know that going in. We think we've got a good chance to go in there and get it done."

Whether the U.S. wins or loses this weekend, McEnroe continues to accomplish what he set out to do when he brought the American team to Winston-Salem in 2001.

He wanted to revive interest and develop a loyalty to Davis Cup with American players, the way it was through the mid-1990s with the likes of John McEnroe, Jim Courier, Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi. He wanted to lay a new foundation built around Roddick and other rising young players. And he wanted to get the U.S. back to where it could be a factor each year and win it all when the draws were advantageous.

Roddick has skyrocketed to the top of the tennis world in the past three years, ranked No. 2 in the world in singles. He has "only" won one Grand Slam - the 2003 U.S. Open - but chalk that up to Roger Federer's recent brilliance. And Federer won't be in Seville this weekend.

The Bryan twins have emerged to give McEnroe a dominant doubles team, and several young players continue to provide fierce competition for the singles spot opposite Roddick. Fish has gotten the nod in three of the four ties this year, but James Blake - who has battled injuries since winning two singles matches in Winston-Salem - Robby Ginepri, Taylor Dent and others remain in the mix.

"I've been very lucky," McEnroe said. "I came in at a time when we had a changing of the guard that was inevitable, basically. You know, Sampras was essentially at the end of his career, though he did play Davis Cup in 2002. Agassi had stated his intentions that he was finished committing to Davis Cup.

"So it was a time when we didn't have too many other players that were sort of veteran-type players that were at the top of the game, and it was time to look to the younger players. Obviously, Andy was the obvious guy. But we had other players like James, Mardy, Taylor, Robby, the Bryan brothers, so it made sense to go in that direction.

"But they're the ones who deserve the credit, because they're great kids, they're really inspired by Davis Cup, they're really passionate about playing for their country, and they get along with each other. I mean, you could be the captain, and these guys would be pumped up and jacked up to play."

If the U.S. doesn't win the title this weekend, indications are that it will sometime soon.

"We're starting to really build a good team unity and chemistry along with having great players," McEnroe said. "That's a combination you need for long-term success in Davis Cup. You can get lucky a year here or there if you've got a couple good players. But to really be in the hunt and in contention year after year, you need, No. 1, great players, but you also need guys that are committed to it, and you need some versatility. You need some players that can play on different surfaces. And we have that now."

Of course, McEnroe continues to fight an uphill battle selling Davis Cup to the average American sports fan. As wildly popular as it is in some counties - definitely in Spain - Davis Cup falls somewhere between professional poker and professional fishing in ESPN's ratings. Even a U.S. win this weekend would probably not make the front page of many sports sections around the country.

But McEnroe isn't discouraged.

"We've had very successful home ties this year going to not huge cities but medium-market cities," McEnroe said. "We had a tremendous turnout in Charleston, S.C. (semifinals vs. Belarus). I think if you go and talk to those people, they love Davis Cup and they love what the team is bringing. Obviously, winning helps a lot. So if we can do that over the next few years, I think we'll be doing pretty well."

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U.S. ready to hit the dirt at Davis Cup

By Charles Bricker
Staff Writer
Posted December 3 2004

The opponents will be hostile and so will the crowd, which is expected to reach record levels in the semi-enclosed, 60,000-seat Olympic Stadium in Seville, in the south of Spain.

But the U.S. team, led by 22-year-old Andy Roddick, is hoping for a reprise of 1995, when the United States went to Moscow and upset Russia, on clay, for the 32nd American title in Davis Cup history.

This tie also will be on clay, as slow as the Spaniards could make it, and that works heavily against the big hitters from the United States.

"We're not going to be able to just hit through these guys in a five-set match. We're going to have to do some of that, but we're going to have to play smart," said captain Patrick McEnroe, whose enthusiasm has inspired a solid corps of young Yanks to embrace Davis Cup with more passion than U.S. tennis has seen since the days when big brother John McEnroe was playing for his country.

There was one surprise Thursday when the draw was made. Spain captain Jordi Arrese tabbed his flashy, 18-year-old prodigy, Rafael Nadal, to play singles today against Roddick, instead of Juan Carlos Ferrero, who has had a year of injury and disappointment.

Mardy Fish, the Olympic Games silver medalist, will lead off (6 a.m. EST) against Carlos Moya, and if the United States can gain a first-day split it will feel confident of gaining an edge with twins Bob and Mike Bryan playing the doubles on Saturday.

The reverse singles will be played on Sunday. Although the captains have designated their matchups, they can change up to one hour before players are scheduled to go on court.

Roddick, who grew up in Boca Raton and who still owns a home there, is aware of the changes he has to make in his explosive game, but he added, "I will still have to play my game and do what I do well. I have to stick to my weapons, which is hitting big shots."

Roddick's last match on very slow red clay was memorable for all the wrong reasons. He was cruising along in a second-round match at the French Open against Olivier Mutis of France, having won the opening set, when it began to drizzle. Roddick never adjusted to the slowed conditions and lost in five sets.

Roddick has played Nadal once, whipping him easily in the second round of this year's U.S. Open, on a hardcourt. Fish has never played Moya on clay, though he has beaten him two of three times -- all on hardcourts.

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 05:23 AM
thanks Deb :)

just wondering...are you guys gonna be home/online tomorrow when the matches are on tv?

J. Corwin
12-03-2004, 08:04 AM
i'll be :)

J. Corwin
12-03-2004, 10:39 AM
Actually I won't be online cuz y'all would know the scores probably and I dont' want to know about it..I just want to watch and find out from TV. :)

andyroxmysox12191
12-03-2004, 11:05 AM
SMALL LITTLE ALERT FOR ANYONE WHO DOESNT WANT TO KNOW WHATS GOING ON IN MARDYS MATCH!!












omfffffg can i slap mardy!!?!?! you're putting me in a bad mood for school! i'm like the sims....take me to school with a bad mood, i wont do good. :fiery: :fiery:
go up 3-0 and then you let him break you....?*sigh* you have issues mardy :(
please win at least one set which I am highly doubting that he can do at this moment. that way I dont have to kill him like I want to do now.
I hope Pmac puts Vinny in on Sunday.
Sorry, that was my little vent. I'm dead tired now and I gotta get to school soon.*blee* I think I'll post again if I get the chance when I'm at school...bye everyone

Neely
12-03-2004, 12:20 PM
Fish had no chance in this match, he got the break in the 1st set and from there on Carlos found to his game and handled him at will....

Natasc
12-03-2004, 01:15 PM
WOW!!
Andy is PLAING NOW!!
Many peoples said to me that he will just play at 9pm here :confused:
O lost Moyá playing 'cause of this mystake :bigcry: :bigcry: :bigcry: :bigcry:

4-3 Roddick

Golfnduck
12-03-2004, 01:45 PM
TB time!!!! GO ANDY!!!! :worship:

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 01:50 PM
no, I won't be here when it's on tv

Golfnduck
12-03-2004, 02:01 PM
OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!! Andy came back from 1-4 in the TB to win 8-6!!! So proud of him!!!! GOOOOOO ANDY!!!!! :worship:

zoltan83
12-03-2004, 02:38 PM
:bigclap: Congrats Andy for the first set. :woohoo:

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 02:40 PM
celebrating too soon :o why does his head go away on clay!

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 02:51 PM
ok i didnt wanna know what happened before i saw it on tv, but i dont have enough discipline to restain myself from the computer, so so much for that lol

zoltan83
12-03-2004, 03:25 PM
celebrating too soon :o why does his head go away on clay!

The match is not over. It's 3-4 in the third set and it's andy to serve.

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 03:41 PM
Can somebody give me Mardy's score? I just signed on; Andy and Rafa are beating the holy hell out of each other right now :scared:

snaillyyy
12-03-2004, 03:46 PM
4-6, 2-6, 3-6 Tangy :sad:

zoltan83
12-03-2004, 03:47 PM
4-6, 2-6, 3-6 Tangy :sad:

ouch.. :eek: you scared me... I was disconnected for a few moment and one moment, I thought it was the score of Andy...Before noticing that Andy won a TB and there is no TB in your score.

snaillyyy
12-03-2004, 03:50 PM
OMG I am sorry :eek:

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 03:59 PM
dammit andy!!

snaillyyy
12-03-2004, 04:01 PM
OMG Andy.....that whole set was a battle, and look what you do!! Now lets see how mentally ready he really is.

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 04:03 PM
damn, and finally our tv coverage starts, but we have to sit through mardy losing first :(

Nishy
12-03-2004, 04:07 PM
OMG... It was close in 3rd set. Hope his both mental and phisical are OK.

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 04:14 PM
Thanks Carly. I don't think anybody was expecting Mardy to beat Carlos but I'm looking at the bright side: he wasn't bagelled! :banana: ;)

Andy and Rafa are in a blood battle out there. I just hope Andy can hang in there and take it to five sets. If he can do that, I think Rafa will finally melt. :scared:

snaillyyy
12-03-2004, 04:17 PM
Yeah didnt expect Mardy to win.....and poor Andy, I think is done, that last set wiped him out :sad:

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 04:19 PM
Yeah I spoke too soon; Andy is melting in this fourth set. Poor Andy. :hug:

Nishy
12-03-2004, 04:20 PM
Yea it seems to be done.. He was broken 2 time in 4set.

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 04:24 PM
is it over yet then? *sigh*

EDIT:
okay, now its over. what happened to proving yourself on clay, andy?? :o

Havok
12-03-2004, 04:32 PM
I seriously expected Andy to go down much more easily than he did:o. Nice effort though, losing in 4 sets to Nadal on clay is pretty good. Though I truely think that this DC loss to Spain on clay will make him at least bust his ass and get better on clay than his past results.

andyroxmysox12191
12-03-2004, 04:35 PM
in school right now...
mother effer andy! :fiery: i thought it'd be a little better than that but hopefully he put up a good fight
ok gotta get working now...bye everyone!

snaillyyy
12-03-2004, 04:38 PM
Those TB took alot out of him, but I agree Naldo I didnt expect him to do as well as he did..

Nishy
12-03-2004, 04:45 PM
I actually expeced him to win... hahaha.
As Naldo said, this lost boost him to play well on clay.

By the way, I am watching the TV right now and it is huge stadium.

k-rod83
12-03-2004, 04:47 PM
its pretty certain spain have won the DC now.....there is now way in hell that mardy will beat nadal....he was awsome. Andy played ok but made it dificult for himself...in the 2nd set and begining of 3rd he looked like he couldnt be arsed

Havok
12-03-2004, 04:53 PM
Can Patrick sub Fish for Spadea or no? Either way it won't matter because Spain won already pretty much.:p

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 05:00 PM
I agree Naldo. As I've said before, these losses in Spain might be a good thing for the US team in the long run because if they reallyreally want to win DC, they are going to have to improve their clay games.

And I hope Andy will have the strength to tell Mattress Mac "no" to Houston and go to Europe next Spring.

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 05:01 PM
*sigh* oh well. I just hope he fought til the end. I think he proved that he's at least capable. Long tough match. At least he has a break now. This is what I was worried about though, he would try so hard and expend so much and come so close and still be disappointed :( I almost hope the Bryans lose just so that Andy doesn't have to play again. Doesn't that sound awful. lol

No, spadea can't be subbed, but it's really irrelevant, this is not going to a 5th rubber.

Neely
12-03-2004, 05:06 PM
Okay, the Davis Cup is lost now... the US team won't win three matches in a row, I think that's quite safe to say...

Still I was glad that Andy at least took the first set after a little comeback in the tiebreak and that he could hold close another one which was lost in the tiebreak.

At the end, Nadal was the big favourite in this match (as almost all good claycourters against Andy have to be highly favoured) and came through deservedly. Still it was funny to see when some interim understatements were coming up after Andy won the 1st set... "Roddick has chances to win this match", "Many people didn't like Nadal being selected" :lol: ... but well, I had then rather quickly the feeling that it won't be more than just winning one set as I saw that Nadal was finding his game... and of course, we all know who is winning the points then because the general consensus and conclusion is that Andy plainly sucks on clay and Nadal is playing on home soil and is one of the most talented Spanish players ;)

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 05:16 PM
I had to laugh at everyone in GM groaning about how Nadal was a terrible mistake. :retard: Just because Andy demolished Rafa on hardcourt doesn't mean he'll do it again, and definitely not on clay. Andy may fight like hell but he's not a claycourter. I'm just glad that so far, there have been no bagels and Andy managed to get a set off of them. So far, the pummeling hasn't been as bad as I thought it would be. :lol:

But if the Bryans lose, then I'll be shocked :tape:

Golfnduck
12-03-2004, 05:35 PM
I'm alright with how Andy played. I thought he could win this match in 4 or 5 sets. Nadal's favorite surface is clay, whereas it's Andy's worst. Andy tried his best, and for that you can't be mad. He showed that he can play on clay and he just needs to improve his game. Nadal made some mistakes, but overall played great, props to him. But I think Andy has made a lot of progress and i didn't get bitch-slapped. Now I praying that the Bryans win.

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 05:46 PM
im going to have to watch the whole match to be able to say im happy with how andy played. you cant tell from just the scorelines. so far there have been four breaks of serve (up to where the coverage on espn is on) which is surprising for someone like andy, but i guess not as surprising as its on clay and his serve isnt as much as a threat. but still, i guess i am more dissappointed at all those BPs he wasnt able to convert and how he just couldnt pull it out in the end when he was so close to winning that 3rd set TB.

