Yannick Noah's son [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Yannick Noah's son

khyber
12-25-2005, 07:24 PM
I had no idea his son was in the US and playing basketball:

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/13476363.htm

enqvistfan
12-25-2005, 07:26 PM
I had no idea his son was in the US and playing basketball:

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/13476363.htm

Yes, and he has a good level :) A couple days ago, we had a documentary about Noah on tv, and they showed his son, Joakim,, very tall guy !!

betowiec
12-25-2005, 07:28 PM
i have seen him play for Florida, decent player, still young, maybe he will make it to the NBA

uNIVERSE mAN
12-25-2005, 08:01 PM
he sucks

Gonzo Hates Me!
12-26-2005, 01:16 AM
His nephew goes to my university and plays tennis here too. All the girls are obsessed with him. We used to be friends when I worked for the team, but then we got in a dumb fight because I hated Juan Carlos Ferrero and he didn't like me anymore

El Legenda
12-26-2005, 02:20 AM
he sucks

12ppg. 6reb. 2apg,1.7spg,2.1bpg with 63% shooting for a Sophomore is not bad, good shot at NBA.

betowiec
12-26-2005, 02:38 AM
he sucks

I bet you are better :rolleyes:

Pea
12-26-2005, 07:36 AM
His nephew goes to my university and plays tennis here too. All the girls are obsessed with him. We used to be friends when I worked for the team, but then we got in a dumb fight because I hated Juan Carlos Ferrero and he didn't like me anymore

............................

Action Jackson
12-26-2005, 08:16 AM
he sucks

:clap2: :clap2: :clap2:

NaDALiTa
12-27-2005, 01:54 AM
"Yes, and he has a good level A couple days ago, we had a documentary about Noah on tv, and they showed his son, Joakim,, very tall guy !!"

yeah a very good documentary on Noah, but i still think he caught the big head ....... once there were 3 fans who asked him an autograph and he did as if they were ghosts, he didn"t even look at them he took his car and drive away......... :(
he still remain a good player the best ever french player

mojo37_12
12-27-2005, 05:14 AM
he still remain a good player the best ever french player

Unfortunately :yawn:

Marine
12-27-2005, 09:17 AM
"Yes, and he has a good level A couple days ago, we had a documentary about Noah on tv, and they showed his son, Joakim,, very tall guy !!"

yeah a very good documentary on Noah, but i still think he caught the big head ....... once there were 3 fans who asked him an autograph and he did as if they were ghosts, he didn"t even look at them he took his car and drive away......... :(
he still remain a good player the best ever french player

I agree. I saw the documatary, Noak is really a "personnage", he's very charismatic, I like him. But I think sometimes (in french) il s'écoute trop parler, il nous fait toujours le grand sage, un peu trop moralisateur, philosophe, alors qu'il est quand même très flambeur et pas si zen que ça à mon avis. Mais bon, il est ce qu'il est et j'aime bien l'ensemble, j'aime autant le sportif et meneur d'homme que le chanteur, et ça c'est rare. ;)

NaDALiTa
12-27-2005, 02:37 PM
Unfortunately
i hope gasquet will be btr than him :)

pour marine , tu as tout a fait raison , c'est une image qu'il se donne je doute qu'il soit si zen en privée mais bon nous on ne voit que la face publique du personnage et il me plait aussi mais la facon dont il s'est comporté devant mes yeux m'a choqué , quand il y a une camera il est sympa yannick mais en dehors......un peu comme guga d'ailleurs!!!!

Marine
12-27-2005, 03:28 PM
once there were 3 fans who asked him an autograph and he did as if they were ghosts, he didn"t even look at them he took his car and drive away......... :(


It was children ?? Because he said he has never refused an autograph to a kid, he insisted on this point.

Saumon
12-27-2005, 05:14 PM
un peu comme guga d'ailleurs!!!!
c'est vrai pour guga :rolleyes: :o

darrinbaker00
12-27-2005, 07:26 PM
he still remain a good player the best ever french player
I like Yannick Noah as much as the next person, but YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS!! Noah himself will be the first to tell you about four men named Rene Lacoste, Henri Cochet, Jacques Brugnon and Jean Borotra, "The Four Musketeers." At best, Noah is the fifth-best French player ever. ;)

enqvistfan
12-27-2005, 07:47 PM
Unfortunately
i hope gasquet will be btr than him :)
pour marine , tu as tout a fait raison , c'est une image qu'il se donne je doute qu'il soit si zen en privée mais bon nous on ne voit que la face publique du personnage et il me plait aussi mais la facon dont il s'est comporté devant mes yeux m'a choqué , quand il y a une camera il est sympa yannick mais en dehors......un peu comme guga d'ailleurs!!!!

As Marine said, in the documentary, he insisted on the point, that he has never refused to sign an autograph. Well, this documentary was very positive. I have never been a fan of him when he was a player, I didn't like the personality, a bit big head, but this documentary made me change my point of view about him. I won't become a fan of him now though.

Regarding Guga, I saw the same thing once, when there was the camera and not. So, I'm not surprised about what you said

Rosa Luxembourg
12-27-2005, 08:21 PM
Here is his pic

http://www.gatorzone.com/basketball/men/images/bioimg2004/Noah_Joakim.jpg

Saumon
12-27-2005, 08:44 PM
As Marine said, in the documentary, he insisted on the point, that he has never refused to sign an autograph. Well, this documentary was very positive. I have never been a fan of him when he was a player, I didn't like the personality, a bit big head, but this documentary made me change my point of view about him. I won't become a fan of him now though.

the productor of the documentary was his wife, it would have been really surprising if it was negative ;)

and his son looks so much like him :eek:

enqvistfan
12-27-2005, 08:50 PM
the productor of the documentary was his wife, it would have been really surprising if it was negative ;)

and his son looks so much like him :eek:

Yes, I wasn't sure it was his new wife the producer. Thanks for confirming. So, it was a bit biaised. Well, you don't touch the most popular person in France at the moment !! Only positive things. Yes, to come back to the real subject, his son, he's looking like him a lot !!

NaDALiTa
12-28-2005, 11:41 AM
enqvistfan: "As Marine said, in the documentary, he insisted on the point, that he has never refused to sign an autograph."


HE DID IT !!!!!!
moreover i dunno who made this documentary but it was on france 2, hav u ever seen france 2 said something wrong about a player except rafael nadal???? :lol:


to darinbaker00 , actually i was talkin about since the start of the open era (thanx JM :)) !!!!!!!!
but u r rite les mousquetaires are the best french players :)

enqvistfan
12-28-2005, 06:42 PM
enqvistfan: "As Marine said, in the documentary, he insisted on the point, that he has never refused to sign an autograph."

HE DID IT !!!!!!
moreover i dunno who made this documentary but it was on france 2, hav u ever seen france 2 said something wrong about a player except rafael nadal???? :lol:

No problem, i trust you :)
I don't like France TV and especially their commentators. The only one I like is Nelson Montfort, he he !!

NaDALiTa
12-28-2005, 06:58 PM
Nelson Montfort,
i find him funny but not a good commentator :lol: :lol:

Truc
12-28-2005, 07:47 PM
it was on france 2, hav u ever seen france 2 said something wrong about a player except rafael nadal???? :lol: Yes, I have. :o

This is becoming more and more off-topic, maybe we should rather discuss it in the French forum, but: what do they say about Nadal? (I'm French, but I don't live in France anymore.) And are you sure their comments are aimed at Nadal in particular and not against the claycourters in general? Because I know they complain every year about the fact that there are so many Spanish and Argentinian claycourters during the second week in Roland-Garros.

Clara Bow
03-12-2006, 07:07 PM
I am watching the SEC championship game today and it seems like the person operating the camera has a wee bit of a crush on Joakim. They are showing him a whole bunch - not just on the court but during time outs, etc. The announcers are also loving him. And they have also mentioned his father...describing him as a "great" athelete.

I have to admit that Joakim does have a very appealing presence out there on the court- as well as a cute, gangly run. He also seems to be getting better and better as a basketball player as he matures. There is a marked difference imo between him this year as a sophomore and last year as a freshman. And I'm digging the pony tail (http://www.firstcoastnews.com/sports/news-article.aspx?storyid=52949).

ETA- Noah just got the last offensive points and blocked South Carolina's attempt to score up the game and take it into overtime as Florida wins the SEC championship. This kid has talent and Seth Davis said that if he brings his A, A+ game Florida can beat just about anyone in the country (of course, the other top Florida players have to be on their A game as well). Wow!

Anyway- here is a good article on Joakim from the 1/23/06 Sports Illustrated that also mentions his father a lot. He really does seem like a neat kid.




HEADLINE: The Son Also Rises;
Florida center Joakim Noah, who chose a whole different racket from his father, Yannick, has found his own on-court success--and helped the surprising Gators to their best start ever

BYLINE: GRANT WAHL

BODY:


In the cluttered walls of his dorm room--among the Rastafarian flags, his dad's Rolling Stone cover and a traffic-stopping shot of his mom, a former Miss Sweden--Florida center Joakim Noah has tacked up a photograph that represents everything he loves about his native New York City. In it a smiling Shea Stadium vendor is hawking raw tuna to hungry Gotham baseball fans. "That's my favorite," Noah says, admiring the cultural mash-up. "A black guy selling sushi!"

For Noah it's not just a picture. It's a personal mission statement, a daily reminder to embrace the unknown and the unexpected in an increasingly diverse world.

What happens when you cross Yannick Noah, the dreadlocked French-Cameroonian tennis star and pop icon, with his former wife Cecilia Rodhe, a classic Scandinavian blonde model who's now a sculptor? Add the influences of three continents, and you get Joakim (pronounced Jo-a-KEEM), an effervescent 6'11", 227-pound sophomore who displays the same charisma, relentless athleticism and wild hair on the court as his French Open--winning dad once did.

Joakim likes nothing more than to challenge preconceptions, whether the subject is politics, society or basketball--and sure enough, he is having a breakout season that has helped turn No. 2 Florida from an unranked preseason afterthought into the nation's most surprising team.

Through Sunday the 16-0 Gators were off to the best start in school history, due in large part to Noah's 12.0 points and 5.8 rebounds a game. "Not many big men can run as well as he does," says Miami coach Frank Haith, who saw Noah burn his Hurricanes with 18 points, eight boards and six blocks in a 77-67 Gators win last month. "He made key buckets by just outrunning us downcourt."

Unlike Florida's recent outfits, which were often plagued by selfishness, this one has thrived on its chemistry, not least because its four sophomore starters--Noah, wing Corey Brewer, point guard Taurean Green and forward Al Horford (box, page 57)--happen to be best friends who share a campus suite. That closeness helps explain why the Gators were leading the nation in average scoring margin (21.5 points) and were in the top five in field goal percentage (51.8) and assists per game (19.3). "There's a level of trust on our team," says coach Billy Donovan, "where everyone thinks each guy is playing for the right reasons."

In fact, Noah initially balked at being singled out for this story, fearing it might hurt the team's hard-won fraternité. While it's true that he's not the team's most dangerous offensive threat (that would be Green) or even the top NBA prospect in his dorm room (that would be either Horford or Brewer), one thing is certain: Noah is no average Jo. "Unique is the best word to describe him," says Green.

Take Noah's taste in movies. He persuaded the guys to see City of God, a movie about life in a Rio de Janeiro shantytown. "It wasn't even in English," says Brewer, "so we were sitting there trying to read the subtitles. But I actually liked it." Noah recommended Hotel Rwanda, the acclaimed film about that country's 1994 genocide, to assistant coach Anthony Grant and recently asked Donovan to watch Michael Moore's documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 so they could dissect the film afterward. "People think we're ignorant just because we're athletes, but everyone should be able to discuss things," Noah says while listening to the songs of Damian Marley (Bob's son) in his apartment's common room, which he has decorated with African wood masks and a black-and-white portrait of the Eiffel Tower. "Poverty, war, politics: There are so many important issues around the world. You have to be aware, and not just about your own country. If you're rich, think about what it might be like to be poor. Imagine you were a kid living in Iraq. How would your perspective change? You have to listen to different people's ideas, and then yours may change too." While most American players dislike traveling to tournaments abroad and spend their time overseas playing video games and eating at McDonald's, Noah takes the opposite approach. "Travel is the key to having more perspective on where you are," he says.

He has certainly been exposed to some extraordinary things in his 20 years. He had seen the World Trade Center from the windows of his school bus as it passed the buildings on Sept. 11, 2001, then watched, a short time later, the horror unfold on TV with classmates whose parents were in the towers. He's seen poverty-stricken kids in Yaoundé, Cameroon, walking along dirt roads with giant jugs of water balanced on their heads. He's seen the blue-eyed stares in Åsa, his grandparents' Swedish farm town, that greet a 6'11" biracial giant out on a training run. He's seen swarms of Parisian paparazzi, taken baths in remote Maui waterfalls, hung out with dreadlocked Rastas in Guadeloupe.

"Jo's a citizen of the world, and he's very respectful of everybody's culture," says Donovan. "He's always talking about what's in the news. When Katrina hit New Orleans, the next day he was in the office saying, 'We've got to help those people in some way.'"

It's a sentiment that speaks to the influence of Joakim's parents. Yannick was discovered as a tennis prodigy by Arthur Ashe during an African tour in 1971 and left his family at age 12 to train and attend school in Nice. In 1983, at 23, he became the first Frenchman in 37 years to win a championship on the red clay at Roland Garros. Long retired from tennis and now a stadium-filling, Afro-reggae pop star, Yannick is still active in charities that he started in France and in Cameroon. "Joakim is French with African blood, and he was born in America, so he's in between all of this," Yannick says by phone from Paris. "In that situation you always feel for the victims. His sensitivity helps him appreciate not just what we have, but also that it can go away at any moment. He feels at home everywhere, which helps put things in perspective."

"Most interracial children have a basic open-mindedness," says Cecilia, who was a top five finisher at the 1978 Miss Universe pageant and has exhibited her sculptures at the United Nations in New York City and Geneva. "Because of the large bouquet of cultures Joakim has been given, he's very curious."

One pursuit that never sustained his interest was tennis. After spending the first three years of his life in New York City, Joakim moved to Paris with his parents and younger sister, Yelena, in 1988. (Yannick and Cecilia divorced a year later.) One day five-year-old Joakim asked his father to give him a tennis lesson, on the clay courts of the tony Racing Club. It was a disaster. "People were stopping to watch," Joakim recalls, wincing at the memory. "At that stage you just want to have fun. You don't want people comparing you and saying, 'Oh, that's Yannick Noah's son.'" He vowed never to play again.

Besides, Joakim was already consumed with another sport, an obsession that had begun in New York City when Patrick Ewing, one of his father's friends, gave him a minibasketball as a present when he was a toddler. "We used to live in SoHo, and there weren't many parks close by," says Cecilia, "so we took our kids to the basketball courts and let them run. Joakim was only two or three years old, but I remember him saying, 'Mommy, I want to play basketball!' He was entranced by the whole scene."

Joakim's passion for hoops only increased with time, and it was one reason his mother decided to move back to New York with her children in 1998. Joakim soon found a mentor in Tyrone Green, his coach in the Police Athletic League and the man who had helped discover Ron Artest and Chamique Holdsclaw. During the summer, while Cecilia was abroad, Joakim would live with Green in Queens and play ball with him in Brooklyn's rough-and-tumble Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. "It was a different kind of travel," Noah says. "Instead of going on planes, I was taking the E train to tournaments in Jamaica, Queens. It opened up a whole new world, and I saw there was poverty in America, too."

With a work ethic that rivaled his father's at the same age, Noah threw himself into the game, starring at Brooklyn's Poly Prep and then at Lawrenceville Prep, a boarding school outside Princeton, N.J., where he won a state championship his senior season. He improved so much that he went from being the ball boy at the ABCD Camp in Teaneck, N.J., one year to a fast-breaking, shot-swatting, Division I--quality big man the next.

After choosing to attend Florida, he spent a trying freshman season there, averaging just 9.4 minutes and 3.5 points while playing behind David Lee, a future first-round NBA draft pick. But back in New York for the summer, he thrived in the famed Rucker Park league against pros like Artest and Jamaal Tinsley. "I got my swagger back in Harlem," Noah says. He also got a sweet nickname from the Rucker deejay: the Noble One.

From the start of practice in Gainesville last fall, Noah's coaches noticed a change. "Last season Jo couldn't compete up front physically with anybody who had any size," says Donovan. "He still needs to get stronger and shoot the ball better from the perimeter. His greatest attributes are his passing, his emotion and how hard he runs the floor. I don't think Jo will reach his full potential until he's 26 or 27 years old."

In other aspects Noah remains on a different plane from most college players. Consider his stance on religion. Noah often wears a crucifix alongside a necklace of Muslim prayer beads from Senegal--a gift from his mother--and he'll go silent when the Gators say the Lord's Prayer in huddles, opting for his own internal worship instead. "That's just me," he says. "I believe in God, but I won't say that I'm a certain religion. I think I'm a little bit of everything."

Joakim has been influenced by Rastafarianism and the timeless music of Bob Marley, as was his father. Theirs is a complex bond. While they have almost always been separated by thousands of miles--Yannick, who has five children from three relationships, did make it to Joakim's game at Miami last month--they speak by phone every day. "When people say, 'Joakim Noah, the son of Yannick Noah,' it makes me proud," says Joakim. "My father is my best friend."

"I'm very happy that Joakim is working hard and having success doing his own thing," says the elder Noah, who celebrated his induction into the tennis hall of fame in Newport, R.I., last summer with his smiling son at his side. ("I'm not used to feeling like a midget," cracks the 6'4" Yannick.)

In Joakim's dorm room, not far from his treasured photo of the sushi vendor, he keeps a weathered snapshot of a boy and his dad taken many years ago on a trip to Cameroon. Still in diapers, young Joakim is riding on the shoulders of Yannick, who's the picture of cool with a smoldering Gauloise dangling from his fingers.

Now grown, the son is making his own way and even breaking new family ground. For all his memorable triumphs Yannick never rose higher than the No. 3 ranking. As a Gator, Joakim is already No. 2--and on the verge, perhaps, of No. 1.

SI.COM Read more about Florida and Joakim Noah in Grant Wahl's Mailbag at SI.com/collegebasketball.

BOX STORY:

Pro Progeny

In Taurean Green and Al Horford, the Gators have two other players whose fathers were professional athletes

LAST SATURDAY, on a rare January weekend when Indiana didn't have a game, Hoosiers assistant coach Sidney Green finished practice and drove straight to the Bloomington airport. His destination: Gainesville, Fla., where he arrived just in time to see his son, Florida point guard Taurean Green, score 21 points in the Gators' 69-57 victory over Auburn. "I may not get to come back this season, so I really wanted to make it," said the elder Green, who was a second-team All-America forward at UNLV in 1982-83 and went on to have a 10-year NBA career.

Taurean Green and Joakim Noah are two of a trio of Gators whose dads played at the highest level of their respective sports. Sophomore Al Horford's father, Tito, was a 1985 McDonald's All-American who played two seasons at Miami and then spent three years in the NBA before bouncing around several European and South American leagues. Says Tito, "I don't want Al to make the same mistakes I did" by not developing his game. "He's told me to treat every day like I haven't achieved anything yet," says the younger Horford, a 6'9", 235-pound power forward who is already considered a potential NBA lottery pick.

All three fathers maintain that they try not to be overbearing, and their sons say they appreciate their advice. "It's good to have their perspective on the game and what it takes to get to the next level," says Taurean.

While busy schedules have kept the trio of former pro-athlete dads from getting together in the same place at the same time, Sidney Green and Tito Horford were able to compare notes when they sat next to each other at a Florida-Villanova game in Nashville last year. "We had a lot of fun talking about how proud we are of our boys," says the elder Horford, who's now a counselor at a children's home in Lansing, Mich., "and how we hope someday they'll get a chance to play in the NBA like we did."

"When people say, 'Joakim Noah, the SON OF YANNICK NOAH,' it makes me proud," says Joakim. "My father is my best friend."

gusman890
03-12-2006, 08:22 PM
yeah i saw the game, i never saw him play before, it was exciting

Jim Jones
03-13-2006, 02:05 PM
He is taller than Karlovic. Imagine if Dad made him play tennis instead.

sigmagirl91
03-13-2006, 02:05 PM
Joakim looks just like his daddy.

Clara Bow
03-17-2006, 09:15 AM
Nevermind- I am an idiot who can't prevent a duplicate post.

Clara Bow
03-17-2006, 09:16 AM
This boy is amazing. He plays with so much passion- it is great to see. I have become a fan. (And I got my undergrad at Georgia- so that is unusual to say about a UF player,) And ther fact that he has grace with his height!

This kid got first team SEC. He also got MVP of the game today- and deserved it. He is so good to watch on court- a pleasure. :) For those who like college bball- check him out.

Here's another ariticle about this kid.
Noah refuses to slow down, let Florida lose

By BRENT WORONOFF
LOUD AND CLEAR
JACKSONVILLE -- Joakim Noah was not around for Florida's last five years of NCAA tournament futility.

But the sophomore was on the team last year, relegated to the bench late in the season as the games became more and more important. A ball of energy, the 6-foot-11 string bean was a bomb ready to explode.

This year he exploded.

From a freshman who averaged just over nine minutes a game and did not play at all in the Gators' NCAA tournament-opening win against Ohio, Noah has blossomed into a first-team all-SEC selection and arguably the team's MVP.

Florida coach Billy Donovan said he has never had a player who improved so much in one season. Noah has transformed from a freshman who barely had a role into the emotional leader of the team.

Without Noah on Thursday, the Gators could have become a first-round upset victim for the third time in five years.

Lee Humphrey hit 6-of-8 3-pointers on the way to a game-high 20 points, and Al Horford and Corey Brewer also came up big in Florida's 76-50 triumph over South Alabama. But Noah was the Gators' heart and soul, as he has been most of the season.

