Sam (Soterios) and Georgia Sampras [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Sam (Soterios) and Georgia Sampras

Greg-Pete fan
08-16-2005, 08:53 PM
What do you think about Pete`s parents - Sam (Soterios) and Georgia (some people say "Gloria")? Here I give you one photo of them (when they were young) ;)

angiel
08-16-2005, 09:46 PM
What do you think about Pete`s parents - Sam (Soterios) and Georgia (some people say "Gloria")? Here I give you one photo of them (when they were young) ;)



I think they are the best sport parents - I admired then and glad they are his parents.


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/young/L_clipping.jpg


Here is another one with her and her kids & husband.

angiel
08-16-2005, 09:50 PM
here is some with his dad.


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2000wimb7/L_HugDad4.jpg http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2000wimb7/L_HugDad1.jpg http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2000wimb7/L_HugDad2.jpg

angiel
08-16-2005, 09:51 PM
Some more


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2000wimb7/L_HugDad3.jpg

angiel
08-16-2005, 09:53 PM
http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2000wimb7/L_HugDad5.jpg

ella andry
08-16-2005, 10:22 PM
His parents are very humble people, especially his mather. I have seen her for a first time at Wimbledon 2000. and she did not say a word how she feels after Pete breaking Grand Slam record. She is very humble and normal person. I think she was very poor (she comes from a big family- I think six brothers and sisters) before coming to USA. :sad: :wavey:

angiel
08-16-2005, 10:35 PM
His parents are very humble people, especially his mother. I have seen her for a first time at Wimbledon 2000. and she did not say a word how she feels after Pete breaking Grand Slam record. She is very humble and normal person. I think she was very poor (she comes from a big family- I think six brothers and sisters) before coming to USA. :sad: :wavey:



Yep, they are very humble folks, both mom & dad, she is from greece and came here to the US a poor young lady, didn't speak any english at all. :wavey: :angel: :angel: :angel: :angel:

ella andry
08-16-2005, 10:42 PM
Yep, they are very humble folks, both mom & dad, she is from greece and came here to the US a poor young lady, didn't speak any english at all. :wavey: :angel: :angel: :angel: :angel:

Hwo old was she at the time? What do u think, do their children speak Greek? :) :) :wavey:

angiel
08-16-2005, 10:47 PM
Hwo old was she at the time? What do u think, do their children speak Greek? :) :) :wavey:


I think she was about 20 years old or so, ( will check for right age) I am not sure if they do speak Greek, I know Pete does not. :D :D


Correction - his mom was 25 years old, when she came to the States.

Read below.

angiel
08-16-2005, 11:10 PM
This is part of an interview that pete gives in 2000


Pete on his parents

Q. Your parents, Sam and Georgia, are legendary for staying clear of the limelight. How would you describe them and how they influenced you?

I found tennis for myself. My parents just supported my interest in the game. It was a financial strain. For a while, my dad worked two jobs. [Sam Sampras, now retired, was both an engineer and a restaurant owner.] At first, he tried coaching me by reading books about the game. But that didn't last too long, and we joke about it now.

Dad turned my development over to my first coach, Pete Fischer. But he was right there, at a lot of my lessons, and driving me to matches and tournaments. So he was involved, but not on-court. He was smart enough to know what he didn't know.

My dad is a similar kind of character to me. He keeps people at arm's length, but once he trust and likes you, he'll be loyal to the end. That could take a while, though. It took my younger sister Marion's husband, Phil Hodges, a year to break through Dad's shield.

He also doesn't come off as the warmest of people on the phone. When my childhood friends would call, they were always a little intimidated.

But Dad's also nervous. Neither he or my mum could bear to watch the 1990 US Open final on TV, so they wandered around a shopping mall near our house in California. They found out I had won when they passed by an electronics store and saw a TV tuned to a shot of me holding up the trophy.

When I was a junior, I played in higher divisions than my age. At 12, I'd be playing against 16 year olds. Often, right in the middle of some tough match, I'd look up at my dad. So what does he do? He waves goodbye and goes for a walk! And then I feel like I'm out there alone. I'm convince that those experiences shaped who I am today. They made me tough and independent. That's why you rarely see me looking at the players' box during a match.

My mum is the rock of the family. She used to feed me tennis balls because I was so crazy about the game, but she doesn't have many interests of her own beyond her kids.

She started out dirt-poor, moving to the States from Greece at the age of 25 without speaking a word of English, with a family that included six sisters and two brothers. Those first years, she sometimes slept on a cement floor. She became a beautician, and met my father when a friend of his encouraged him to check her out at the place where she cut hair.

Mum is the caretaker of the family. She has no education, but a lot of common sense, and she reads people well. Her talent is her heart, yet in her own quiet way, she's very strong.

Q. Your parents normally never come to watch you play, but this year they attended a Davis Cup tie and then, for the first time, Wimbledon. What prompted them to come and watch?

It's all part of a bigger picture that includes my moving back to Los Angeles.

I went off to live in Florida in my early twenties so I could focus on my tennis. The plan worked, but tennis began to consum me and I ended up enjoying the game less because of it. The time I spent with my family was mostly on the phone. Now that I'm back in Los Angeles, I fell I'm back where my roots are. I see my sister, Stella, three, four times a week. I drop by my parent's house once a week or so. It's been more good for my life to be back here. It's been great.

My dad sat through all the matches at the Davis Cup [against the Czech Republic] - a first. And when he came onto the court after I won the decisive rubber against Slava Dosedel and gave me a hug, it felt good. Really good.

I think they always wanted to be there with me, but they didn't want me worrying about them. And I would have - did they get their tickets okay? Is the hotel any good? That kind of stuff. The funny thing was that I actually had to make the point that I really wanted them there. I had to come out and tell them how much it meant to me for them to come.

Greg-Pete fan
08-17-2005, 08:06 AM
Great photos :worship: But I can`t find photo of Georgia. She was in this special Wimbledon 2000 final too ;) Their parents appeared also in 1992 U.S. Open final... Pete lost to Stefan Edberg :sad: Soterios was during Davis Cup 1995 final in Moscow too ;), but they rarely went on Pete`s matches :)

angiel
08-17-2005, 09:38 PM
Great photos :worship: But I can`t find photo of Georgia. She was in this special Wimbledon 2000 final too ;) Their parents appeared also in 1992 U.S. Open final... Pete lost to Stefan Edberg :sad: Soterios was during Davis Cup 1995 final in Moscow too ;), but they rarely went on Pete`s matches :)



I try to find photos of her but I can't, will post any if I do find. :wavey: :wavey:

Greg-Pete fan
08-18-2005, 10:14 AM
Don`t worry angiel. We will find her photo ;)

angiel
08-18-2005, 07:24 PM
Don`t worry angiel. We will find her photo ;)



I know, cheers. :wavey: :wavey: :wavey: :wavey: :worship: :worship:

Greg-Pete fan
08-18-2005, 07:38 PM
We have to find :devil:

Greg-Pete fan
08-19-2005, 10:58 AM
And I have got her photo (Wimbledon 2000)!!! :cool:

ella andry
08-19-2005, 11:17 AM
Good job Greg!! :) :) :) It's so nice to have you here! :) :) :) :worship: :wavey:

Greg-Pete fan
08-19-2005, 11:45 AM
No problem ella andry ;) Write more here ;) We need more fans ;)

ella andry
08-19-2005, 07:24 PM
Pete with mom at his wedding (September 30th 2000.)


http://www.menstennisforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=59692&stc=1

Marine
08-19-2005, 09:07 PM
I think she was about 20 years old or so, ( will check for right age) I am not sure if they do speak Greek, I know Pete does not. :D :D


Correction - his mom was 25 years old, when she came to the States.

Read below.

To be exact, Pete doesn't speak greek but he understands it, his mother sometimes used to talk him in greek.
(old memories of a french interview...)

angiel
08-19-2005, 09:20 PM
To be exact, Pete doesn't speak greek but he understands it, his mother sometimes used to talk him in greek.
(old memories of a french interview...)



Thank you Marine, how are you doing? :wavey: :wavey:

Mimi
08-23-2005, 07:56 AM
thanks greg for the photos :D

then pete's mum looks very young :eek: , if she was already 25 when she moved to usa, then i guess she gave birth to pete when she was about 30 :confused: , then she must has 60 when she attended wimby 2000 :eek: , but for me, she looked like 40 something at that time :eek: :eek:

angiel
08-23-2005, 07:25 PM
thanks greg for the photos :D

then pete's mum looks very young :eek: , if she was already 25 when she moved to usa, then i guess she gave birth to pete when she was about 30 :confused: , then she must has 60 when she attended wimby 2000 :eek: , but for me, she looked like 40 something at that time :eek: :eek:



Age is just a number my dear ;) ;) :cool:

angiel
08-23-2005, 08:40 PM
Grand Parent
Source: LA Times



[June 16, 2002 BILL DWYRE, LA Times] Staying in the background is just fine for Sam Sampras, who never wanted to be a typical Tennis Dad

It was two years ago, as his son climbed over chairs and people to reach him high in the stands at Wimbledon, that Sam Sampras showed the sports world that this father knew best.

Of course, nothing of the sort was crossing his mind. Proving things to people, showing the world this or that, could not be further from the intentions or personality of this quiet, shy man who handed Pete Sampras his first tennis racket in Potomac, Md., in 1976.

Pete was 5, and the racket mostly swatted balls against basement walls then. Never did Sam Sampras think, or even care, that 24 years later, he would share this moment in an international spotlight with that now-grown little boy, who had just established himself, by the nature of the 13th Grand Slam event title he had just won, as the greatest male player in the history of the game. Nor, at that moment, was Sam Sampras even thinking about any sort of validation for how he and wife Georgia, as parents of a world-class tennis player, had raised their son and stayed out of his way as he grew up and grew successful. In the world of tennis, Sam Sampras is the antithesis of the pushy parent. When the bright lights turn on, Sam turns away.

"It was Pete who was playing, Pete who deserved the credit," Sam Sampras says now.

That Sam would say anything in a public forum is noteworthy. Never before had he submitted to a lengthy interview on a topic about which he seems less than comfortable. Himself.

There was something about it being for Father's Day that made it all right this time, just as there was something about Wimbledon in 2000 that made it all right for him to say yes to getting on a plane and flying to England in time for the historic match against Patrick Rafter. This wasn't the first time that Pete had invited Sam to come see him play, but it was only the second Grand Slam final he had seen in person, and Pete had won 11 others.

The Sampras parental recalcitrance became legendary after Pete won his first Grand Slam event, the U.S. Open, in 1990. Stories later told of how Sam and Georgia had walked around a Long Beach mall while Pete was playing and finally, unable to stand it anymore, stopped at a bank of TVs and asked the salesman who was winning.

"I'm just too nervous," Sam says. "That's why we don't go and watch much. It's just too hard. Only if you are a parent can you really understand that. Watching is excruciating."

But the quest for the magic 13th Grand Slam event title, topping Roy Emerson's long-standing mark, was such tennis history that, this time, pain of parenting took a back seat to pride of parenting. Sam and Georgia flew to Wimbledon just in time for the final and agonized with the rest of the sports world as their son somehow turned things around from a set down and 1-4 in the second-set tiebreaker.

Eventually, he was at match point on his own serve.

Just before Pete Sampras stepped to the service line, and started the famous rocking motion that has unleashed several thousand aces in his 15-year career, TV analyst John McEnroe leaned to the microphone in the broadcast booth and set it up perfectly for the millions watching: "History, folks," McEnroe said.

The serve that had battered Rafter all day kicked into him one more time, and when the return drifted wide, Sampras raised his arms high in joy and relief.

And soon, with uncharacteristic emotion, Pete Sampras scanned the crowd, found his parents and began his climb. The photographers, ready when he got there, captured the hugs and tears. It was the most public of private family moments, one for both the tennis history books and the Sampras family scrapbook.

For Sam Sampras, the thoughts and emotions ran wild.

"I knew he was coming to see me," Sam says. "This was a match that was history.

"You gotta understand the parent. Nobody knows what you go through. I was thinking about what all those years meant, about all those trips to the Kramer Club [in Rolling Hills Estates] with the kids.

"Some parents feel they are the child. They get emotional. It's like you see in Little League baseball. I always walk away. I don't bother my kids."

As much as that Wimbledon experience brought joy, it also brought pain to Sam Sampras, as only it could to a man who says he really has no hobbies, who retired seven years ago at age 58 as a mechanical engineer and project manager for the space shuttle program and who derives much of his joy from the comfort zone he has built around him in Palos Verdes, where he brought his family to live in 1978.

"Before all those TV cameras at Wimbledon, I could walk around here, I could go to my spa and work out, and nobody would know me," he said. "That changed everything.

"Even after we left the stadium, and we walked around the village of Wimbledon, people kept coming up to us. They all knew me."

One man's well-wisher is another man's intrusion, and for Sam Sampras, painfully shy, it has taken a while for things to get back to normal. That's why, during the interview, he shed a tear at the memory of the immediate aftermath of Wimbledon, of people walking up to him in the village. And that's why he drew a line at having a picture taken to go with this story.

Life far away from the public eye comes with the Sampras family genes. Sam was born and raised in Chicago, and his father was a cook who ran a restaurant. His mother was a housewife. One of Sam's goals, even as he went off to engineering school at Iowa State and later Missouri, was to run a restaurant.

So foreign to this family was the concept of fame and public persona that Sam's father, who died five years ago at 96, didn't really know his grandson was a great player until he saw him on TV one day and asked a friend how good he really was. The friend answered that he was pretty good. Matter of fact, he was No. 1 in the world.

Sam married Georgia, who had been born and raised in Greece. They met in Washington, D.C. They were poor, and when they started married life in Chicago, the dream of running a restaurant remained. That came to pass in McLean, Va., where Sam joined other family members in the restaurant business for seven years.

But Sam's engineering education brought them better chances and sent them to Washington, where the job paid better and the family began. First there was Gus, then Stella, Pete and Marion.

Stella shared young Pete's passion for the game, spent a year on the pro tour and has been UCLA's tennis coach for the last six years. This year, her Bruins were ranked No. 4 in the country.

"I can remember my dad taking us down to the local high school tennis courts when we were little and lived in Maryland," Stella says. "Pete and I loved it, Gus didn't care for it all that much and Marion was too young.

"For a while, I beat Pete. I think I beat him longer than he is willing to admit. You know how competitive he is. He says I stopped beating him when he was 11. I think it was more like when he was 13. We still argue about that."

Pete was 7 in 1978, when Sam Sampras moved the family to Southern California. Sam says he did so because the space industry was booming here, meaning good jobs, and California's climate and lifestyle were, well, California.

Sam kept the family interest in tennis alive by first joining the Peninsula Club, and soon, the Jack Kramer Club, the latter a hotbed of tennis that has produced, among other stars of the game, Tracy Austin and Lindsay Davenport.

By the time he was 14 or 15, Stella was no longer beating Pete. Matter of fact, almost nobody around Southern California was. His coach then, Pete Fischer, would take him around to some of the better Division I college teams, including programs such as Long Beach State, and try to get some competition for this skinny kid with the huge serve. Frequently, Sampras would beat the college players. Even more frequently, they would refuse to play him.

In the background was Sam Sampras.

"Pete and Stella had great coaches," he says. "They were doing well. I wanted to stay out of it. My only problem was that I had four kids and the tennis lessons were expensive. I wanted to be fair and do things for all four kids."

For a while, Sam was against Pete pursuing tennis.

"I guess I preferred he be a doctor," he says.

But soon, so many people were telling Sam that his son was so good that there was no turning back.

"Those days at the Kramer Club, that was quite some place," Sam says. "It was right in the middle of the tennis boom, and Pete and Stella were right there.... The parents were all over the place. That stuff kind of turned me off.

"I was always kind of modest, kind of pessimistic. People would tell me how good Pete was, how he was the best player. I'd always say, well, we'll see tomorrow."

Tomorrow eventually brought six years of being ranked No. 1 in the world. It brought seven Wimbledon titles, four U.S. Opens and two Australian Opens. It brought fame and fortune to a family, and especially to a father, who remains uncomfortable with the invasion of privacy that comes with it. Sometimes, it is all overwhelming to a man who likes the simple life, who went to the doctor six years ago for kidney stones and found out he needed double- bypass surgery.

It's not that life isn't good for Sam Sampras. All his children live in the Los Angeles area, Pete in Beverly Hills, Stella in Santa Monica and Gus and Marion nearby in Palos Verdes. Gus runs tennis tournaments in Scottsdale and Manhattan Beach and Marion Hodges is a school teacher. Gus has one child and Marion has one on the way.

Eight days from now, Pete Sampras will be in England as Wimbledon begins. It will be his 14th, and there has never been anybody like him on the grass there. From 1993 through his historic moment in 2000, Sampras lost one match, a 1996 quarterfinal to Richard Krajicek. His record in that string was 53-1.

He is 31 now, just two months from 32, and as his career fades a bit, and as he acquires some of the perspective that comes with the age, he cares more about such things as Father's Day. He not only liked the idea of a story on his dad for Father's Day, but talked Sam into sitting for an interview.

Pete Sampras echoes Stella's gratitude about their father giving them independence, giving them the space to grow and the freedom to spread their wings. And he said that his trip into the stands in 2000 at Wimbledon said everything needed to be said about his feelings for his parents.

He also said he didn't need to be quoted in this story, that it was not his day.

It was his father's day.

angiel
09-13-2005, 10:34 PM
Pete his dad, coach Pete Fischer & brother Gus.


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/sixtyminutes/dadfischer.jpg