Becker: Andre should retire. [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Becker: Andre should retire.

Stevens Point
09-13-2005, 12:42 PM
Boris Becker writes in this German paper "Handelsblatt" that he thinks that Andre should retire now. The sentences in bold are translated into English by me after the quote.

To understand why exactly Becker thinks so, you should read the whole article, but unfortunately I don't have enough time to translate the whole thing. Someone might be kind enough to do it... :) :worship:

Warum Andre Agassi zurücktreten sollte

Andre, mach Schluss!

Von Boris Becker

Einen Penny für Deine Gedanken, heißt es doch so schön. Ich würde heute gerne die Gedanken von Andre Agassi lesen können. Der Bursche spielt mit 35 Jahren ein fantastisches Tennis, quält sich bei den US Open drei Mal gegen deutlich jüngere Spieler durch fünf Sätze und verliert am Ende nach großartigem Kampf gegen das Ausnahmetalent Roger Federer. Ich möchte fast wetten, dass Andre dieses eine Mal ein bisschen Bammel vorm Sieg hatte. Denn er wusste genau: Wenn er gewinnt, muss er das Tennis an den Nagel hängen, seine Karriere beenden – denn einen besseren Zeitpunkt, die Bühne zu verlassen hätte es nicht gegeben. Das ist ihm bestimmt während des Matches nicht aus dem Kopf gegangen. Denn er war doch ganz nah dran, Federer zu schlagen. Als Andre dem Schweizer im dritten Satz den Aufschlag abnahm, da hatte er ihn eigentlich schon in die Knie gezwungen.

Nun, vielleicht verrät Andre mir irgendwann einmal, ob er wirklich Angst vorm Aufhören hatte. Sicher bin ich mir allerdings, dass er sich so einen schönen Abgang wünscht, wie sein großer Rivale Pete Sampras ihn hatte. Sampras hatte Agassi im Finale von Flushing Meadows in New York 2002 besiegt und dann 14 Tage später seinen Rücktritt erklärt. Genau so – mit einem Sieg bei dem Grand-Slam-Turnier vor heimischen Publikum – will oder wollte Andre abtreten.

Nun hat es nicht geklappt mit dem Traum vom US-Open Sieg. Doch wenn ich Andre etwas raten darf, dann würde ich ihm empfehlen, trotz der Niederlage jetzt zurückzutreten. Er hat eine so unglaubliche Leistung in den vergangenen 14 Tagen gezeigt, dass es mehr als fraglich ist, ob er die in einem Jahr in New York noch einmal wiederholen kann. Er wäre dann 36 Jahre alt, zum 21. Mal in New York dabei und ob sein Körper die Strapazen dann noch einmal mitmacht, wage ich fast zu bezweifeln. Deshalb sollte er sich jetzt zurückziehen. Einen besseren Zeitpunkt wird es für ihn nicht mehr geben. Und ich bin mir sicher, dass ihm genau diese Gedanken gerade im Kopf herum gehen. Einen Penny ...

HANDELSBLATT, Dienstag, 13. September 2005, 07:01 Uhr

"If I was allowed to advise Andre, despite of the loss (in the final) I would recommend him to retire now. He showed such an incredible performance during the last 14 days, and it is more than doubtful if he can repeat like that in a year in New York again. He will be then 36 years old, and it is going to be his 21st appearance in New York. I am doubting that his body can produce such an exertion one more time. Therefore he should retire now. There won't be a better time for him anymore. And I am sure that these thoughts are also going through his mind now."

gk_891
09-13-2005, 12:49 PM
He could be right. This might very well be the best way to go out. Steffi did that by winning the French getting to the finals of Wimbledon. But if Andre feels like he can produce more great tennis, that's his choice.

Purple Rainbow
09-13-2005, 01:00 PM
Though I agree with Boris Becker, I also think it would be a sign of respect not to talk about other player's retirements publicly.

Neely
09-13-2005, 01:13 PM
I don't think at all it's disrespectful to speculate about the retirement.
Becker is right what he says, but I guess it's too hard for Andre to retire because he feels he has still too much left? We will see...

thrust
09-13-2005, 02:49 PM
I agree with Purple Rainbow.

R.Federer
09-13-2005, 02:52 PM
Becker also has said this about Pete Sampras when Pete has lost to George Bastl, saying "He should retire now, it is sad sight to see 13 time Grand Slam champion on the side of the court reading encouragement notes from wife"
Then Pete wins USO and Becker shut up :)

Carlita
09-13-2005, 03:04 PM
People have been asking Andre when he'll retire for 5-6 years now!! (they have now started with Carlos, who turned 29 :rolleyes: )

It might be a good idea to stop when you still are successfull....then again, if Andre still likes it, his body is agreeing :lol: and he can still beat the younger guys...

There's no law/rule that says you have to stop at 30 :(

LET HIM PLAY!!! Shut it Boris! If Andre wants to quit, he'll tell the world! I hate speculations....will he quit now...will he stay till the Masters... :ras: Maybe he wants to play till he's 50! If he's still happy and good at his "job" I hope he stays around!

Andre, you rule! :yeah:

Neely
09-13-2005, 03:12 PM
I think Becker himself would have wished a more succesful retirement (reaching a last Wimbledon final for him would have been a total dream I guess), but he also knows how hard it is to stop playing.

joycomesmorning
09-13-2005, 03:31 PM
I just finished reading Becker's book, "The Player."

What an ego!

Now I don't dislike Becker...he was one of the "charisma giants" who could play the game as well as relate to the crowds....GREAT for tennis

But the man seems to have had trouble finding just what he should be doing ... and when.... He actually relates in his autobiography that on the night in Wimbledon (in 1999) after he lost to Rafter that after he spent some time with the "boys" he went home to his family, already half-tanked...got into a fight with his very pregnant wife....

She had labor pains...and a friend took her to the hospital (turned out to be a false labor...but she was in the hospital overnight)...and all the while, Becker went out "on the prowl" and met up with his infamous closet mistress for a quickie... Oh BTW, he did manage to make a telephone call to the hospital to check on his wife somewhere between the scotch and zipping up his pants.

Are you kidding me!!! This guy is giving other people ADVICE about their life decisions!!!!!

Becker also relates that he thought he thought he might "get off" on the tax issues (and even deserved to) because of how much he had done for the economy of his country just by being, well, Boris Becker!!! ENOUGH!!!

When Andre is ready to retire he will...I'm old enough to remember calls for Agassi to hang it up in 1991 (he was 21 years old)...1993 (after he lost first round in the US Open to Enqvist...BIG TIME in 1997 . . .again massive calls for his retirement in early 1999 after he lost to journeyman Spadea in the Australian Open (fourth round)...

He was "done" in 2000 when he flamed out in the US Open (when his mom and sister were ill)...when he went home without playing a round in the 2002 Australian (P-Mac prounounced that Andre would never play another match)...various points throughout 2004... and it's the first question he is asked at every interview in 2005!!

I think he GETS IT!!!!Check out Selena Roberts article (NY TIMES September 12)...she states clearly and emphatically that Agassi is not His Smugness Pete Sampras who was looking for a glorious exit...this is Everyman, lunchpail Agassi who is looking for a way to continue playing....

He told us, when he's ready, he will. He has surrounded himself with people in Reyes and Rogers and Cahill and of course Steffi) who not only care about his career...they care about him.

A retirement press conference may not be far off...the end of the year or certainly sometime next year...and I hope he agrees to a big goodbye party in New York...even if it's in the nosebleed section...or in Armstrong on closed circuit TV, I want to be there to hear the love!!!

jcm

uNIVERSE mAN
09-13-2005, 03:56 PM
Becker was finished as a top player at 24. He's just jealous that his longevity/consistency was nowhere near Agassi's.

mishar
09-13-2005, 04:01 PM
If Agassi doesn't want to stop, he shouldn't stop. Going off in a blaze of glory is not all that matters in life. If he enjoys the challenge still and the competition, why not? He's still capable obviously of winning smaller tournaments, making a lot of money. He's a huge draw for the game of tennis, whereever he goes, so it's good for the game that he stays. And he might look at this tournament and say what if Federer were to get injured or lose early at one GS next year? Andre would definitely be one of the favorites to win in his place (on hard courts especially.)

Stevens Point
09-13-2005, 04:09 PM
And this is from Agassi's side.

from www.si.com

And what of Agassi's future? Will he keep playing? Is there a ninth major title to be won after coming so close before losing to Federer in four sets on Sunday?

Agassi, 35, said he will decide at year's end whether to play on, taking into consideration his fragile back, the sciatic pain he's dealt with, and the toll traveling takes on his family life with wife Steffi Graf, their son and daughter.

"If I felt it was compromising my family too much, that would be a factor," he said. "If I felt like, physically, I just couldn't come out here with the hope of making the best play the best, that would be a factor."

Agassi's trainer and good friend, Gil Reyes, knows that Agassi will have to find ways to keep playing other than taking more cortisone shots in the spine. He had four this year, one more than is usually advised by doctors. His last shot was just before the U.S. Open. Surgery or some less invasive procedure is a possibility to repair the herniated disc or correct a condition called stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal column. Former football player Joe Montana had such surgery and returned to the field within months.

"We can't depend on the cortisone shots," Reyes said. "There was something transitional about that period that cortisone was appropriate. We had to pull him off a career ending state of mind. It's too fragile an option and certainly a risky option."

Reyes said Agassi considered ending his career when the sciatica flared up in the first round of the French Open.

"Yes, it sure seemed that way," Reyes said. "The sad fact of the matter is that, at 35, we don't really have the luxury of healing time."

Denaon
09-13-2005, 04:17 PM
I think the only one that should advice Andre to retire is Steffi ;)

vogus
09-13-2005, 04:32 PM
Becker was finished as a top player at 24. He's just jealous that his longevity/consistency was nowhere near Agassi's.



exactly, Becker won his last Wimbledon at age 21, he is a jealous whining bitch, and he hates Andre for all the success he has had and is still having, 10 years after Becker played his last GS final. This is the last person Andre needs to listen to. I'm looking forward to seeing Aggy at least one more time at the USO.

irma
09-13-2005, 04:39 PM
Boris B is really a great advisor of retirement. I mean he handled the last day of his career so incredible well :rolleyes:

Margy
09-13-2005, 05:03 PM
I think the only one that should advice Andre to retire is Steffi ;)

I agree. At this point in his life, i'm sure that family means more to him than playing to any indefinite point in time or winning any random tournament. As long as he can pick and choose which events he is physically up to playing level for and sit out the rest, then he as the physical ability to keep going for some time. What may force a decision is when his kids reach the age where Steffi will have commitments involving them with their school and activities which will keep her from accompanying him as he travels. At that point, I bet he'll look more seriously at calling it quits. And that will be a family decision that they will make together.

irma
09-13-2005, 05:08 PM
I guess Jaden will go to school next year? (not sure when American children go to school, but here it's when you are 4)

niko
09-13-2005, 05:35 PM
I guess Jaden will go to school next year? (not sure when American children go to school, but here it's when you are 4)
Where? :confused:

irma
09-13-2005, 05:41 PM
In the Netherlands. When you are 4 you are going to group 1

Lee
09-13-2005, 05:46 PM
Becker also has said this about Pete Sampras when Pete has lost to George Bastl, saying "He should retire now, it is sad sight to see 13 time Grand Slam champion on the side of the court reading encouragement notes from wife"

Not surprising from someone who knows nothing about relationship, married life or family life.

Then Pete wins USO and Becker shut up :)

I believed one of the reasons that Pete was so determined to win one more Slam was to shut up all the critics on his wife.

Lee
09-13-2005, 05:50 PM
I think he GETS IT!!!!Check out Selena Roberts article (NY TIMES September 12)...she states clearly and emphatically that Agassi is not His Smugness Pete Sampras who was looking for a glorious exit...this is Everyman, lunchpail Agassi who is looking for a way to continue playing....


:lol: Selena Roberts knows all the players very well and extremely objective in her articles. Don't forget to read her article about Lleyton Hewitt too :p :rolleyes:

Lee
09-13-2005, 05:51 PM
And back to the topic, Agassi should retire whenever he wants to, feels like to, etc etc etc.

alfonsojose
09-13-2005, 05:58 PM
Boris, shut up and take care of your dick. No more broom made babies :tape:

musefanatic
09-13-2005, 08:08 PM
lol alfonsojose!!!! I think Andre should keep going until he either feels he doesn't want to continue or it is physically impossible for him to play. I personally hope he can continue for a bit longer

AgassiFan
09-14-2005, 03:23 AM
Boris is a lesbian

YoursTruly
09-14-2005, 03:34 AM
I think Becker does have a point that Andre's great run at the US Open 2005 was so unbelievable that it is rare to produce something like that again, that he should go out this way and retire. BUT, I don't agree with him making an article out of saying Andre should retire and for making the decision for Andre. Who knows? This is not some other player we're talking about. We're talking about Andre Agassi. The one who has looked so down and out many times now and then stuns everyone by coming back in historic ways.