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 06:14 PM
The scoreline doesn't look so bad: 6-7(6), 6-2, 7-6(6), 6-2. Andy *can* play on clay, when he puts his mind to it. He just needs a shot of confidence that he can compete out there. :)

More agony of defeat pictures. :sad:

http://images.sportsline.com/u/ap/photos/XAF111120313_1024x768.jpg

Even though he was losing, he still goofed around with Doug's hat :)
http://images.sportsline.com/u/gettyimages/photos/51810875CB048_DavisCup120313_1024x768.jpg

http://images.sportsline.com/u/gettyimages/photos/51810875CB050_DavisCup120313_1024x768.jpg

http://images.sportsline.com/u/ap/photos/XAF107120314_1024x768.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20041203/capt.sge.lqj83.031204184849.photo01.photo.default-278x364.jpg

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041203/i/r64585774.jpg

Ya think Rafa's happy?
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20041203/i/r178626324.jpg

Neely
12-03-2004, 06:23 PM
True, I was also happy that Andy could avoid the worst things (bagel or complete blowout without chance) and in the end it's okay for me if Spain win it. Just hoped and rooted for the US team that it will be closer than expected :p

Nishy
12-03-2004, 06:46 PM
Thanks the pic tangy.
I like Doug's hat pic. But Is his leg something wrong?

Havok
12-03-2004, 07:06 PM
Yay more pictures of the shoes.:banana: Oh, btw the figjams Doug has on are the style I have.:smoke:

andyroxmysox12191
12-03-2004, 07:19 PM
Thanks for the pics tangy :kiss: Rafa looks so adorable there in the last pic :D I'm glad he was picked for the team
wow I can't believe someone used the blow horn right when andy was at the net. why on earth would you do that?

Black Adam
12-03-2004, 08:01 PM
proud of the fight andy!
next i think his main goals are wimby and DC and next year most of their matches will be at home so i am willing to bet 100 vcash on their chances on winning. besides a final for such a young team.....:worship: guys :hearts:

Natasc
12-03-2004, 08:03 PM
Okay, the Davis Cup is lost now... the US team won't win three matches in a row, I think that's quite safe to say...

Still I was glad that Andy at least took the first set after a little comeback in the tiebreak and that he could hold close another one which was lost in the tiebreak.

At the end, Nadal was the big favourite in this match (as almost all good claycourters against Andy have to be highly favoured) and came through deservedly. Still it was funny to see when some interim understatements were coming up after Andy won the 1st set... "Roddick has chances to win this match", "Many people didn't like Nadal being selected" :lol: ... but well, I had then rather quickly the feeling that it won't be more than just winning one set as I saw that Nadal was finding his game... and of course, we all know who is winning the points then because the general consensus and conclusion is that Andy plainly sucks on clay and Nadal is playing on home soil and is one of the most talented Spanish players ;)

Yeah, US lost now
maybe just the Bryans brothers will bring the only point for US

Hum...about the match, today I see all the match.
Andy plays very well in the 1º SET but after that he lose the rhythm, and in the 4º set he was over, he just "played the towel".

Good luck in the next match, and I still have hope that US can win ;)

tangerine_dream
12-03-2004, 08:09 PM
I thought Deb would've posted some news by now but I guess she's still in class. Here's some for now:

Roddick shell-shocked after Davis defeat

SEVILLE, Spain, Dec 3 (Reuters) - A baying, frenzied Spanish tennis crowd and Rafael Nadal combined to bring world number two Andy Roddick to his knees on Friday at the Davis Cup final.

It is not an experience he is likely to forget.

"It was crazy. You know, it was unlike anything I've experienced before," the shell-shocked American said after his 6-7 6-2 7-6 6-2 defeat at the hands of the 18-year-old.

"Obviously, emotionally I'm pretty down -- I wanted to get one for the team."

Roddick's serve -- the world's fastest -- and his ferocious forehand were both blunted by the Mallorcan teenager as Spain took a 2-0 lead in the best-of-five rubber match.

"I just ran into a guy today that was too good," the American said. "I couldn't have tried any harder. You know, I couldn't have... I gave it everything I had. It just wasn't enough on the day."

Roddick threw everything at his young opponent but the 18-year-old absorbed it all.

"I had to do something to try to win points. I felt like I stuck to the game plan and I volleyed pretty well today. I just ran into someone who played too well," Roddick said.

"Every once in a while people come along and they're big match players.
"This is the third time this year he's stepped up in singles and played well. I think you either have it or you don't, regardless of age."

Roddick predicts a bright future for the left-handed Nadal.

"I think he could become possibly one of the best clay courters in the world," he said.

"You know, he showed a lot out there today. I tried everything... so it's no secret that he has a very, very bright future."

Twins Bob and Mike Bryan must now beat Nadal and Tommy Robredo to keep alive American hopes of winning a first Davis Cup since 1995.

Despite their predicament, U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe heaped praise on Roddick for his efforts.

"I'm extremely proud of the way Andy played today, the way he competed, which he always does," he said.

"But more importantly, the tactics that he used and the improvement that he showed in playing that style.

"So to me that bodes very, very well for him, and therefore for us, not just for us this weekend, but for the future.

"I'm extremely proud of what he was able to do today. It was a hell of a match."

=================

Roddick played well in Friday's loss
Matt Cronin / tennisreporters.net

SEVILLE, Spain - Andy Roddick has never fought harder in a Davis Cup match and has never experienced a team loss like he did in his 6-7 (6), 6-2, 7-6 (6) 6-2 defeat to Spanish 18-year-old Rafael Nadal on Friday in the U.S.-Spain Davis Cup final.

Roddick pushed, pulled, sweated and strained to dictate the action on the super slow clay in the three-hour, 38-minute contest, but the lightening quick lefty had too much from him from the backcourt. The extremely nationalistic and emotionally involved crowd of 27,200 cheered Roddick's every fault. He was restrained for a man who usually makes his living debating the finer points of line calling with chair umpires. He cut loose on the balls instead, but Nadal chopped him down nonetheless.

"Emotionally I'm pretty down," Roddick said. " I wanted to get one for the team. I leave everything out there, and I take a lot of pride in that. I just ran into a guy today that was too good. I couldn't have tried any harder. I gave it everything I had. It just wasn't enough on the day."

As a result of Roddick's dramatic loss and Fish's routine 6-4, 6-2, 6-3 defeat at the hands of Carlos Moya in the opening match, the U.S. will go into Saturday's doubles in a 0-2 hole. It's a hole as deep as they've ever been in and one they are not likely to climb out of.

For most of the match against Nadal, Roddick went above and beyond his capabilities on the surface. He's never hit that many half-volley winners in his life. But in the end, America's big gun had his power muted on the wet clay by an 18-year-old with a world of spunk and shotmaking abilities.

Roddick and Nadal contested two of the most athletic and spectacular tiebreaker of the year. Both men dove, reflected volleys and pulled off hooking passing shots that caressed the lines. In the first set breaker, Roddick came back from 3-5 down when the youngster got nervous and committed a series of errors. At that moment, it seemed like the 2003 US Open champion might have a shot at winning the contest based on experience alone.

But as one Spanish journalist said as they walked off the court, the hand of god touched Nadal. Gone was his youthful erratic swings and mental letdowns. In the tradition of his uncle, Miguel, who was nicknamed "The Beast" when he raged for the Barcelona soccer team, the now muscular Rafael was a lion. He hammered and hooked his forehand every way possible, and powered his once weaker backhand deep and with authority. He displayed remarkable touch with his sleight of hand drop shot. Roddick kept charging and serving bullets, but Nadal sped around with hungry determination, consistently getting returns in play and waiting for a chance to dip balls at Roddick's feet and then swipe a passes beyond the reach of taller and equally ferocious American.

"He played well. It's very impressive," Roddick said. "Every once in a while people come along and they're big-match players. He apparently looks like he's a big-match player. He's come through. This is the third time this year he's stepped up in singles [in Davis Cup] and played well. I think you either have it or you don't, regardless of age. Maybe it helps him in a way."

With the fans sounding like a group of wasps on a mosquito hunt, the match turned in the third set. Nadal had eight chances to break Roddick, but the American team leader came up with tape-snapping serves and ambitious volley winners. Roddick fought off seven of the eight break points with winners, earning himself another nail biting tiebreaker. He was inches from winning the third set and had he done so, may have won the contest. Up 5-4 and with two serving points on his racket, Roddick doubled faulted to 5-5. He quickly responded by scooping up a low volley and forcing Nadal into a forehand error. On set point at 6-5, Nadal went to his drop shot, Roddick charged, and couldn't lift a forehand passing shot over the net cords. The Spaniard then crushed a swing volley winner and a backhand crosscourt to win the set.

"Obviously that was going to swing the momentum either way - and fast," Roddick said. "You were playing those two points for the next two sets. They were pretty crucial. I just missed that [set point], so that was big."

The match essentially ended there as Roddick's confidence level plunged and Nadal soared along with the crowd. Roddick slowed considerably and Nadal became the new darling of Spanish tennis, celebrating like he won the Grand Slam.

There is a glimmer of hope on Saturday, because Nadal might be tired when he and Tommy Robredo go up against the Bryan Brothers, former Roland Garros champions who might be able to pull out a win. But even if that occurs, Sunday looms. To think that the Bryans will emerge victorious and Roddick and Fish can both win their singles matches on Sunday is wishful thinking, but if you're a US fan, there's nothing left to ponder. In the 104 years of Davis Cup competition, an 0-2 comeback has happened only once in the World Group, in 1939, when Australia came back to shock the US. It's only happened eight times in the World Group period and here's a shocking fact: the hard court bred boys of the US have never pulled it off on clay. They did it once in an inter-zonal match in 1934 against Australia on grass. The US is 1-30 when they are 0-2 down. They are underdogs of the scraggly and wounded variety.

With the temperatures dropping into the mid 40s, US captain Patrick McEnroe nearly froze sitting five hours courtside. But he needs to gets his team fired up as quickly as possible because the last thing the US wanted coming here was to travel across the Atlantic, spend all week get used to sliding on dirt and have their buts kicked in a shutout.

"We know our backs are against the wall," McEnroe said. "But we're going to come out and we're going to fight for every point. We're going to come out and hopefully play a great doubles match. And Sunday will be a new day. There's no big mystery of what we need to do. We came here knowing the difficulty and knowing the challenge. We're still going to relish the opportunity. We've still got an opportunity to make history."

=========

Nadal, Crowd Too Much For Roddick, USA
TennisWeek

“OK, time for Plan B” was the feeling of the U.S. Davis Cup team as night fell on Seville and its best player — the guy who was No. 1 in the world last year — left the Estadio Olimpico de Sevilla flummoxed and frustrated by the beating he had suffered at the hands of the second-youngest player ever to compete in a singles match at a Davis Cup Final.

A dreary opening day to the first Davis Cup by BNP Paribas Final the United States has competed in for seven years ended with Andy Roddick losing to 18-year-old lefty Rafael Nadal 6-7(6), 6-2, 7-6(6), 6-2, putting the U.S. team behind 2-0. At this point, only the Bryan twins can save the Americans from a Spanish sweep that would surely send this sports-mad city into hysterics.

“We know our backs are against the wall,” said U.S. Captain Patrick McEnroe, “but we're going to come out and we're going to fight for every point like we did today. We're going to come out and hopefully play a great doubles match. And Sunday will be a new day.”

So whereas Plan A would have been for the United States to win at least one of the matches on opening day, win the doubles on Saturday and win one singles match on Sunday, Plan B is to win everything from this point forward.

Only once in the 104-year history of Davis Cup has a nation come back from 0-2 down in the Final. In 1939, Australia rallied from 0-2 down against the United States on grass at the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford, Pa. Even more, of the 30 times previous that the United States has been down 0-2 in Davis Cup, the only time the team managed to seize victory from defeat was in 1934 in the Inter-Zone final — essentially a semifinal — against Australia on neutral ground at Wimbledon.

The United States is playing in anything but neutral surroundings for this Final. While the crowd, at a record 27,206, remained rather courteous in its vociferous support of Carlos Moya in his straight-sets victory against Mardy Fish in the tie opener, fans took things to another level during the Roddick-Nadal match. In the fourth game of the second set, play was delayed momentarily after chair umpire Mike Morrissey called for a let after someone blared a horn in the middle of a point that Nadal won.

Referee Stefan Fransson had to go on court to try to placate Spanish Captain Jordi Arrese, who did not see any cause for the replay, which might well have come from the American fans. Said Nadal, “If you go to a tie in Argentina, in Brazil, or in Chile, then you can see what cheering is all about. So I believe that the crowd behaved nicely. There was just cheering. It was a good example of fair play.”

Roddick, on the other hand, felt so strongly about the crowd behavior that he declined answering questions about it. “I’m going to skip that one,” he said. “I’m not going to go there.”

Another perspective would be that with 27,000 fans at a tennis match, a crowd the size of which has never been seen at a sanctioned tennis event, no one really knows what the behavior should be. Filling a even Arthur Ashe Stadium, with its 23,000 seats, is almost unimaginable for a Davis Cup tie in the United States — even with a massive ticket giveaway. Some tournaments don’t even get 27,000 fans during their full week of play.

Too, the crowd was energized by a match that had the feel of a heavyweight fight. With the temporary court set-up in the massive Olympic Stadium, the lights shined down on the court very much like it was a boxing ring.

