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Murray opts for a Latin influence in his search for a new coach

WhataQT
04-20-2006, 02:56 PM
Murray returns to roots with approach for Perlas
By Neil Harman

The Scot opts for a Latin influence in his search for a new coach


JOSÉ PERLAS has been asked if he would fancy taking over as Andy Murray’s coach. The answer was “no”, but it was well worth the inquiry because Perlas, a Spaniard, has coached two French Open champions in Carlos Moyà and Albert Costa and it is to him that Juan Carlos Ferrero has turned to rejuvenate his career from its relative low of No 26 in the world.

It was a touch odd, during his defeat by Jean-Rene Lisnard here at the Monte Carlo Masters Series event on Tuesday, to see Murray turning to his girlfriend, manager and physical trainer, when they can offer only moral support. The decision to replace Mark Petchey after ten productive months prompted grand debates about why the crunch came — a couple of on-court clashes in Indian Wells last month were the beginning of the end — and it leaves Murray vulnerable at a crucial moment.

The networking has already begun and Perlas would have been a mighty catch. However, Ferrero, the 2003 French Open champion, pounced when Perlas split with Guillermo Coria after a year trying to coax the Argentinian to live up to his talents. Antonio Martínez, who has mentored the 26-year-old Ferrero since he was 9, remains in the background for spiritual guidance.

The player just wanted a different voice offering the daily mantra. “I want to show everybody and especially my new coach that I can be the same as before,” Ferrero, who became No 1 in the world after reaching the 2003 US Open final, said yesterday. “I want new words and new motivation.” Nothing there about changing styles, said to be the sole reason behind Petchey’s departure.

So what is a coach other than, as Brad Gilbert, who has tutored Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick, says, someone to blame when his player loses? They do whatever they can to make their charge comfortable, speak when spoken to, give encouragement at the appropriate moment — coaches invariably nod at their players even when they have made a total hash of a shot — make sure the courtesy car arrives when wanted, scout the opposition and pray their man or woman does not wake up one morning and loathe the sight of them.

Perlas lasted a year before Coria, on whom Murray bases much of his game, responded to a fractured 2005 (two defeats in finals by Rafael Nadal and one grand-slam quarter-final) by dropping him like a stone in favour of José Higueras, another Spaniard who inspired Michael Chang and Jim Courier to their French Open successes. But what can a man in the stands do when, as Coria was against Paul-Henri Mathieu yesterday, his charge is 6-1, 5-1 down and serving like Anna Kournikova at her double fault-ridden worst?

Coria kept shooting glances across and what he got back from Higueras was the sense of calm that finally transported itself into his game. He saved four match points and on his own seventh, nailed a forehand pass to win 1-6, 7-6, 6-4 in two hours and 47 minutes. He could almost forget the 20 double faults. “I hired Higueras especially because I want to get to a higher level,” the world No 9 said. “We are in a period where we’re getting to know each other. We will work through Wimbledon and make another decision. He had very good results as both a player and a coach.”

One player is usually enough to be getting on with, but Riccardo Piatti, of Italy, coaches two — Ivan Ljubicic, the world No 5, and Novak Djokovic, the teenage Serb at No 67 coming of age every bit as swiftly as Murray. “I consider Novak to be one of the top players already. He has more talent at his age than Ivan, but he has to learn about the vision of a professional, he needs to understand ‘the way.’ ” Piatti said. “Like Murray, he needs to make mistakes, to go through all the experiences. They have to be able to control themselves through so many problems. Only that way can they learn.”

Bob Brett, who took over Boris Becker’s stellar career in 1987 and remained until 1991, described his role as “managing the product”. Ion Tiriac, Becker’s manager, had preferred to hire someone with a prodigious playing record, but Becker held sway and chose Brett — “because he wanted commitment and passion, which I had brought to the careers of both John Lloyd and Robert Seguso,” Brett said. “And we just clicked.”

Murray requires that clicking sensation and his own product management. The move for Perlas indicates the likelihood of a return to Latin influences. The Scot spent the best part of three years at the Barcelona academy run by Sergio Casal and Emilio Sánchez, two former professionals, learning the basics of point construction, how hard he would have to work for his pay and they, in turn, found him an excellent pupil. Turning that into gold is the next man’s task, whoever it may be.

WhataQT
04-20-2006, 03:04 PM
Hot Scot tempts Cash
By Leo Schlink
April 20, 2006

ALTHOUGH stung by his experiences as coach of Mark Philippoussis and Greg Rusedski, Pat Cash admits he could be tempted into a mentoring role with volatile Scot Andy Murray.
Cash says he was so badly affected by his dealings with Philippoussis and Rusedski he was convinced he "never wanted to take up a coaching job again".

But Murray's stunning decision to sack English coach Mark Petchey has Queensland-based Cash revising his attitude.

"I admit that I would have to think twice if the opportunity to work with Murray presented itself," Cash said in his London newspaper column.

"Perhaps it's the splash of Celtic blood that flows through my veins, but I can identify with Andy Murray.

"Almost a quarter of a century ago I was the teenage kid with a rebellious streak who was tipped for stardom and became the nation's top player at a young age.

"I was fortunate enough to have almost a second father in my coach Ian Barclay and a committed uncle in Australia captain Neale Fraser. Right now, Murray looks a kid very much on his own."