FROM TEARS TO CHEERS

The son of former tennis pro Yannick Noah scored 16 points, grabbed eight rebounds, distributed seven assists, blocked five shots and even stole the ball three times against the Jaguars.

"If he plays like this every night, we won't lose," backup center Chris Richard said.

Noah has been playing like this every night. While most of his teammates' stats went south in the second half of the season as the competition got tougher, Noah's improved. He has averaged 16.8 points per game in February and March.

His swift rise might have surprised some outsiders. But the Gators always knew it was coming.

"He's never had a bad practice since he's been here," Donovan said.

What you see in games is what the players and coaches have seen every day since Noah first stepped on campus -- perpetual motion, nervous energy, a will to win.

"His improvement is more of a shock to the fans. We always knew what he was capable of doing," Richard said. "Now he has the opportunity to showcase his skills."

Not having that opportunity at the end of last season nearly crippled Noah. During the NCAA regional in Nashville, Noah came to Donovan's hotel room, broke down in tears and begged for a chance to help his teammates on the floor.

The coach assured Noah that his seat on the bench was only temporary.

"It was a shock to him that he was not ready or able to help the team win," Donovan said.

Noah knew he had to pay his dues as a reserve behind senior David Lee. But throughout his freshman year he worked harder than everybody else. Maybe it was just working off the nervous energy.

"When David left I knew my role would change," Noah said. "But that wasn't when I started working harder. I always tried to do more than anyone else -- running extra miles, lifting extra weights, staying after practice and taking extra shots."

His work ethic and hustle on the court were never the problem -- harnessing his enormous energy was.

"Sometimes your greatest strength is your greatest weakness," Donovan said. "Joakim has learned how to think in the game better. He understands his role in our system and what he has to do."

That role has been expanding rapidly.

Seriously, this kid is great :inlove: Call me a bandwagoner or whathave you- but I have become sports smitten with Joakim! He is the real deal.

cobalt60
03-17-2006, 12:01 PM
This boy is amazing. He plays with so much passion- it is great to see. I have become a fan. (And I got my undergrad at Georgia- so that is unusual to say about a UF player,) And ther fact that he has grace with his height!

This kid got first team SEC. He also got MVP of the game today- and deserved it. He is so good to watch on court- a pleasure. :) For those who like college bball- check him out.

Here's another ariticle about this kid.

Seriously, this kid is great :inlove: Call me a bandwagoner or whathave you- but I have become sports smitten with Joakim! He is the real deal.
After reading your first post I happened to catch the highlights of the game on the sports news. I wouldn't have known otherwise about who he was as the announcer never gave a clue about his famous dad. He's got game ;)

amierin
03-17-2006, 12:29 PM
He looks just like his father. Now I'll have to pay attention to Florida.

smucav
03-21-2006, 03:30 AM
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2006/jnoah.aspMARCH MADNESS
March 20, 2006
Noah Emerges From Father's Shadow

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/jnoah.jpg
© Getty Images

Joakim Noah, son of French tennis legend Yannick Noah, continues to make his own mark on the sporting world. Noah, who stands 6' 11'', is one of the hottest players in the American collegiate basketball championships - the NCAA 'March Madness' tournament.

At the weekend Noah led the Florida Gators to the 'Sweet 16' - the last 16 teams of the tournament.

Noah had 17 points and seven rebounds in the Gators' 82-60 win over Wisconsin-Milwaukee, which followed his dominant performance in the Gators' first-round win over South Alabama. In that game Noah had 16 points, eight rebounds, seven assists and five blocks.

Noah's Florida Gators will play Georgetown on Friday in Minneapolis.

Below is a story on Joakim Noah that appeared in the Summer 2005 issue of DEUCE, the ATP's Offiicial Magazine:

Yannick Noah is the proud father of two sons and three daughters, and at least one offspring is following in his father’s athletic footsteps.

Joakim Noah, Yannick’s 7-foot son, is preparing for his sophomore season with the University of Florida basketball team. With his floppy hair and arms and legs that stretch forever, Joakim is completely at home on the basketball court. “Since we were always hanging around the clubs or I was always playing on the tour in those early days, I thought he would naturally start playing tennis,” says Yannick. “But it was always basketball, and I’m glad it was. He didn’t need to grow up playing tennis in some shadow.”

Joakim’s childhood was different from his teammates’. Not only was his father one of the best French tennis players ever, his mother was Cecilia Rodhe, a former Miss Sweden who modeled around the globe and has since become a successful artist. Joakim (pronounced JOE-a-kim) was born in New York but moved to France when he was just 5. After his parents split, Noah and his mother moved back to New York City when he was 13, where he began playing basketball daily.

Noah and his father would still visit each other a few times a year and today they talk on the telephone once or twice a week. “Even though I saw him less and it was hard at times,” Joakim says, “looking back, it all worked for the best.”

Noah’s skills didn’t catch up with his height until his senior year in high school. By then, colleges began taking notice. “[Noah] idolizes his dad, but I think in his own mind, he would like to try to create his own identity as an athlete,” says Florida coach Billy Donovan. “He really wants to achieve his potential. He works extremely hard, always one of the first in the gym and the last to leave."

Because he was a freshman last season, Noah wasn’t slated to receive much playing time, but he still emerged as one of the most vocal and supportive Gators. A bout with mononucleosis sidelined Noah early in the year, but he battled back to average 3.5 points and 2.5 rebounds. He led the Gators in field-goal percentage, shooting at a 60 percent clip.

Around campus he wears baggy clothes that hang from his slim frame. Beads and necklaces dangle from his neck. He’s outspoken, passionate and emotional. “Joakim hates to see injustice of any sort,” says Rodhe. “When he was 5 years old, he would see another kid hitting a tree and jump in front of the tree. ‘Stop, you cannot hurt this tree.’”