As the match moved toward its climactic third set tie-break, both players were slugging away from the baseline. For the match, Nadal had 52 winners from the backcourt, 37 from his forehand. Roddick had 22 winners from the baseline, 15 from his forehand.

Roddick attacked the net, perhaps more often in this three-hour, 39-minute match than he ever has previously, in an attempt to thwart Nadal. He won 37 of 65 of his points at the net, scoring on everything from routine volleys to the lunging backhand volley winner he had when serving at 5-6 in the third set.

“I had to do something to try to win points,” Roddick said. “I felt like I stuck to the game plan and I volleyed pretty well today. I just ran into someone who played too well.”

Nadal swung the match on the 12th point of the third set tiebreaker. After netting an attempted forehand passing shot to give Roddick set point at 5-6, Nadal played a near-perfect forehand drop shot from just inside the baseline. Roddick got to it, but was unable to get it back. Nadal then scored on a swinging forehand volley winner from mid-court and a crosscourt forehand passing shot to close out the set. Roddick walked to his seat next to McEnroe and momentarily hung his head in his hands.

While that essentially marked the end of this match, the hope for the United States is that it isn’t the signal for the end of the U.S. team’s dream of capturing a record-extending 32nd Davis Cup title. As the stadium emptied and Spanish fans rejoiced with victory but one match win away, Gloria Gaynor’s 1970s disco classic “I Will Survive” blared over the public address system. For the Spaniards, it was the beginning of partying that will last into the night. For the Americans, it was a rallying song.

“We came here knowing the difficulty and knowing the challenge,” McEnroe said. “We're still going to relish the opportunity. We've still got an opportunity to make history to come out and play our best.”

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 08:16 PM
yea, was in class now talking about exams and stuff with people at lunch...

It sounds like Andy did what I was hoping he would - play hard, fight hard, leave his guts out there, and show that he is capable of playing well on clay. He did those things, so I'm not really that upset, just sad for him that he tried so hard and still fell short.

But ultimately, as PMac said, this should be really encouraging for Andy. This was horrible cold conditions, on like the slowest court possible (most clay courts he would play wouldn't be quite this slow which would make a difference), in about the most adverse conditions he will EVER face and it took an opponent almost playing out of his mind, playing the best match he says he's ever played and Andy still came pretty close, he still made it a close match. HE CAN PLAY ON CLAY and I hope he really believes that now, even though he lost. Win or lose, I think that is the biggest thing for Andy to take from this match/weekend.

andyroxmysox12191
12-03-2004, 08:44 PM
Now that I've seen the match (not fully cause we're in the 4th set but I can see where it's going) I'm not upset cause when I saw the score, I was in school and obviously, I didn't see it yet. They both played wow-like and that was one hell of a third set. I think it took a lot of energy out of Andy cause now, he just seems really tired. Feel so bad for the team and him :sad:
I'm hoping the Bryans win so we at least have one match won. If Andy and Mardy win their matches on Sunday (which I HIGHLY DOUBT but there's that .00000000000000000000001% left) if Bob and Mike win tomorrow, then...I'll do something crazy or something that could be crazy....

J. Corwin
12-03-2004, 09:06 PM
I held out hope that Andy would pull out the match, but given ESPN's time constraint (ending at 5pm EST) I knew Andy had lost it after that 3rd set. I was about to say that the U.S. should sub Vinny in for the 5th rubber but it looks like it's not allowed...

Andy played well but Rafa played one of his best matches, 70-something winners :eek:

U.S. could still win so no giving up yet. :)

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 09:12 PM
yeah, now that i have seen the match, im happy with how andy played. rafi was just playing so well, 70 something winners, and all that. andy did play a hell of a match, and really, had he won that one point in the tiebreak to win the set, with the momentum on his side in the fourth, it really could have been a different story. but i think andy proved today that he can compete on clay with the est of 'em, and hopefully that's something he can take out of this weekend.

zoltan83
12-03-2004, 09:47 PM
OMG I am sorry :eek:

It's ok...I'm always alive :)



:sad: Andy. I hoped that i win. It's not the case but i don't have any regrets. He played hard, showed his best so.

RodFan08
12-03-2004, 09:51 PM
yeah, now that i have seen the match, im happy with how andy played. rafi was just playing so well, 70 something winners, and all that. andy did play a hell of a match, and really, had he won that one point in the tiebreak to win the set, with the momentum on his side in the fourth, it really could have been a different story. but i think andy proved today that he can compete on clay with the est of 'em, and hopefully that's something he can take out of this weekend.

I agree, to me this was the best match he's ever played on clay. He finally played the way I knew he could......With some versatility. He wasn't going for winners all over the place, seemed very patient. He tried using angels in stead of blasting aswell. To me what shocked me the most was his volleying. He seemed like a different player. He dug out some low vollies that were right on his feet numorous times. He also closed in very well.

To me this is a huge step in the right direction. GO ANDY:) :worship:

MisterQ
12-03-2004, 10:02 PM
Andy really played pretty well for a while there. I liked the way he was mixing things up. The problem is that he was playing in difficult circumstances, against a very talented and FIT opponent. As the match went on, Nadal just got more pumped up, and never lost a step, whereas Andy slowed down a bit. So by the fourth set Andy was approaching the net a little slower, and off of approach shots which were more feeble. Nadal was able to pass him left and right.

While there are plenty of things to compliment him on, this match proves that Andy's fitness could still use improvement.

It's too bad Andy double faulted in the third set tiebreak serving up 5-4.

anyway, we'll see what happens tomorrow with the doubles...

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 10:45 PM
I taped the coverage but just got in and with finals coming I don't think I even have time to watch so I'll probably just take it home and watch at that point in a few weeks but from what you all are saying it sounds like Andy played so well. And to me that is just SO encouraging that he could sustain that level in those conditions against the way his opponent is playing...

Interesting about his fitness, though. I hope he realizes that and then works even harder on the off-season. Things like this should just motivate him. It sounds like he was pretty down right after - and considering it sounds like he just absolutely left everything he could out on the court, that's hardly surprising - but I hope, and think he will, use it to motivate himself - it can only be a good thing. And based on what PMac said, I'm sure they've told Andy this. It's sad and disappointing to try soooo hard and still come up short but just like after Wimby, there are only positives to take away at the end of the day.

But is it bad of me to kinda hope that the Bryans lose so he doesn't have to go through it again? NO way he can go through this again against Moya on Sunday:(

But it sounds like it's hard to be disappointed in HIM like I can so often be LOL

J. Corwin
12-03-2004, 11:06 PM
I think the Bryans should STILL win, if only for U.S. morale, that the Bryans can defeat any doubles teams, in Spain, no less. Andy will be pumped up to fight with Carlos and it will give him another great (not as in result) experience in a big match on clay. I view this whole thing as a learning process and experience gaining for Andy. He has a poor record on European clay so he needs more practice, even if it means he will lose again.

I was a lil surprised about Andy's fitness level, to be honest. I thought he wouldn't be tired so quickly cuz he's shown that he could go the distance and fight/gut matches out.

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 11:15 PM
Yea, Jace, I suppose that's true. I mean, I DO want the Bryans to win... but I also am feeling maternalistic towards Andy and I don't want him to have to play his guts out AGAIN and lose AGAIN, y'know? :hug:

He said part of the problem was the cold and that his muscles were tightening up. I think that's a fair thing. We've seen him go matches just as long (or longer) and be ok physically at the end - but everything said it was going into the 40s during the match - that's not good for anyone's fitness. And by the end you're also deflated and the adrenaline might not be working as well as it might be if you're winning the match.

This is what he said: "Physically, I feel okay. It was cold out there, which made it tough because your muscles would tighten up pretty easily." So, maybe he wasn't *really* as tired as he looked? Or, he was absolutely pooped and he's just saying that.

I'm not trying to excuse Andy and say he doesn't need to get into better shape, because obviously he does. But I also think he's more recently realized that this is something he really really needs to work on - in the past few months, so it's still a process for him. As long as he takes that out of this experience and says "OK Yes I've started to work hard but obviously I really need to work even harder" then it can only work out for the better for him in the longrun. For me, still, the most important thing is that, while it will always be tough for him and it will always be his worst surface, when he REALLY puts his mind to it, he IS capable of playing on this stuff. Once he starts to really believe that himself, he can start posting good results during the clay season.


Here's the transcript from the press conference, if anyone wants to read it:
======

2004 DAVIS CUP FINALS
USA vs. SPAIN
SEVILLE, SPAIN

December 2, 2004

TEAM USA

RANDY WALKER: If we could have questions for Mr. Roddick and Mr. Fish first because we have a practice court, then we'll do press for Patrick and the Bryan brothers.

Q. Tell us about the court. Is it mud? Is it playable? Is it slow, slower, slowest?

ANDY RODDICK: It's pretty much what we expected. You know, I think, you know, it's slow, but it's nothing ridiculous. It's the surface we expected when we came over here. I do think the roof helps. It takes away a lot of variables. It's a great court. It's been playing really nice all week. I think they did a really good job of putting it all together.

Q. Can you compare the court this way to St. Polten when you won there, compared to Roland Garros, compared to here?

ANDY RODDICK: I don't really remember. I don't really remember St. Polten that much. Roland Garros, it's -- this is a little bit grittier, I think. It's not as powdery or slippery as Roland Garros. I guess that's the best way to explain it. It's a little bit closer to green clay as far as the grittiness, whereas Roland Garros, like I said, it's a little bit more slippery. It almost feels a little more like powder.

Q. Had you had your mind set to playing Ferrero? How much of a surprise is it that Nadal is playing in his place?

ANDY RODDICK: Personally, I was expecting to play Ferrero. But at the same time, I think our team knows that they have four very capable singles players, and that's one of their strengths, is that they do have options. You know, they can mix and match. You know, that being said, we have a lefty practice partner, one of the youngsters, I've been practicing with him a little bit this week just in case. So, you know, now we know and we'll prepare for Nadal.

Q. Can you talk about starting off the tie, Mardy? And, Patrick, talk about the order of play tomorrow?

MARDY FISH: Yeah, it's no different from what we're used to out on tour each week, week by week. You know, sometimes we have to play first on; sometimes we have to play second on, third on. So it's no different. You know, I'm used to -- I've been waking up relatively early every day and trying to get used to the possibility of playing first. So I'm excited to get things off to hopefully a good start for us.

Q. What do you remember about your match with Nadal at the US Open, Andy?

ANDY RODDICK: I remember I was able to get off to a pretty good start. You know, he might have been -- he got off to a little bit of a slow start and I think that really helped me, you know, to get on top early. He made a run at it in the third set, and I was able to kind of squeak that set out. But, you know, he's got -- he has a lot of game. You know, he hits the ball a ton, and he's very competitive. In an atmosphere like this, he's going to get the crowd going. I think Davis Cup might work well for him. But at the same time I just need to focus on this match because, obviously, the surfaces are different. The circumstances are, you know, a complete 180 from the US Open. So I'm going to focus on this one.

Q. Could you talk a little about the camaraderie on the team, the atmosphere, looking forward, all of you, to your first Davis Cup finals?

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I mean, it's no secret that we all are pretty close. That's been said a million times. But I think it's even more satisfying that we've had one common goal for the last couple years, and now we're here together and actually to have the opportunity to compete for the title means a lot to us. You know, this has been our focus as a team for the last couple of years as far as going with the young guys and stuff. Now, you know, we're here and now we just have to try to take the next step. But I think we're all happy to be here and doing it together.

Q. Is this the main reason why you choose Fish?

CAPTAIN McENROE: I'm going to answer questions after Andy and Mardy are done because they have to get to practice.

Q. Mentally I'm sure this week you've been working on the possibility of playing long matches. Mentally are you prepared for four and five hours? Strategically, do you have to change things up a bit because you're going to be playing on a slower court?

MARDY FISH: No, yeah, I mean, I think one of the tough things about playing on clay is that, you know, you have to be a little more patient than normal on some of the faster courts that we're used to. And, yeah, we're well aware that it's going to be -- you know, we're probably going to have to stay out there for a long time. And mentally and physically, you know, it's pretty grueling. And we're well aware of that. You know, we came into this tie knowing the task and knowing that that's what we -- that's, you know, probably what we had to accomplish.

Q. Gentlemen, the US record on European clay is not outstanding. The Spaniards are favoured. What makes you think you can win?

ANDY RODDICK: You know, Mardy and I have been preparing very hard, and so have the Bryans. The record's not good, but I think it's a different team now than two years ago when we lost in France. I think we've all been ready for this. We've known about it for a couple months now. We've been preparing appropriately. The Bryans won the French Open on clay, so they've obviously had success. And basically it's up to Mardy and I have to kind of pick it up and really try to prove ourselves on clay.

Q. Obviously you guys have been around a while. It will be a huge, very loud partisan crowd tomorrow. In your mind, how have you been preparing for that?

ANDY RODDICK: Do you want to go?

MARDY FISH: Go ahead (smiling).

ANDY RODDICK: To be honest, I don't know if you can prepare for 26,000 people. I don't know if you can simulate that in practice. But at the same time we've known about it. You know, nothing this week has come as a complete surprise to us. You know, we knew going in that it was probably going to be this court, this way, this many fans. So, you know, subconsciously we've been preparing for it mentally for a couple months now. You know, hopefully that will help us through.

Q. Is this the biggest doubles match of your life, putting aside slams and the Masters Cup, all that?

MIKE BRYAN: Yeah, I think so. You know, obviously when we came on the tour, we wanted to win Davis Cup. And for us, this is probably the biggest, you know, competition, tournament, whatever. You know, this would really, you know, make us really happy if we won this one. This is huge for us (smiling). You know, I could put the racquets down and be happy if we won this. So walking out there, I think we know that this is, you know, probably the biggest moment of our lives. And we're going to give it hell.

Q. It was asked outside of the Slams and Masters Cup, where does this rank, but including the Slams and Masters Cup, where does this fit?

BOB BRYAN: I mean, yeah, we've been talking about that. This is above all that. You know, Grand Slams, after playing Davis Cup, kind of just feel like any other week, you know. These weeks are pressure-packed, exciting, great atmosphere. You know, you walk out to a Slam now, and you feel a little flat after playing these Davis Cup matches. These are up there in our minds. I think probably the top, for sure.

Q. Do you guys think your enthusiasm, chest pumping, so on, might incite the crowd?

BOB BRYAN: I don't think we'll do it as much. You got to know when to use 'em, you know. Maybe here is not the place, until we get that last point (smiling). We did it in Madrid actually, and I think the Spanish crowd was kind of getting warmed up to us. We did it, and then it was just complete quiet. I mean, we played the best point of our life. In the States, they would have been on their feet. Here we got some boos and some whistles. Maybe see kind of what the crowd's going to be like. It's going to be tough. You know, we're prepared for it. We played college tennis, which is like 6,000 people, which is nothing like this. But, you know, we can understand English a lot better than we can understand Spanish. When they're saying stuff about your mom that you can understand, it hurts a lot worse (smiling). I don't know. It's going to be tough. You know, we'll tone it down a little bit. But we still want to bring the energy.

Q. Patrick, it doesn't look as though you're going to need your motivational powers too much, but is it going to be important when you're on the bench to keep the players mindful of the crowd and the reaction, what they can and can't get away with?

CAPTAIN McENROE: Yeah. I mean, we've talked about that during the week, you know, being enthusiastic and being positive, but doing it in the right way and not trying to, you know, get the crowd more into it than they're already going to be. You know, we just have to focus on what we do. It's still played on a court, the dimensions are the same, et cetera. But, you know, as you hear from the guys, they've been preparing mentally for it for a while. You know, I think we're excited about it. I mean, what a chance, to play in front of this many people in a Davis Cup final. I mean, it's a pretty amazing experience, I think. So we're going to enjoy it, but we're also going to try to do, you know, the best we can do to help us win the match. I think that probably means, you know, toning it down slightly and not getting bothered by calls, et cetera. We have to assume we're going to get some bad calls and that's just going to be the way it's going to be.

Q. Patrick, the majority of captains are fielding three singles players. You took another option. That means you are positive that they're going to win the doubles, no?

CAPTAIN McENROE: I'm confident. You're never positive of anything. But, you know, it's always a difficult decision, and it took me a little while to make the decision to go with a doubles team. These guys have certainly proven that they deserved it with the way they've played in Davis Cup. They're 4-0 and they've played great. They bring a lot of enthusiasm and I think help the other singles players relax, you know, that they can prepare for their singles matches, and that's all they need to do. So, you know, you take the chance obviously of somebody getting hurt. But obviously we've got some young players that are working pretty hard and are in pretty good shape. So to me the positives outweigh the negatives at this point, and that's having these guys on the team. Not only the fact that they're winning their matches, but what they bring to the whole team concept I think is very valuable.

Q. Is this the main reason why you chose Fish instead of Spadea, or any particular reason why on clay Fish is better than Spadea?

CAPTAIN McENROE: Well, you know, we were very lucky, we've been very lucky to have Vince here. He's been great this week. He's played great. He's really pushed our guys in practice. But at the end of the day, I still felt that Mardy gave us the best chance to win this match, you know, to win a match here with his game and his style of play and the way he potentially can match up with the Spanish players.

Q. Your thoughts on the choice of Nadal?

CAPTAIN McENROE: I'm not that surprised. You know, obviously he's got a great future. He's got a lot of energy. He obviously can play very well on clay. I think Juan Carlos has had a tough year, you know, with injuries, with his confidence, changing racquets, et cetera. So it's difficult to come into as big a match as this, you know, relatively cold - he hasn't played a lot of tennis. So we're not that surprised. It's going to be difficult, I think, for Nadal to play a tough singles match on Friday and then have to come out and play a great doubles match. I mean, he's certainly young and fit, but I still think that's asking him a lot. He's going to have to play a very physical match with Andy. And he's, you know, been playing great and is extremely fit and focused. So it's a tough ask for him. But, you know, he's 18 or so, so he's obviously got young legs and a lot of energy. But, you know, we prepared. As Andy said, they've got four great singles players. It wouldn't surprise me if we saw somebody else on Sunday, you know, if it gets down to that.

Q. How do you handicap your team? Do you see them as total underdogs, favorites, in between?

CAPTAIN McENROE: I think we're a slight underdog. I mean, playing away and playing a very tough Spanish team. They're obviously playing on their best surface. I mean, there's no secrets there. It's not our best surface. But at the same time we've prepared, and we feel we're as prepared as we can be. We certainly feel going into each match that we can win it. And, as I said, playing at home like we played this year, we've had a good draw to have played three matches at home. But, you know, the opportunity to come here to Spain and to play in a final is a great challenge. I think it would certainly make it even sweeter, you know, to be able to figure out a way to win here, in probably one of the toughest places to play.

Q. How does this court compare with the court in Slovakia as far as speed?

BOB BRYAN: It's like the same. About the same.

Q. Mardy played very well there.

BOB BRYAN: He did.

Q. After looking at the draw this morning, do you feel more optimistic now of the possibilities?

CAPTAIN McENROE: You know, if Nadal's playing, that means he's playing damn well. We know that. But we feel we're playing well. And certainly Andy has been thinking about this, been focusing his training, his fitness on this match for quite some time. So, you know, we have to do what we do. We have to play our games. We have to obviously slightly adjust to the conditions. And I think a lot of that is just being physically prepared, you know, to play some long points and grind it out. So, you know, we're prepared to do that. We know it's going to be tough. But, I mean, in answer to your question, it doesn't really change my outlook for the whole weekend, no. As I said, I think for Nadal to now play a singles, a doubles, maybe another singles, it's difficult. It's difficult on clay. As I said, he's obviously very fit. But, you know, our doubles guys are certainly going to be ready come 4:00 on Saturday. I mean, they're going to be chomping at the bit to get out there. Their guys are going to have to play with a lot of energy.

Q. What are the one or two things you've learned from your few years of captain now that have helped you in terms of preparation for this match?

CAPTAIN McENROE: Well, I think you have to have a team concept, but you also have to be able to understand that tennis is an individual sport. It's different. You hit different buttons with different guys to try to motivate them and to try to get them to play their best. Certain players need a kick in the butt a little more than others, where others need more strategy, more technical things. So I think that's probably the biggest thing. Obviously, I've been around tennis my whole life, so I felt like my understanding of strategy, et cetera, has always been there, and just trying to impart some of that to these guys. But understand that certain players can do certain things well and can take that sort of coaching, you know, in different ways. It's just really being able to deal with different personalities and guys that are used to, you know, being out there on their own. You still have to go out there and play a match here as an individual, but luckily we've had guys that really have grasped the team concept of what Davis Cup is and felt that that was important. I mean, I haven't really honestly had to do too much because they're all such a positive group of guys that really want to play and support each other.

End of FastScripts….

superpinkone37
12-03-2004, 11:17 PM
I think the Bryans should STILL win, if only for U.S. morale, that the Bryans can defeat any doubles teams, in Spain, no less. Andy will be pumped up to fight with Carlos and it will give him another great (not as in result) experience in a big match on clay. I view this whole thing as a learning process and experience gaining for Andy. He has a poor record on European clay so he needs more practice, even if it means he will lose again.

I was a lil surprised about Andy's fitness level, to be honest. I thought he wouldn't be tired so quickly cuz he's shown that he could go the distance and fight/gut matches out.

i totally agree :yeah: i wouldnt want them to walk away with a 0-5 defeat, and an really rooting for the bryans to pull out a win. and like you said, that would also give andy another big match experience. if he can find a way to win, or at least play successfully with 25,000 spaniards against him again, that can only help. i was actually surprised and pleased with the way andy dealt with line calls and stuff today :)

anyways, i guess hes just not used to the long rallies he is forced to play on clay, and hopefully he can learn from that so he will be much better prepared next clay season. but like you guys have said, it was really cold and that probably had something to do with it as well. i just hope that even though they most likely wont win, the guys can take something good out of this :)

and thanks for posting the transcript, Deb :kiss:

Deboogle!.
12-03-2004, 11:39 PM
Well that's great that he really acted on the fact that he knew he couldn't be cranky, if for no other reason than it proves to himself that he CAN keep himself under control if he wants to. Of course, Pmac was there to help but yeah.

Anyway, there's a very short audio on the DC site with Andy. He sounds so sad :( The guy asks if he takes any consolation from playing in one of the best matches of the year and he said all he could think about right now a half hour after the match were the missed opportunities. He also said he hopes that he can play Carlos in a "relevant" match and that he'll try his hardest again.

I know he's good at turning disappointments into long-run positives, but I hope he can do that with this too. There are just so many silver linings I hope that in a few days he and the other guys can really see them.

J. Corwin
12-04-2004, 12:05 AM
It's not just about playing longer rallies and hitting more balls, it's also about the movement on clay. Andy won't ever be a natural clay mover/slider but he can improve on that too. Wishful thinking but I'd like to see him win a TMS on clay by the end of his career. If not, at least go deeper in them and in RG.

His Grand Slam History:

------------Career------04------03------02------01------00
Aus Open*** 10-3*****QF****SF****2nd****DNP***DNP
Rol. Garros***3-4*****2nd****1st****1st****3rd****DNP
Wimbledon***15-4****RUP****SF****3rd****3rd****DNP
US Open*****19-4****QF****WON***QF****QF****1st

He has a negative record at RG. :o

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 12:09 AM
from what a couple people told me on MSN he moved pretty well, considering his discomfort on the surface. He'd been moving better as of late, anyway.. was this not the case? Renata told me he got to some balls she didn't think he could get to and sometimes he even won those points... no?

And yea, that's my biggest hope - that he realizes that if he gets there way early and practices a ton and gets really used to the surface and really gets in the "I really want to win and I"m willing to give it all I have to try to that" mindset that he had today and he has most of the time when he's not on clay, he CAN get good results on the surface against good players. I hope that even though he lost and even if he has to play Carlos and loses to him too that he still can build confidence from it. b/c after all, most of the players he would face on clay, esp. in the early rounds of a tournament, are NOT of this caliber and if he can play such good clay-courters this close with these conditions all against him then surely he should have the confidence next time he's up a set and a break on Olivier Mutis or Wayne Arthurs or Sarge or whomever. For me that's the ultimate.

J. Corwin
12-04-2004, 12:20 AM
Yes he did move quite well, he was fast and reached a lot of shots, especially dropshots. He improved on it of course, but he was still surprised with a few dropshot winners from Rafa.

Also, he gets wrong-footed more easily and when he backtracks, he goes for outrageous shots (which resulted in errors) because he was out of position. The high top-spin shots from these clay-courters also push Andy back further and further behind the baseline. He can either 1) take the ball early, before it jumps up high, which is hard....or 2) wait til the ball gets up higher and maybe even fall, before hitting it. Andy tends to do the latter sometimes. ;)

Andy can also work on the cross-court finesse drop shot or sharp-angle volley while he's at the net, instead of always trying to punch volleys deep. That would be :cool:

Oh, and I was also very proud of Andy's volleys in this match. Considering it's clay, he was still able to put away many volleys...some that were very difficult reflex and pick-up volleys too. :)

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 12:23 AM
ahhhh gotcha. yea that makes sense. Well, all we can hope is that he just tries to take the positives, after the sting of the disappointment goes away, and just keeps working his ass off. But after this, there's no way he can get away with being a total putz on clay again. He just has to decide he wants to win, and of course he needs to keep putting in all the work on and off court to prepare. But I KNOW he can do it. I just know it. :)

As for the volleying, gotta take one step at a time. He needs to work on getting up there and hitting good approaches.. then maybe he can add an EYEDROPPAH ;)

Havok
12-04-2004, 01:02 AM
Andy really played pretty well for a while there. I liked the way he was mixing things up. The problem is that he was playing in difficult circumstances, against a very talented and FIT opponent. As the match went on, Nadal just got more pumped up, and never lost a step, whereas Andy slowed down a bit. So by the fourth set Andy was approaching the net a little slower, and off of approach shots which were more feeble. Nadal was able to pass him left and right.

While there are plenty of things to compliment him on, this match proves that Andy's fitness could still use improvement.

It's too bad Andy double faulted in the third set tiebreak serving up 5-4.

anyway, we'll see what happens tomorrow with the doubles...
If only he was able to take balls insanely early and hit incredible powerful angled shots ala Seles.:sad: Makes me miss Seles now, hope she plays in 2005.

tangerine_dream
12-04-2004, 01:08 AM
Boy, it's cold outside tonight. brrrr. I almost didn't want to go out for a nightcap with friends but they insisted we'd be drinking hot chocolate instead, so I went. :) And I'm somebody who actually loves the snow and cold.