Murray, who has surged into the top 50 after his first tournament victory, when he beat Lleyton Hewitt in the final in San Jose, California, is regarded as a future major winner and possible world No. 1.

Twelve days ago he was fined $3360 after exploding verbally at officials during Britain's Davis Cup loss to Serbia and Montenegro in Glasgow.

Murray dumped Petchey after agonising over a difference in philosophy on where his coach wanted to make changes in his game.

Cash has warned Murray to be wary of suitors who merely view him as a cash cow.

"Murray and his advisers must be careful because there are a lot of dud coaches out there," Cash said.

"They come out of academies and think they know it all. Just walking around the practice courts and hearing them makes me cringe.

"They just yell slogans at their players like 'Go for it!'. What on Earth does that mean? Look at the real quality players and they had a stable coaching environment in their formative years."

DrJules
04-20-2006, 05:52 PM
Murray should have stayed with Mark.

WhataQT
04-21-2006, 06:18 AM
Murray's camp ponders offer from Bollettieri
By Nick Harris
Published: 21 April 2006

Nick Bollettieri has offered to become part of Andy Murray's coaching team and the veteran American's proposal will be one of several considered as Britain's No 1 tennis player maps out the direction in which he wants to take his career.

Murray, 18, split with his full-time coach, Mark Petchey, last week, after only 10 months together. He cited a "difference of opinion" over his game. Bollettieri, 74, who had a pivotal role in developing the careers of Grand Slam winners including Andre Agassi, Monica Seles and Maria Sharapova at his Florida academy, has already spoken to Murray's mother and mentor, Judy, about some kind of link-up.

Writing in today's Independent, Bollettieri says: "I have something to offer as part of a team." He discounts the possibility of returning to a day-to-day life on tour, but adds: "There can be a role for an older guiding hand to offer advice, perspective, sometimes one-on-one intensive sessions ahead of big events ... it's the job I think I could do for Andy."

Bollettieri made the initial approach to the Murray camp earlier this week. He then spoke to Judy Murray on Wednesday, outlining how he might be able assist Andy Murray's development. The offer will be discussed by the Murray camp in the next few days. They are in no hurry to come to a decision, and Murray is likely to find an interim coach to work with him in the coming weeks before selecting a full-time coach.

Mrs Murray, a long-standing coach herself in Scottish tennis, knows Bollettieri and is familiar with his set-up in Florida. One of her former students, Graeme Dyce, a 16-year-old from Edinburgh, is currently a student at Bollettieri's. Since studying there, Dyce has become the top British youngster, rising as high as No 100 in the junior world rankings.

Bollettieri is not alone in offering assistance to Murray since the parting of the ways with Petchey, and a key factor in whether they work together could be the stance of whoever ends up as Murray's full-time day-to-day coach. It would not be unusual for a coach to want sole control of the player's development, in which case there would be no role for Bollettieri. Another option is for Bollettieri to provide a travelling coach and work as a senior mentor within a team.

One thing is certain, Murray does not lack options, although Tim Henman jokingly ruled himself out yesterday as being too expensive to afford.

Nick Bollettieri has offered to become part of Andy Murray's coaching team and the veteran American's proposal will be one of several considered as Britain's No 1 tennis player maps out the direction in which he wants to take his career.

Murray, 18, split with his full-time coach, Mark Petchey, last week, after only 10 months together. He cited a "difference of opinion" over his game. Bollettieri, 74, who had a pivotal role in developing the careers of Grand Slam winners including Andre Agassi, Monica Seles and Maria Sharapova at his Florida academy, has already spoken to Murray's mother and mentor, Judy, about some kind of link-up.

Writing in today's Independent, Bollettieri says: "I have something to offer as part of a team." He discounts the possibility of returning to a day-to-day life on tour, but adds: "There can be a role for an older guiding hand to offer advice, perspective, sometimes one-on-one intensive sessions ahead of big events ... it's the job I think I could do for Andy."

Bollettieri made the initial approach to the Murray camp earlier this week. He then spoke to Judy Murray on Wednesday, outlining how he might be able assist Andy Murray's development. The offer will be discussed by the Murray camp in the next few days. They are in no hurry to come to a decision, and Murray is likely to find an interim coach to work with him in the coming weeks before selecting a full-time coach.
Mrs Murray, a long-standing coach herself in Scottish tennis, knows Bollettieri and is familiar with his set-up in Florida. One of her former students, Graeme Dyce, a 16-year-old from Edinburgh, is currently a student at Bollettieri's. Since studying there, Dyce has become the top British youngster, rising as high as No 100 in the junior world rankings.

Bollettieri is not alone in offering assistance to Murray since the parting of the ways with Petchey, and a key factor in whether they work together could be the stance of whoever ends up as Murray's full-time day-to-day coach. It would not be unusual for a coach to want sole control of the player's development, in which case there would be no role for Bollettieri. Another option is for Bollettieri to provide a travelling coach and work as a senior mentor within a team.

One thing is certain, Murray does not lack options, although Tim Henman jokingly ruled himself out yesterday as being too expensive to afford.

OddJob
04-21-2006, 09:04 AM
eeeppp Pat Cash wanting to coach Andy :tape: