Wheelchair Tennis [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Wheelchair Tennis

Phunkadelicious
09-09-2005, 04:45 AM
I think next year the coverage of the USO should include some wheelchair tennis. I think seeing those guys and gals play would be amazing and I am willing to bet people would watch.

Wheelchair athletes :worship:

LuckyAC
09-09-2005, 05:45 AM
I certainly wouldn't watch, the woman are already hard enough to stand.

Carlita
09-09-2005, 06:06 AM
I certainly wouldn't watch, the woman are already hard enough to stand.
have you ever seen wheelchair tennis then? Go and have a look before you make a judgement! it's brilliant !

:hatoff: I'm amazed at what they do! :worship: I have no idea how on earth they do it! Keep moving the wheelchair AND hitting a ball......:scratch: takes a real effort to do that !!! :clap2:

delsa
09-09-2005, 06:25 AM
I certainly wouldn't watch, the woman are already hard enough to stand.
:rolleyes: :ras:

Is it true that it's the same rules except that two rebounds are allowed before they hit the ball back?...

Carlita
09-09-2005, 09:41 AM
:banana: the Dutchies do well in wheelchair tennis!

Men
Country
Pts
1
HALL, David (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=50000033)
AUS
2166 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=50000033)
2
JEREMIASZ, Michael (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=100013548)
FRA
1974 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=100013548)
3
AMMERLAAN, Robin (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=50001066)
NED
1954 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=50001066)
Women


1
VERGEER, Esther (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=55000204)
NED
1874 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=55000204)
2
WALRAVEN, Sharon (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=55000164)
NED
1561 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=55000164)
3
GRIFFIOEN, Jiske (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/biography.asp?ID=55000432)
NED
1402 (http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com/asp/players/rankbreak.asp?Mtype=Singles&ID=55000432)



I've seen Esther Vergeer play once and it was great fun to watch!

I think the rules are about the same. Except the ball can bounce twice I think before hitting back.

Look here, you'll find all the info!

http://www.itfwheelchairtennis.com :yeah:

Nikki♥
09-09-2005, 11:42 AM
:hatoff: I'm amazed at what they do! :worship: I have no idea how on earth they do it! Keep moving the wheelchair AND hitting a ball......:scratch: takes a real effort to do that !!! :clap2:

:worship:

I have never seen a wheelchair tennis match before but if I ever get the chance to do so I would definitely take it.

Meeek
09-09-2005, 11:46 AM
It's amazing what they do. Really, :worship: to all wheelchair tennisplayers. Matches are very interesting. Too bad it doesn't get much attention.

hosky
09-09-2005, 12:42 PM
but do you think the number of audience will be a considerable one?

Kristen
09-09-2005, 02:05 PM
To LuckyAC, the women of wheelchair tennis are of a very high quality... Jiske, Esther, Sonja.... gorgeous, and talented. Yes, two bounces, but they have to work hard to get to them, and in a lot of the top players rallies, they dont need the second bounce.

Martin Legner ROCKS!!!

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wheelchair_tennis/

whoa! There's my shameless plug to my group :lol:

SwissMister1
09-09-2005, 02:29 PM
I remember seeing a segment with, I think, Chanda Rubin playing against a pro female wheelchair player. Chanda was getting her butt kicked...

How much money would like the top player make?

delsa
09-10-2005, 02:30 PM
To LuckyAC, the women of wheelchair tennis are of a very high quality... Jiske, Esther, Sonja.... gorgeous, and talented. Yes, two bounces, but they have to work hard to get to them, and in a lot of the top players rallies, they dont need the second bounce.

Martin Legner ROCKS!!!

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wheelchair_tennis/

whoa! There's my shameless plug to my group :lol:

Thank you for answering my question Bjorkman_Girl! :hug:

It's even more a shame you don't pay more attention to wheelchair tennis, LuckyAC, since your country has two players in the top 10 (men: Michaël Jérémiaz#2 and women: Florence Gravellier #4 plus some others...)! Shame on you! :ras:
I would love to have a player from my country succeeding so much in this sport even/especially if it was in wheelchair tennis! :p
Great discipline! ;)

Article about it: "Roulant Garros" (http://www.humanite.presse.fr/journal/2005-06-04/2005-06-04-635813)

Rex
09-10-2005, 02:59 PM
yhe i reckon it takes a hell of a lot of work to do wheelchair tennis.

delsa
09-10-2005, 03:48 PM
yhe i reckon it takes a hell of a lot of work to do wheelchair tennis.
Definitely! :yeah: And it's an hybrid version of the game. So it must be very interesting to watch because they have to be creative and invent new shots and everything... ;)
And they must realize they love tennis and playing much more than many other players do too. And it's always great to watch ppl enjoying what they do first in any sport...

Peta Pan
09-10-2005, 04:25 PM
It's a different game to watch but still very interesting and you just have to admire how incredible these guys and girls are!

Then you get players like Australia's Anthony Bonaccurso :drool: who might just have the best arm muscles EVER!!!

delsa
09-10-2005, 04:44 PM
Then you get players like Australia's Anthony Bonaccurso :drool: who might just have the best arm muscles EVER!!!

That indication begs for pics to illustrate it and let us be able to judge by ourselves! :drool: ;)

Peta Pan
09-10-2005, 06:24 PM
Well I have one that Kristen sent to me... I'm pretty sure she won't mind me posting it :p

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v23/thewhiteladyofrohan/Peta/bonaccursosmall.jpg

delsa
09-10-2005, 06:35 PM
Beautiful huge arms indeed! :hearts:
Is it a common wheelchair tennis player's characteristic? :angel: :o :lol:
And a nice laugh/smile on top of that... ;)

Peta Pan
09-10-2005, 06:55 PM
Beautiful huge arms indeed! :hearts:
Is it a common wheelchair tennis player's characteristic? :angel: :o :lol:
And a nice laugh/smile in top of that... ;)
It is a very common characteristic ;) It builds up muscles pushing a wheelchair around!
Yes he has a very nice smile too ;)

delsa
09-10-2005, 06:58 PM
It is a very common characteristic ;) It builds up muscles pushing a wheelchair around!
Yes he has a very nice smile too ;)
A thought comes to my mind: even for the female players? :tape:

Peta Pan
09-10-2005, 07:01 PM
A thought comes to my mind: even for the female players? :tape:
Well... I guess they would have to considering they still have to push the wheels.... I'm not really sure of what their arms look like coz I haven't tended to look at the females body features ;)

delsa
09-10-2005, 08:21 PM
Fom usopen.org:

http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0907_021wheelchair.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0907_023wheelchair.jpg
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_023verfuerth.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0908_026vergeer.jpg
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_024vergeer.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_025vergeer.jpg
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_022verfuerth.jpg

They look perfect! Not too muscular at all... ;)

Some other photos to put the names on some faces...:

Jayant Mistry (GBR):
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_026mistry.jpg

No. 2 Seed Robin Ammerlaan (NED):
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_028ammerlaan.jpg

No. 1 Seed David Hall (AUS):
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_045hall.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_046hall.jpg

Michaël Jeremiasz (FRA):
http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_044jeremiasz.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0909_043jeremiasz.jpg http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_0907_022wheelchair.jpg

Plus the articles that go with them:

Wheelchair Competition Rolls Into Flushing
by Erin Bruehl
Thursday, September 8, 2005

On the first day of the first-ever wheelchair competition at the US Open, the top seeds had no problems advancing, and a young American pulled an upset over a top 10 player.

David Hall and Esther Vergeer, the No. 1 men's and women's wheelchair players in the world, cruised into the semifinals with ease, but the day's headline was won by 19-year-old Kaitlyn Verfuerth, ranked No. 52, who defeated No. 9 Sonya Peters of the Netherlands 6-0, 6-0.

After the first set, Peters called for a medical timeout and trainers tended to the thumb on her playing hand. She'd injured the thumb a few days earlier when she caught it in one of the wheels of her chair.

Peters continued, but Verfuerth won the second set quickly, perfectly placing many of her ground strokes. The two - who are friends -- then embraced at the net after the match.

"I felt good," Verfuerth said. "In the beginning I was nervous but I was hitting my shots and doing my returns well. We're pretty good friends off the court, so it was difficult; she had an injury -- I felt bad."

Vergeer, 24, the No. 1 seed from the Netherlands, beat American Elizabeth Williams 6-1, 6-1. Vergeer has not lost a match since February 2003, a streak of 152 wins, and is now 35-0 in 2005. She'll next face Verfuerth in the semifinals.

Karin Korb, the New Jersey native ranked No. 25, won the first three-set match of the wheelchair competition, edging fellow American Beth Arnoult-Rithaler 6-3, 5-7, 6-4 to advance to the semis. She will next play either American Jan Proctor or Kori Homan of the Netherlands.

On the men's side, Australian Hall sailed over American Paul Walker 6-0, 6-0. The 35-year-old Aussie has been impressively dominant in a career that began at age 19, posting a 619-108 record, including 34-5 in 2005. In the semis, Hall will play either American Derek Bolton or Michael Jeremiasz of France.

In other action, No. 13-ranked Jayant Mistry of Great Britain defeated 46-year-old Lee Hinson of the U.S. 6-3, 6-0. Robin Ammerlaan, the No. 2 seed from the Netherlands, cruised past American Lee Quintero 6-1, 6-1, and will next take on Mistry in the semis


Wheelchair Tennis: The Art of the Possible
by Neil E. Schlecht
Wednesday, September 7, 2005

At the US Open in Flushing Meadows, the tennis events include men's and women's, juniors and seniors. For a select group of players here for the first time, the tennis featured at the last major of the year might be more properly divided into able-bodied and wheelchair events.

Professional wheelchair tennis is being played for the first time at the 2005 US Open. The sport, which originated in the US, already included tour events at the other Grand Slams -- the Australian and French Opens and Wimbledon -- as well as the Paralympics. The inaugural event at the US Open features men's and women's draws of eight, which include several of the highest-ranking wheelchair players in the world.

Wheelchair players may be less visible and receive vastly less prize money than players in the main draws, but they get the same benefits as able-bodied players, including access to practice courts and per diems. And success on the court is determined by the same factors: power, touch, and quickness (known in this realm as chair speed).

Anyone who has watched wheelchair tennis competitors whack the ball, nimbly wheel their chairs around the baseline and strike topspin backhands high above their heads, knows that in a perfect world they would also command the same respect as their able-bodied brethren.

At Key Biscayne, said Sonja Peters, 28, a Dutch player who's No. 9 in the world, "A kid who had come to see Agassi was standing next to the court watching us and he begged his mom to let him stay and watch us instead."

Three of the women competitors at the US Open are from the Netherlands. In fact, of the top seven players in the world, six are Dutch. Esther Vergeer, 24, from outside Amsterdam, is the Roger Federer of the circuit. Ranked no. 1 in the world, she has not lost a match since February 2003 -- 151 straight victories. The obvious No. 1 seed at the Open, she trains with the two other Dutch players here, Peters, and Korie Homan, 19. The three, good friends as well as rivals, share hotel rooms and hit together before matches. They even share a coach.

"When Esther and I played each other at the Paralympics in Athens last year, we shared a hotel room and warmed each other up before. Our coach spoke to each of us individually, we planned our strategy, and then we went out and played," said Peters.

Peters, from Amsterdam, has been playing wheelchair tennis for a decade. Disabled since birth, she started to play tennis because her father belonged to a club that had a few wheelchair players.

Only the top few players in the world, or those fortunate enough to have scored good sponsorship deals, can play wheelchair tennis for a living or make any money at it. Sonja is also studying child neuro-psychology. "You have to have something after tennis. . . or next to tennis," she said. "I've been as high as No. 2 in the world, but I'm still losing money."

Derek is luckier than most. He has two sponsors, Lasher Sports, the manufacturer of his wheelchair, and the TWAA (Tennessee Wheelchair Athletic Association), and he is able to play wheelchair tennis as a full-time profession.

Increased sponsorship and prize money is what all the players hope for. Meanwhile, there are some advantages to being in a wheelchair. Sonja Peters went to the Coldplay concert last night at Madison Square Garden. How did she get tickets to the sold-out show? "Wheelchair tickets weren't sold out! Plus, they were really great seats!"

The wheelchair tournament at the US Open begins Thursday, September 8 for both the men's and women's draws.

The official tour website, www.itfwheelchairtennis.com, rankings list 356 men and 126 women from around the globe, including information on the players' wheelchair manufacturer, sponsors, age at which they began playing wheelchair tennis, and whether or not they played before their accident, if indeed they had one.

For the 2006 US Open, organizers hope to present a draw of 16 men and 12 women and introduce a quad (quadriplegic) field, as well as increase prize money five-fold.

Players in Wheelchairs Get Their Own Open
By John Eligon // New York Times // September 8, 2005

Growing up in Paris, Michael Jeremiasz loved to play sports. He began skiing at age 2. At 5, he was playing tennis. He also enjoyed basketball and swimming.
But when he sustained a spinal injury in a skiing accident in 2000, Jeremiasz's first concern was girls. "I was like: 'Darn! They're not going to look at me the same way,' " he said.

Jeremiasz, then 18, quickly found the advantages in using a wheelchair. "I figured out that it's even better because you know when you enter a place, you're not like everybody else because you're in a wheelchair," he said yesterday at the National Tennis Center. "So they just look at you. No matter what you look like, people look at you. Then, if you look good, if you look nice to them, it's your contact."

In addition to not allowing a wheelchair to hamper his relationships, Jeremiasz, 23, is not letting it hurt his tennis game either.

He is the No. 2 men's wheelchair tennis player in the world and will be one of 16 players competing in the inaugural wheelchair competition at the United States Open. The eight men and eight women begin play today, with the finals set for Sunday.

The free-spirited Jeremiasz is perhaps the embodiment of what the wheelchair tennis players are trying to show: they are real athletes, playing a legitimate sport.

"These are some of the top tennis players in the world," said Dan James, the coach of the United States wheelchair team. "Sometimes that gets lost. Sometimes the inspiration overcomes what they really want to be known for, and that's their tennis."

Paul Walker, who is originally from Buffalo, has played in a wheelchair since 1997 and has coached an able-bodied high school team for three years. He said: "Some people who are smart enough to know tennis and look at it ultimately say: 'You know what? It just doesn't matter that he's in a wheelchair. He knows the game of tennis; he knows how to teach somebody who wants to play the game of tennis.' "

The International Tennis Federation's wheelchair tour has ranked 356 men and 126 women. The tour began in 1992 and sanctions more than 100 events in about 30 countries.

The wheelchair players have said they are not trying to prove that they can keep up with players who stand on two legs. But they want people to realize that their sport is difficult in its own way. "If I play with an able-bodied tennis player, there's a big gap," Jeremiasz said. "But if you put Roger Federer in a wheelchair, I beat him, 6-0, 6-0."

Amélie Mauresmo, the third-ranked player on the WTA Tour, played an exhibition match against Jeremiasz last year. Mauresmo said she gained much respect for what wheelchair players could do.

"Let me tell you something," she said yesterday after her loss to Mary Pierce. "When you're not only watching, but on the court also playing with these guys, it's really amazing. It was real shots."

The only major rule difference in wheelchair tennis is that the ball can bounce twice: only the first bounce must be inbounds. And wheelchair tennis is much more demanding on the upper body because players are constantly using their arms.

Another major difference between wheelchair tennis and the traditional game is money.