And, of course, the fruit doesn’t fall too far from the family tree. A conversation with Noah is like a basketball that won’t stop bouncing. It might start on a basketball court, but eventually it climbs up the gym steps, out the doors, across campus and into the real world. “At the end of the day, all of the things you think are a certain way because some society says it or some government says it or the media says it, that don’t make it the truth,” says Joakim. “Nobody has the truth. You have to go out there and find your own truth.”

That’s what his father did, and that’s what Joakim is doing. Only he’s doing it from a different court.

—Rick Maese

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/joakim_noah.jpg
© Deuce Magazine

NYCtennisfan
03-21-2006, 09:42 AM
His nephew goes to my university and plays tennis here too. All the girls are obsessed with him. We used to be friends when I worked for the team, but then we got in a dumb fight because I hated Juan Carlos Ferrero and he didn't like me anymore

LMAO!!

Clara Bow
03-22-2006, 03:03 AM
Boy, his stock continues to rise.

He has been mentioned as one of the most impressive players of the first rounds of the tournament, is now seen as a potential high number draft lottery pick should he decide to go for it (I think he will stay in school) and is now on his region's cover (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/magazine/cover/) of Sports Illustrated.

I wonder if Yannick will be in Minneapolis to see the regionals, and if Florida makes it to the Final Four he will go to Indy?

Sorry, sorry- I know this is a tennis board. Must...quit...gushing. ;)

Action Jackson
03-22-2006, 05:33 AM
Good to see Joakim is making progress in his chosen field and the correct pronounciation is Yoa-keem, and not pronounced with the j sound in English.

Clara Bow
03-22-2006, 05:43 AM
Good to see Joakim is making progress in his chosen field and the correct pronounciation is Yoa-keem, and not pronounced with the j sound in English.

That's what I assumed when I first read his name. But the announcers always pronounce it with the "J" - and his nickname is "Jo" so maybe he pronounces it oddly. Or maybe he just gave up on correcting people when he moved back to the States.

Action Jackson
03-22-2006, 05:45 AM
That's what I assumed when I first read his name. But the announcers always pronounce it with the "J" - and his nickname is "Jo" so maybe he pronounces it oddly. Or maybe he just gave up on correcting people when he moved back to the States.

He is so used to it, that you are more than likely right in that he can't be bothered with trying to correct people.

smucav
03-31-2006, 12:07 AM
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2006/jnoah2.aspMARCH MADNESS
March 29, 2006
Noah Eyes NCAA Championship Title, MVP Award

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/noah_si.jpg
© Sports Illustrated

Joakim Noah, son of 1983 Roland Garros champion and former world No. 3 Yannick Noah, remains on track to claim one of the highest honors in college sports as he leads the Florida Gators into the final weekend of the NCAA basketball tournament. Noah has led the Florida Gators to the Final Four for the first time since 2000 and on Saturday the team will play George Mason for a place in the final of the tournament.

Noah, at 6' 11'', has literally and figuratively been the Gators' stand-out player during 'March Madness' and should the team go all the way to the NCAA title, he will be in strong contention to win the tournament's coveted MVP award. Last weekend in Minneapolis Noah won the regional Most Outstanding Player award when, in two games against Villanova and Georgetown, he amassed 36 points, 25 rebounds and 10 blocks. Not bad for a sophomore who last year saw just two minutes of court time during the NCAA tournament.

After his dominant performance against Villanova - in which he had 21 points, 15 rebounds and five blocks - Noah spoke to his father in France via cell phone while cutting down the net. "He felt the vibes. He was hyped, and it's like 4 in the morning over there." Noah blew kisses to his mother, Cecilia Rodhe, the 1978 Miss Sweden winner, who attended both victories. "There's no feeling like winning and having my mother here and I'm talking to my dad on the phone," Noah said. "My sister is over in France excited for me. Everybody is excited. But now we have to be humble. The journey is not over."

Such is Noah's celebrity that he was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated, an honor never bestowed upon his father, even after his Grand Slam triumph.

Noah is one of three players on the Gators' team with famous sporting fathers. Al Horford's father Tito played for the Washington Bullets and Milwaukee Bucks and Taurean Green's father Sidney was a marquee college player for Nevada-Las Vegas.

smucav
03-31-2006, 12:18 AM
But the announcers always pronounce it with the "J" - and his nickname is "Jo" so maybe he pronounces it oddly.Noah himself pronounces it with the J. He's in a commerical for the NCAA that's been running during the tournament & he introduces himself as JOE-a-kim Noah; also during one of the games his mother was interviewed in the stands & she referred to him as Jo (with a J).

Also:
http://www.gatorzone.com/basketball/men/bios.php#coaches

NYCtennisfan
03-31-2006, 01:57 AM
This kid has come out of basically nowhere to a lot of talk that he could be in the top 5 of the NBA draft. He shows an amazing nimbleness and fluidity of movement at 6-10/6-11 and can finish with either hand. He has that unconventional screwdriver shot, but that hasn't stopped him from being a pretty good free throw shooter.

Looks like the Noah name will live on in sport. :)

NYCtennisfan
03-31-2006, 01:58 AM
Noah himself pronounces it with the J. He's in a commerical for the NCAA that's been running during the tournament & he introduces himself as JOE-a-kim Noah; also during one of the games his mother was interviewed in the stands & she referred to him as Jo (with a J).

Yep. I thought it was Yoa-keem until I heard him saying his name.