And I think that even more that Becker shouldn't be talking this way because he has no credibility on this subject as he ruined his retirement (and himself) by ending up in some trashy broom closet acting like a hog.

Tennis Fool
09-14-2005, 03:59 AM
Question: Do you think Chang should have retired when he wanted?

R.Federer
09-14-2005, 04:04 AM
Question: Do you think Chang should have retired when he wanted?

He did, didn't he?

There is a double standard here. Chang was no longer considered champion type by the mid 1990s or little later, so no one used the excuse of needing to see him retire with a Big Win.

However, Pete and andre and others are/were winning or reaching deep ends of the draws and so there is perception of these as "champions" who journalists or Becker or others do not want to see leave suddenly after a R1 or R2 type loss.

Ays25
09-14-2005, 04:20 AM
Becker was finished as a top player at 24. He's just jealous that his longevity/consistency was nowhere near Agassi's.

becker wasn on top of his form untill he was 30, end of 1996 the year he won
his last major and ranked 2 behind pete
he is one of 3 great players of the 80s to 2000s along with pete and andre, all three are above federer for sure.

and about his idea for andre to retire.. i love to see andre play, he is the last great of tennis remaining. so for once boris is miles wrong

AgassiFan
09-14-2005, 04:42 AM
he is one of 3 great players of the 80s to 2000s along with pete and andre, all three are above federer for sure

Federer is not even in his prime yet - not completely unflappable yet; serve, backhand, volleying all will be better before it's said and done - and most tennis experts already consider him in the same boat as Pete and ABOVE Agassi and Becker.

By the time he's done 10 years from now, he will have a CALENDAR Grand Slam and at least 12-14 total Slams, more realistically 15+. Greatest since Laver, and we know he would blow Laver off the court head to head.

Only a major injury can stop him.

NYCtennisfan
09-14-2005, 05:29 AM
I don't think Andre is going to have a better chance of winning another slam so I think this is the high point. ON the other hand, he is easily one of the 6 best players in the world right now so it would be hard to walk away knowing that you still had some good tennis left in you.

Federerhingis
09-14-2005, 06:00 AM
In the Netherlands. When you are 4 you are going to group 1

Its the same in latin-america too. Actually now they start them as young as three as long as they can mumble more than the mere mama and papa. It was such a dissappointment for me when I first emigrated into the US and not being able to start school right away at the age of five.

All kindegartenners had to be six back in 1988, I dont know how it works now. I had already been through kindergarten in my native country, it was so boring doing it all over again, "oh lets do the alphabet again, a is for apple" I mean get a grip. Anyway off topic, I just get a little bitter had it not been for this I would have been in graduate school by now.

JazzGurl
09-14-2005, 06:15 AM
On one hand, people can say that it may not get any better than this for him, and therefore this would be the most ideal time to get out... And as far as him possibly doing no better than he has done, that COULD very well be true. On the other hand, I never sensed from Andre that tennis was about the glory to him or about how much he can win. It always seemed to me that he plays because he truly has a love for the game itself and it gives him joy. IF he was the sort of player that NEEDS to be on top and go out with a bang or on top, maybe this would be the time to go... but IF he is the way I think he is, and this is more about his desire to play as much as he can for as long as he can because he LOVES the game, then he should keep playing! I wish people would just leave him be about the issue and let his own sensibilities and reasonings rule him.. Noone knows his heart or the way he feels about the game and what it means to him EXCEPT for him... So he will say when it's time to go and people should stop trying to do it for him.. Just my opinion...

AgassiFan
09-14-2005, 06:15 AM
I don't think Andre is going to have a better chance of winning another slam .

Why not? ReboundAce is his best surface; many top players are not in their peak shape in January; and unlike the USO which Andre only had a few weeks to prepare, he will have months to rest his back before the Aussie Open and still get into playing shape.