Esther Vergeer, the top women's wheelchair player for five years, said she earns about $30,000 a year. Lindsay Davenport, the No. 1 player on the WTA Tour, has made about $1.8 million in prize money this year.

For Vergeer and others, wheelchair tennis is about more than money. She lost her ability to walk at age 8 after complications during surgery. Back then, tennis helped Vergeer, now 24, boost her self-esteem.

"When you just get in a wheelchair, you only see the things you can't do," said Vergeer, who is from the Netherlands. "And when I played tennis, it's like: 'Oh, I'm sort of good at this. I can do this.' "

Still, Vergeer cannot help but ponder what might have been.

"I'm sometimes frustrated about it, and I always wonder what level I would have if I would stand up and play tennis," she said. "I sometimes ask myself, if we're at a tournament like this, do players that play here sometimes ask themselves how it would be if their legs didn't work?"

Phunkadelicious
09-10-2005, 08:53 PM
thank you guys so much for taking part in this thread. I think WC tennis is something that needs to be brought to peoples attention instead of being just a sideshow.

Kristen
09-11-2005, 10:26 AM
Nice work Peta :yeah: Anthony and his awesome arms should definitely be shown to the world :lol:

More photos:
Melbourne 05
http://photobucket.com/albums/v217/kristen4382/WCT-Melbourne2005/
Sydney 05
http://photobucket.com/albums/v217/kristen4382/WCT-Sydney2005/

Somehow, wheelchair tennis makes me patriotic. But, only for the WCT players :lol:

Rex
09-12-2005, 04:06 PM
nice pics B_girl

Kristen
02-03-2006, 03:11 AM
For once (in recent times... although it has been for a while now) we have a new #1 in the world. Michael Jeremiasz made it to #1 after his US Open win, and he's still there, though the pressure will be on, this Aussie Open :yeah: I've put some photos of Niclas and Peter in the Swedish forum, and will have quite a few 'casual' :lol: shots of Jeremiasz in the near future...

bad gambler
02-03-2006, 03:29 AM
what happened to david hall?

i have had the chance to meet him several times - he trains at my local tennis courts :yeah:

but he doesn't seem to be around of late :shrug:

Kristen
02-03-2006, 03:31 AM
Apparently he was injured sometime last year, and hasn't played since around November. This is all second hand information, of course... and I haven't bothered to check any facts, but will look into it. There's a chance he may not return. He's a nice guy, very focused :eek:

Kristen
02-03-2006, 03:40 AM
From November 15 2005The first pool in the men’s competition is lead by world No. 1 one Michael Jeremiasz from France who is attempting to win the first Masters title of his career. To succeed, the 24-year old Frenchman will have to overcome the challenge of Japanese Satoshi Saida, Martin Legner from Austria and first-time participant Ronald Vink from the Netherlands. In the absence of two-time champion and current world Nr. 2 David Hall (AUS) who withdrew because of a shoulder injury, the top position in the second pool went to Dutchman Robin Ammerlaan who is the 2003 Masters champion and also a favourite for the title this year. Challenging him in his pool matches this year will be Tadeusz Kruszelnicki (POL), 1996 Masters champion Stephen Welch (USA) and one of the sport’s youngest and most promising starts, Japanese Shingo Kunieda who replaced David Hall.
Classic 8's, Melbourne 25/01/2006In the absence of reigning champion David Hall (AUS), a new line-up is guaranteed for the Men's final for the first time in the event's five-year history.
From this weeks Sydney event: In the mid 1990s Mick Connell (AUS) partnered David Hall (AUS) to help Australia win the World Team Cup and a Men's Doubles Silver medal at the Atlanta Paralympic Games. A decade later, and with Hall sitting out this week's NRMA Insurance Sydney International Open, part of the NEC Wheelchair Tennis Tour, Connell thrilled home supporters once again on Wednesday when he became one of four Australians to reach the Men's Main Draw Singles second round at the first ITF 1 Series event of the year.
According to the information on the itf site, he's just sitting out a few events. I'm sure they'll mention anything more on it...