Anyhoo, here's a great article about the bad behavior from the Spanish crowd. LOL. And the 'tards in GM think I make this stuff up? I like how it's dimsissed by some as "passion." Funny how "passion" turns into "nationalistic jingo pride" when it's a North American displaying the same kind of "enthusiasm." ;)


Seville crowd do their worst
By Andrew Baker
(Filed: 04/12/2004)

The Spanish do not come to tennis matches to spectate. They come to join in. They do not just get behind their players: they get in the way of the opposition.

Halfway through the third set of the match between Rafael Nadal and Andy Roddick, the American moved in for a crucial volley. Just as he made contact with the ball, a spectator gave a loud yell. Roddick missed his shot, and the crowd exulted.

But the umpire was having nothing of it and ordered the point to be replayed. Outraged, the Spanish crowd pointed at the tiny contingent of American fans. It was them, they cried. The Americans pointed back. It was a playground spat involving 26,000 people, 25,700 of whom were Spanish.

Another favourite trick is the wolf-whistle in the middle of the American's service action. A particularly persistent exponent of this was a tubby little boy in the VIP seats: his mum patted him on the head after every whistle.

There was nothing unexpected about all of this. The Spanish crowds have always been rowdy, and they reserve their worst behaviour for Davis Cup finals. The Australian players were given a horrible reception in the final in Barcelona four years ago. But this is nastier. This is personal and, unfortunately, political.

Hey, the Spanish say it is just enthusiasm, and that is a quality the Spanish have in spades. While watching tennis, they simultaneously do many other things with enthusiasm. They drink, smoke, argue, snog and have lengthy and loud mobile phone conversations.

They also play the tuba or the big bass drum. It is an interesting aspect of the security operation here that police officers will X-ray something as harmless as a notebook, while admitting an entire brass band with impunity.

The stadium is bizarre enough without musical accompaniment. The matches are being played at one end of the vast, rudimentary and optimistically named Estadio Olimpico. This edifice was built in Field of Dreams style in the hope of landing the Olympics of 2004.

They built it, but the Games did not come, and Sevillans have been wondering what to do with it ever since. Their latest brainwave has been to dump several tons of clay at one end, build temporary grand stands all over the football pitch, and have the Davis Cup come to town.

Great idea. Except that it is December. And in December even in southern Spain the weather can be on the chilly side. So this was not only the largest crowd to attend a Davis Cup final but also the coldest.

And the wettest. The organisers have sensibly erected a temporary roof over the court itself, but have not extended the coverage to the cheap seats. The rain in Spain falls mainly on the mean.

The players were alright; they could run around. That was the idea, at least, but Mardy Fish stopped running about halfway through the final set of his match against Carlos Moya when he realised that no matter how much effort he put in he was never going to out- manoeuvre his opponent.

Fish likened the experience to a particularly partisan college American football game, but he felt that he was now well qualified to advise his team-mates on the conditions they were about to encounter. "If somebody has a question about the court or the fans or how it is out there," Fish said, "I'll just yell and scream as loud as I can."

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 01:12 AM
I think it's interesting that Andy refused to comment on the crowd... he usually just tells it how it is or bullshits some diplomatic answer... In fact, except for stuff when he was asked about Mandy, I don't know if I ever remember him saying "I won't talk about that" or something similar.

Golfnduck
12-04-2004, 01:15 AM
Thanks for the article Tangy!!! I'm behind you all the way about the people in the GM. Although, I won't go in there right now because they are looking for someone to attack, then ban them. Dirty, dirty people.

tangerine_dream
12-04-2004, 01:26 AM
I'm sorry I keep harping on bad crowd behavior and it must look like I hate Europeans or something (apologies to the non-Americans here for my constant whining about the Spaniards and the French ;) :hug: ) but I have a real personal problem with nasty, bad sportsmanlike behavior from crowds, and yes they come from the US too. No matter where it comes from, I hate it. I've never booed anyone in my life no matter how much I didn't like the visiting team. And bad sporting behavior from athletes and/or the audience is one reason why I hate sports like basketball (yes, a predominantly American sport; and here's a link to an article about the latest ruckus (http://www.voanews.com/english/2004-12-01-voa73.cfm) on the court :rolleyes: ). I'm not asking for a dull, quiet crowd like Wimbledon-- it's ok to cheer your team and get excited and jacked up-- but knock off the dirty tricks and just show some respect, especially when you're the host country. The kind of crowd I like is the one where Andy played Guille at Nasdaq. They were passionate, rowdy, and into it, but there was nothing ill-mannered about their behavior, either. :)

tangerine_dream
12-04-2004, 02:29 AM
I've been hearing so many good things about Andy's playing that I can't wait to see this match now. :yippee: It sounds like Nadal had to play out of his mind to beat Andy. On clay! :D

On a Slow Court, Spain Is Quicker
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
NYTimes

December 4, 2004

EVILLE, Spain, Dec. 3 - The first day of the Davis Cup final between Spain and the United States made history as a record 27,200 spectators took their seats under the temporary roof in the Estadio Olimpico. If the United States team is going to bring the trophy back to its ancestral home on the other side of the Atlantic, it is going to have make some history of its own.

Underdogs when this final began, they looked and played the part Friday, falling behind by 2-0 after Mardy Fish lived up to his clay-court reputation by losing in a hurry to Carlos Moya. Andy Roddick was beaten in much less resounding fashion on the slow red clay by Rafael Nadal, an 18-year-old bundle of energy and phenomenal passing shots.

To win their first Davis Cup in nine years, the Americans must take all three remaining matches, beginning with the doubles on Saturday between the Bryan twins, Mike and Bob, and Nadal and Tommy Robredo. The final singles matches are on Sunday.

Ever since a Harvard alumnus named Dwight Davis founded the Davis Cup, tennis's premier team competition, in 1900, the United States has come back successfully from an 0-2 deficit on one occasion: in 1934 against Australia.

"We know our backs are against the wall, but we're going to come out, and we're going to fight for every point like we did today," said the United States captain, Patrick McEnroe, who, unlike his older brother John, is an even-tempered sort but spent much of his long afternoon on the chair wincing at missed shots and opportunities as the overwhelmingly Spanish crowd had plenty to shout about.

Moya went first, dropping the first three games when Fish went for his big shots and converted. But the steady, powerful Moya quickly imposed his will, dictating to Fish from the baseline as the grit that covers this slow court got into Fish's groundstrokes and confidence. The final score was 6-4, 6-2, 6-3, which was certainly no surprise considering that Fish had played just one match on clay all year (he lost) but certainly no supporting argument to McEnroe's decision to use the 37th-ranked Fish over the 19th-ranked Vince Spadea.

"I don't know how the captain is making the team, but I think it's obvious that Vince is a better player on clay, but I also have a very good record against him," said the fifth-ranked Moya, a former French Open champion.

Fish's quick demise might not have mattered if Roddick had managed to snuff out the gathering storm that is Nadal, who was chosen for the singles ahead of the former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero. Instead, Roddick ended up being the ideal foil for Nadal, a quick teenager from the same Mediterranean island, Majorca, as Moya.

Seldom in the long history of the game have so many spectacular shots been hit from such extreme angles, and though the second-ranked Roddick played beautifully and bravely at times - pushing forward much more than was predictable or prudent on such a slow surface and hitting some terrific low volleys and half volleys - Nadal's energy and baseline brio eventually wore Roddick down by the score of 6-7 (6), 6-2, 7-6 (6), 6-2.

It was only a minor upset in light of Nadal's clear affinity for clay, but it was still quite an accomplishment considering that Roddick powered through him in straight sets on a hardcourt at this year's United States Open and even more of an accomplishment considering that Nadal missed more than two months this season with a stress fracture in his left foot.

"I have had a very tough year, especially after the injury," the 51st-ranked Nadal said. "I have been training very hard, and I think I do really deserve this victory."

While Roddick's energy seemed to flag on occasion, Nadal's was a constant: reinforced by the wall of sound emanating from the stands awash in Spanish flags and banners. Fish compared the atmosphere with playing tennis in the middle of a college football game.

Roddick was in no mood to search for helpful comparisons, settling for, "It was crazy; unlike anything I've ever experienced before."

The pivotal set was the third, in which both men held set points. Roddick saved two on his serve at 5-6. Nadal saved his in the tie breaker at 5-6 with a fine drop shot that Roddick reached, just barely, with his forehand and smacked into the net. Nadal won the next 2 points to take the set and, despite cramps in his sturdy legs down the stretch, he broke Roddick's massive serve twice early in the fourth set, closing out the biggest victory of his career with relative ease.

If Roddick can have any regret, it's that he didn't push Nadal hard enough down the stretch to give him more time to start getting nervous.

"He showed a lot out there today," Roddick said. "I tried everything, and he played very well, so it's no secret that he has a very, very bright future."

Until Friday, the biggest crowd to watch a sanctioned tennis match - the Battle of the Sexes in 1973 between Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King does not count - was the crowd of 25,578 that watched the United States and Australia play in Sydney in 1954.

But the comparisons stop there. That match was played during the Australian summer. This one was played in temperatures that dropped into the low 50's: chilly enough to see the players' breath.

Above all, that 1954 match was 2-0 after the first day in favor of the United States, which went on to win, 3-2.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 03:30 AM
Yea, Tangy, it's great that he still tried the net stuff even after what happened in the Hewitt match. It sounds like he volleyed well but also was passed quite a lot, and on some important points. but I guess that's just stuff he needs to keep working on. If he keeps doing it in matches like this and of the kind of magnitude of these matches, it's going to really become a solid part of his game soon. That can only be a good thing, especially when Wimby rolls around :)

btw... Nadal said he was tired and cramping at the end of the match, too. And he's generally known to be in good shape also. So it sounds like the cold condition and the match's intensity definitely did partly contribute to that stuff, for both players.

Also, at the DC site there's an audio with PMac and he talks about Andy and says some really nice things (I mean of course we know he loves Andy anyway but still, very complimentary)...for anyone interested.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 04:55 AM
So wait, what did Doug treat Andy for? :awww:

some editorial comments from yours truly :p

==========
2004 DAVIS CUP FINALS
USA vs. SPAIN
SEVILLE, SPAIN

December 3, 2004

R. NADAL/A. Roddick
6-7, 6-2, 7-6, 6-2

ANDY RODDICK
PATRICK McENROE

RANDY WALKER: Could we have questions for Patrick McEnroe and Andy Roddick, please.

Q. Had you ever experienced before such a situation - the crowd, the noise, all the things that were happening?

ANDY RODDICK: No.

Q. No?

ANDY RODDICK: No.

Q. And nothing similar somewhere in the world?

ANDY RODDICK: No.

Q. Andy, what is your general feeling physically and emotionally?

ANDY RODDICK: Obviously, emotionally I'm pretty down. You know, I wanted to get one for the team. Physically, I feel okay. You know, it was cold out there, which made it tough because your muscles would tighten up pretty easily. But, you know, I think my biggest problem was Nadal. He played very well today.

Q. I've never seen you attacking that much in your career. Was this because emotions or tactics?

ANDY RODDICK: Because of what?

Q. Emotions or tactics.

ANDY RODDICK: I thought you said Martians. (OH DEATH!!!!!) No, it was tactics. You know, I had to do something to try to win points. You know, I felt like, you know, I stuck to the game plan and I volleyed pretty well today. You know, I just ran into someone who played too well. (Andy felt badly that Juan Carlos didn't play, so he used his quota of "you know"s in his honor)

Q. How surprised were you that an 18-year-old kid goes out there and can keep up that level for three and a half hours?

ANDY RODDICK: He played well. You know, it's very impressive. You know, every once in a while people come along and they're big-match players. He apparently looks like he's on -- or he is a big-match player. He's come through. This is the third time this year he's stepped up in singles and played well. I think you either have it or you don't, regardless of age. You know, maybe it helps him in a way.

Q. Does this encourage you and probably Mardy to spend more time on European clay, pick it up?

ANDY RODDICK: I don't know. I haven't really thought about my schedule too much right now.

Q. I mean, as an overall thing, you haven't spent much time on European clay.

ANDY RODDICK: Just last year. The years before that, I played a pretty full schedule.

Q. What was it like out there? What will you tell your grandchildren about days like this, which are so unusual in tennis, particularly to Americans?

ANDY RODDICK: My grandchildren?

Q. Or any children, or your friends.

ANDY RODDICK: Bud, we're looking way ahead, aren't we? I don't even have a girlfriend and already I have grandchildren. (LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Once a smartass, forever a smartass)

Q. What will you tell the folks at home about this experience?

ANDY RODDICK: That it was crazy. You know, it was unlike anything I've experienced before.

Q. After fighting so hard just to get into that third set breaker, did it kind of turn there at the end? You had the one set point, the forehand coming up to the dropshot, not able to hit it over the tape. Did that pretty much turn the match there?

ANDY RODDICK: No. I mean, I still had chances after that in the breaker. But obviously that was going to swing the momentum either way - and fast. You know, you were playing those two points for the next two sets. So, you know, obviously they were pretty crucial. I just missed that one, so that was big.

Q. The clay is important, but how would you have handled him on a fast court?

ANDY RODDICK: That's an irrelevant question. I've played him on a fast court before. You probably saw it.

Q. You had well over 20,000 fans yelling and screaming again and again. Mardy said it was a little bit like an American football crowd. Point to point, when the noise was so loud, what goes through your mind? What were you thinking specifically?

ANDY RODDICK: I'm going to skip that one. I'm not going to go there. :scratch:

Q. (Translated from Spanish) When you mentioned earlier that it was quite crazy, that you had never experienced anything like that before, what do you mean by that? Do you have any complaints against the public, the audience?

ANDY RODDICK: No. You know, they supported. They did everything in their power to support their player.

Q. You're a player that leaves everything out there on the court. When you walked off the court today, what percent of your reserve, if any, did you have left?

ANDY RODDICK: As far as effort?

Q. As far as emotionally, physically.

ANDY RODDICK: I mean, like you said, I leave everything out there, and I take a lot of pride in that. You know, I just ran into a guy today that, like I said, was too good. I couldn't have tried any harder. You know, I couldn't have -- I gave it everything I had. It just wasn't enough on the day.

Q. On that shot you said swung the momentum, does it just happen so fast that you can't account for it, missing a shot like that?

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. I mean, when you're out there, obviously you try to just go on to the next point. You know, it's after the fact that you can think about it a little bit. But, yeah, I mean, you have to be ready to play 6-All in a breaker, you know, 25, 50 seconds later. So, you know, you try to get over it as fast as you can and move on.

Q. You brought a left-handed sparring partner to practice with before the matches. Do you think Nadal, being left-handed, was in any way a factor? Sorry to insist, but you said that it was crazy, that you don't want to talk about what's going through your head, that the Spanish fans were supporting their player. Do you think it affected the outcome of the match, the crowd support?

ANDY RODDICK: Well, obviously when you play at home, it's an advantage. You know, that's a no-brainer. You know, they tried as hard as they could to support their player. It's nothing more than that. I forgot the first question.

Q. Just if you thought you had special practice against left-handed player beforehand.

ANDY RODDICK: Obviously, it makes a huge difference when someone's left-handed versus right-handed. (Yea, we're better :devil: and cooler, and smarter...)

Q. Did you feel prepared bringing a left-handed player to practice with?

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. We brought a left-handed practice partner over on purpose, you know, knowing that this could be an option. So we did everything in our power. Captain picked the practice partners with that in mind. I don't know if we could have done anything more to help me.

Q. Do you think that for tennis it would be better to have 14,000 spectators who behave like in Wimbledon or 27,000 who behave like here? What is the best?

ANDY RODDICK: It doesn't matter because I'm not the one making the decisions. I think they're each unique. They're both special in their own way. You know, I think -- I don't think you can try to make everything the same. I think that's what makes tennis unique, is that you're playing on different surfaces in front of different crowds every week. You know, it's different. I like that about tennis.

Q. Is it a good price to pay for it, to have 26,000?

ANDY RODDICK: I don't understand. "Good price to pay"?

Q. To get more money, you have 26,000 spectators, they make more noise.

ANDY RODDICK: Oh, I don't know. I'm not involved, you know, with the money and where it goes. I'm just a tennis player. I don't make those decisions.

Q. Patrick, what have you told or will you tell the guys?

PATRICK McENROE: All the guys or the guys that are playing tomorrow?

Q. The guys that are playing tomorrow, and the team as a whole?

PATRICK McENROE: I don't really need to tell them anything. We know our backs are against the wall. But we're going to come out and we're going to fight for every point like we did today. I mean, we're going to come out and hopefully play a great doubles match. And Sunday will be a new day. I mean, there's not a whole -- there's no big mystery of what we need to do. You know, we're going to come out swinging tomorrow like we did today.

Q. You're still optimistic?

PATRICK McENROE: I certainly am, yeah. You got to win three last time I checked.

Q. This question comes with an assumption, but forgive that. Is it better to have a day off before you come to face Moya or would you rather just get out there tomorrow?

ANDY RODDICK: No, it's good to have a day off, I think. You know, it's tough playing in conditions like this, playing three out of five back to back to back. I think you have to have a day in between to rest, mentally rest, physically rest. Yeah, I don't think it would be smart to play the singles back to back.

Q. Is the weather working out to be a challenge, too? We were told it would be warm here. How was it out there?

ANDY RODDICK: It was warm?

Q. We were told it would be warm here. It obviously wasn't.

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, you can't do much about that (smiling). If I could control the weather, I'd have a lot more fun. You know, he had to play in the same thing I did last I checked. You know, his side of the court wasn't warm. So you just got to roll with it.

Q. Patrick, this is where a captain really earns his spurs as a motivator. Will you employ any motivational ploys, techniques with your guys that you have not tried before? Do you take any strength from what the (inaudible) with Red Sox versus the Yankees? (:worship:Ahhhhhhhh there is a smart reporter in the world!!!!!!)

PATRICK McENROE: There's a lot in that question, a lot more than a question. You know, our guys know what they have to do. We've been together for a while. The Bryan boys have been in every situation, they've been two up, they've been 1-1 a couple of times. Now we're 0-2. You know, we came here knowing the difficulty and knowing the challenge. We're still going to relish the opportunity. We've still got an opportunity to make history, you know, to come out and play our best. I mean, I'm extremely proud of the way Andy played today, the way he competed, which he always does. But more importantly, you know, the tactics that he used and the improvement that he showed in playing that style. So to me that bodes very, very well for him, and therefore for us - you know, not just for us this weekend, but for the future. I'm extremely proud of what he was able to do today. It was a hell of a match. :D:yeah:

Q. (Translated from Spanish) Do you think that you played today against the possible future No. 1 in the world of tennis?

ANDY RODDICK: There's a guy right now that's a pretty good No. 1 player in the world in tennis. I think he could become possibly one of the best clay-courters in the world. You know, he showed a lot out there today. I tried everything and he played very well. So it's no secret that he has a very, very bright future.

MisterQ
12-04-2004, 05:11 AM
Bud, we're looking way ahead, aren't we? I don't even have a girlfriend and already I have grandchildren.

you could always adopt, Andy. ;)

MisterQ
12-04-2004, 05:12 AM
(Yea, we're better :devil: and cooler, and smarter...)


and more modest!

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 05:13 AM
and more modest!

:ras: :nerner: Don't hate us cuz you're JEALOUS!

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 05:31 AM
:( Mike :(

"Mike Bryan's right hip is acting up again, forcing him to skip Thursday's practice. But the righty twin did practice on Friday."

This article (tennisreporters) also mentioned that b/c Vinny came onto the stage with the team for the draw even though he knew he was not on the team, the US team might be fined... Matt Cronin had some not-so-nice words to say about Vinny and the way he handled the situation...

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 08:23 AM
(Andy felt badly that Juan Carlos didn't play, so he used his quota of "you know"s in his honor).

:lol: :lol: :lol:

thanks for posting the interview Deb :)

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 02:39 PM
well Juan is playing right now in doubles so he's at least playing :)
thanks for the interview deb :kiss: :lol: love your comments ;)

wwwwooohoooooo!!!! :woohoo: we just bageled spain in the first set :D :banana:

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 02:46 PM
yeah then got broken to open the second.... ay gevalt.

Guess Nadal wasn't in the physical condition to play.... and Spain had pretty much conceded the doubles point anyway.. I really feel for JCF that he's being treated like a second-string player. I really hope that he can turn himself around next year.

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 02:58 PM
*blee* spain broke again :retard: 2-1 now on on spain's serve. lets break again :-/
I can see how Nadal wasnt in condition to play :hug: Poor guy had to play an almost 4 hour match yesterday and had to play again today for doubles? Glad he took the day off
I think Juan'll have a better year next year....or that's just me wanting him to

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 03:00 PM
Always a little humor from good ole Bud... but I didn't realize Andy hit that many errors :eek: :(

suddenly the bryans can't hold, I hope it's not Mike's hip :(
==========

On Day 1, a lot of pain in Spain
Roddick, Fish dig US 0-2 hole
By Bud Collins, Globe Columnist | December 4, 2004

SEVILLE, Spain -- It's the Bryans or bust!

That's the desperate predicament today for some American tourists -- a.k.a. the US Davis Cup team -- who find themselves in a lion's den called Estadio Olimpico. Surrounded by 27,200 high-decibel growlers, Andy Roddick and Mardy Fish felt the teeth of those homebodies in the seats, plus Rafael Nadal and Carlos Moya on the cocoa-hued soil, and fell yesterday, their cause now looking hopeless.

The only way out lies in the hands of the US double-threat Bryan twins, Bob and Mike. They can keep the uproarious best-of-five Cup final series alive by beating Tommy Robredo and Nadal this afternoon. Otherwise, Spain will stretch its 2-0 lead to an insurmountable, triumphant 3-0.

Only one US team ever recovered from 0-2, and that was 70 years ago over Australia in the semifinals. Dick Williams, a survivor of the Titanic, captained that team, and maybe some of his luck rubbed off on the players.

Think Red Sox, guys.

This edition's captain, Patrick McEnroe, said, "We're in it until somebody gets to three. I like the Bryans' chances, and our taking this into [tomorrow]."

But when "El Nino," the season's prize Cup rookie Nadal, finished polishing off No. 2 Roddick, 6-7 (6-8), 6-2, 7-6 (8-6), 6-2, and the band stopped playing, the record tennis crowd ceased roaring his name, the US effort appeared as chilled as the raw matinee in the low 50s. Fortunately, daylong rain didn't interfere, thanks to a portable ceiling over the turgid clay court, the sort of European footing that generally befuddles American men.

In the warmup act to the tremendous 3-hour-39-minute Nadal-Roddick struggle, No. 5 Moya opened with admitted jitters, lost the first three games, then pasted No. 37 Fish, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3. "I thought Fish would get a fast start, but knew he couldn't keep it," said Moya, a man with a devastating forehand (18 winners).

The Biceps Boys from the tiny island of Majorca, Rafael and Carlos, were turned out in sleeveless burgundy muscle shirts, and had the sinewy shots to go with the costumes.

Moya, 28, French Open champion six years ago, has been around. But it was the swift lefthanded kid, Nadal, who made his mark, and should keep on going up as a threat to anybody.

As merely the second 18-year-old to win a Cup final singles match (Boris Becker, 155 days younger, was the other in 1985), Nadal came in 49 lengths behind Roddick at No. 51. But rankings mean little in nationalistic Davis Cup. He was obviously well recovered from a fractured left foot that kept him out of the French and Wimbledon, although he made it to the US Open, losing a second-rounder to Roddick, 6-0, 6-3, 6-4.

Page 2 of 2 -- But that was asphalt, and this was Rafael's home ground, the dirt arena, where "the audience helped me much, cheering behind me."

"It was crazy, unlike any experience I've had," said Roddick, whose serving faults and mistakes were hooted. Umpire Mike Morrissey pleaded, "Por favor!" and "Gracias" (please and thank you) and "Silencio!" more than he would ever have imagined. But the customers, the horn blowers and drum pounders, singers, whistlers, fast-clappers, and stompers, did pause for points to be played.

Neither Roddick nor Fish complained. Fish said, "It was fun, a great crowd." Roddick said, "It was plenty loud, but they were supporting their team. It was sort of like an American college football crowd." Both will probably see the red-and-gold Spanish flags, thousands of them, waving in their dreams.

Nadal's smooth inside-out forehand and ripping backhand passers, down the line and crosscourt, piled up 73 winners to Roddick's 44, while the long-haired Spaniard erred only 39 times to the crew-cut Yank's 63.

Their exchanges were splendid displays of pushing each other hither and yon in frequently double-digit rallies, incredible retrieving and constant banging in search of winners.

It was Roddick's finest clay court performance, yet not enough. "I was fine physically all the way, emotionally down at losing. But," he said, "my big problem was Nadal. He's a big-match player, very impressive."

So he was. A discouraging foe because his speed constantly canceled seeming winners, and made Roddick hit one more ball too often.

Still, Roddick was in it for three sets. He was up a break in the first, 3-1, but couldn't pierce Nadal after that, and held a set point against serve at 5-6 that could have won the third set tiebreaker. Nadal saved it with a nifty drop shot, taking advantage of Roddick's tendency to play groundies well behind the baseline. Then he won the last two points on a serve-and-swinging volley, and a sizzling backhand crosscourt passer that foiled Roddick's serve-and-volley. The American's chances were gone.

At the 2 1/2-hour mark Roddick raised his racket like an ax, ready to kill. "It was a momentum swing," he ruefully recalled his bungled swing. Maybe it was. Roddick had just dodged three break points, and it was 3-3 in the third, Nadal facing a rare break point. Roddick charged. Caught up in a furious skirmish, he made two volleys, setting up the third that he hacked into the twine. "Breaking Nadal there could have meant a lot," he said.

Roddick sought the net more often than usual, volleyed -- not his forte -- effectively at times, lunging, leaping, scooping, daring to follow second serves in. But unless he was on the money, Nadal had the passing antidotes. "I had to keep trying everything I could."

The Spaniard's serve wasn't in Roddick's league for rapidity (three aces to 14, no service winners to 11), but he defended and returned handsomely.

Two games as good as they get, laden with awesome shotmaking, were holds by Roddick to 6-5 through four deuces, and ditto by Nadal, lifting them into the first-set tiebreaker. There Nadal dashed to 5-2, only to quake somewhat as Roddick seized six of the last seven points. It looked like rookie angst, yet Nadal rebounded strongly as the cacophony grew stronger along with him.

A half-century ago in Sydney, Americans in town inspired the previous record mob, 25,578, as Tony Trabert and Vic Seixas lifted the Cup from Aussies Ken Rosewall and Lew Hoad. Enthusiasm was high, but nothing like this lion's den, where a band played bullfight tunes, "Espana!" was chanted, Spanish flags flapped like matadors' capes, and the throng made it a partisan and raucous, but good-natured, party such as the game probably had never undergone.

Great for Spain, which has won the Cup but once, 2000. But for the American tourists, yearning for a 32d Cup, it's the Bryans or bust.

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 03:12 PM
Did Doug treat Andy for cramps?? *I know I'm a little late*

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 03:12 PM
he treated him for something. I asked for what and no one responded:(

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 03:20 PM
thanks for the article :)

yeah, i saw on the internet first a picture of doug out there with andy during the match so i knew he must have been treated for something and was expecting that when the match came on tv. but the commentaters never said anything or showed anything, i just saw doug carrying that maroon bag off ther court, but i wouldnt have know it was him had i not seen the picture first. so i really dont know what andy was treated for, but my guess would be cramps.

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 03:24 PM
I think it was cramps but can you get treated for cramps? lol
Pat said Andy was having cramps in the beginning of the match and then Andy told Pat again that he was having the cramps in the 3rd and 4th set. *shrug*

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 03:25 PM
Barring anything really bizzare it looks like the Bryans are gonna win. But, oh man. I am not looking forward to Andy playing Carlos tomorrow.

Yea, Mani, you can get treated. they just rub it down and rub some warming stuff on it. I dunno if it actually *helps* but that's what I've seen them do in the past

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 03:28 PM
so then I'm guessing it was cramps? *is wondering*

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 03:34 PM
:shrug: I guess so. It was cold and stuff, so yeah. it seems like the most likely thing.

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 03:51 PM
:bounce: :banana: and the Bryans save the day, 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 :)

now, i can officially start worrying about andy playing moya tomorrow....

andyroxmysox12191
12-04-2004, 03:55 PM
yay for the Bryans! :banana: at least we got one win!
Andy and Moya....I dont wanna think about it cause I'm already wondering where my mom is....

Golfnduck
12-04-2004, 03:56 PM
Tomorrow I want to see Andy put out the kind of effort he did yesterday. Hopefully he wins, which would be amazing. I think he'll gain alot of experience from tomorrow's match. Mardy better be ready to go if/when Andy wins. I'll be rooting hard for Andy. WAY TO GO BRYANS!!!!! :bigclap: :worship:

Neely
12-04-2004, 04:08 PM
yay for the Bryans! :banana: at least we got one win!
true, it's better than 3-0 for Spain after today ;)

I didn't get to see anything of this match, but the scoreline looks very convincing and it looks like they didn't lose much time on their way to the victory.

These Bryans are really very good and they will win the very huge majority of all their doubles played, the only bad thing is that they take away two spots from the lineup and that nobody of them is a true weapon for singles and so the US team can only chose from two single players then.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 04:31 PM
Neely, PMac has talked a lot about that predicament. Bob is the better singles player but he plays VERY little and isn't that good anyway. But considering the Bryans have never lost a set in DC play, and have played on all surfaces and now in all kinds of conditions, I think they have more than proven that they are worth the risk. Plus, their infectious enthusiasm is great for tennis in this country. They need to get on TV. I mean, who would else would the US have - Andy and Mardy? They're ok as a team and maybe if they played together more often they'd be better, but yeah.... the best pair after the Bryans would probably be Mardy and James because with a little practice together I actually think they would be a GREAT and very successful team (they won 2 titles this year - one even on clay - beating some very good teams in the process!), but I think what the Bryans bring to the team is irreplaceable and I'm glad PMac finally gave them a chance last year.

No need to worry about Andy playing Moya...

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 04:47 PM
Good, I'm glad the Boys did their bump. they said they maybe weren't going to b/c of the Spanish crowd... but I guess they did a good job of silencing them with their play anyway ;)

There's a pic on Getty of the boys being congratulated by the US Team and Andy's in the background of it with his head down... like an "oh fuck thanks now I have to get up tomorrow and play Moya" kind of look :p or maybe I'm just reading too much into it :silly:

I found it interesting that the Eurosport commentary said that the crowd started to empty out at the start of the third set. That's kinda poor.

http://www.gotennis.com/Photos/2004-12-04T173411Z_01_SEV10D_RTRIDSP_2_SPORT-TENNIS-DAVIS.jpg

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 05:53 PM
yay im glad the boys did their bump :) im looking forward to watching the match later, and i'll check out those getty pics. lol at what you said andy was thinking .... :p :lol:

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 05:58 PM
*pats PMac's head* poor boy...
=======

McEnroe still sets sights on victory
Sat Dec 4, 2004 06:54 PM ET

By Ossian Shine
SEVILLE, Spain, Dec 4 (Reuters) - Only once in the 104-year history of the Davis Cup has a nation won the final from 0-2 down, but U.S. coach Patrick McEnroe believes his team has what it takes to rewrite the record books.

The U.S. trailed Spain 0-2 at the end of the opening day at Seville's Olympic Stadium before Mike and Bob Bryan hauled them back to 1-2 on Saturday with victory in the doubles.

Not since Australia reeled in the U.S. in 1939 has a team bounced back from a 0-2 deficit.

McEnroe, however, is upbeat.

"Look, we know what we're up against it," he said.

"But by no means do we think we're out of it.

"We didn't think that last night. We didn't think that this morning. We don't think that now.

"It's certainly not out of the realm of possibility to beat these guys. As I said, we're the underdog. We've been the underdog from the minute we landed here.

"But we believe we can do it. There's not a lot I need to say to them (U.S. team). They know they can do it. It is possible.

"We're going to have to pour our guts out there and we're prepared to do that.

"Andy (Roddick) did that yesterday and came up a little short. But, you know, a swing or two here or there, we could be up 2-1. But we're not.

"So, you know, to me there's no reason why we can't come out tomorrow, if Andy can win, it's two-all, we're in with a shot."

Carlos Moya is due to face Roddick in the first singles match on Sunday while Roddick's conqueror on Friday, Rafael Nadal, should play Mardy Fish.

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 06:00 PM
Doubles Details
By Staff
2004-12-04
Before the match, the entertainers did a great job of whipping up the Spanish crowd playing songs such as "I will survive" and batting tennis balls into the over excited crowd. The Netheads joined in beating their drums and chanting "USA! USA!"

The opening bagel for the Bryans got the US off to a great start. At 5-0, with the Spaniards serving, the twins came back from 40 down to strike a clean winner and take the first set.

The second set started with exchanges of breaks. The Bryans had the first hold of the set taking a 3-2 lead. The Spanish crowd who had been quieted regained their momentum as the Spaniards held to 3-3, but this momentum was soon to be broken as the Bryans stormed their way to a 5-3 lead after errors from the Spanish team. Chants of "Go Bryans Go" from the Netheads encouraged the twins to hold their own serve and with a winning volley they took the second set 6-3.

The Bryan twins had a fast start to the final set, bursting to a 2-0 lead. At 4-2, the twins claimed the second break of the set as they smashed their way to a 5-2 lead.

Serving for the match and the Bryans hit a superb backhand pass at 40-15 to set up match point and an ace sealed the victory.

After the match, Bob Bryan said "Andy came and thanked us for giving him a shot." The Spanish team was also very complimentary of the Bryans as Robredo said, "The Bryans are excellent players. I want to congratulate them."

Mike Bryan said about the Spanish fans, "We were ready for this crowd...wanted to keep them silent." When asked on what they said to each other before the last point, Mike responded "Let’s do a chest bump!"

Patrick McEnroe who also attended the interview, commenting on tomorrow’s singles said, "Andy has a good chance the way he matches up against Moya."

"By no means do we think we’re out of it...They know they can do it."

Go USA!

================

andy thanked them for giving him a chance tomorrow, well thats good then, though maybe he's just a little more down cuz he knows all the pressure is on him and not the bryans now.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 06:05 PM
When asked on what they said to each other before the last point, Mike responded "Let’s do a chest bump!"



:lol: That's so great!

That is classic Andy to say that to them, and I know he means it. On one hand, he has pressure b/c it's an elimination match, but on the other hand... really... what does he have to lose? Not much. He should really just go for it and let loose completely. Hopefully he's physically recovered enough from yesterday to give it his best shot.

Oh Bob... so sweet, so naive... so silly.

"I'm really confident in Andy winning that first match," Bob Bryan said. "And then anything can happen."

And there's an audio on the DC site with the twins... god, their energy is SO infectious!! I just listen to them and smile b/c they're so energetic LOL

tangerine_dream
12-04-2004, 06:13 PM
:woohoo: And the Mighty Bryans save the day!!!!! :D With a BAGEL no less! 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 :haha: What a demolition. :worship: The Americans actually serve up a bagel to the clay kings. No bagel for the clay-inept Mardy and Andy but we got one for the Spaniards. Beautiful. :hearts:

And I'm so glad to see the Bryans do their chest bump. It's their signature move and if the crowd was going to be nasty about it, well, too bad. The Bryans shut them up good. :p

2-1 now. At least it's not a total blowout. Thank god for the Bryans. :bowdown: :kiss: :worship: :hatoff:

Golfnduck
12-04-2004, 06:14 PM
Well....I'm getting up at 4 a.m. to "watch" the match on live scoreboard. I wish I could be there with the Netheads. Although, I probably would have lost my voice by now, lol. I think Andy will be ready for tomorrow and it should be a good match. GOOOOOO ANDY!!!! :worship:

Golfnduck
12-04-2004, 06:17 PM
:woohoo: And the Mighty Bryans save the day!!!!! :D With a BAGEL no less! 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 :haha: What a demolition. :worship: The Americans actually serve up a bagel to the clay kings. No bagel for the clay-inept Mardy and Andy but we got one for the Spaniards. Beautiful. :hearts:

And I'm so glad to see the Bryans do their chest bump. It's their signature move and if the crowd was going to be nasty about it, well, too bad. The Bryans shut them up good. :p

2-1 now. At least it's not a total blowout. Thank god for the Bryans. :bowdown: :kiss: :worship: :hatoff:
We did bagel the clay kings!!! OMG!!! Miracles do happen!!! Even Mardy didn't get bageled by Moya!!! Something to be happy about.
I agree with you Tangy. Thank God for the Bryans!!! Where would the US Davis Cup team be without them?? Hopefully they'll help pump up Andy for tomorrow.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 06:20 PM
Considering JCF has been pulled around on a string for a few weeks and has no match play in him, and considering he and Tommy had a stellar 3-12 doubles record together going in, I don't know if bageling them is the biggest feat, but still it sounds like Bob and Mike played a great match (They said they thought it was the best they've played in DC:)). And it's just really sad for JCF that he only held once :(:(

I hope Andy hit a little early today to be ready just in case he had to play at noon tomorrow. I don't think he's so much a fan of playing that early.
========

Bryans Keep US Dreams Alive
The 2004 Final of the Davis Cup by BNP Paribas is poised for a thrilling climax on Sunday thanks to Bob and Mike Bryan’s demolition of Juan Carlos Ferrero and Tommy Robredo, 60 63 62 in just 1 hour 38 minutes.

At 2-0 down after Friday’s play, a second Davis Cup title would have been Spain’s today if the Bryans had lost, but they handled the pressure magnificently to bring the tie back to 2-1 in Spain’s favour. Of course, the home team still only needs one win from the two singles rubbers scheduled for Sunday, but the manner of the American victory today may just have sowed a seed of doubt in Spanish minds.

“It feels good to give those guys another shot,” said Mike Bryan of his teammates after the match.

“Spain has to go sleep on that. You know, everything went according to plan. Won that first set 6?0. It went pretty smoothly.

“But, you know, it's not going to be as good if we don't win two tomorrow.”

Rafael Nadal had been scheduled to resume his usual Davis Cup partnership with Tommy Robredo today, but Captain Jordi Arrese and his two co-lieutenants, Juan Avendano and Jose Perlas, decided overnight that Friday’s hero had earned a day of rest.

That was not an altogether surprising choice, given that Nadal had been forced to conduct some of his interviews after his win over Andy Roddick walking around the press area, as he was beginning to cramp.

But still, to rest the boy wonder today was an admission that the Spanish feared the Bryan brothers would be too good for whatever Spanish pairing was put out. It was also in turn a clear signal that they feel they may need Nadal tomorrow for a potentially decisive fifth rubber against Mardy Fish – not exactly a confidence-booster for the two players they sent into battle, Robredo and Ferrero. They had played together before, in 2002 and early 2003, but they had won only three of 15 matches and had never teamed in Davis Cup.

Of course, Davis Cup is a team competition, and if they had won today to secure the trophy it would have rescued a wretched 2004 for Ferrero, but from the moment he stepped on to court he cut a forlorn figure whose confidence has been shattered by a year of injury and bad form. From World No. 1 to weak link on the Spanish team in just over a year must be a hard descent to accept, and he hinted as much when asked whether he had been put in a difficult position by being asked to play doubles, something he had only done twice previously at all this year.

“Let me just say that I am here. I am part of the team. The first day it was not considered appropriate that I play, and it was considered appropriate that I played today in the doubles match because Rafael is tired and because he had a very long match yesterday.”