Clara Bow
03-31-2006, 04:32 AM
I have been watching college basketball for about as long as I have been watching tennis (which I started watching as a wee tot)- and I have to say that I have never seen any player make the ascendency in a one year span as Joakim has. From playing two minutes total in the first two games combined of Florida's run last year to being named MVP of his regional this year. He is growing as a player so expodentialy. That is nuts. He just has such a feel- that is so unusual for his size. The Villanova coach attributed to his father's genetics after the Elite 8 game this year and alluded to the fact that Noah's swift and great movement is something that his father had on the tennis court.

A lot of the press has been charmed by Joakim- for example, from Pat Forde of ESPN

It seems ludicrous now. As we watch the ponytailed rasta boy of celebrity lineage bounce and glide and soar and scream and pound his chest and hug his teammates and shower his charm all over America, is it really possible that this kid was barely worth noticing a year ago?

From nobody to Noah! Starlet of March Madness!

Hard to believe, but true.

Actually, it's only partly true. Joakim Noah was only a basketball nobody before this season. Everything else about him -- the bushy ball of hair, the cross-cultural combo platter of arresting features, the multilingual skills, the tennis-star dad and beauty-pageant mom, the extrovert's personality, the wide-angle worldview, the very fact he's 6-foot-11 -- commands attention.

Noah has exploded into the minds of NBA scouts with his March rampage.
Those traits will continue to get him plenty of attention this week, leading up to the Final Four, but so will his game. Noah is no longer just an interesting human who rarely took off his blue-and-orange Florida warm-ups. He's an interesting human who is positively blowing up as a basketball player, before our wondering eyes.

"The Gator boys are hot right now," Noah said in Minneapolis, after the Gator boys had cut Villanova down to size and cut down the Metrodome nets.

That's true. But this Gator boy is habanero hot.

The sophomore power forward has become the leading man on a team that rejected having such an animal all season. This Florida bunch has succeeded where recent predecessors have failed in large part because of the cohesion, the chemistry and the statistical parity of its wonderful four-man sophomore class.

That's a fine working premise in the locker room. But outside it, Noah's ascendancy cannot be ignored.

NBA scouts have gone from bored to intrigued to enamored with the guy, shooting him up to presumed lottery pick status if he were to come out this spring. Scuttlebutt in the Metrodome last week was that some scouts altered travel plans to attend an international tournament so that they could catch Noah's act in person against Georgetown's 7-foot-2 center Roy Hibbert.

They watched the lithe and athletic big man do his KG-on-training-wheels thing in KG's town, racking up 36 points, 25 rebounds and 10 blocked shots in two games to walk off as the Minneapolis Regional's Most Outstanding Player. His NCAA Tournament averages are 17.3 points, 10 rebounds, 4.8 blocks, 3.5 assists and 1.5 steals per game. Talk about raising your game, right on cue.

"This is what it's all about," Noah said. "This is what we fight for, this is what we strive for. This is the big test. … This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity."

Remember, this is a guy who was the No. 75 high school senior in America according to Rivals.com -- right between Chamberlain Oguchi and Justin Cerasoli -- and No. 68 according to Scout.com. And that was only after Noah had a productive senior season and a breakout performance at the adidas camp the previous summer.

Prior to that, there were a few wishful Ivy League schools that thought they might end up with the kid.

Last season Noah averaged nine minutes and 3.5 points per game, and by season's end he hardly was getting off the bench at all. He played two scoreless minutes in the 2005 NCAA Tournament.

Even after moving into the starting lineup this season, Noah ranks last among the starters in minutes played per game. But that's been steadily changing.

He played 30 minutes or more just once in the first 24 games of the season. He's gone that much in nine of the last 13 games, including every outing this NCAA Tournament.

After not even registering last March, Noah is right there alongside George Mason and Big Baby Davis as the tournament's leading men.

"He is fun to watch," said Georgetown coach John Thompson III. "Just the energy and enthusiasm he plays this game with, the caring that you can see that he has because of how he handles himself and how he works. It is tremendous."

Noah is the anti-Husky. While Connecticut's players toiled with no apparent joy this postseason, Noah has been hopping around like a kid who just chugged three Red Bulls and burst through the front gates of Disney World for the first time.

"I've always played with passion," Noah said. "Even last year when I played four minutes a game, I had passion. It's nothing new."

That showman's passion, in the estimation of longtime Gainesville Sun columnist Pat Dooley, helps makes Noah the most popular Florida basketball player. Ever.

"The two most important people in my 4-year-old daughter's life right now are Joakim Noah and Albert (the alligator mascot)," Dooley said.

That sort of celebrity is not new to someone who grew up in a performer's family. Father Yannick, a demonstrative tennis star with his own famous head of hair, won the French Open and was a national hero in that country and in Cameroon, where he has roots. Mother Cecilia Rodhe is a former Miss Sweden, a Miss Universe finalist and a renowned sculptor.

But those are all very individual pursuits. Joakim gravitated to team sports, soccer and basketball, as he grew up in France. As much as he enjoys the attention of a crowd, Noah is acutely aware of the importance of group dynamics.

He digs the Child of the World thing that has grown up around him. In Minneapolis, he was happy to talk about growing up in France, speaking French and being nicknamed "Frenchy," "French Fry" and "French Toast" by John Thompson Jr. at Georgetown's basketball camp. He talked about his visits to Cameroon. He said he knows some Swedish, courtesy of his mother. He talked glowingly about his New York roots, playing in the summers at Rucker Park and in Hell's Kitchen. Said he had Bob Marley, one of his heroes, on his iTunes.

But the more questions he got about his NBA potential and burgeoning star status, the more he squirmed.

"I can't care about things like that right now," Noah said. "All this attention for me right now, there's nothing positive that can come out of it. … Right now, it's all about Florida basketball. These are my brothers. We've been going to war together all season. That would be so selfish of me to be thinking about something else right now, like going to the NBA.

"It's very flattering, but at the end of the day you've still got to go to the gym and get better. Is it harder for a kid to go to the gym who's got nothing and is hungry? Or is it harder to go to the gym when everybody's patting you on the back?"

Joakim Noah must get used to the back pats now. There's no avoiding them. The quality of his play has caught up to the quality of his personal story, and that combination has made him a March star.

NATAS81
03-31-2006, 05:46 AM
For the last time, it's Yoahkeem Noah. Well if he wants to divert his image to worldwide constraints then he would alter it.

SwissMister1
03-31-2006, 05:58 AM
As funny as it would be to see Yannick run on to the floor and start singing "Saga Africa" when the Gators win the title, I'm still rooting for George Mason :)

NATAS81
03-31-2006, 06:00 AM
Florida and GM are the two who play best as a team.

BAMJ6
04-02-2006, 03:41 AM
Noah's kid is one win away from equaling/maybe overshadowing Dad's French Open win

bad gambler
04-02-2006, 04:07 AM
Noah's kid is one win away from equaling/maybe overshadowing Dad's French Open win


Perhaps only from an American perspective

NYCtennisfan
04-02-2006, 04:10 AM
If UF does wind up winning the championship, Noah will probably make himself eligible for the NBA draft and be a top 5 pick. This guy has come out of nowhere.

PaulieM
04-02-2006, 04:17 AM
Perhaps only from an American perspective
no not even from an american perspective. :p there's just no way that NCAA championship>slam. :rolleyes:

njnetswill
04-02-2006, 07:38 AM
no not even from an american perspective. :p there's just no way that NCAA championship>slam. :rolleyes:

Well not in the world of sports...but he is certainly more famous than his dad right now. ;)

Fedex
04-02-2006, 10:23 AM
I had no idea his son was in the US and playing basketball:

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/13476363.htm
Yes and he's quite good too, though he should be good at basketball for a guy who is 6-11.

David Kenzie
04-02-2006, 10:43 AM
Well not in the world of sports...but he is certainly more famous than his dad right now. ;)
No way is he more famous outside the US.

delsa
04-02-2006, 12:08 PM
No way is he more famous outside the US.
Absolutely. :p

Yannick is the French favorite's sportsman (yes! in front of Zizou who always dominated it). Tonton Yannick's point of view is asked on everything from politics to cuisine, whatever by the media and he's listened to as if he was a living God. :cool:

If he pronounces it the French way like his father does, it's Joe-akim. ;)
If he pronounces it the Swedish way to please his mother, it's Yoa-kim. That way everybody's pleased. ;)

There has been lots of reports, articles, tv stuff about Joakim since about 3 months ago here. That's a bit getting too much. :rolleyes:

We began seing about him during last years RG because his father was working with Mauresmo and he was with him. Each time there was a report on Mauresmo he was around. He said he was some kind of "body guard" for her and his father at the time! :lol: Momo and him were joking with each other etc...He seemed like a nice, funny and endearing guy. :D

Here's a pic.

http://img162.imageshack.us/img162/7603/joachimnoahescortemomo0zc.th.jpg (http://img162.imageshack.us/my.php?image=joachimnoahescortemomo0zc.jpg)

NATAS81
04-02-2006, 12:13 PM
That is some incredible odds to be 6'11" (210cm - I rounded Karlovic's height. Too busy to look for a converter) when your dad was 6'4" (193cm). Then again I don't know his mom's height but I have a feeling I am about to find out.

radics
04-02-2006, 01:30 PM
Absolutely. :p

Yannick is the French favorite's sportsman (yes! in front of Zizou who always dominated it). Tonton Yannick's point of view is asked on everything from politics to cuisine, whatever by the media and he's listened to as if he was a living God. :cool:

If he pronounces it the French way like his father does, it's Joe-akim. ;)
If he pronounces it the Swedish way to please his mother, it's Yoa-kim. That way everybody's pleased. ;)

There has been lots of reports, articles, tv stuff about Joakim since about 3 months ago here. That's a bit getting too much. :rolleyes:

We began seing about him during last years RG because his father was working with Mauresmo and he was with him. Each time there was a report on Mauresmo he was around. He said he was some kind of "body guard" for her and his father at the time! :lol: Momo and him were joking with each other etc...He seemed like a nice, funny and endearing guy. :D

Here's a pic.

http://img162.imageshack.us/img162/7603/joachimnoahescortemomo0zc.th.jpg (http://img162.imageshack.us/my.php?image=joachimnoahescortemomo0zc.jpg)

lol, but that's a bad picture. :unsure:

He looks like "Hey baby, come to daddy" and she looks like "Oh no, not this guy again, leave me alone!"

Saumon
04-02-2006, 05:31 PM
did you know that he doesnt even have the french citizenship? :eek:

almouchie
04-02-2006, 07:15 PM
he is getting this much attention beocz he is Noah's son
needs to earn it first
he may be good but still has a lot to do

Clara Bow
04-02-2006, 08:27 PM
he is getting this much attention beocz he is Noah's son
needs to earn it first

I disagree. Here in the States he is getting the attention mainly for being a very good basketball player- who has been MVP of several tournament games, can play both offense and defense, moves better than almost all big men of his height, and has improved a phenomenal amount in the past year. He could very well end up being MVP of the whole tournament if Florida wins the championship game tomorrow. And that title would have been earned- not given because of his dad.

I think he is earning his kudos. And believe me- the praise that he is receiving in the US press about his skills as a basketball player is most often given by folks who don't give a whit who his father is or tennis.