As long as Federer is in the draw, it will be tough for ANYONE to win a Slam on hardcourt from here on out. But you never know - one mis-step on court or a particularly ill-advised fucking position Mirka insisted on - and Fed may go out of action for a few weeks/months, meaning the Slams are once again open for business. ;)

Experimentee
09-14-2005, 04:01 PM
Going out on a huge win is overrated anyway. Let Andre retire when he feels its time, not because other people want him to.

RogerRocks
09-14-2005, 04:05 PM
Becker should retire from speaking to the media :o

alfonsojose
09-14-2005, 04:06 PM
IF U.S. is back to the world group, he could wait to next year first round match. Who knows if they have to play the argies in Buenos Aires. On clay, he could beat Coria, Nalbandian and anyone. What a retirement :baby: ;)

skel1983
09-14-2005, 04:18 PM
becker wasn on top of his form untill he was 30, end of 1996 the year he won
his last major and ranked 2 behind pete
he is one of 3 great players of the 80s to 2000s along with pete and andre, all three are above federer for sure.

and about his idea for andre to retire.. i love to see andre play, he is the last great of tennis remaining. so for once boris is miles wrong


All three are above Federer??????????????????

WHAT!! Agassi is two majors ahead of him and Federer has been in his element for 2 years, have you seen Federers record this year he is breaking record after record after record!!!

Sampras is the only one of the three you could say is above Federer at this moment in time but that is because Federer has not had the time to eclipse all his records, the other two are never above Federer, please tell me when Andre and Becker won 3 back to back slams???? also back to back Wimby's and Us open's, oh and not to forget his four different TMS in one year and there is still two to go!!!!! All this and the depth of the mens game has never been better so your assumption of:

"These three players are above Federer for sure" is so not sure!!!

KarstenBraasch#1
09-14-2005, 04:54 PM
Becker was finished as a top player at 24. He's just jealous that his longevity/consistency was nowhere near Agassi's.
Bullshit.

KarstenBraasch#1
09-14-2005, 04:55 PM
exactly, Becker won his last Wimbledon at age 21, he is a jealous whining bitch, and he hates Andre for all the success he has had and is still having, 10 years after Becker played his last GS final. This is the last person Andre needs to listen to. I'm looking forward to seeing Aggy at least one more time at the USO.
Even bigger bullshit.

BlackSilver
09-14-2005, 05:06 PM
Its the same in latin-america too.

Not in Brasil

gillian
09-14-2005, 05:20 PM
I think he GETS IT!!!!Check out Selena Roberts article (NY TIMES September 12)...she states clearly and emphatically that Agassi is not His Smugness Pete Sampras who was looking for a glorious exit...this is Everyman, lunchpail Agassi who is looking for a way to continue playing....jcm

I think you've hit on why Pete's "will he or won't he" pre-retirement dance annoyed me to no end, while I'm in no hurry to see Andre go (and he's not even one of my faves).

Jogy
09-14-2005, 06:22 PM
Becker is a big asshole. And he always has his head up in Federer's ass :o

joycomesmorning
09-14-2005, 06:26 PM
Guardian Unlimited disagrees with Becker.
Article attached: No Time to Quit

Only undaunted Agassi can rally in the face of Federer
Las Vegan remains the No1 threat to the world No1

Les Roopanarine
Wednesday September 14, 2005

Guardian Unlimited

If Roger Federer is secretly a tad miffed that Andre Agassi's inspired performance partly overshadowed his achievement in becoming the first player since Donald Budge to win Wimbledon and the US Open in consecutive years, he shouldn't be; Agassi is a phenomenon.
At 35, Agassi is the oldest man to compete in the final of a Grand Slam event since Ken Rosewall squared up to Jimmy Connors in the 1974 final at Flushing Meadows. A Grand Slam champion on eight occasions, the Las Vegan is a happily married father of two whose hair - or what remains of it - is flecked with grey. Yet age cannot wither him.

Consequently, as Federer's rivals sift through the wreckage of their own Grand Slam aspirations for a second successive summer, they should resist the temptation to draw comfort from Agassi's ability to unsettle the Swiss. No other player in the world could have stood toe-to-toe with Federer and traded blows to such breathtaking effect.

That is not to discount the manifold skills of Marat Safin, Rafael Nadal and company. Rather it is to acknowledge the singularity of Agassi's gifts. Blessed with immaculate timing, lightning-fast hands and an ability to read the flight of the ball quicker than players half his age, Agassi is preternaturally comfortable taking his groundstrokes on the half-volley, a priceless asset when it comes to handling Federer's ferocious array of heavy artillery.

It is a measure of Federer's quality that even these attributes brought Agassi little success at first. The world No1 began the final in the imperious style that has become his trademark on the big occasions, sweeping the ball majestically into the corners. Lesser men than Agassi would have crumbled. Lleyton Hewitt endured a similar experience in the opening set of last year's final and never recovered.

But Agassi, whose tennis education was at the school of hard knocks known as the Sampras era, understands better than anyone what it takes to meet the game's greatest challenges. Upping his level from the superb to the sublime, the American quickly put the loss of the opening set behind him and went on to subject Federer to the sternest examination he has faced in a Grand Slam final.

In the process, Agassi staged a masterclass in how to disrupt the Swiss metronome's rhythm. From the latter stages of the first set to 6-6 in the third, the American dictated play from the baseline with strokes of almost inhuman power and precision, eliciting a series of errors from Federer. In particular, Agassi demonstrated that there is substance to the view - often articulated, rarely exemplified - that Federer is relatively vulnerable on the backhand side. Impressively, he did so by pursuing a strategy that few players have the courage or skills to emulate.

Conventional wisdom has it that the Federer forehand, one of the most potent weapons in the game, is to be avoided at all costs. Agassi, though, has rarely gone in for the conventional. Undaunted by the world No1's formidable right side, the veteran boldly exchanged forehands, disturbing the champion's customary equilibrium and thereby establishing the perfect platform from which to launch a sustained assault on the backhand.

Had his body served him better, Agassi, who has been plagued by an inflamed sciatic nerve for most of this year, would have had a genuine chance of recording a third US Open win. Nonetheless, having survived three five-set matches on the punishing cement courts simply to reach the final, Agassi is hardly on his last legs.

Talk of retirement is premature, not least because Agassi, on his day, remains one of the few players capable of stopping Federer's relentless acquisition of the game's major prizes. Tennis needs him.

Since winning Wimbledon in 2003, Federer has collected six Slams. Unbeaten in his last 23 finals, he appears vulnerable only on clay, where he has twice stumbled to defeat this year, against Richard Gasquet and Nadal. On terra firma, only Safin, the prodigiously talented Muscovite who survived match points against Federer en route to winning this year's Australian Open, has shown himself capable of maintaining the level of tennis required to tame the Swiss over five sets.

Safin, though, is notoriously volatile, and - until his performances are governed by something more predictable than whether he has got out of bed on the right side - it is difficult to see him mounting a sustained challenge to Federer's dominance.

Of the other main pretenders, Andy Roddick will continue to stagnate until he addresses the need for greater tactical variety in his game, while it remains to be seen whether Nadal, who won a combined total of three matches at Wimbledon and the US Open, or Gasquet, a fourth-round loser in both tournaments, can bring their talents to bear on surfaces other than clay.

In the meantime, hopes of derailing the Federer Express in Grand Slam competition rest largely with a follicly-challenged father of two. Like Federer, Agassi can do things on a tennis court that no else can. This is no time to quit.

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2005

Lee
09-14-2005, 06:47 PM
I think you've hit on why Pete's "will he or won't he" pre-retirement dance annoyed me to no end, while I'm in no hurry to see Andre go (and he's not even one of my faves).

Before the USO2005 final, everybody are saying it'll be great that Agassi win the title and retire from his career which will make a legend. (I'm not saying Agassi is not a legend himself already)

So...

Can somebody explain to me that if Pete wanted to go out with a big bang, why didn't he announce his retirement right after his USO2002 championship? (And I'm not saying Pete was not a legend in 2002 already)

AgassiFan
09-15-2005, 01:53 AM
Steffi had any balls, she would urge the Baldie to play until he's 40.

sigmagirl91
09-15-2005, 02:53 AM
If Andre should retire, then Becker should have a Coke and a smile and shut the fuck up.

Federerhingis
09-15-2005, 03:58 AM
Not in Brasil

Sorry, yeah generalizations dont always hold true, my bad.