The Bryans on the other hand did not look like men who were troubled by the thought that their nation’s fate in their hands, or on the end of their rackets. Because of their weakness in singles, Captain Patrick McEnroe’s selection of the twins puts extra pressure on them to win the doubles – as if extra pressure were needed today – but from the beginning they showed that the prospect of what they had continually referred to as the biggest match of their lives would serve as an inspiration for them.

A comfortable service hold followed by a break of Ferrero’s serve in a marathon second game set the tone for the contest, and the Americans raced through the first set without dropping a game in just 27 minutes. They were playing the kind of controlled attacking tennis that took them to the Roland Garros title in 2003, and were clearly targeting Ferrero.

Breaks of both Bryans’ serves at the start of the second set suggested that a Spanish fightback was possible, but both times the USA broke straight back. Ferrero served at 3-4, and after a backhand pass sailed wide on breakpoint, he trudged back to the chair, head bowed. Sections of fans tried to lift Ferrero by chanting his name rather than the usual raucous ‘Espana! Espana!’ but it simply served to highlight Ferrero’s plight.

USA closed out the set 63 and hammered another nail into the Spanish coffin with a break of Robredo’s serve at the start of the third set. A fifth break of Ferrero’s serve – in fact he only held once in the whole match – set up Mike Bryan to serve out for victory, which he duly sealed with an ace. Only now did the brothers do their trademark bumping of chests to celebrate a precious, vital point for their country.

“We didn't want to break out the chest bump the first couple of sets just because the crowd would be riding us the rest of the match. So we saved it for the match point, kind of stuck a dagger in them,” said Mike Bryan.

Spain is still in the driving seat, and it would be a surprise if it is the visiting team who take the Cup home on Sunday. Only once before, when Australia defeated USA in 1939, has a team overturned a 0-2 deficit in a Davis Cup Final, and the only time USA has ever done it was in 1934, against Australia in an Inter-Zonal final match. In fact, there have only ever been 42 comebacks from 0-2 in the competition, with eight in World Group action.

Even if the weight of history is against USA, a live fifth rubber is still a distinct possibility. Carlos Moya by his own admission was not in spectacular form on Friday, and Andy Roddick did not play all that badly in losing to an inspired Nadal. If Roddick can win the first singles on Sunday, then home hopes will presumably once again rest with Nadal, and then, as history has also shown us, anything can happen in Davis Cup.

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 06:24 PM
yeah i wouldnt wanna play that early either. but i hope he is loose tomorrow and play as though he has nothing to lose. yeah, if he loses then they lose the tie, but really he just needs to prove that he can be competitive with these clay courters.

im so happy for the bryans and they did say that this was probably the best they have played in DC so yeah. :)

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 06:26 PM
Well Andy also knows it's the last match he has to play for a month. So he can just leave it all out there. I mean, so can Carlos, but yeah... we just don't know how much andy HAS to give. but I'm sure he'll fight as hard as he can. Whether that'll actually be enough is rather questionable, but yeah.

superpinkone37
12-04-2004, 06:28 PM
yeah i dont have a doubt that andy wont leave it all out there, give it all he has, it just comes down to how much is needed to win, like you said.

Black Adam
12-04-2004, 06:29 PM
Pliz andy..........give us a fifth rubber match . you can make history tomorrow boyz. c'mon! godd luck against moya ;)

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 06:56 PM
USTA.com Davis Cup writer Jason Brown is in Seville, Spain covering the World Group Final between the United States and Spain. Check back here daily for his travelogue as he tracks the competition and absorbs the culture of Andalucia.

Saturday, Dec. 4, 7:30 PM local time

They're back!

What a courageous display by the United States Davis Cup Team this afternoon, with their backs against the wall, down 0-2 to Spain in front of over 27,000 people.

Mike Bryan and Bob Bryan -- "Double Trouble," "The Wonder Twins," Twin Dynamite" -- whatever you want to nickname them, are, to borrow a catch-phrase, cooler than the other side of the pillow.

Wayne Bryan's boys from Camarillo, California did it again, showing why they've finished the year ranked No. 1 in doubles for the second straight season.

They were just having fun out there on the court today, and I think even the staunchest Spanish supporter could break into a smile, mesmerized over the array of unbelievable gets, overheads, and extreme angles the twins were bouncing back at the Spanish side.

Captain Patrick McEnroe said his guys found out today at about 2 pm, just two hours before the match started, that former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero would replace Rafael Nadal to give the 18-year-old an extra day to rest.

Did it affect the Bryans one bit?

Nope, they went right after Ferrero the entire match, making the "Mosquito" a marked man pushed up against the stickiest of fly paper.

After the match, the Bryans revealed that Roddick greeted them saying, "thanks for giving me another shot," as the American No. 1 will now combat Carlos Moya in a must-win match on Sunday.

Great stuff from the Bryans today, and what a final day of the Davis Cup World Group Final we have on tap for tomorrow.

===========================
===========================
===========================

Bryans Keep US in Davis Cup Final by Trouncing Spain

12/4/04 7:39 PM
By Matthew Cronin, special to USTA.com

SEVILLE, SPAIN – Mike and Bob Bryan may have saved their chest bump for last, but they were nearly perfect all day as they crushed Spain’s Juan Carlos Ferrero and Tommy Robredo 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 to breath life into the US team at the Davis Cup final in Spain. In notching the victory, the Bryans earned the US its first point of the tie and now the Americans head into Sundays action down 1-2 with at least of puncher’s chance of pulling off an upset on clay.
"It feels good, but it's not going to be as good if we don't win two tomorrow," said Mike. "It feels good to give those guys another shot. Spain has to go sleep on that. Everything went according to plan. We played more doubles than they have. We exploited their doubles skills. We rose to the occasion."

On Sunday, top American Andy Roddick will face top Spaniard Carlos Moya, followed by Mardy Fish confronting teen sensation Rafael Nadal.

In order to save him for Sunday’s singles, Spanish captain Jordi Arrese pulled Friday’s hero Rafael Nadal out of the doubles and subbed in Ferrero, who has only played a handful of doubles matches on the pro tour. The 2003 Roland Garros singles champion was a fish out of water on the muddy court, consistently playing out of position and looking lost at the net. For their part, the second-ranked Bryans put up a wall at the net, reflexing volleys to all angles of the court and dictating action the entire afternoon. Unlike some Americans, the 2003 Roland Garros doubles champ Bryans can adapt to clay.

"I think we're more comfortable playing hard and grass, but doubles is less movement," said Bob. "We just tried to keep those guys uncomfortable. We feel good on clay. We didn't feel great until we won the French Open. But now, we love it. We try to take as many balls out of the air as we can and make the other guys play doubles, because they would beat us in singles."

While the Spaniards were often content whacking groundstrokes from the baseline, the twins sole intention was to find routes to the cords and they were successful in that with both their service and return games. The Bryans quickly silenced the sell out crowd of 27,200 in the opening set by easily holding serve and breaking Ferrero twice and Robredo once. The Southern Californians won the set when Bob laced a forehand volley crosscourt.

"We’ve played a couple teams that stayed back and ripped groundies at us," Mike said of he and his twin’s development on the surface. "We decided we were going to hit every ball at the net guy. We also said we needed to use some variety, use some dippers, some lobs, keep them off balance."

The Spaniards picked up the level of their play in the second set, as Robredo decided to poach at will and Ferrero found his vaunted return of serve. The two teams traded four breaks to open the set, but the Bryans settled down on their service games and took a 4-3 lead. They pounded on Ferrero in the eighth game, breaking him to 5-3 when he was wide with a two-handed backhand. With Bob serving, the Bryans won the second set when Mike raced across the court and crushed a forehand volley.

The Bryans broke Robredo to open the third set and never looked back, breaking Ferrero to 5-2 and then winning the contest on when mike whipped an ace wide into the court. Although usually enthusiastic twins were muted in their celebration during the match because they didn’t want to incite the crowd, after they won, they leapt high and gave each other their trademark chest bump. Given that they have won all five matches and 15 sets they’ve played in Davis Cup, they have a lot to be proud of.

"We didn't want to break out the chest bump the first couple of sets just because they'd be riding us the rest of the match," Mike said. "So we saved it for the match point, kind of stuck a dagger in them."

Captain Patrick McEnroe was all smiles on Saturday, but he knows he has huge task ahead of him on Sunday. Only one team has come back form a 0-3 deficit in a World Group final, and that team, Australia, wasn’t playing on it’s least favorite surface. But Roddick has never lost to Moya and if Fish can step up his level of play and Nadal drops his level a touch, a miracle could occur.

"It’s a big task but we know what we have in front of us," said Fish. "I said when we came back in the locker room that we took away their momentum. It’s on Andy right now and if he wins, it’s on me. I hope we take it to a fifth match."

McEnroe said that his team has never lost it’s spirit and is convinced that his boys are ready to battle Spain’s formidable clay courters, the crowd and every circumstance that’s thrown at them.

"By no means do we think we're out of it," he said. "We didn't think that last night. We didn't think that this morning. We don't think that now. It's certainly not out of the realm of possibility to beat these guys We've been the underdog from the minute we landed here. But we believe we can do it. They know they can do it. It is possible. There’s no reason why we can't come out tomorrow, if Andy can win, it's 2-All, we're in with a shot."

tangerine_dream
12-04-2004, 07:01 PM
Is it true that Juanqui was in tears during this match? :eek: Poor kid, he so desperately wanted to play. He's had a really tough year. I hope he can recover and come back strong in 2005. :hug:

Disappointed but desperate to play a part
eurosport

Juan Carlos Ferrero could barely hide his disappointment at Spain's post-match press conference on Saturday. The former world number one was called on to play Davis Cup doubles with Tommy Robredo, but the rookie pair crashed to a 6-0 6-3 6-2 defeat against American twins Bob and Mike Bryan.

Dropped from the singles in favour of Rafael Nadal, Ferrero replaced the 18-year-old in a decision made only hours before the rubber was played at the Olimpico Stadium in Seville.

Asked if he had been hoodwinked into playing the doubles, Ferrero said: "If I say yes to the question, of course that would not be good for the team.

"Let me just say that I am here. I am part of the team.

"The first day it was not considered appropriate that I play and it was considered appropriate that I played today in the doubles match because Rafael is tired and because he had a very long match yesterday.

"That's the answer to the question."

Nadal vindicated captain Jordi Arrese's decision to select him for the singles on Friday, beating world number two Andy Roddick over four sets.

Ferrero could not hide his disappointment at being dropped, however, despite suffering a drop in form in 2004 as a result of illness and injury.

"Yesterday was disappointing to me to not play in this fantastic stadium, you know, with all the crowd supporting us," he said.

"But today I wanted to play because it's one more point to Spain. But, of course, I knew that this is very difficult to play against the Bryans and to win against them."

Ferrero could well be called upon for Sunday's reverse singles rubber, commenting: "I will do anything for Spain."

"And we'll see tomorrow what's going on. I don't know if I will play. Captains, we'll see what they do. We'll see who is going to play."

Perhaps, most importantly, Arrese refused to rule a switch out.

"Tomorrow is fully open," Arrese said. "All our choices for tomorrow are fully open."

SUNDAY'S ORDER OF PLAY - 12:00cet
Carlos Moya (Spain) v Andy Roddick (United States)
Rafael Nadal (Spain) v Mardy Fish (United States)

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 07:13 PM
Mardy learns fast? since when!?
==========
Roddick carries US hopes in Spain
SPAIN 2-1 USA

Andy Roddick gets a chance to avenge his opening singles defeat and level the Davis Cup final when he takes on Carlos Moya on Sunday.
Spain lead 2-1 with the reverse singles still to play in Seville, but the US were boosted by Saturday's doubles win.

"If Andy can win, it's 2-2," said US captain Patrick McEnroe. "We're in with a shot."

The final rubber will see Mardy Fish face Rafael Nadal - conqueror of Roddick on Friday.

"Look, we know what we're up against it," said McEnroe. "But by no means do we think we're out of it.

"We didn't think that last night. We didn't think that this morning. We don't think that now.

"It's certainly not out of the realms of possibility to beat these guys. As I said, we're the underdog. We've been the underdog from the minute we landed here.

"But we believe we can do it. There's not a lot I need to say to them. They know they can do it. It is possible.

"We're going to have to pour our guts out and we're prepared to do that."

Bob and Mike Bryan kept the Americans in the tie on Saturday when they thrashed Juan Carlos Ferrero and Tommy Robredo in the doubles, and they remain positive.

"Andy's excited to get another shot out there," said Bob Bryan. "I'm really confident of Andy winning the fourth match."

That would see Fish, who was heavily beaten by Moya on Friday, face a daunting decisive rubber against Spanish hero Nadal.

"Obviously, Mardy is the underdog - but he learns pretty quickly," said McEnroe.

Golfnduck
12-04-2004, 07:29 PM
Since when does Mardy learn fast??? PMac is going a little crazy over there in Spain. Hopefully if Mardy gets a chance tomorrow, he doesn't choke.

Deboogle!.
12-04-2004, 07:30 PM
hahaha well choke would imply that he was even in a position to win.. so, let's not get ahead of ourselves ;)

MisterQ
12-04-2004, 07:36 PM
Mardy started out on fire in the match vs. Moya. (admittedly Moya was a bit slow getting started too). I don't know if there's any way for him to sustain that kind of controlled aggression --- easier said than done --- but he should try. :yeah: