Wimbledon 2005 [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Wimbledon 2005

NOMAD
06-19-2005, 12:47 PM
C'mon Rocky :bounce:

Court 1 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3]vs. Christophe Rochus (BEL)

2 Ladies' Singles - 1st Rnd.
Amelie Mauresmo (FRA)[3]vs. Melinda Czink (HUN)

3 Gentlemen's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP)[23]vs. Jamie Delgado (GBR)

Socket
06-19-2005, 01:09 PM
Let's go, Lleyton, get this campaign off to a great start!

euroka1
06-19-2005, 02:34 PM
Lleyton, please concentrate on tennis for a while longer! :wavey:

Knockers LaBroad
06-19-2005, 02:43 PM
Come on Lleyton!! :bounce:

And yay for me: coverage!! :D

scythe19pro
06-19-2005, 03:23 PM
Court 1?? Why not center court? They're probably gonna show Fed's match instead of Lleyton's. :( Anyway, go Lleyton! :bigclap:

momeche
06-19-2005, 09:41 PM
Hello,I'm from Moscow :wavey: and my english is not so good,but I wish Lleyton good luck on the Wimbledon!
C'mon Lleyton :) :kiss:

sorry my english,please! :worship:

jusjctin
06-19-2005, 09:52 PM
Hello,I'm from Moscow :wavey: and my english is not so good,but I wish Lleyton good luck on the Wimbledon!
C'mon Lleyton :) :kiss:

sorry my english,please! :worship:
Perfect, English!

tournesol
06-20-2005, 10:08 AM
Hello,I'm from Moscow :wavey: and my english is not so good,but I wish Lleyton good luck on the Wimbledon!
C'mon Lleyton :) :kiss:

sorry my english,please! :worship:

:wavey:

welcome on board

SomL.
06-20-2005, 10:44 AM
Go Lleyton against Christophe Rochus !!!!!!!!! Come on Lleyton ^_^

star
06-20-2005, 01:46 PM
Hello,I'm from Moscow :wavey: and my english is not so good,but I wish Lleyton good luck on the Wimbledon!
C'mon Lleyton :) :kiss:

sorry my english,please! :worship:

Welcome!!

Your English is wonderful. Don't worry about it. :)

Lleyton has the first set. :yippee:

Jess
06-20-2005, 02:49 PM
Well done Lleyts :bounce: Great start! Nice easy straightforward 3 setter :clap: and 19 aces :woohoo:

tournesol
06-20-2005, 02:59 PM
:clap2: :clap2: well done

Yasmine
06-20-2005, 03:01 PM
good start from Lleyton, I can't wait for Cilla to come back with the pictures, lucky girl who got ticket for court one today :p

momeche
06-20-2005, 04:09 PM
Thank you :)
I'm very glad for Lleyton and for start successful on the tournament)))
but i didn't see the game,because our tv don't transmit the tournament, but i hope that they'll show Wimbledon :awww:
sorry,my mistakes :rolleyes:

Turkeyballs Paco
06-20-2005, 04:48 PM
Not that I'm expecting to see it, but does anyone know if ESPN in the US showed any of Lleyton's match today? I am recording everything ESPN says they are showing today, but I have to wait until later before I see what I got. Just curious!

Oh! and congrats to Lleyton for winning round 1 !!!

NOMAD
06-20-2005, 04:52 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 1
Monday, June 20, 2005


Q. A dumb question here. Is the grass fast or slow? We keep hearing different things from different people.

LLEYTON HEWITT: All grass is different. But today it was pretty slow, very slow. It felt very soft out there today. I've got no doubt, though, it's going to quicken up over the next two weeks, you know, the more play it gets on it, I think because the show courts just don't have any play at all. So, you know, today they're very green out there.

Both of us playing from the back of the court, where both of us were serving, we were leaving imprints into the court it was that soft. You know, I've never seen that before.

Q. Did you play one serve‑and‑volley point?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I tried to, but it was part of my 19 aces, I think (smiling).

Q. Did you feel more and more comfortable as the game went on?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, for sure. First round of any Grand Slam's tough. It's a match you just really want to get under your belt, go out there and get through it as quickly as possible. You know, today was no different.

I had some good rallies out there. I felt like, you know, footing‑wise, moving my feet, I got better as the match went on. It was a good hit out without wasting a lot of energy either.

Q. Coming from cracked ribs, did you think the serve would be as much as anything you'd gauge your recovery by, you must be delighted given your service game?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Apart from a couple of doubles here and there today, I thought I served extremely well. My first serve felt on song. You know, it's not a matter of always hitting as hard as possible; it's finding the angles and the lines and court position and setting myself up for the point.

I felt like I did that well at Queen's. It's just a played a guy that out‑served me. You know, I didn't ‑‑ that was probably one of my best serving matches I had against Karlovic at Queen's.

At that point, it really hasn't ‑‑ the ribs haven't affected my serve too much.

Q. Physically, where do you feel you're at?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, you know, I'm happy with where I'm at at the moment. But every match you're going to have to get better. There's no doubt that I'm going to play a lot better opponents throughout the tournament. I've got to take my game to another level. But I was happy with the matches that I got at Queen's and the way I've been practicing all last week. I've been hitting the ball sweetly. If I can just take that into this tournament, hopefully I'll have a good showing.

Q. On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you describe your preparation or focus for this tournament?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, preparation‑wise I've done, you know, everything I guess that was in my control. You know, when you're injured, you only play one tournament beforehand, then that's out of my control. There's not a whole heap I can do with that.

But at Queen's I felt like I got three tough matches. I played totally different style of games, big servers, Xavier Malisse who plays from the back of the court. Last week I practiced as hard as I ever had, hit a lot of balls in a lot of practice sets. Physically I feel like I'm in pretty good shape and mentally I'd say as well.

Q. Are you relaxed into this tournament?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah. I guess everyone's a little anxious to get the tournament underway when you've been practicing here for just over a week. You sort of want to get it started. I think in some ways the first round's a bit of a steppingstone.

Q. You unfortunately missed quite a lot of tennis this year because of your injuries. Is there any sort of pent‑up frustration or aggression inside you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not a whole heap. Obviously, missing the French Open was disappointing. But as I say, it was out of my control. You know, once it's out of your control, then there's no point worrying on it or dwelling on it. It was something I had to get out of my mind as quickly as possible. I was practicing back in Australia on clay, the one clay court that we have there. I was trying to work on my game, training extremely hard getting ready for that.

But, yeah, I had to make that decision that I wasn't able to play, which basically was from the doctors, then it was pretty much just have to focus on the grass and getting ready for that.

Q. How disappointed were you to be demoted to 3 in the seedings when your ranking is 2?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not going to talk about it right here. There's seven matches to win the tournament. You know, there's no point dwelling on it.

Q. Is it one you've got tucked away?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Mate, I'm not going to talk about it.

Q. The allergies you used to have, are they under control now? Is it place by place?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Place by place a little bit. I still sneeze now and then, get a bit of hayfever and stuff. Yeah, it's pretty good. I can control it.

Q. Is this one of the places where it's pretty good, under control here usually?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Depends on the weather here in London. I found over the years, some days are worse than others. The hot weather sometimes brings it out a little bit more. But, yeah, it doesn't worry me when I get on the court, though.

Q. Your thoughts on possibly playing James Blake next round?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's another step up, at least a step up from today's match, if not a few. You know, James has got a lot of firepower out there, and you've really got to try and exploit that, you know, put him on the back foot as much as possible.

In a lot of ways, I've got to play the consistent game out there, make him play a lot of extra shots. But he's a talented player that can play an all‑court game. In that respect it's not going to be easy because you've got to mix it up. But it's a good test to have early in the tournament, that's for sure.

Q. Has the layoff been a bit of a blessing, you can come in here fresh and ready to go?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Who knows. Yeah, I feel ready to play. I think when I made my run at the Australian Open and at the US Open last year, I played a lot of matches going into both those slaps. So in some way it's different preparation, but it doesn't bother me either way. I feel fresh at the moment, I feel physically in good shape. If you can get the first week under your belt, get into the second week, I don't think it's going to play a big part in the tournament for me.

Q. Men from Australia and the US have dominated this tournament. Now you see countries like Spain, France and Germany have more players than the US, like Belgium have more players than Australia. Do you see a power shift going on geographically in the sport, something cyclical?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Definitely something's changed or gone wrong for Australia and the US, I guess. But on Australia's part, we don't have enough players. What have we got? We've got four guys in the main draw, the men's. One is a wildcard, one is a protected ranking who is going to retire soon, then we've got Wayne and myself. It's really not good enough for our country.

We've got to try and find a way of producing, you know, young kids to come up. This tournament is a huge tournament back in Australia. The tradition of talking about Wimbledon, even people that don't understand tennis, they know what Wimbledon is about. That's why I think it's held such a rich tradition in Australia and the top Australian players over the last 10, 20 years, or longer, because we've had so many great champions here.

Q. Have you spoken at all, a new development with a new guy being appointed in Australia, have you spoken to him at all or are you aware of his background?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't spoken to him. I don't know what he looks like to tell you the truth. I think he's South African. Yeah, I'd be interested to talk to him. But now is not the right time. Obviously, you know, maybe around Davis Cup time when I get back home, I'd definitely like to sit down and talk to him.

I think we've got to try and use a lot more of the top guys that have just come off the tour, there's no doubt about that, as coaching around Australia and to help the younger guys. We've got so many guys that are capable, Jason Stoltenberg is the perfect example of that, someone that can be based in Australia and work with the top Juniors. Whenever Todd Woodbridge stops, they're the first people that should pick up on him.

Q. You're still young yourself, but after your career...

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't even thought about me at that stage. I'm just worrying about hopefully getting ‑‑ hopefully I'll be playing long enough to play with some of these next‑tier guys that come through. At the moment it's more looking at the guys that can help and change that.

Q. Have you spoken to the cricketers?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I had a message from Gilchrist.

Q. What have you been thinking watching them over the last week?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm thinking that England, we'll come back to bite 'em. That's what I'm thinking.

Q. How do you rate the Ashes chances?

LLEYTON HEWITT: England talk themselves up every time. I don't know. Obviously they've got a bit better unit this year. Our side, it's proven. We've had some better wins I think over the last couple years than England have.

Q. You mentioned the US. What do you think of the factors to their blip?

LLEYTON HEWITT: The US is definitely ahead of Australia at the moment. They've got a group of guys that came up just behind Andy Roddick: Dent, Fish, Ginepri, Morrison, these kind of guys, right now they're not the world beaters, not the Top 5, Top 10 in the world, but they're playing tournaments week in and week out on the tour. Australia doesn't even have that at the moment.

Obviously you need someone like a Roddick to carry the flag for America, especially the power of the United States, tennis needs, the sport needs a top player from that country, there's no doubt about it. Hopefully Roddick is going to stay up there for a while.

I don't know what their program is like, but they've been able to produce ‑‑ they've been very fortunate to have guys like Sampras, Courier, Agassi, Chang, these guys coming up all the time. You get a little bit spoiled I think.

Q. There's only one American ranked in the top 16 for the first time this 37 years. What do you attribute that to?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. Wouldn't have a clue. What is Agassi ranked?

Q. That are playing here now.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Thanks (smiling).

Q. Are you in any discomfort at all from the ribs now?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, it's pretty good at the moment. I felt a couple of little twinges around maybe early Queen's when I was practicing, that was about it. Since then I haven't felt a thing. It's been great. I've been able to get in the gym and do pretty much as I normally would, which is good.

Q. What was the nature of the injury? Did you fall somehow?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I slipped down ‑‑ I was going to practice, and I slipped down some stairs in my house in Sydney. I just fell on my back and cracked two of my ribs in my back. It was pretty painful at the time.

Q. Slippery stairs?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I was wearing socks. Had my shoes at the bottom of the stairs. I was carrying my change of clothes.

Q. How would you rate your serve now compared to three years ago when you won the title?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Week in and week out I think it's better now. I've got more variety now. The only thing ‑‑ those two weeks I served extremely well when I needed to, when I went on to win the tournament here. It's hard to sort of rate it because it was one tournament and I served as well as I've ever served for those two weeks.

Q. Do you see that as a key to your progress?

LLEYTON HEWITT: For sure, for sure. I think that's definitely helped me over the last 18 months or so. It's an area we've been working on. I'm a good enough returner that I'm going to get opportunities to break if I can clean up my service games.

Socket
06-20-2005, 04:54 PM
Not that I'm expecting to see it, but does anyone know if ESPN in the US showed any of Lleyton's match today? I am recording everything ESPN says they are showing today, but I have to wait until later before I see what I got. Just curious!

Oh! and congrats to Lleyton for winning round 1 !!!
ESPN Classic (which I don't get) would have shown it, because it fell during that channel's 8-10 am timeslot. But I suppose that the main match would have Federer's.

scythe19pro
06-20-2005, 06:29 PM
well done lleyton !:banana:





Hewitt back in the groove
By Jessica White
June 21, 2005

LLEYTON Hewitt shrugged off a seeding controversy and an injury-ravaged preparation to reach the second round at Wimbledon with a commanding 6-3, 6-3, 6-1 victory over Belgian Christophe Rochus.

Hewitt had been upset about being seeded third behind last year's Wimbledon runner-up Andy Roddick despite being slightly ahead of the American in the official rankings.


And he had played only three matches in the past three months as he first underwent toe surgery and then suffered cracked ribs in a freak accident at home.

But Hewitt has always thrived on adversity and he began confidently against a nervous Rochus with six aces in his first two service games before breaking the Belgian's serve in the fourth game with a gentle volley and his trademark cry of "come on!".

Rochus fought back immediately breaking the 2002 Wimbledon champion and sealing the next game with a powerful running forehand around the net as Hewitt began to look a little rusty with a series of unforced errors.

The momentum did not shift Hewitt's way until a tense eighth game which had three deuces and which the 24-year-old Australian finally took when the Belgian sprayed a forehand wide.

Hewitt held serve with little effort to claim the set and signalled his intentions early in the second by breaking his opponent in the first game.

Rochus had no answer to the Australian's relentless barrage as Hewitt mixed thumping aces with gentle volleys and hunted down every ball.

By the time Rochus mustered another challenge, it was well into the third set, when he pushed Hewitt to deuce three times but could not break serve.

Advertisement:



Seemingly broken in spirit, Rochus appeared spent after that and offered little resistance as Hewitt swept the match. The Australian reacted with huge relief at the end of the match, after a tough build-up to the tournament.

Socket
06-20-2005, 06:38 PM
I was listening to one of the channels on the BBC internet radio, which broadcast Lleyton's match, and the commentators said that his forehand's timing was off, although it got better as the match went on. Certainly, his serving was excellent, and the commentators praised Lleyton for how well he did on second serves, including not being afraid to go for a big second serve. Hopefully, he'll improve for the second round.

scythe19pro
06-20-2005, 06:38 PM
from wimbledon site



Match Reports

Hewitt Routs Rochus


http://www.wimbledon.org/images/pics/thumbs/m_01_hewitt11_ap_a_grant.jpg (http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/photos/imagepages/2005-06-20/200506201119281396177.html)
©AP/ A.Grant

Monday, June 20, 2005

Impending fatherhood to look forward to, wedding arrangements to make and the small matter of a grand slam title to win - Lleyton Hewitt is a busy man at the moment.

As Bec Cartwright, soon to be Mrs Hewitt, looked on, her fiancé served his way into the second round, cruising past Christophe Rochus of Belgium 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. He pinged down 19 aces, 32 unreturnable serves and 43 clean winners. Against that sort of form, Rochus did not stand a chance.

Rochus is the older, slightly taller but slightly less successful of the two Belgian brothers. He is two inches higher than his diminutive 5'5" sibling, Olivier, but, at No. 47, 12 places lower in the world pecking order. Olivier, whose greatest ambition in life is "to be taller", has had some memorable moments at Wimbledon, not the least of which was beating his brother in the opening round in 2002 and then going on to oust Marat Safin in the second.

Christophe's best result came in 2000 when he reached the second round. He was walloped by Sjeng Schalken when he got there but at least he had won a match.

Then again, the rest of the circuit has not been treating Rochus too kindly, either. Regardless of the surface or the time of year, he had managed to lose in the first round of eight tournaments on his way to Wimbledon. And, once Hewitt has worked out what to do about Rochus's slice and nippy wee legs, the Belgian never looked likely to improve on that record.

Once the first set had been banked, Hewitt began to run away with the match. From time to time Rochus would see the door slightly ajar, with the sight of a chance in the distance, and then Hewitt would slam it shut again. After an exchange of breaks at the start of the first set, Hewitt got his nose in front to take a 5-3 lead and from there he never looked back. And the better Hewitt got, the more Rochus looked like he desperately wanted to be somewhere else.

This is only Hewitt's second tournament since the middle of March. Hurting his foot in the final of the Indian Wells Masters, he had a minor operation to repair the damage but, just when he thought he was ready to return to active service, he fell down the stairs in his new Sydney home and cracked a rib. Easing his way back at Queen's Club 10 days ago, he was outgunned by Ivo Karlovic in the quarter-finals.

Since then Hewitt has clearly been hard at work on the practice court. Even if Rochus was not the strongest of opponents, the Australian still looked keen, eager and sharp. Applying the pressure at will, no part of his game seemed rusty and he was looking perfectly at home on the manicured turf of No.1 Court.

scythe19pro
06-20-2005, 06:45 PM
Hewitt Carries Australia's Hopes


http://www.wimbledon.org/images/pics/thumbs/m_01_hewitt04_getty_p_cole.jpg (http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/photos/imagepages/2005-06-20/200506201119274989581.html)
©Getty/ P.Cole

Monday, 20 June, 2005

The Australians keep a close eye on Lleyton Hewitt, the nation's only player remotely in with a chance of winning the Wimbledon title it once almost owned.

John Newcombe, three times singles Champion, poked his head around the door when Hewitt was giving his press conference after winning his opening match on No. 1 Court. Tony Roche, Newcombe's old doubles partner when they dominated Wimbledon, is at The Championships coaching Roger Federer but he would have known all about Hewitt as well.

Hewitt cannot avoid being Australia's lone hope. He won the title three years ago so he knows the business of winning on grass. In Australia they hope he knows the business just as well this time.

"On Australia's part, we don't have enough players," said Hewitt as he assessed his country's part in the tennis world. "What have we got? We've got four guys in the main draw, the men's. One is a wild card, one is a protected ranking who is going to retire soon, then we've got Wayne (Arthurs) and myself. It is really not good enough for our country.

"We have got to try to find a way of producing young kids to come up. This tournament is a huge tradition back in Australia. There is a tradition of talking about Wimbledon - even people that don't understand tennis know what Wimbledon is about. That is why it has held such a rich tradition in Australia. We have had so many great champions here."

Hewitt started The Championships against Christophe Rochus of Belgium, winning in straight sets. Afterwards he said: "All grass is different, but today it was pretty slow, very slow. It felt very soft out there. I've got no doubt though it's going to quicken up over the next two weeks the more play it gets on it. I think because the show courts didn't have any play they were very green out there today. But with both of us playing from the back of the court, we were leaving imprints in the court. It was that soft."

Hewitt's year included two injury periods, the second of which put him out of the French Open when he fell downstairs at his house in Sydney and cracked two ribs. And now? "It's pretty good at the moment," the Australian said. "I felt a couple of little twinges when I was practising. That was about it. Since then I haven't felt a thing. It's been great. I've been able to get to the gym and do pretty much as I normally would, which is good."

Hewitt assessed his serve compared with when he won the Wimbledon title. "Week in, week out, I think it's better now," he said. "I've got more variety. Those two weeks I served really well when I needed to, when I went on to win the tournament here. I'm a good enough returner that I am going to get opportunities to break if I can clean up my service games."

scythe19pro
06-20-2005, 06:59 PM
here in romania they're gonna show lleyton's match tomorrow morning. Can't wait. I'm gonna watch it although I know the score. I haven't seen much of lleyton this year.

Yasmine
06-20-2005, 07:06 PM
here in romania they're gonna show lleyton's match tomorrow morning. Can't wait. I'm gonna watch it although I know the score. I haven't seen much of lleyton this year.
Good for you I know the feeling! when you get so little coverage, as soon as you can see a match even if it's after it's played you're up for it :hug: I'm quite dissapointed with french channels today, they only showed women's tennis :o but I found a couple of other channels showing mens... I'll just have to learn german or italian :cool:

Socket
06-20-2005, 07:52 PM
Jan Hernych has just beaten James Blake in 4 sets, so now we know Lleyton's second round opponent. I don't believe they have ever played before. I guess most people were expecting Blake to come through. I hope that Rasheed scouted at least part of this match.

Turkeyballs Paco
06-20-2005, 07:55 PM
:eek: I hope Lleyton's ready for him.

I guess we can't expect ESPN to show it if James Blake isn't playing. :rolleyes:

Socket
06-20-2005, 08:03 PM
:eek: I hope Lleyton's ready for him.

I guess we can't expect ESPN to show it if James Blake isn't playing. :rolleyes:
Yeah, I'll be surprised if ESPN shows this one. They'll probably show a re-run of Federer's match before they'll show Lleyton. :rolleyes:

I guess the good news about Lleyton playing Hernych is Lleyton's superior big match experience and his slam experience. Lleyton should play on Centre Court on Wednesday, because he played on Court 1 today. That might the first time for Hernych, and some players get intimidated by that. And personally, I think that, given their past history, Blake would like to beat Lleyton more than he would like to beat any other player (although he's such a goody-goody, he'd never admit that), and he always seems to play his best tennis against Lleyton. So, all in all, I'm pretty happy with the way things turned out (to be revisited on Wednesday, of course!).

sprinterluck
06-20-2005, 08:19 PM
Lleyton's BBC Interview video after the Rochus match is online:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/video_and_audio/default.stm#
Click Hewitt happy after easing past Rochus

Socket
06-20-2005, 08:32 PM
That video interview is really nice. Lleyton is looking great these days. Thanks for the link, sprinterluck.

Socket
06-20-2005, 09:08 PM
I was just on gettyimages, and there's one photo of the players' box that identifies Bec as "Hewitt's fiancee" and Cherilynn as "Hewitt's wife." :rolls:

Socket
06-20-2005, 09:12 PM
BTW, it looks like Lleyton shaved his "beard."

:worship: :woohoo: :hatoff: :banana: :aparty: :yippee: :bigclap: :clap2: :bounce:

FanOfHewitt
06-20-2005, 10:20 PM
Got a chance to watch Hewitt play. Was definitely rusty and was missing a lot of makeable shots.

Nonetheless I was really impressed with his court coverage. It seems that dropping a bit of upperbody weight with the rib injury might have made him a little lighter on his feet. Moved very fast around the court.

Hopefully he gets a handful of matches here under his belt and is extra sharp by the time Davis Cup comes around.

scythe19pro
06-21-2005, 06:27 AM
Hewitt to fight 'crisis'
From correspondents in London
June 21, 2005

LLEYTON Hewitt fired his first big Wimbledon shot off court this morning (AEST), warning Australian tennis is in crisis.

Lamenting the dwindling numbers of Aussies on the international circuit, the former Wimbledon champion said "something has changed or gone wrong for Australia and the United States".

Speaking after his comfortable 6-3 6-3 6-1 first-round win over Belgian Christophe Rochus, Hewitt said the state of tennis in Australia is worrying.

"Something has changed or gone wrong for Australia and the United States. Just in the Australian part, we don't have enough players.

"We've got four guys in the main draw in the men's and one's a wildcard (Mark Philippoussis), one's a protected ranking that's going to retire soon (Scott Draper) and then you've got Wayne (Arthurs) and myself," he said.

"It's really not good enough for our country. We have got to try and find a way for young kids to come up."

Hewitt said Australia's low representation at Wimbledon is particularly disappointing given the esteem with which the tournament is held in his country, and vowed to do his best to help Tennis Australia with improving the status of the game back home.

And Hewitt's views were echoed by Mark Philippoussis, who also reached the second round with a 7-5 6-4 6-2 win over Slovakia's Karol Beck.

"I definitely agree with him. You've got to look at the players coming up and unfortunately we don't have too much. There's no one stepping up, no one qualifying or in the top 100," said Philippoussis.

Advertisement:

Earlier, Hewitt shrugged off a seeding controversy and an injury-ravaged preparation to serve 19 blistering aces in advancing to the second round.



Hewitt, who was upset about being seeded third behind last year's Wimbledon runner-up Andy Roddick despite being ahead of the American in the official rankings, had played only three matches in the past three months as he first underwent toe surgery and then suustained cracked ribs in a freak accident at home.

But the 24-year-old has always thrived on adversity, and he began confidently against a nervous Rochus with six aces in his first two service games before breaking the Belgian's serve in the fourth game with a subtle volley.

Rochus fought back immediately, breaking the 2002 Wimbledon champion's serve and sealing the next game with a powerful running forehand around the net.

But, the momentum shifted in a tense eighth game, which Hewitt finally clinched as at deuce, Rochus double faulted and then sprayed a forehand wide.

Hewitt held serve with little effort to claim the set and signalled his intentions early in the second by breaking his opponent in the first game.

Rochus had no answer to the Australian's relentless barrage as Hewitt served thumping aces and hunted down every ball.

By the time Rochus mustered another challenge, it was well into the third set, when he pushed Hewitt to deuce three times but could not break serve despite holding four break points.

"The grass felt very soft but it will quicken up over the next two weeks," said Hewitt who refused to discuss the seeding row.

"I didn't feel my ribs were affected by my serving but the first round is always tough and it was good to get the win under my belt. It was a good hit without wasting a lot of energy." Hewitt plays Jan Hernych in the second round after the Czech beat American James Blake in four sets.

Goonergal
06-21-2005, 01:45 PM
I managed to get an (unexpected) ticket to watch Lleyton at Wimbledon yesterday :eek: So, I will write a report later :)

Nimomunz
06-21-2005, 03:46 PM
I managed to get an (unexpected) ticket to watch Lleyton at Wimbledon yesterday :eek: So, I will write a report later :)
goooooooooood for you!! :wavey:

scythe19pro
06-21-2005, 09:08 PM
Wednesday OOP

Court 1 1.00 pm Start

1 Ladies' Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Marissa Irvin (USA)
vs. Kim Clijsters (BEL)[15]



2 Gentlemen's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Roger Federer (SUI)[1]
vs. Ivo Minar (CZE)



3 Gentlemen's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3]
vs. Jan Hernych (CZE)




Court 1 again?? He deserves center court.
go LL !!!:banana:

Socket
06-21-2005, 09:28 PM
3 Gentlemen's Singles - 2nd Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3]
vs. Jan Hernych (CZE)




Court 1 again?? He deserves center court.
go LL !!!:banana:
I have to agree on this. Safin, who is seeded below him, and is not a Wimbledon champion, is on Centre Court again, instead of Lleyton. He's really getting shafted by the effing Brits this year.

flip_fan
06-21-2005, 10:08 PM
I have to agree on this. Safin, who is seeded below him, and is not a Wimbledon champion, is on Centre Court again, instead of Lleyton. He's really getting shafted by the effing Brits this year.

yeah but safin is playing mark, who has a great record at the championships... its the match of the tournament so far, so of course the organisers would put it on centre court.

Goonergal
06-21-2005, 10:43 PM
yeah but safin is playing mark, who has a great record at the championships... its the match of the tournament so far, so of course the organisers would put it on centre court.
Tbh, I agree. As a spectacle (and a one off) I'd rather go & see Marat Vs Mark, and I think that this match does deserve centre court over LL/Henrych. I'm sure Lleyton will get centre soon.

SomL.
06-22-2005, 10:28 AM
Go Lleyton against Jan Hernych ^_^

scythe19pro
06-22-2005, 06:45 PM
well done LL !!:bigclap:

great comeback in the 2nd set winning 5 games in a row!

scythe19pro
06-22-2005, 07:36 PM
Match Reports

Hewitt On a High

http://www.wimbledon.org/images/pics/thumbs/m_03_hewitt_122_epa_g_penny.jpg (http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/photos/imagepages/2005-06-22/200506221119456995950.html)
©EPA/ G.Penny


Wednesday, June 22, 2005

Lleyton Hewitt booked his place in the third round by beating Jan Hernych 6-2, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. The Czech, ranked 66, made the third seed work hard in the middle phase of the match, but it was a losing battle.

Hernych got off to a depressing start, surrendering his serve immediately. Hewitt, on the other hand, was all instant confidence and authority despite the blazing summer heat of No.1 Court. Hernych could do little to halt the tide, and the set was gone inside the half hour.

Hewitt looked sharp and is clearly recovered from the surgery he underwent in March to remove a cyst from his right foot. It was not that injury which kept him out of last month's French Open (breaking a run of 25 consecutive Slam appearances) but an injury to two ribs, cracked in an accident at home in Sydney. He returned in time for some grass court preparation at Queen's, succumbing to Ivo Karlovic in the quarter-finals.

Back on No.1 Court, no one seemed more surprised than Hernych at the start of the second set when he managed to break Hewitt and went up 3-0. Hewitt's unforced error count was creeping up, and Hernych was less overawed. He held on long enough to win a set point at 5-3, but could not manage the clincher. Predictably Hewitt battled back to take it 7-5.

But the Czech had acquired a taste for the fight, and was not about to fold. Instead in the third set he broke Hewitt again for 4-2, and this time he held on. The Australian was angry with himself and went into maximum fist-pumping mode to get himself going. It worked, generating an instant break of serve, and Hewitt never looked back.

Time passes quickly in elite sport. One moment it seems as if a new player is set to dominate, the next someone still younger and hungrier has changed the story. Even though he is still just 24, Hewitt's Wimbledon victory of 2002 seems strangely distant. For a while the period after that triumph seemed punctuated by a mental uncertainty damaging the authority of Hewitt's game. The same period also witnessed the full flowering of Roger Federer's formidable talent.

Now Hewitt's problems appear to be receding, and he is once again becoming the player we first met. But during this Wimbledon it is highly likely the Australian will have to face both Marat Safin and Federer if he is even to reach the final, never mind lift the trophy.

Will it play on Hewitt's mind that he lost to Safin in this year's Australian final, and to Federer in last autumn's US Open final?

One step at a time. Next up for Hewitt is Justin Gimelstob, ranked 123 and a lucky loser from the qualifying tournament. But the amenable American is struggling with a back injury, and admits he will need to be "firing on all cylinders and ready to go to work" against Hewitt, who "brings so many skills to the table". A place in next Monday's last 16 is already beckoning the Australian.

Socket
06-22-2005, 07:45 PM
Wow, I was ready to spit nails when Lleyon couldn't convert those 4 BPs at the start of the third set! But maybe a tough match like this is just what he needed to work his way into the tournament.

Anybody know if ESPN covered any of the match?

star
06-22-2005, 07:49 PM
Yes. ESPN covered a lot of it. They cut away for other matches. I'm not sure exactly how much they showed.

NOMAD
06-22-2005, 08:35 PM
Hewitt Battles Through

By Mark Staniforth, PA Sport


Lleyton Hewitt battled through a tough four-set clash with Czech Jan Hernych today to book a place in the third round of Wimbledon.

The former champion did not have things all his own way against the world number 66, who briefly threatened an upset before Hewitt finally came through 6-2 7-5 3-6 6-3.


And the Australian said he was grateful for a challenge which he believes will improve his chances for his imminent third round clash with Justin Gimelstob and beyond.

Hewitt said: “To get a tough four-set match under my belt is going to hold me in better stead for the rest of the tournament.

“You have got to get out of some tough matches in the first round of all Grand Slams, and today it was nice to get there.

“I got off to a good start, had a couple of lapses in the second and third sets, but was able to concentrate when I had to and play the bigger points well.”

Hewitt mixed up his typical baseline play with aplomb and also hit 15 aces to move into the next round.

Eighth seed Nikolay Davydenko became the biggest casualty of the men’s draw so far when he retired hurt from his match against Sweden’s Jonas Bjorkman.

The Russian 24-year-old was leading 7-6 2-1 when he was forced to quit with a wrist injury, enabling Bjorkman to progress to a third round meeting with Mikhail Youzhny.

Former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero advanced after an epic 6-4 3-6 4-6 6-3 6-3 win over Hyung-Taik Lee of Korea.

Ferrero, who reached the fourth round at the All England Club two years ago, is seeded 23 this year after being ruled out for much of last year due to illness and injury.

Unseeded American Gimelstob caused a minor surprise by overcoming 29th seeded Chilean Nicolas Massu 6-3 4-6 7-6 7-6.

And Gimelstob’s compatriot Taylor Dent also moved quietly through to the third round beating Kevin Kim 6-3 6-4 6-4.

Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean completed a marathon 3-6 7-5 4-6 7-6 6-4 victory over compatriot Michael Llodra in a first round match held over from the previous night.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wimbledon-Hewitt hammers into round three
Wed Jun 22, 2005 8:16 PM BST
Printer Friendly | Email Article | RSS

By Ossian Shine

LONDON, June 22 (Reuters) - World number two Lleyton Hewitt fired his way into the third round of Wimbledon on Wednesday with a workmanlike 6-2 7-5 3-6 6-3 win over Jan Hernych.

The beefed-up Australian, better known for his baseline tenacity, smacked 15 aces past the Czech as he advanced.

"Not too bad in patches," Hewitt quipped. "For me it's just nice to get through it and into the third round now. I feel pretty good.

"My body feels good. To get a tough one under my belt today that will hold me in good stead later in the tournament. That's what you've got to do."

Champion in 2002 before Roger Federer took a grip of the Wimbledon crown, Hewitt next faces Justin Gimelstob.

The American beat Olympic champion Nicolas Massu of Chile 6-3 4-6 7-6 7-6.

"Mate, Gimelstob played well ... that's a good win for him," Hewitt said.

"Yeah, his serve's obviously his biggest weapon. He's going to serve volley a hell of a lot.

"He plays with a lot of passion out there, as well. He's a guy that's always going to leave everything on the court.

"I'm going to have to return well and pass well and be very sharp out there. It's not going to be a long rallies against Justin."

Hewitt is seeded to meet champion and top seed Federer in the semi-finals.

Socket
06-22-2005, 08:37 PM
Yes. ESPN covered a lot of it. They cut away for other matches. I'm not sure exactly how much they showed.
Well, I guess that's the most I can expect these days from ESPN. Thanks for the head's up.

NOMAD
06-22-2005, 08:41 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 3
Wednesday, June 22, 2005


Q. Were you happy with the way you played?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not too bad in patches. You know, for me it's just nice to get through it and into the third round now.

Q. What are your thoughts on Justin Gimelstob?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, obviously he's come through quallies and then had especially a good win today against Massu. I know it's not Massu's favorite surface, but he's a tough competitor on any surface. You know, he's hungry out there. He leaves everything out on the court. So Justin obviously had to play extremely well to beat him in a tight four‑set match.

I look forward to the challenge in the next round.

Q. Did you get a chance to catch up with Mark yet about his injury?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't, no.

Q. From a Davis Cup point of view, does it encourage you that Mark is getting back to something like his old form?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's great to see Mark playing like we all know he can, and that he has for so many years. He had a lot of chances from what I saw and heard out there today against Marat. Marat's a tough player on any surface. He's got so much firepower.

Two tiebreaks could have gone either way. Could have been a different story.

Q. Personally, physically having had that break, coming in now second round at Wimbledon, are you back A‑Okay? Will you even feel fresher for having that time off?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know about "fresher," but I feel pretty good. I can't complain right at the moment. The body feels good. Obviously, to get a tough four‑set match today under my belt, that's just going to hold me in better stead for the longer I go in the tournament.

Yeah, you've got to get out of, you know, some tough matches in the first week of all Grand Slams. Today it was nice to get out there. I got off to a good start, you know, had a couple of lapses throughout the second and third set, but I was able to concentrate when I needed to and play the bigger points well.

Q. After a long layoff, what do you think the easiest surface is to come back on for a player?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Probably hard court.

Q. Why would that be?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, for most guys, unless you're Argentinian or Spaniard, obviously clay. A lot of guys ‑‑ for me, personally, because I grew up on hard court, so movement‑wise, ball striking, it gives you a lot of rhythm I think on a hard court.

But then again, the clay court specialists, clay is probably the easiest for them to come back purely because they're sliding. For them, that gives them a lot of rhythm, you know, going out there and hitting hundred‑ball rallies.

Q. During the BBC coverage, the cameras were on your girlfriend and your family. Pat Cash was heard to remark, "I beat she's up the duff." I just wonder if you mind your girlfriend being talked about like that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: What did he say?

Q. Pat Cash was commenting on the game. The camera came across your girlfriend. He remarked, thinking his microphone was off, "I bet she's up the duff." The BBC apologized for that. I wonder if you mind her being talked about like that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, Pat's ‑‑ Pat always comes out with some loose comments now and then. Yeah, I was talking to Pat in the locker room just before. He obviously didn't bring that up (laughter). We're obviously pretty good mates. You know, I've got a lot of respect for him as a person.

Q. No offense taken?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, not from me.

Q. Do you feel like you're trying to restore a bit of lost Aussie sporting pride the way the cricketers started off at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. Is that the only thing you guys have won?

Q. Early days.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Very early days, mate.

Q. Are you a cricket fan?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think any Australian likes cricket. We love winning.

Q. Do you think they'll come back and win the Ashes?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Got no doubt.

Q. No doubt?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No doubt.

Q. How long have you had it over here, the Monaro? Do you get it to take it for burns much?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, it's not mine. My coach's fiancee actually has a dealership with Holden. Her father has a dealership with Holden in Adelaide. Roger got the car to drive around for a couple of weeks.

Q. Does it turn heads when you're driving it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't driven it.

Q. Going back a fair way against Gimelstob, but anything ‑‑ you were a young bloke when you played him. Can you remember anything of those matches?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, his serve's obviously his biggest weapon. He's going to serve‑volley a hell of a lot. He plays with a lot of passion out there, as well. He's a guy that's always going to leave everything on the court. I'm going to have to return well and pass well and be very sharp out there. It's not going to be a long rallies against Justin.

Socket
06-22-2005, 08:51 PM
I'm not British, and even I know that "up the duff" means pregnant. From the fact that the BBC apologized, I guess it has impolite overtones. Or perhaps they were apologizing for the fact that Pat Cash is such an idiot that he was the last person in the tennis world to know that Bec is pregnant.

In any event, Lleyton was smart not to take the bait that whoever asked the question was obviously holding out in front of him. Looks like that person was trying to start another spat like Cash had with Flip a few years ago.

Neely
06-22-2005, 09:29 PM
Well done, Lleyton! C'MON!!! :banana: :bounce: Through to third round, next one is Gimelstob!

Yasmine
06-22-2005, 11:42 PM
In any event, Lleyton was smart not to take the bait that whoever asked the question was obviously holding out in front of him. Looks like that person was trying to start another spat like Cash had with Flip a few years ago.
I agree Marlene! He did really well at staying smart about it and take no offence... The journalists are lacking imagination trying to dig that kinda stuff out. And they also brought the cricket back, not that I mind but did they run out of subjects or what? :rolleyes:

ON another note, I got news from Mandy, and gosh I'm jealous. I suppose she went all the way from Australia to Europe now she's at Wimbly she's making the most of it. You probably will guess that oday she had tickets for court one and therefore watched Kim, Federer and Lleyton (my 3 faves, I wanna go back there :smash:)

SomL.
06-23-2005, 11:53 AM
Well done Lleyton ^_^ Good luck to the thrid round !!!!!!!!

NOMAD
06-23-2005, 06:47 PM
Lleyton will be first on centre court (finally!) C'mon!!! :bounce:

Centre Court 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3] vs. Justin Gimelstob (USA)



2 Ladies' Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Roberta Vinci (ITA) vs. Kim Clijsters (BEL)[15]


3 Gentlemen's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Roger Federer (SUI)[1] vs. Nicolas Kiefer (GER)[25]

Turkeyballs Paco
06-23-2005, 10:55 PM
c'mon lleyton! :kiss:

SomL.
06-24-2005, 12:30 PM
Go Lleyton against Justin Gimelstob ^_^ Come on Lleyton ^_^

bavaria100
06-24-2005, 06:02 PM
Great match by Lleyton. It´s a shame that he is in Roger´s side of the draw. I am sure he would reach the final if he would be in Andy´s half.

NOMAD
06-24-2005, 06:30 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 5
Friday, June 24, 2005


Q. What did you think of Gimelstob's diving?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Spent more time on the ground than he did standing up, didn't he? :p Yeah, some of them, you know, I guess were pretty spectacular, but there were others he probably dived a little bit when he could have stood up and made a volley, I guess.

Gets the crowd involved. That's the kind of tennis that Justin likes to play. He likes to play high‑energy tennis and get the crowd involved. In those situations, you know, you got to take your hat off to the guy who is throwing himself all around the place.

Q. How do you (indiscernible) this match with the next match against Dent?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, very similar. Taylor's going to be the same sort of player. You know, Justin served extremely well today. That at least gave me a look at what I'm going to face on Monday. You know, I've just got to get mentally right to return well and go out there and believe in my passing shots and play a solid match from the back of the court, as well.

Q. How pleased are you so far with your form? Is it coming along nicely?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah. I can definitely still play. It's nice to be in the fourth round now. Especially the last two matches, there's been a lot of tight points out there, which is what I need when I haven't played a lot of matches. In that respect, it's been good that I've had to come up and play some big points, especially against Justin in the first‑set tiebreak today. When it really counted I was able to lift another notch.

That's what you're going to have to need when you have to face guys like Federer, Taylor Dent, these kind of guys in the next round. That preparation's definitely been good so far.

Q. What do you got on for the weekend?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Don't know. Just practice and, you know, keep the timing up. It's a little bit strange having two days off in the middle of a Slam. But, yeah, it's just a matter of keeping your focus there, you know, keep the timing going, you know. I can have a good hit out tomorrow.

Q. Is there a part of you that would rather get the Monaro and go for a drive and forget about tennis for a while?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, no, I'm not here to do that.

Q. Does the weather have anything to do with the way you played? Would you say you adjust to it better than other players or not? The warm weather here, does it make conditions that much different?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really that much, I don't think. The courts ‑‑ Centre Court was definitely playing a lot quicker and harder today than Court 1 in my first two matches. But that's always going to happen. Obviously, with the weather, it's definitely helped.

Yeah, it's always going to happen the more that play gets played on these match courts, especially the show courts. It's going to get roughed up a bit, quicker, the ball's going to be shooting through a lot more.

Q. You said the first week is a survival week. You pick it up in the second week. How much do you think you'll need to pick your game up next week?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, at the moment, I'm just worrying about Taylor Dent. I'm not looking any further than that. I still feel like I got to play better to guarantee myself a win against Taylor. I've got to play better again because he's capable of playing very good tennis, and he can sustain it over five sets, especially on a grass court.

Yeah, I feel like I can definitely go up a notch or two, though.

Q. The British media put heaps of pressure on players like Henman, Rusedski. They're out. They're also making Murray the new king of Wimbledon. Do you feel you get similar pressure now that you've won a few slams? Do you think the Australian media put the same sort of pressure on you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know about pressure. I think you're in the spotlight the whole time. I think what Henman's had over the last, you know, eight years or so now, it's been pretty amazing. The whole country really stops for him every time he steps on the court here at Wimbledon. It's amazing. It's like the British people forget that there's another three majors out there, as well, that Tim made a semi in two of them last year as well.

I reckon Tim's a great guy and I think he's done a hell of a job handling the situation. I think his record speaks for itself here, to be that consistent.

But obviously in Australia, I feel, especially now that we don't have so many guys like the Rafters, Philippoussises up there in the Top 10 any more, then obviously the eyes, especially this year, were all on me. I felt like I handled it pretty well.

Q. What about the Dent name in Australian tennis? What does it mean there?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, not a whole heap when he's got USA written at the end of his name. Not a whole heap.

Q. What about Phil?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. I don't know enough about Phil as a player. I know all the ‑‑ he's very good mates with JA, a lot of the older guys who have played Davis Cup for Australia. But for me, he's been in America for such a long time, I've had nothing to do with him.

Q. Is somebody like Taylor Dent the perfect next match for you in the sense that he's a dangerous player, probably not Federer, but he's the next rung up the ladder for you in your development in the course over the next two weeks?

LLEYTON HEWITT: In some ways, yeah. But I've had a lot of tough matches with Taylor in the past. I'm going to be, you know, ready to go mentally as soon as I get out on the court against him. Yeah, he's a tough competitor. He's not going to give me too many cheap points out there. He's obviously got a great serve‑and‑volley game. He's going to keep coming at me all day. A few years ago we played a tight five‑setter here, which, you know, was a pretty memorable match.

I'm going to have to work just as hard as I did that day if I'm going to get over the line.

Q. Do you have a look during the tournament at how the others are playing? Have you looked at Federer's games, taken account of his form?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't watched any of the Rodge.

Q. You lost to Taylor at the very start of the year at Adelaide. Can you take anything out of that in terms of his style, anything he may have had up his sleeve?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I won't take a whole heap out of that. Yeah, obviously he played extremely well that whole week, you know, made the final there. I had a lot of opportunities in that match and wasn't able to take them. Lead a break early in the second set, I think. Just wasn't quite timing the ball as well as I did the next three weeks in Sydney and the Australian Open. That's obviously where I wanted to be, you know, hitting my strokes a bit more in Melbourne.

Yeah, this is a Grand Slam. This is over five sets. So, you know, it will be a little bit different.

Q. Having won here before, do you ever get in a situation where you feel as if it's on, the title is on this year, or is it literally you never know till you've won the next match?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's so many dangerous players out there, you can't look ‑‑ everyone has a go at all the players or athletes for saying "One match at a time." You literally have to look at it that way.

Yeah, and I've been on the hand of upsets. Lost some upsets when I've been the favored player before. You can't just look too far ahead in these tournaments. Yeah, that's something that I think you learn, to really pace yourself over five sets, especially when you're playing Grand Slams and you're experienced at that.

Q. When you see people like Safin losing, potential winner, Henman is out, does that mean anything to you or do you just have to concentrate on your opponents?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, there's not a whole heap I can worry about, especially guys like Henman or Roddick. They're on the other half. There's no point in me even worrying about it right at the moment.

Obviously, Safin was in my quarter. But Feliciano Lopez, I knew that was going to be an extremely tough match for Marat on this surface. Big left‑handed serve, he's probably going to play Ancic in the next round.

Yeah, there's a reason. Every match that you get to, there's a reason why you're playing that opponent. They've obviously done something right to get that far. That's the way you've got to look at it.

Q. How does your form compare to 2002 when you won here?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. I think I played a lot of matches before I won it in 2002. Obviously, I was on autopilot a little bit, I think especially throughout the first week. Yeah, it's hard to say. The match‑ups have been probably a little bit different, as well, in terms of the guys that I've played against early in the tournament.

Yeah, I can't ‑‑ I won't look at it in the same pattern, I guess.

Q. How did the number of dives by Gimelstob in this match compare with other opponents you've ever faced?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I've never seen someone dive more, yeah.

Q. Did you watch the cricket at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yesterday, I saw a little bit yesterday.

Q. Inspiring?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, is funny, no one brings it today, do they? All the POMs have gone back in their shells.

NOMAD
06-24-2005, 07:24 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4619519.stm
Accurate placement meant Hewitt was able to convert 81% of his successful first serves :)

http://img236.echo.cx/img236/8950/0000js.png

Hagar
06-24-2005, 08:07 PM
Saw the tiebreak of the first set today.
Man, Lleyton is SO GOOD on this surface. So typical, down 3-5 in the tiebreak and two BRILLIANT returns, keeping the ball low. Just awesome.
When I saw him at Queens, it was against Karlovic and he didn't really manage to enter into a rally, but when you see him rallying on grass, really one of the best players out there.
Some of the passing shots... :eek:
Was nice to see him throw in a lawnmower as well at the end of the breaker. :devil: If he doesn't do it on grass, then where should he do it? :p

scythe19pro
06-24-2005, 08:54 PM
i saw the match too. sooooo great. i thought LL was gonna have an easy match giving the fact that Gimelstob was a lucky loser. but there were several times where this justin guy really pushed LL. In the first set he made some uncharacteristc UEs, saved a couple of break points, and eventually won the TB. In the 3rd set LL raised his game and was hitting amazing passing shots and he was winning his service games a lot easier.
well done LL!!:bounce:
next round : Dent. tough one. but i have faith :p

scythe19pro
06-24-2005, 08:56 PM
Hewitt hitting top form
From correspondents in London
June 25, 2005

LLEYTON HEWITT's impressive campaign has rolled into the third round with a convincing 7-6 (7/5) 6-4 7-5 win over injury-hit American Justin Gimelstob tonight.

Gimelstob, who had to receive treatment on his shoulder during the match, mounted a brave challenge against the third seeded Australian as he attempted a third comeback from a series of debilitating injuries.

However, Hewitt was commanding in his response, and although stretched at times completed a comfortable victory to set up a fourth-round meeting with burly American Taylor Dent.

After his 123rd ranked opponent forced the first set into a tie-break, Hewitt broke twice in the final two sets to secure a win that keeps him on course for a potential semi-final meeting with Swiss champion Roger Federer.

After a tense struggle, the match ended on an anti-climax when the feisty Gimelstob double faulted.

The American began impressively in the first set and matched Hewitt for aggression and determination as the pair engaged in a series of rallies before a bad mistake at the net gave the Australian his first set point.

Gimelstob saved it with an ace and was able to stave off another set point with the help of an incorrect line-call, forcing the set into a tie-break.

The first, hard-fought point of the decider lasted more than 10 strokes and when Gimelstob finally clinched it with a diving volley, he roared in triumph.

However, Hewitt, cheered on by his pregnant soap-star fiancee Bec Cartwright and Australia's Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald, immediately levelled the scores at 1-1 with a blistering return of serve.

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He rallied again from 2-4 down to take the tie-break 7-5 with an ace, twice belting out his trademark "Come on!" to the delight of the boisterous contingent of Australians in the crowd.



Gimelstob, who had dived in vain to save a point late in the tie-break and fallen on his arm, needed the assistance of a trainer during the break, and was granted a medical time out.

Coming back from a broken foot and a chronic back problem that has required regular cortisone injections in the lead-up to the tournament, Gimelstob winced and swore in pain as the trainer worked on his shoulder.

The gritty 28-year-old shrugged off the pain to return to the court but was broken in the third game.

Restricted by his injury, Gimelstob, who took several falls in his zealous attempts to reach seemingly impossible balls, had to stop himself from throwing his body around the court.

He had an opportunity to break Hewitt back in the sixth game but failed. Still, he continued to challenge the former world No.1, who needed two set points before moving to a two-set lead.

Socket
06-24-2005, 09:04 PM
Despite the fact that I don't include Gimelstob on my list of favorite players, if you read his post-match interview, he does have some very nice things to say about Lleyton.

Q. . What happened in the injury time‑out there?

JUSTIN GIMELSTOB: I mean, I don't want to make too much of this. I mean, he's a better player than I am, you know, and his career shows that.

I think I would have had a little bit of a better chance to maybe make the situation a little bit more competitive because, you know, there are just certain shots that I just could not execute because of the fact that, you know, I ‑‑ and I haven't done the test yet, but I think I probably have a minor tear or strain of my, you know, pec or bicep tendon.

And I just ‑‑ you know, he was serving a ton of balls to my forehand. I just couldn't stretch to my forehand or generate anything on the forehand.

But, I don't ‑‑ like I said, he's, you know, a better player than me. He's accomplished a million times more than me anyway. But I just have a ton of respect for him. A lot of guys, you know ‑‑ a lot of people give him a lot of flack because of the way he competes or something. But he is, you know, just an incredible competitor, and I just have a ton of respect for the way he plays.

Q. Where do you put his game at the moment? Do you think he can go all the way here?

JUSTIN GIMELSTOB: Yeah, I mean, I think obviously Federer's the player to beat. But, you know, he's definitely in the top echelon of players, probably the second or third favorite. I think it probably goes Federer, then Hewitt and Roddick.




Q. What did Lleyton say to you at the net? You talked.

JUSTIN GIMELSTOB: I just told him that I have ‑‑ you know, kind of what I touched on before. I just told him that I have a ton of respect for the way he competes. And a lot of people, you know, they see that, you know, he's gruff or even me today, you know, like he'll hit great shots and I'll say "nice shot," or I get a let cord and I say "sorry." He just does not acknowledge anything out there.

But you look at it from a negative standpoint, but you also have to understand here's a guy who's undersized and undermanned playing against great athletes ‑ not me being one of them ‑ but the Roger Federers, Andy Roddicks, Pete Sampras type of players, and he just has to figure out a way to try and beat them with the skills that he has.

You know, I just have tremendous respect for the fact that he goes out there and competes on the tennis court. I don't know him off the court, I mean. And people always kind of assume things by what they see from people that they see and, you know, in the spotlight, whether it's people commenting on Jennifer Aniston or Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie. Nobody really knows what's going on with those people.

It's the same with Lleyton Hewitt. You could assume based on certain things. I mean, I know I've done things on the court or situations that I hope don't, you know, summarize or epitomize what I'm all about.

But, you know, it's tough out there. It's a very competitive, you know, combative arena. I just told him that I have a lot of respect for the way he competes, and I wished him luck for the rest of the tournament. He said, "You had a good tournament," and, "keep on working hard."

Socket
06-25-2005, 01:04 AM
This is a pretty entertaining article.

Hewitt raids magic box to defeat Gimelstob in battle of the crocks
Richard Edmondson at Wimbledon
25 June 2005

Lleyton Hewitt and Justin Gimelstob must have compared scars in the locker-room before they traded blows on the Centre Court yesterday. Infirmaries around the globe are on stand-by whenever they are in the vicinity.

As anticipated, the trainer earned his fee during the third-round encounter, but the only lasting damage was statistical, as Hewitt cruised through 7-6, 6-4, 7-5.

By dint of thoughtful planning, the SW19 executive had interposed another match between this game and the women's singles that was to occur on Centre later in the day. That avoided an embarrassing coming together between Hewitt and Kim Clijsters, love's young thing at the tournament 12 months ago but now on their separate ways.

It should have been that Clijsters was Mrs Hewitt by now. Their February wedding came so close to fruition that a wedding dress was purchased. Lleyton never got the thought of matrimony in 2005 out of his mind though, and, next month, he will marry his pregnant girlfriend, Rebecca Cartwright, an actress in Home And Away. This is a soap opera, as is the programme in which Ms Cartwright appears.

Hewitt, the 2002 champion, was initially peeved when he was allotted just the No 3 seeding this year. As it is, he could not have enjoyed an easier passage thus far. Gimelstob was a third opponent surrounded by garnish and served on a platter following Christophe Rochus and Jan Hernych.

But then the Australian needs a little easing in. In late March, he had a cyst removed from his right foot. Shortly afterwards, the 24-year-old cracked two ribs when slipping down the stairs at his Sydney home.

There was, however, little sign of malfunction in the world No 2 during the early exchanges. Hewitt was dominated physically, a phenomenon he is well used to, this little harbour tug boat of a man among the supertankers at the top of world tennis. Yet no one gets on top of him mentally. As usual, he was pumped and he let us know.

Depending on your point of view, Hewitt is either a paradigm of Antipodean pluck, a celebration of the combative spark which lies dormant in most human beings, or a complete pillock. He was twitching around like a garden robin yesterday, regularly correcting the strings on his racket, hitching the shirt on the shoulder and exhorting "come on" at critical moments. There were not too many of those, however, so robin did not have to beat his breast during this encounter.

Hewitt is the sort of man who could take six bullets and still nut you on the way down. The bad times - such as yesterday's first-set tie-break - bring out the best in him. The common quality of the élite is that they find their peak in the nastiest moments.

So it was as Gimelstob gained a mini-break and threatened to take command of the match. Hewitt dipped into the magic box and produced first a pass and then a winning lob. It was the difference in the set, a difference maintained throughout the match.

Gimelstob, which may be a word from Call My Bluff, has a substantial medical log of his own. Seven months of his career have been lost to a broken foot and he was able to play here thanks only to a cortisone injection in his weakened back.

The American's doctor must have been rendered apoplectic as Gimelstob spent the entire match diving, for volleys, with varying degrees of difficulty. We had not seen anything like it since Boris Becker used to disturb the turf in SW19. "He spent more time on the ground than standing up," Hewitt said. "I've never seen anyone dive more."

The man from New Jersey had arrived at the championships as the lowest form of competitive life, a lucky loser. He retired from the qualifiers at Roehampton, where his back played up, but recovered to claim the place vacated by Andre Agassi.

Despite this unprepossessing journey, Gimelstob's presence made for a match dotted with enjoyable cameos, the American's aerobatics apart. Justin does monologue and dialogue and was not above kissing the net cord when a fluke went his way. He has, unfortunately, become a rather threadbare old teddy and hurt himself once more when straining his right arm in trying to save a first set point. From then on he was rotating the limb, apparently Mick Channon after scoring, as the trainer popped on and off court.

It almost certainly made no difference. Hewitt produced his final golden moment at 5-5 in the third set with a cross-court backhand pass which set up break point. The worms braced themselves once again as Gimelstob took off meatily, but his racket swatted nothing but air. Next up, Hewitt will have to deal with the rather slimmer and faster model of Taylor Dent.

"I have got nothing but respect for Lleyton," Gimelstob said. "He is undersized and undermanned when he is up against all those great athletes at the top of the game."

Legal | Contact us | Using our Content | © 2004 Independent Digital (UK) Ltd

Socket
06-25-2005, 01:13 AM
Another interesting article.

Hewitt leaves Gimelstob out for the count
By Martin Johnson
(Filed: 25/06/2005)

In pics: Day five action from Wimbledon
Wimbledon seedings in full
2005 singles draw

Hard to believe though it is, there is a southern hemisphere strain of Henmania, and the symptoms are disturbingly similar. Local boy plays in home Grand Slam, and an entire nation is plunged into a state of hysteria. "Give it to me straight, Doc."

"Well, it's bad news I'm afraid. Your cap is on back to front, you appear to have an Australian flag painted underneath both eyes, and there's that uncontrollable urge to shout . . . to shout . . . oh no, I think I'm coming down with it myself. C'mon Lleyton!"

In its most virulent form, Hewittitis can make Henmania look like a runny nose, and at this year's Australian Open, a niggling injury to Lleyton Hewitt's hip occupied whole newspaper pages, complete with medical diagrams. There were hourly bulletins of the kind normally reserved for royal illnesses ("We interrupt this episode of Skippy The Bush Kangaroo . . .") and when he was spotted in a restaurant with his Home and Away actress girlfriend, the chef was trotted out to confirm that Lleyton had plumped for the chicken burritos and guacamole dip.

Hewitt's abrasive style has made him slightly less popular with his opponents than his own public, and several players at the Australian Open expressed their displeasure at the number of times he yells "C'mon!" in the course of a match. It's Hewitt's way of geeing himself up in pressure situations, but in yesterday's third-round match against Justin Gimelstob, of the United States, a total of only eight "C'mons" was a fair indication of a pretty routine victory.

Beaten 7-6, 6-3, 7-5, Gimelstob might have made more of a fist of it if he'd been fit, but then again the 29-year-old who was America's leading junior player 10 years ago rarely is. America is not short of lawyers, and if Gimelstob left his body to medical science, they'd be falling over each other to contest the will.

In 2005 alone, Gimelstob has had 14 cortisone injections for a chronic back complaint, foot surgery, a dodgy hip and a shoulder strain. None of which surprises you when you see him play, which is a bit like watching a football goalkeeper practising for a penalty shoot-out. As Hewitt said: "I think he spent more time on the ground than he did standing up."

It made for an interesting contrast in styles, with Hewitt sticking to his baseline game and Gimelstob rushing to the net, from where he constantly hurled himself sideways to try to intercept the passing shot. The American earned £25,510 as a third-round loser, and whatever he's got left over after paying his doctor, the rest will be swallowed up by his laundry bill.

His shoulder took the brunt of the strain, and at the end of the first set he required such violent treatment from the trainer - who appeared to be trying to wrench the arm from the socket - it seemed unlikely that he would continue. However, out he went for another two sets of thundering towards his opponent and tumbling to the ground. It is a style all of his own, although it may be at least partially based on watching old videos of Frank Bruno.

Hewitt does not hit a tennis ball particularly hard by modern standards, but he is remarkably quick around the court and no cause is ever lost. He's like a Labrador chasing a stick, bringing it back to its owner and then chasing it again. He also has an arrogance about him, as though he were looking down on his opponent - in Gimelstob's case, literally.

The American, however, is an open admirer of Hewitt's make-up, and said afterwards: "I applaud him for a great shot, or apologise for a lucky one, and he doesn't acknowledge anything out there. And a lot of people give him flak for that. But I have a ton of respect for him."

Gimelstob talked at some length about Hewitt's qualities, but then again he talks at some length about everything. If he dropped a transcript of one of his own interviews onto his foot he'd have another injury to worry about, and he was as deprecatory about his own tennis yesterday as he was complimentary about Hewitt's.

The only thing, in fact, he talks up about his own game is his diving. "Boris Becker was a billion times better player than me, but I'm a better diver," he said. If he's that good at diving, someone ought to tell him he's wasting his time playing tennis for peanuts when could be earning a fortune playing football in the Premiership.

NOMAD
06-25-2005, 01:40 AM
wow that's :angel: of Gimelstob to say those things about Lleyton :worship:

and the articles are :rolls: Thanks for all of them,Marlene. :kiss:

Socket
06-25-2005, 02:29 AM
wow that's :angel: of Gimelstob to say those things about Lleyton :worship:

and the articles are :rolls: Thanks for all of them,Marlene. :kiss:
You're welcome, Tara. I'm sure that the players like Justin who admire and respect Lleyton greatly outnumber the players like Chela and Nalbandian, but try telling the Hewitt haters (including some of the media) that. :rolleyes:

star
06-25-2005, 04:50 AM
ick ick ick

:ras:

Why did you have to mention those names here???? In sweet little LleyLand.

Socket
06-25-2005, 05:24 AM
ick ick ick

:ras:

Why did you have to mention those names here???? In sweet little LleyLand.
*hangs head in shame*

bad gambler
06-25-2005, 05:34 AM
JMac gives his thoughts in a daily recap/summary on bbc

www.bbc.co.uk

By John McEnroe
BBC Sport tennis pundit

I'd be a little worried if I were Lleyton Hewitt.

I don't think the confidence is back to what it was, and when you're confident you're faster, which is his greatest asset.

He's vulnerable. I don't think he's played as well as at previous Wimbledons.

Having said that, he's not going to go out without a big-time fight.

He still covers a lot of ground and I wouldn't write him off, but a guy like Taylor Dent, who he plays next, will see this as an incredible opportunity.

star
06-25-2005, 05:38 AM
If Dent beats Lleyton, it will be the worst thing ever. Dent is one of my least favorite players, but even disregarding that, I think he doesn't have the talent Lleyton has and he certainly doesn't work nearly as hard on his game or his fitness. It would be a shame if someone like him knocked Lleyton out of the tournament.

SomL.
06-25-2005, 10:27 AM
Well done Lleyton ^_^ Good luck Lleyton in fourth round ^_^

Socket
06-25-2005, 01:00 PM
If Dent beats Lleyton, it will be the worst thing ever. Dent is one of my least favorite players, but even disregarding that, I think he doesn't have the talent Lleyton has and he certainly doesn't work nearly as hard on his game or his fitness. It would be a shame if someone like him knocked Lleyton out of the tournament.
I agree that it would be a shame if Lleyton lost to an also-ran like Dent, and he's not certainly at the top of his game yet, but if you look at his stats from the Gimbelstob match, they are quite impressive, especially how few points he lost on his first serve and how many winners he had. He was exquisite in the TB when he needed to pull something big out of his hat. And Lleyton in the second week is different than he is in the first week; it's that grand slam experience coming to the forefront.

Hagar
06-25-2005, 06:19 PM
LOL@"The man from New Jersey had arrived at the championships as the lowest form of competitive life, a lucky loser"

scythe19pro
06-26-2005, 12:15 PM
Hewitt braces for big hitter
By LEO SCHLINK in London
26jun05

LLEYTON Hewitt concedes he needs to lift sharply to survive Taylor Dent's shuddering serve-volley arsenal at Wimbledon tomorrow.

http://www.news.com.au/images/advertisement.gif


Into the fourth round with a controlled 7-6 (7-5), 6-4, 7-5 victory over American firebrand Justin Gimelstob, Hewitt admitted he needed to improve.



"I still feel like I've got to play better to guarantee myself a win against Taylor," Hewitt said.

"I've got to play better again because he's capable of playing very good tennis and he can sustain it over five sets, especially on a grasscourt.

"I feel like I can definitely go up a notch or two, though.

"I've had a lot of tough matches with Taylor in the past.

"I'm going to be ready to lift mentally as soon as I get out on court against him.

"He's a tough competitor."

Hewitt leads Dent 3-1, but there is a tangible edge to the pair's rivalry.

Hewitt narrowly survived the Californian in 2001 in a Wimbledon centre court five-setter, but lost to Dent in Adelaide in January this year.

Hewitt was given a dress rehearsal for his Dent clash by trading blows with Gimelstob in a frenetic third-rounder.

Hewitt has resolved not to fret if Dent produces the heavy serving that propelled him to a 6-3, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3 triumph over Czech Tomas Berdych.

"I've got to get mentally right to return well and go out there and believe in my passing shots," he said.

"I need to play a solid match from the back of the court."

Net-rushing Dent says he plans to stretch Hewitt psychologically tomorrow.

"I'm just going to have to try to match him in mental toughness because I think that's what it's all about in the fifth set," Dent said.

"If you want to try to beat the best, you have to beat all these guys.

"Lleyton's one of the guys to beat.

"My bottom line is: If I execute, I'm going to be a handful for Lleyton.

"I'm going to prove very tough to beat."

Gimelstob rated Hewitt as the second favourite for the title behind defending champion Federer.

And he praised the former world champion's brilliant adaptability.

"I have a ton of respect for him," Gimelstob said. "A lot of people give him a lot of flak because of the way he competes.

"But he is an incredible competitor.

"Here's a guy who's undersized and undermanned playing against great athletes -- not me being one of them -- but the Roger Federers, Andy Roddicks and Pete Sampras type of players.

"And he has to figure out a way to try to beat them with the skills that he has.

"I have tremendous respect for the fact he goes out there and competes on the tennis court."

If Hewitt can overcome Dent, he will progress to a clash with either Croat 10th seed Mario Ancic or Spanish 26th seed Feliciano Lopez.

Victory in Wednesday's quarter-final would almost certainly deliver the match most people believe should have been the final -- Hewitt against Federer. But by dint of the All-England Club's decision to promote Roddick to second seed over world No.2 Hewitt, the sport's best two players are in the same half of the draw.

Socket
06-26-2005, 03:43 PM
Somebody actually managed to pry a comment out of Lleyton about the forthcoming baby! :)

Hewitt knows it's time for the big c'mon
June 27, 2005

He's been quiet by his standards, but expect Hewitt to fire up, writes Richard Hinds in London

As he rides the highs and lows of a sometimes brilliant, sometimes controversial career, Lleyton Hewitt has always been something of a walking headline. However, during the first week of Wimbledon he was, by his own standards, the invisible man.

The defeats of seeds such as Tim Henman and Marat Safin, the emergence of Scottish teenager Andrew Murray, speculation about whether consecutive champion Roger Federer is more vulnerable this year than in the past and Rafael Nadal's wardrobe have all been the subject of far more scrutiny than anything the Australian has done to date.

All Hewitt has done is complete the routine task of winning his first three matches, let the emboldened members of the English press know the Ashes remain safe in Australian hands, then disappear back to the practice courts to hone his improving game or perhaps to his rented house to practise folding nappies.

Even in his impressive third-round victory over American Justin Gimelstob, it was his opponent's repeated, and often unnecessary, diving at the net that captivated the cameras more than anything Hewitt could come up with.

However, on centre court on Monday, after a two-day break, Hewitt's cover may be blown. Now he will be forced to answer the first major question of this unorthodox Wimbledon campaign. After three months' absence due to injury, is his game sharp enough to survive the serve-volley bombardment of Taylor Dent and take him within one step of a much-awaited semi-final showdown with his recent nemesis, Roger Federer?

In Dent, he faces an opponent capable of making things far more uncomfortable than they were against Gimelstob, Jan Hernych or Christophe Rochus. If he is on his game, and Dent's promising career has been noted for his inconsistency, Hewitt will not be able to dictate terms or get in a comfortable baseline rhythm.

He had a taste of the net-rushing tactics he will face against Dent in the match against Gimelstob, although the veteran American seemed to launch himself to the net behind shots that came from a slingshot while the more-powerful Dent possesses a first-serve canon. Yet, Hewitt took confidence from the fact his groundstrokes were so sharp he was often able to send Gimelstob waving his racquet at thin air as he sprawled on the ground like a crazed circus performer.

"Taylor's going to be the same sort of player," Hewitt said. "Justin served very well. That at least gave me a look at what I'm going to face on Monday. I've just got to get mentally right to return well and go out there and believe in my passing shots and play a solid match from the back of the court as well."

If he gets through the match, Hewitt will be aware that another difficult, big-serving opponent may be blocking his path to Federer. Favoured to be awaiting Hewitt in the quarter-finals is Mario Ancic, the Croatian known as "Super Mario" for his big game, but also "the new Goran" for his occasionally erratic play.

After reaching the semi-finals here last year, Ancic has snuck even lower under the Wimbledon radar than Hewitt this time, polishing off his first three matches well away from the show-court spotlight. Ancic also faces a tough fourth round against Feliciano Lopez, the impressive left-hander who knocked out Marat Safin in straight sets. but looms as a danger, perhaps even for the title itself, if his serve is firing and his head is screwed on.

Hewitt is uttering the one-match-at-a-time mantra, with good reason. "Every match that you get to, there's a reason why you're playing that opponent," Hewitt said. "They've obviously done something right to get that far. That's the way you've got to look at it."

While he might be about to face the heavy artillery, Hewitt has always been a tough man to beat in psychological warfare. Perhaps as a sign of his new off-court challenges, the newly engaged father-to-be has at least seemed a model of contentment here.

"It took me a while to get my head around it," he said of fiancee Bec Cartwright's pregnancy. "But it's something that is going to be a great part of our lives together."

Indeed, so mellow has Hewitt been that his first "C'mon!" in the match against Gimelstob did not come until late in the first set as he struggled to break the American's early resistance.

But Hewitt says domestic bliss has not dulled his famous intensity."Obviously things have changed a fair bit there [off the court)," he said. "But I'm still put- ting everything into my tennis, into what I do."

So Dent, Ancic and perhaps even Federer can consider themselves warned. Expect the flames of Hewitt's famous inner-fire to be fanned in the heat of the more intense battles that begin on Monday.

star
06-26-2005, 04:37 PM
Thanks for that article, Marlene! :kiss: :kiss:

NOMAD
06-26-2005, 04:45 PM
C'mon Rocky!!! :bounce:

Centre Court 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles - 4th Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3] vs Taylor Dent (USA)[24]


2 Ladies' Singles - 4th Rnd.
Lindsay Davenport (USA)[1] vs Kim Clijsters (BEL)[15]



3 Gentlemen's Singles - 4th Rnd.
Roger Federer (SUI)[1] vs Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP)[23]

Jess
06-26-2005, 04:51 PM
I do wish the schedulers would stop putting him on first! I'm visiting my parents and I can't keep telling them that I want to stay in all day! They seem to expect me to go out and do things during the day! :lol:

Forecast is for sunshine tomorrow :) so it should all get played.

star
06-26-2005, 05:01 PM
Go away from the TV when Wimbledon is on????
That's a bit of an unreasonable expectation. :)

I love it when he's on early because I can watch before I go to work. They keep putting Kim and Lleyton on the same court.

ComeON Lleyton and Vamos Juan Carlos.

RaRaChick
06-26-2005, 07:14 PM
Yep Lleyton first on Centre tomorrow, Kim second. Hope they dont pass each other on their way on/off court :lol:

Socket
06-26-2005, 10:38 PM
More articles for you to read. Yes, this will be on the test.

Federer wants Hewitt to play second fiddle
Leo Schlink
27jun05

ROGER Federer yesterday zeroed in on a third consecutive Wimbledon crown, singling out Lleyton Hewitt as his main threat.

Relieved after subduing German Nicolas Kiefer 6-2 6-7 (5-7) 6-1 7-5, world No. 1 Federer admitted that Hewitt remained his biggest obstacle.

"I think the guy just behind me in the ranking," Federer said, referring to world No. 2 Hewitt when asked who he considered his toughest rival.

"The ones at the top right now, I've beaten them all. I've lost to them all.

"They've proven they are the most consistent players on tour. They are, in my eyes, the most dangerous."

Federer and Hewitt have followed identical paths to the fourth round, each losing a set in three matches.

Like Hewitt, Federer's stated aspiration was to survive the first three rounds before regrouping for a second-week push. "I'm happy to be through to the second week because that's definitely my goal at the beginning of the tournament," Federer said.

"Now that I'm into the second week, it's just four matches left. I feel definitely it's a special year, trying to make it three in a row. But the opponents are not getting easier from here."

Federer and Hewitt are seeded to meet in Friday's semi-final, but there are some rickety bridges to cross first.

Federer today faces former world No. 1 Juan Carlos Ferrero, who is on the comeback trail after a string of injuries.

If Federer eliminates the Spaniard, he will play either ferocious Chilean counter-puncher Fernando Gonzalez or Russian Mikhail Youzhny.

Hewitt, dropped from his ranking to third seeding to accommodate Andy Roddick, has an equally dangerous course to negotiate.

He faces American Taylor Dent's powerhouse game today, with victory carrying the prize of a quarter-final appointment with last year's semi-finalist Mario Ancic or Spaniard Feliciano Lopez.

Federer leads Hewitt 9-7 in a rivalry stretching back to 1999.

Hewitt has won only two of 18 sets from Federer since he reeled in Federer with a remarkable comeback in the 2003 Davis Cup semi-final.

Federer yesterday dismissed suggestions from American media types that Hewitt was the most offensive competitor in the sport.

"Where are we going here?" Federer asked. "Do you want me to name names?

"The guy who gets pumped up is definitely (Rafael) Nadal. In your face, it's (Radek) Stepanek.

"I turn around rather quickly, don't really pay too much attention."

Pushed on Hewitt, Federer was asked if he was bothered by Hewitt's signature animation.

"Not any more," he said. "Used to.

"I started to play him so many times. I know him by now. Doesn't bother me any more."

Armed with tactical advice provided by his father Phil -- a former Australian Davis Cup representative -- Dent will attempt to ruin Hewitt's dream.

The American serve-volleyer said he would tap into the strategic nous of his father, who remains a highly sought coaching source in the US.

"He's going to want me to win out there," Dent said of his father.

"He'll be chomping at the bit to tell me everything he knows. He'll be as detailed as you care to hear, that's for sure.

"For me, my game is pretty simple. I like to tell him, 'Look, bottom line is if I execute out there, I'm going to be a handful for Lleyton. I'm going to be very tough to beat'.

"He (Phil Dent) will definitely fill me in on what he thinks I need to do out there."

Dent knows precisely what to expect in a classic confrontation between serve-volleyer and baseliner.

So does Hewitt.

Of the pair's four encounters, only one has come on grass -- at Wimbledon in 2001 -- and it was claimed by US Open and Wimbledon champion Hewitt.

Dent posted his first victory against the Australian in Adelaide in January when Hewitt appeared to lack his usual zest as he prepared for a brutal summer circuit.

Joining Hewitt, Federer, Dent and Ferrero in the fourth round are title contenders Roddick, Swede Thomas Johansson and Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean.

Argentine Davis Cup stars Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian both posted excellent five-set wins, against Jurgen Melzer and Andrew Murray, respectively.

Grosjean advanced with a 7-5 6-4 5-7 6-4 win against Serb Novak Djokovic.

Swedish 12th seed Johansson punctured fellow Serb Janko Tipsarevic's hopes with a commanding 6-2 6-3 6-1 win.

And Russian Dmitry Tursunov upended German Alexander Popp 5-7 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 6-2.

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Dent has Hewitt worked out
Chip Le Grand
27jun05

TENNIS is forever searching for the biggest game. The thunderbolt serve. The knock-out forehand. The one-two combination. The weapons you have. What you bring to the table.

It's the ultimate power sport. Or so you'd think.

Taylor Dent has a big game. A monster serve and a brutal forehand. He might have the teeth of an Osmond, but he has the shoulders of a front-rower. He lumbers to the net more than rushes. In three or four giant steps, he is in volleying position. In his space. In your face.

Yet Dent is the first to admit that size doesn't matter. Not when you are playing Lleyton Hewitt, the biggest little man in the sport.

"The biggest thing I have learned is not to panic out there," said Dent, who beat Hewitt for the first time in their most recent encounter, in Adelaide in January.

"Lleyton is an unbelievable player and an unbelievable competitor. But if you stay calm and keep your focus, he is human. He is just like anybody else out here. So not to panic is the biggest thing."

Over the past week, Dent's father and former Australian Davis Cup player, Phil, has watched Hewitt's matches and made detailed notes. Today, father and son will have a chat about how best to play and where to hit the ball. But Taylor knows such considerations are secondary when it comes to playing Hewitt.

The hardest thing about playing the little big man is not to let him get to you, to resist the feeling that he is unpicking your game shot by shot and taking extra pleasure in doing it to a bigger, stronger bloke.

"The best part of his game is mental toughness," Dent said. "I have seen him play so many matches when he is striking the ball so poorly, but just manages to will himself to win. A couple of the players have some problems with his antics on the court, but that is just who he is and how he plays. It is going to be very important for me to go out there and stay focused and worry about myself, not worrying about what he is doing."

With Hewitt, this is easier said than done. Hewitt is no longer the best in the world, but he is the hardest to play against. He does not have a massive serve, nor a crunching forehand. The fact he has neither is his biggest weapon. It is an affront that Hewitt carries into every match against bigger, stronger opponents.

When you share a court with Hewitt, you must contend with his near-maniacal refusal to concede a point and those fast-pumping legs which take him from sideline to sideline in the bounce of a ball.

You must be prepared for the "c'mon", the chainsaw, the lawnmower and all manner of fist-pump pantomime and not let it get under your skin. Then, you must contend with one of the best return of serves and consistent all-round games in tennis, all while worrying about your own game and where to hit the ball.

Many players have tried and failed miserably. Roger Federer this week admitted that Hewitt's antics used to get up his nose and it was only when he found a way to deal with this that he started winning.

At this year's Australian Open, some rivals were reduced to mental wrecks. Argentina's Juan Ignacio Chela, affable on and off the court, spat at Hewitt and tried to knock his head off with a bean-ball serve. The Harvard-educated James Blake took to mimicking Hewitt's fist pumps.

Hewitt's actions were scrutinised and held to account. His antics were generally seen to be unsporting and bordering on obnoxious. Yet it was he who won and stayed alive in the tournament. For Hewitt, tennis has never been about making friends.

American Justin Gimelstob, who endeared himself to many with his slap-stick serve-and-volley routine against Hewitt in their third-round match, believes players who take offence at Hewitt have got it wrong.

One school of thought says Hewitt's antics are designed to unnerve opponents. Another school, to which Gimelstob subscribes, is that they are purely for Hewitt's benefit. For most of their match, Gimelstob felt Hewitt was oblivious to his presence.

"I have a ton of respect for the way he competes," Gimelstob said.

"You can look at it from a negative standpoint, but you also have to understand here's a guy who's undersized and undermanned playing against great athletes - not me being one of them - and he just has to figure out a way to try and beat them with the skills that he has."

This is the rub for Dent. The biggest bring out the best in Hewitt and at 188cm and a conservative 90kg, Dent is as big as they come.

"Tennis is the biggest equaliser there is," Dent said. "Size doesn't really mean anything. He has got the mentality that everyone is against him, so it feeds into that."

The result can get ugly, too, as Chela or Blake know. But for the little big man, ends always justify means.

privacy terms © The Australian

ally_014
06-27-2005, 06:52 AM
Go Lleyton! :D I guess for you guys in England the early match isn’t the best, but at least it means us Aussies might be able to get to bed around 1am instead of 4!

SomL.
06-27-2005, 11:05 AM
Go Lleyton against Dent ^_^ Come on Lleyton ^_^

scythe19pro
06-27-2005, 04:58 PM
well done LL !!!:bigclap:


Match Summary

1st Serve % 74 of 149 = 50 %
Aces 11
Double Faults 7
Unforced Errors 27
Winning % on 1st Serve 58 of 74 = 78 %
Winning % on 2nd Serve 39 of 75 = 52 %
Winners (Including Service) 59
Receiving Points Won 52 of 137 = 38 %
Break Point Conversions 5 of 14 = 36 %
Net Approaches 19 of 30 = 63 %
Total Points Won 149
Fastest Serve 130 MPH
Average 1st Serve Speed 116 MPH
Average 2nd Serve Speed 95 MPH

next: Lopez. shouldn't be a problem. I know he took out safin and ancic, but LL will win.

scythe19pro
06-27-2005, 06:29 PM
Hewitt downs Dent
By Paul Mulvey in London
June 28, 2005

LLEYTON Hewitt cleared the Taylor Dent hurdle to move into the quarter finals at Wimbledon with a tough four sets win overnight.

http://foxsports.news.com.au/common/imagedata/0,5001,5021481,00.jpg
On track ... Hewitt on the court overnight / AFP


Hewitt blew two match points in the third set tiebreak to eventually win the fourth round match 6-4 6-4 6-7 (7-9) 6-3.

After handing back a break early in the fourth, the 2002 champion regained control to move into the quarter finals for the third time.

Hewitt will play 26th seed Feliciano Lopez after the Spaniard upset No.10 Mario Ancic 6-4 6-4 6-2.

Hewitt looked to be racing to an easy win as Dent failed to deliver in an insipid first set.

It took Dent a set to evolve from a mistake-prone hack to the dangerous threat he was supposed to be to the world No.2.

Hewitt raced to a 4-0 lead in 16 minutes as a dormant Dent failed to fire with any of his shots, including his reputed serve and volley.

The American son of 1970s Australian Davis Cup player Phil Dent finally found some touch to break back once but it was not enough as Hewitt held sway to take the first set.

After a dull opening, the match came explosively alive when Hewitt was given a warning for verbal abuse when he fought to hold serve in the sixth game of the second set.

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A late, but correct, overrule from umpire Enric Molina gave Dent the first of three break-back points, sending Hewitt marching to the official's chair in fury.



Hewitt won the next point but again bellowed at Molina whom he believed should have overruled in his favour, but instead issued the Australian a warning.

Despite the antics, it was a typical gutsy rescue act by Hewitt, who scrambled to save Dent's break points to retain the advantage.

A hat trick of unforced errors from Dent gave Hewitt three set points but he had to fight hard after squandering all three.

He eventually took the set at the sixth attempt after some feisty scrambles and a gift from Dent.

At break point to take the set back to 5-5, Dent inexplicably stopped playing only to watch Hewitt's forehand dip and land on the baseline to take the game back to deuce.

Hewitt went for the jugular and took the set with the next two serves.

Dent lifted his game another cog in the third and neither serve was broken, although the American had to work much harder to hold his.

Hewitt took the early advantage in the tiebreak and had two match points at 6-4, but Dent scavenged two points off the Australian's serve to give himself set point. Breaks were exchanged in the second and third games of the fourth set in which Hewitt stood out as the better player and eventually secured the decisive break in the eighth game to serve for the match.

NOMAD
06-27-2005, 06:34 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 7
Monday, June 27, 2005


Q. The first set, first four games, was that as good as you've played in a while?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, a little bit. He started out a little tentative, though. First game, he hit two double‑faults for me to break serve. But, you know, you don't get that many opportunities to break his serve, so when you get those half chances, you really have to take them.

So in that sense, I was happy with the way I started. But, you know, I didn't ‑‑ it was only going to be the first set. I felt playing Taylor, you know, a guy like Taylor, the first set was going to be pretty big out there today. You know, it was good to get that one under my belt. From then on, I felt like I was in control of the match, you know, getting my opportunities now and then as well.

Q. How much will you take out of the US Open last year against Lopez?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, a little bit, I guess. A big court. You know, I played really well, especially at the start of the match. I came out of the blocks firing. You know, I was seeing the ball like a football that night. In a big situation.

He's obviously playing well, though. And he's dangerous, you know, especially on a quicker hard court or a grass court, you know, with that big left‑handed serve. He's had two very good wins in his last two matches. He's no easy beat.

Q. You're in a string of winning matches against the Spaniards. You beat the Spaniards maybe 11 times in a row.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Lucky I missed the clay court season (smiling).

Q. What can you expect with Lopez? He's not the typical Spanish player.

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, he's not. He's very different, and that's why one reason he's succeeded so well on a grass court.

You know, I didn't have a clue of that. I won't be thinking about that going into playing another Spaniard. I'll just be looking at Lopez' game, how that matches up with mine, areas of his game that maybe I can exploit a little bit more. Obviously his serve and his forehand are his two big weapons. He's got a good slice backhand as well and he moves pretty well for a big guy. So, you know, he can mix it up, serve‑volley, stay back. In terms of that, he is a lot different to the traditional Spanish players.

Q. How is your form in comparison to when you won the title?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. You know, a lot depends on the opponents that you play. I feel like I'm hitting the ball well. I think I went up another notch or two today, which I needed to. So in terms of that, you know, Taylor Dent's a dangerous player. I knew it was going to be a dangerous match out there today. Felt like I went up a notch or two when I needed to.

Q. There were a lot of overrules out there today. Is that something that puts you off? Do you lose faith and confidence in the linesmen when there's so many overrules?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, a fair bit. They're been a few, though, all last week as well. You know, I can only speak in my matches.

Q. Is that an issue? Is there something wrong with the level of umpiring and linesmen?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, everyone's human. You know, you're going to make mistakes. Some matches you go through a match without an overrule, and then there's others where you'll go through a tournament where you'll have two or three in every match.

I think sometimes, depending on the chair umpire that you have, occasionally there's a few chair umpires out there that overrule a lot more than some other guys and are probably open to overrule a little bit more.

You know, it's very hard if ‑‑ anything on the far side of the court, you know, especially serves or whatever going so fast, it's very hard for any chair umpire to overrule those.

Q. Taylor suggested you put pressure on them, even intimidate umpires, even if you're not doing it deliberately. Do you think that's a factor?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't think so, no.

Q. You're so emotional and intense out there. Could you reflect on there are so few others at your level in terms of outward emotion like the old days when there were so many.

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's probably more now, I guess. A lot of the younger guys out there. You look at guys like Nadal coming up.

Q. Excuse me for interrupting. Nadal is very emotional about the points, but less so about lines calls and the like. That's what I was referring to more than just getting pumped up about a winner.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, well, only questioned couple line calls today.

Q. Do you think the way you question the calls can put pressure on umpires or not?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. You know, Taylor questioned calls as well out there today, so it's the same for both ends. There's a lot of calls out there you don't question either.

Q. Are you getting sneakily confident about your chances here?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Is that funny?

Q. I thought it was funny.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Good (smiling).

I still feel ‑‑ obviously, it was a little bit of a question mark purely because I hadn't played that many matches coming into this tournament ‑ and in such a big tournament. But, you know, the first week was especially, you know, important for me to get through and just find a way to get through those matches.

Now you come up against the name players, the real chances ‑‑ challengers for the title. That's when you've got to play your best tennis. I felt like I went up a notch today. But, you know, I'm still a long way from holding up the trophy.

Q. Going into the fourth round, you're ninth in aces. How important do you think that is or how telling a statistic is that to success on grass or not?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, you know, it is telling I think for my game purely because I'm going to get so many opportunities to break serve now and then on grass, even as good as some of the servers are out there ‑ a Taylor Dent or Justin Gimelstob. I'm going to get opportunities.

If I can hold my service games a little bit more comfortably and go out there and clean up my service games, then obviously that's going to help me, especially on this surface.

Q. Is it aces that tells you you're holding your serve?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I don't go out there and try to hit a lot of aces. It's a lot about setting up the point for my game.

Q. If you're hitting a lot of aces, do you feel like you're playing well? You don't look at that as a statistic?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't look at that as a statistic, for me in particularly. It's more about trying to get as many cheap points off my first serve, first‑serve percentage, those kinds of things for me.

Q. Do you think London would be a good place to stage the Olympics? Do you think Wimbledon in particular would be a good place? How would you feel about playing in a tennis tournament, an Olympic tennis tournament, here at Wimbledon? Do you think the British people warm to international players?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, I'm sure they would. A big city like London, I'm sure it would stage an awesome Olympics. Then again, I haven't seen all the facilities. A bit hard for me to comment apart from just the tennis facilities. And we all know how popular Wimbledon is, what an arena it is, as well.

There's a lot of traditions with Wimbledon and the tournament itself. Whether they want to even cross over that bridge into the Olympics, I don't know.

Q. Do you think the courts are really slowing down, like many players have said?

LLEYTON HEWITT: At the start the tournament I think they were quite slow for a grass court. They've quickened up. Obviously, you know, you have good days. Weather like we've had throughout this tournament, we've been fortunate. You know, they're quickening up every day.

Q. Would you consider anything but winning The Championships here a successful fortnight for you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: What's that?

Q. Would you consider anything but winning The Championships a successful run here?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, of course. You know, you can go out there and every match is a tough one to win. I go out there and I expect to win. I go out there and I play to win. But you know that any opponent's tough to play out there.

So obviously I'd love to hold the trophy up. But there's still three matches before I can do that. The names get tougher and tougher, you know, the further you go in the tournament.

So, "succeed," you know, it's a tough word. What is success and failure, where do you draw the line? If you go out there and give a hundred percent, leave it all out on the court, for me, that's a success.

Q. Given that Lopez hasn't been through this situation, hasn't come through in these types of matches, what are the ways in which you can exploit that difference in experience?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't think there's ways of me exploiting that. You know, it's more him holding his nerve, I think, in terms of the big situation and being on a big show court and playing big matches. He's come through and beaten two of the big danger men in the tournament in Safin and Ancic ‑ both in straight sets. So he's obviously hardened his nerve pretty well at the moment.

For me, it's purely ‑‑ I'm not worrying about his inexperience in big matches. He's played Davis Cup enough to know situations in the big time. I've basically got to play him on my game against his out there and work on the weaknesses of his game and try and exploit that.

Q. Another thing Taylor said about the dispute in the line calls was that a lot of the members of public actually warm to that, actually like players to show a bit more emotion. Do you agree with that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know about crowds warming to it. Yeah, in the heat of the battle, obviously if we disagree with an overrule or want to question something, then obviously the crowd's going to get involved a little bit with that. Whether all crowds warm to players challenging umpires all the time, I don't know if that's the case in every tournament, every situation.

Q. Does it ever inspire you to play better or affect your game negatively or positively?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, it can over time. Sure, there's matches where it's worked a positive and sometimes it's worked a negative. But today I felt like I was able to block it out extremely well and concentrate on the job at hand, what I had to do, didn't let it affect me at all. I knew that, obviously, I was a set and a break up, trying to consolidate that break in the second set. You know, I just really didn't want to let anything interrupt me.

Q. You've got a strong support group around you. I notice Kieran Perkins. Do you sit back and inspire each other before you go out?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I heard he was coming today, but I haven't seen him or spoken to him.

Q. Is he a close friend of yours?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I don't know Kieran that well. I've only met him a couple of times. Obviously, he's a huge hero of mine, though, for what he's done in the pool and over the years in big situations. But I don't know about me for him.

Q. The foot‑faults today, have you had any in previous matches leading into this? I think you had seven.

LLEYTON HEWITT: I had a couple in one of my previous matches. Yeah, today was more weird timing than anything. It was all happening up one end and not up the other. That's what my question was to the umpire at one stage.

Q. Can you explain what you're saying making sure the red mist doesn't affect your game. Are you talking about that or is it automatically that it doesn't affect you at all?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, today I was actually conscious of trying to not let anything affect me basically, and just think, "All right, well, that's out of the way. It's out of my control now. Why dwell on it?" I think I handled that situation pretty well today.

Q. There was a specific moment in the fourth set, an overrule, Taylor said he felt that you intimidated the official there, the official backed down.

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. The overrule came and Taylor actually walked to the other side of the court. It was sort of Taylor's fault.

Socket
06-27-2005, 06:44 PM
Q. You're in a string of winning matches against the Spaniards. You beat the Spaniards maybe 11 times in a row.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Lucky I missed the clay court season (smiling).
:haha: :haha: :haha:

scythe19pro
06-27-2005, 07:57 PM
Dent regrets the one that got away

By Wayne Drehs

WIMBLEDON, England – The fans knew. The umpire knew. And Taylor Dent knew.

He shouldn't have let that one go. He shouldn't have given up on that Lleyton Hewitt backhand, shouldn't have expected the ball to sail past the baseline and give him a 6-5 lead and the serve in the critical second set of his round of 16 match here at The Championships.

"I don't know if I've ever seen that before," said Jimmy Connors, calling the game for the BBC.

But now it was too late. The ball had clipped the baseline, and Dent had all but tripped on himself trying to regroup. He never got a shot off. Hewitt won the point, then the set, and Dent was left to wonder, "What if?"

The helpless feeling was a common one for Dent on Monday. Playing in the marquee men's match of the day, on Centre Court, against emotional Hewitt, the 23-year-old American admittedly struggled to put his complete game together, playing "three-quarters good tennis" but failing to muster much of a challenge the other 25 percent of the time.

He pushed Hewitt to a fourth set, competing for more than three hours, but eventually succumbed, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (7), 6-3. Afterward, he focused on the positives. And even smiled when it came to the botched point.

"It was a long point," Dent said. "And there were times out there where I was pretty fatigued. It's been that way the whole tournament.

"I thought the ball was going long, I saw it drop on the baseline, but I had already kinda committed to letting it go. I knew it was in, everybody else knew it was in, but there was nothing I could do."

Playing in just his second tournament since returning from an ankle injury, Dent estimated his physical shape to be a "four" on a scale of 10. Earlier this week, when a reporter asked him what he weighed, he said point blank, "I don't know. I'm too scared to look."

Yet there he was Monday, less than 100 percent, pushing Hewitt to a fourth set, in the highest round he had ever advanced to at Wimbledon.

"I think I played a pretty mediocre match for my standards, and yet I had chances to be in it," Dent said. "That's both frustrating and promising. I had chances to win sets. I'm playing one of the best players in the world, playing pretty loose tennis and I'm in there."

Dent, the 30th-ranked player in the world and the son of Australian tennis star Phil Dent, has four career titles and played for the bronze at last year's Olympics, but he has had limited success in Grand Slam events. His fourth-round loss to Hewitt tied the best Grand Slam finish of his career – he exited last year's U.S. Open in the fourth round, as well.

Dent upset Hewitt in the Aussie's hometown of Adelaide in January, but Monday was a different story. After 13 minutes, Dent trailed 4-0 in the first set before fighting back to lose 6-4. He fell behind 3-1 in the second set, and lost that one, too.

"A guy like Taylor, I knew that first set was going to be pretty big out there today," Hewitt said. "From then on, I felt like I was in control."

Thanks in part to Dent's mistakes. He calls it playing loose. Not loose as in laid-back and comfortable, but loose as in error-prone. On Monday, he was plagued by 13 double faults and 39 unforced errors. At times, he even struggled with his serve, the strength of his game. In the last game, Dent wasn't able to get any of his first serves in play.

"Helping him break me, helping him hold serve easier. I wasn't doing that earlier this year," he said. "It's a little disappointing, but I can't expect too much. I try to stay as positive as I can."

From here, Dent said he plans to return home to California, train for a few days and head to Newport, R.I., where he will play in the last grass tournament of the season. From here on out, his biggest challenge will be walking the fine line between being in great tennis shape and great overall shape.

"It's a juggling act," he said. "Right now, I've been working so hard to get my game down because I feel like when I'm executing well, I'm extremely tough to beat. Then as soon as I feel like I've kind of got that under control, then, boom, fitness is No. 1."

scythe19pro
06-27-2005, 09:56 PM
Hewitt on verge of glory: Cash
Leo Schlink
London
28jun05

PAT Cash says Lleyton Hewitt stands on the threshold of more victorious grand slam campaigns, regardless of the outcome of Wimbledon 2005.

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The 1987 Wimbledon winner contends Hewitt is a better player now than he was during a 75-week reign as world No. 1.



And Cash says Hewitt should be given extra credit if the 2002 champion lands a second All England Club title this week.

Hewitt was last night due to face American Taylor Dent in a treacherous fourth-round clash.

"If Lleyton Hewitt powers his way to his third grand slam, it should be heralded as an achievement even greater than his triumphs at the US Open in September 2001 and Wimbledon 10 months later," Cash said in his London newspaper column.

"Not only will he have overcome the brilliance of Roger Federer, he will have triumphed over gross injustice dealt to him by the All England Club. The fact that he was seeded third instead of second is ludicrous.

"But watching him during the first week, seeing the determination he has put into his three wins and taking heed of the way he has toughened up to generate more power, makes me believe that he has a great chance of overcoming any obstacle."

Cash argues Hewitt's selfless decision to opt out of rankings points tournaments in 2003 to concentrate on Australia's Davis Cup quest cost his compatriot.

"By the time he re-dedicated himself to reclaiming top spot, Federer had taken control," Cash said.

"Standards had risen, the game had evolved and Hewitt had a lesson to learn.

"Losing so emphatically to Federer in last year's US Open final and the Masters Cup in Houston convinced him that something extra had to be done to make himself competitive against the best.

"Being defeated six matches in a row by a player you previously had dominated is reason enough to take drastic measures.

"True, that run did extend to seven in the final of the Masters Series event at Indian Wells in March, but that result should not be taken too seriously.

"Hewitt played with an injured toe that required surgery and kept him off court for a couple of months until he ruled himself out of the French Open by falling down stairs and damaging some ribs."

But Cash insists Hewitt will have feasted on Federer's semi-final losses to Marat Safin in the Australian Open and Rafael Nadal at the French Open.

"They (the defeats) underlined two important facts," Cash said.

"Firstly, that Federer is far more susceptible before getting to a final. But, more importantly, an all-out physical onslaught is the only way to unhinge the most accomplished player in the world.

"Full marks for the way he (Hewitt) has worked under coach Roger Rasheed.

"There was never any doubting Hewitt's durability or pace, but now he has added greater strength to the equation and it could reap dividends.

"He has the power to emulate the sort of attack mounted by Safin in Melbourne, Nadal in Paris and, to an extent, Andy Roddick in last year's Wimbledon final.

"He will fight, scrap and chase and get into the face of his opponents. If fist pumps and shouts unsettle the guy on the other side of the net, then all well and good." Cash said he was "appalled by the decision to seed Roddick at No. 2, rather than my fellow Australian".

star
06-28-2005, 04:45 AM
Shut up, Pat. :ras:

NOMAD
06-28-2005, 07:26 AM
Ray McNulty: Hewitt isn't for everyone, but if you loved Jimbo ...
By Ray McNulty
sports columnist
June 28, 2005

For those of us who appreciate pure tennis artistry, there is nothing better than watching Roger Federer on the lawns of Wimbledon.

He is graceful and gifted, poised and precise, athletic and tenacious. He is everything the world's best tennis player is supposed to be. And, if he stays healthy and interested, if he continues to win on the game's grandest stages, it's only a matter of time until people begin describing him with that vaunted label: "The best there ever was."

He's THAT good.

But he's not for everyone.

He's not for the Jimmy Connors crowd.

Contrary to the beliefs of too many dunderheads who think all tennis fans are named Bif and Muffy, drink Perrier and drive to the courts in their BMWs, some of us — even those of us who marvel at Federer's genius — enjoy the sport for the same reasons we enjoy all sports.

We enjoy the sweat. And the grit. And the grind. We enjoy the often-fierce, sometimes-dramatic competition and the one-on-one combat that, in the right setting with the right players, can give a big-fight feel to a tennis match.

That's what Connors, who dragged the game out of the country club and into the arena, brought to tennis in his 20 years on the court.

That's what Lleyton Hewitt brings to tennis today.

He's not "The Next Connors," because we'll never see another Connors — just as we'll never see another McEnroe or Evert or Navratilova. But he's as close as we might ever get. And the feisty, young Australian is almost as entertaining to watch ... if you can get past the

occasional flare-up and accompanying bad behavior.

Like Connors, Hewitt goes to the court with a fire in his eyes, a chip on his shoulder and only one thing on his mind: winning.

Like Connors, Hewitt competes as if his life is riding on the outcome.

Like Connors, Hewitt hates to lose more than he loves to win.

Sometimes, he plays with a boyish joy. Other times, he plays like a childish brat. He can be a consummate professional, a gentleman who does his sport proud. He also can be a punk, an ill-tempered boor whose on-court antics embarrass both him and his game.

It all depends on how the match is going.

Hewitt, much like Connors, takes his tennis as personally as he does seriously. It's not so much him trying to win a match or a tournament. It's somebody trying to beat him. He puts his game up against everyone else's, in a very public forum, and he doesn't easily accept defeat.

He doesn't possess the booming serve or the explosive strokes to blow his opponents off the court. Instead, every point is a tug-o-war, a battle of wills as much as skills. Nothing comes easily.

It's Hewitt's me-against-the-world attitude — and his stubborn refusal to go away, especially when all appears lost, no matter who stands across the net — that gives him a fighting chance in every match, that makes his tennis so compelling, that stirs up memories of the game's fiercest competitor.

And if that's not enough ...

Connors was once engaged to Chris Evert, then one of the top players on the women's side; Hewitt was once engaged to Kim Clijsters, still one of the top players on the women's side. Connors later married Patti McGuire, a former Playboy centerfold; Hewitt is engaged to Rebecca Cartwright, an Aussie actress.

"The Next Connors?"

There won't be one.

But the flinty Hewitt does give the blue-collar Connors crowd somebody to root for — even those of us who also appreciate the pure tennis artistry of Federer.

Yasmine
06-28-2005, 09:11 AM
Shut up, Pat. :ras:
I agree...

FanOfHewitt
06-28-2005, 10:41 AM
Hewitt on verge of glory: Cash


"He has the power to emulate the sort of attack mounted by Safin in Melbourne, Nadal in Paris and, to an extent, Andy Roddick in last year's Wimbledon final.


lol turn it up Cashy!

star
06-28-2005, 12:54 PM
blech! Hewitt is NOT Connors.

Imagine Connors sitting watching one of Evert's matches. :lol: Not likely.

But there are some similarities. Both are very close to their families. Jimmy's mother was rumored to have come between Chrissy and him. Ditto for Chezza (never know if I am spelling that right. (Chrissy said she called up Jimmy's mother and told her that now that she, Chrissy, was the mother of boys, she understood why Jimmy's mother had been concerned)

:hatoff: Thanks for the articles. :)

Socket
06-28-2005, 02:12 PM
Another difference between Connors and Lleyton is that Jimmy was quite the extrovert off the court, as well as on it, while all accounts are that Lleyton is quiet and relaxed off the court. But on court, the similarities are definitely there. Connors, BTW, adores Lleyton.

I wonder if this means that Kim will marry and then divorce a mid-level English player before marrying an American skiier?

Yasmine
06-28-2005, 02:35 PM
I wonder if this means that Kim will marry and then divorce a mid-level English player before marrying an American skiier?
:lol: :haha:

Turkeyballs Paco
06-28-2005, 04:17 PM
:lol: funny, Socket!

Socket
06-28-2005, 04:54 PM
'Intimidation' accusation won't dent Hewitt's drive
Chip Le Grand
29jun05

LLEYTON HEWITT is in his element. The All England Club has stiffed him on the seedings, a linesperson has called him for seven foot faults and Taylor Dent has accused him of intimidating umpires.

With the men's tournament down to the final eight, it is Hewitt against the world at Wimbledon ... just how he likes it.

A long shot from Dent was called good, Hewitt threw his hands up in despair and chair umpire Enrico Molina overruled the call.

"That was not good," a frustrated Dent told Molina. "Whether the call was good or not you had better stand by it. You had better stand by it and not because he is bitching."

Whether Molina changed his call because of Hewitt's bitching is doubtful. It is more likely that a typically pugilistic Hewitt simply beat the umpire to the punch.

But speaking after their match, Dent was concerned at the message the umpire had sent.

"I thought the umpire handled the situation poorly," Dent said. "I don't disagree with the call at the end of the day.

"But that is not the right sign to send to other linesmen. If Hewitt is going to complain and start to get all these calls that is an unfair advantage for him. And that is exactly what happened there.

"The umpire didn't change his call until after Hewitt started complaining about it. I don't know how many matches he has done on Centre Court.

"I don't know if the situation got to him, if he is intimidated by Hewitt or whatever. He handled that situation poorly.

"His (Hewitt's) personality is indicative of doing that. He's fired up, he's yelling.

"I don't know what he said to one of the linesmen out there today but I heard the crowd. That's intimidating. That's intimidating whether it works for him or against him."

Hewitt doesn't believe he intimidates umpires, but did express frustration at the frequency of overrules in his four matches at the tournament.

He was also bemused by his rash of foot faults, which were overwhelmingly called at the one end of the court. Hewitt was dogged by repeat foot fault calls at this year's Australian Open, which he described at the time as "a joke".

"Some matches you go through a match without an overrule and then there are others where you will go through a tournament where you will have two or three in every match," Hewitt said.

"It is very hard - anything on the far side of the court, especially serves or whatever going fast - it is very hard for any chair umpire to overrule those."

Hewitt received a formal warning for verbal abuse for his caustic remarks towards Molina in the first set and was fortunate not to receive a second warning early in the fourth, when he screamed at a lineswoman to "wake-up".

He will receive his fine either today or tomorrow.

Yet irrespective of financial penalty, Hewitt was happy that neither his exchanges with Molina, nor the frequency of overrules and foot faults, distracted him from his focus against Dent.

This is the great strength of Hewitt, who is able to play tennis in a whirlwind yet keep his game on an even keel.

It is also the reason Hewitt will today relish the prospect of playing Feliciano Lopez, a talented, left-handed Spaniard with a reputation for brittleness.

Lopez played doubles for Spain three years ago in its losing Davis Cup final to Australia in Melbourne and is an accomplished grass-court player, having made the round of 16 at two previous visits to Wimbledon. But he has not gone this deep at a Grand Slam and is the first Spaniard to make the quarters at Wimbledon since Manuel Orantes in 1972.

In their only previous meeting, Hewitt thrashed Lopez in the third round of last year's US Open.

Asked whether he could exploit their difference in big-tournament experience, Hewitt said it would be an issue for Lopez to deal with.

"I don't think there are ways of me exploiting that," Hewitt said.

"It is more him holding his nerve in terms of the big court and playing big matches. He's come through and beaten two of the big danger men in the tournament in (Marat) Safin and (Mario) Ancic, both in straight sets. So he has obviously hardened his nerve pretty well at the moment."

As Hewitt fights and fist-pumps his way through the draw, debate will continue to rage over his on-court behaviour.

There is a part of Dent who believes Hewitt's abrasive on-court demeanour is not bad for the sport. As much as Centre Court is infatuated with the gentlemanly grace of Roger Federer, tennis needs someone to wear a black hat, and the crowd seemed to take guilty pleasure in Hewitt's anger.

Dent suggested that rather than try to curb Hewitt's combative tendencies, the ATP should consider relaxing its rules governing on-court behaviour for all players.

"I think the rules should be changed to whatever the spectators want to see," Dent said. "We are in the entertainment business. If the spectators want to see us go crazy out there, lighten up the rules. If not, then leave it the way it is.

"My opinion is it is probably a little tight, a little conservative. I think it could be loosened up a little bit but I think you don't want to send a bad message.

"You don't want kids at home all of a sudden watching tennis and seeing kids throwing their racquets over the fence."

There is no risk of this from Hewitt, who may well need it by the time Friday's semi-finals come around and, perhaps, a date with Federer.



privacy terms © The Australian

FanOfHewitt
06-28-2005, 05:21 PM
'Intimidation' accusation won't dent Hewitt's drive
Chip Le Grand
29jun05

Hewitt received a formal warning for verbal abuse for his caustic remarks towards Molina in the first set and was fortunate not to receive a second warning early in the fourth, when he screamed at a lineswoman to "wake-up".


That was hilarious. He yelled out 'wake up love!' and you could tell the lineswoman was rattled. Poor old bag.

Socket
06-28-2005, 06:04 PM
You know, I have to say that Wimbledon seems to have the oldest and most out of shape line judges of all the slams. And the poor women forced to stand there in the heat dressed in those voluminous dresses, pantyhose, and pumps! No wonder they're making mistakes.

Jess
06-28-2005, 06:16 PM
Centre Court 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[3]
vs Feliciano Lopez (ESP)[26]

2 Gentlemen's Singles
Sebastien Grosjean (FRA)[9]
vs Andy Roddick (USA)[2]


Court 1 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles
Roger Federer (SUI)[1]
vs Fernando Gonzalez (CHI)[21]

2 Gentlemen's Singles
Thomas Johansson (SWE)[12]
vs David Nalbandian (ARG)[18]

:rolleyes: Great he's on first again :o Forecast is for rain.

Yasmine
06-28-2005, 06:23 PM
:rolleyes: Great he's on first again :o Forecast is for rain.
Crap, same time as Roger Federer meaning they're gonna show roger instead of Lleyton! :smash: and forecast was rain today too apparently and there has been no delays during the womens QF so fingers crossed;)

FanOfHewitt
06-28-2005, 06:26 PM
You know, I have to say that Wimbledon seems to have the oldest and most out of shape line judges of all the slams. And the poor women forced to stand there in the heat dressed in those voluminous dresses, pantyhose, and pumps! No wonder they're making mistakes.

True. There was this very old lineswoman in Lleyton's game yesterday, I'd say she was about 70, and she was crouching down in order to see the outerline for return of serves. Being crouched like that in pumps during a match would be difficult enough for a 20 year old, let alone a 70 year old.

I don't know what her reflexes were like but she can thank her lucky stars that Lleyton is a good return of serve otherwise Dent could have been up for manslaughter.

Socket
06-28-2005, 06:47 PM
True. There was this very old lineswoman in Lleyton's game yesterday, I'd say she was about 70, and she was crouching down in order to see the outerline for return of serves. Being crouched like that in pumps during a match would be difficult enough for a 20 year old, let alone a 70 year old.

I don't know what her reflexes were like but she can thank her lucky stars that Lleyton is a good return of serve otherwise Dent could have been up for manslaughter.
:rolls: :rolls:

Did you know that a line judge at the US Open actually died from his injuries after a serve from Stefan Edberg hit him in the groin and he fell over and struck his head on the court?

FanOfHewitt
06-28-2005, 07:19 PM
:rolls: :rolls:

Did you know that a line judge at the US Open actually died from his injuries after a serve from Stefan Edberg hit him in the groin and he fell over and struck his head on the court?

Geez... Na didn't know that.... its funny and tragic. What a way to go.

scythe19pro
06-28-2005, 07:38 PM
Lleyton steps over the line
Chip Le Grand
June 29, 2005



YOU can argue long and hard about whether Hewitt crosses a line with the way he plays tennis.

A more pressing issue for Hewitt is why he continually steps over the line when he serves.

Hewitt was foot-faulted seven times during his four-set match against American Taylor Dent. No other player has recorded as many in a single match at these championships.

Hewitt's response was anger at the linesperson and umpire Enrico Molina, than one of bemusement. He dismissed the rash of calls as evidence of a pedantic linesperson rather than sloppy footwork.

"I had a couple in one of my previous matches," Hewitt said. "Today was more weird than anything else. It was all happening at one end and not up the other. That's what my question was to the umpire at one stage."

http://www.news.com.au/images/advertisement.gif






But as much as Hewitt believed a rogue linesman was at fault, it is not the first time that foot-faulting has emerged as a genuine issue in his game.

At the Sydney International at the the start of this year, Hewitt was called for 10 foot faults in two sets against Frenchman Arnaud Clement.

Then, like now, he believed a linesman, rather than his service action, was at fault, and approached chair umpire Lars Graff to register his complaint.

"If it had happened at both ends, then I can fully understand," Hewitt said then. "But if it's only happening up one end ... and then when all the linespeople changed, I didn't get foot-faulted again. It's not like I change my action during a match."

At the time, Hewitt and his coach Roger Rasheed were more amused than concerned.

"We laughed about it a bit," Hewitt said.

However, Hewitt failed to see the funny side two weeks later in the final of the Australian Open, when he was foot-faulted on an ace in a crucial game in the third set against Marat Safin. Hewitt's anger at the call and abuse of the linesperson responsible earned him a code violation for unsportsmanlike conduct from chair umpire Carlos Ramos.

Yasmine
06-28-2005, 09:24 PM
However, Hewitt failed to see the funny side two weeks later in the final of the Australian Open, when he was foot-faulted on an ace in a crucial game in the third set against Marat Safin. Hewitt's anger at the call and abuse of the linesperson responsible earned him a code violation for unsportsmanlike conduct from chair umpire Carlos Ramos.
well sorry to say that lleyton was completely out of order when that happened during the AO final! especially since they showed a close up and the foot fault call was justified. I haven't seen the match against Dent but it does sound weird that he gets foot faulted more often than any other player. ;)

Yasmine
06-28-2005, 09:25 PM
True. There was this very old lineswoman in Lleyton's game yesterday, I'd say she was about 70, and she was crouching down in order to see the outerline for return of serves. Being crouched like that in pumps during a match would be difficult enough for a 20 year old, let alone a 70 year old.
I have the explanation then :devil: that old lineswoman just enjoyed seeing Lleyton not too far from her and foot faulting him was the best way to enjoy his muscles once more :lol:

Socket
06-28-2005, 09:46 PM
This is just too funny. :haha:

BY APRIL TODD

WHEN LOVE BREAKS DOWN
596 words
26 June 2005
The Mail on Sunday
English
(c) 2005 Associated Newspapers. All rights reserved

BY APRIL TODD

HOW does the old saying go? 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. Try telling that to Kim Clijsters after she ran into old flame Lleyton Hewitt at Wimbledon.

The one-time golden couple of lawn tennis, whose romance came to an abrupt end eight months ago, turned up at the Aorangi Park practice area to find that they had mischievously been allocated neighbouring courts.

Absence clearly hasn't made Clijsters' heart grow any fonder, for within seconds of spying her ex-fiance on the next court the No15 seed stamped her foot and demanded a move to another area.

Officials agreed and Tim Henman, a flop on the court but ever the English gent off it, stepped in and took the Belgian girl's spot to save her any further embarrassment.

The episode has not had a negative impact on Clijsters' form, judging by the ease with which the 22-year-old blonde dismantled Roberta Vinci 6-3, 6-4 yesterday to set up a fourth-round encounter with the top seed Lindsay Davenport tomorrow.

But it was a timely reminder of how a once beautiful romance had turned so ugly in the space of a few, short months.

Aussie star Hewitt and Clijsters were sport's perfect pair Down Under after their relationship became public knowledge more than four years ago. The young lovers even teamed up to play mixed doubles at Wimbledon in 2001 and reached the final.

The course of true love could not have been running any smoother and, after buying houses together in Belgium and Australia, they announced their engagement.

Kim's happiness was mirrored in her form as she shot to the top of the rankings in August 2003, won the women's doubles at Wimbledon with Ai Sugiyama and, to complete the perfect picture, she and Hewitt pencilled in February this year for the wedding.

He proposed during a romantic cruise in Sydney Harbour and she cooed: 'I couldn't be happier.'

However, 2004 produced a very different story. A wrist injury ravaged her season, she got so depressed she even stopped going to rehab and then came the bombshell -- the wedding was off. And, to irk her Aussie lover even more, she announced it through her website. Hewitt was stunned, though not for too long, since he is now engaged to be married to Australian soap star Bec Cartwright and they are expecting their first child in October.

Clijsters has also bounced back, with her enforced spell on the sidelines and memories of her former lover now firmly in the past.

'It definitely changed my perspective on life, what with my mother being sick,' she said. 'Over the last five years I was more in Australia and now I am in Belgium. I was also able to meet a lot of people and do a lot of things that I've never been able to do.

And that's the best part of it. In the end, everything turns out to be positive if you think positive. I am more mature. I've learned to deal with things.'

Except, it seems, seeing your ex on an adjacent court at practice.

And here's another possible scenario for Clijsters to deal with. Should she and Hewitt win their respective titles, they will be expected, as tradition dictates, to take the first dance at the Champions' Ball. [Editorial comment: They stopped that years ago.]

Don't go rushing off, Tim. Your peacemaking services could be required one more time

Turkeyballs Paco
06-28-2005, 11:49 PM
I have the explanation then :devil: that old lineswoman just enjoyed seeing Lleyton not too far from her and foot faulting him was the best way to enjoy his muscles once more :lol:

:lol: it was the AO, I think where he asked one of the linespeople (a woman), "what are you looking at, love?" WE KNOW what she was looking at, and we don't blame her, but she really should be doing her job. :angel:

NOMAD
06-29-2005, 03:23 AM
C'mon Aussie, I'm tired :rolls:


June 29 2005
Shepparton News


Over the years, winter is a season I've come to love and hate.
It's not the cold weather which does my head in, although I am partial to the warmth of the summer sunshine.

It's not having to front up to football training week after week, as well as playing on Saturdays, writing about it, watching it, discussing it and generally becoming immersed in it.

It's not even the pouring rain and dark nights that invariably come our way once daylight savings has disappeared for another seven months.

What I hate about winter, and also love, is the sleepdeprived state I get myself into year after year.

Take Monday night for example.

After a long day at work, I sauntered home before making my way to the gym for a brief workout.

Dinner was cooked, the chores were done and after a little television, I was ready to catch some wellneeded zeds.

But just as I went to flick off the TV, I was roped back in, much to my chagrin.

Channel 9 had just begun its Wimbledon coverage and Lleyton Hewitt was warming up on court.

Should I watch it? I asked myself.

After a moment's thought, I assured myself that I would watch the first set before turning it off and obtaining the much-needed sleep my body was craving.

So there I was at a tick after 10.30 pm, and not for the first time recently, watching Hewitt trounce America's Taylor Dent.

After a few come-ons, from me and not Hewitt, the fighting Australian secured the first set.

I'll watch one more set and then I'll go to sleep, I told myself.

So the second set came and went and before I knew it I was watching the third set tie-break and the clock had just ticked past midnight.

What had I gotten myself into?

Watching nervously, I could do little but look on as the American claimed the third set before hurling my remote into the wall.

S***, now I've got to watch the rest of the match, I told myself.

History will show Hewitt won the tie in the fourth set and progressed through to the quarter-finals, but that meant little to me yesterday as I rolled into work.

You look like crap, one of my colleagues told me.

Ta, I responded.

I don't know why, and nor do I care, but there is something to be said about sitting up late at night and watching Australians strut their stuff on the international stage.

It's compulsive, it's addictive and above all, it's something I love to do, except for the lack of sleep thing.

That's right, winter and I have a love-hate relationship, but I wouldn't have it any other way.

star
06-29-2005, 03:37 AM
Those Aussies have made staying up late at night to watch sports a tradition. They're tough.

SomL.
06-29-2005, 11:24 AM
Go Lleyton against Lopez !!!!!!!!!!! Come on Lleyton ^_^

bouncer
06-29-2005, 01:34 PM
I wanna c more net play from hewy! grr...

scythe19pro
06-29-2005, 03:19 PM
lleyton won !!:bounce:

i guess the inevitable has happened: he's gonna play Fed in SF. I have a feeling i'm not gonna enjoy thant match. If only LL could hold his service games and then hope for some lucky TBs and push the match into a 5th set. Fed will choke. He doesn't have a good 5 set rocord.

Yasmine
06-29-2005, 04:22 PM
Well I'm in a dilemma here, I really like both of them. On the one hand I want roger to win the whole tourney since he hasn't won a GS this year, that would shut people up... and on the other hand I want Lleyton to win too :shrug: (to win and cut his pony tail :tape: )

Turkeyballs Paco
06-29-2005, 04:26 PM
Yeah, I understand why so many people want to see Federer win this one, after all we are really surprised he hasn't taken everything this year. But since the baby is coming for Lleyton soon, it sounds like he has maybe 2 more chances in his career to win a grand slam, although statistics don't mean much when it comes to Lleyton. Still, I think realistically, it's all down hill after the baby.

Yasmine
06-29-2005, 04:28 PM
Still, I think realistically, it's all down hill after the baby.
I'm not sure about that. Well I hope not anyway. He might be distracted for a bit especially at the beginning but I hope he'll set himself into a routine and habits including the baby... it might actually give him a boost :cool:

Turkeyballs Paco
06-29-2005, 04:30 PM
Well, I certainly hope so! :wavey:

scythe19pro
06-29-2005, 04:33 PM
oh, man. so much hate in GM. so many ppl cheering agains lleyton. these guys really need to get a life.:cuckoo:

Yasmine
06-29-2005, 04:34 PM
that doesn't surprise me, that just conforts me in not going there anymore;)

Jess
06-29-2005, 04:48 PM
Yeah, I understand why so many people want to see Federer win this one, after all we are really surprised he hasn't taken everything this year. But since the baby is coming for Lleyton soon, it sounds like he has maybe 2 more chances in his career to win a grand slam, although statistics don't mean much when it comes to Lleyton. Still, I think realistically, it's all down hill after the baby.


Oh I really don't think you can say that! There are many top sportsmen who continue to do very well in their career after a baby is born! Lleyton is 24 he could (although I don't think he will) carry on playing for another ten years. I'm not quite sure how that only gives him another two chances at a slam. Having a child can be a very positive thing - he seems the kind of guy to draw a lot of support from having his family around. Plus it's not like they couldn't afford a whole load of fancy childcare if thats what they decided to do.

Having a family hasn't exactly done Agassi much harm has it ;)

Socket
06-29-2005, 05:06 PM
I think that Lleyton's exceptionally strong support group will prevent his career from being adversely affected by the baby. He's used to travelling with his friends and his parents, so he and Bec will have loads of assistance when they take the baby on the road. In fact, I suspect that Bec might have a hard time getting the baby away from Grandma at times.

scythe19pro
06-29-2005, 05:22 PM
Hewitt through to semis
By Paul Mulvey in London
June 30, 2005

THIRD seed Lleyton Hewitt set up an enticing Wimbledon semi-final against Roger Federer with a commanding quarter-final display overnight.

Hewitt breezed past Spaniard Feliciano Lopez 7-5 6-4 7-6 (7-2) and will meet top seed Federer in what many pundits say should be the final rather than a semi.

Defending champion Federer was equally impressive in his 7-5 6-2 7-6 win over Chilean Fernando Gonzalez.

Hewitt, although ranked No.2, was controversially seeded third behind Federer and Andy Roddick for Wimbledon, resulting in a semi-final clash between the world's two best players.

But Federer will go into Friday's semi with a big hold over Hewitt, winning their last seven contests to take a 9-7 head-to-head record against the Australian.

"Last time I made the semis I went on to win the tournament, so hopefully that's a good omen," he told BBC TV after the win.

"Roger is going to be a tough match, it's like a final for me."

After a shaky start against Lopez, Hewitt charged into the Wimbledon semis for the second time with his best performance of the tournament.

The 2002 champion delivered 15 aces as his serve was again a major weapon while his speed around court and regular forays to the net unsettled Lopez.

Advertisement:

Hewitt answered every challenge put to him by the rare Spanish serve-volleyer who kept watching potential winning shots fired back past, or over, him.



Watched from the royal box by Manolo Santana, the only Spaniard to win the Wimbledon title, Lopez's nerve failed him when he lost the first two sets by crumbling when serving to stay in the set.

On both occasions, Hewitt didn't have to work hard to claim three set points.

It was Hewitt, though, who looked fragile early in the match.

He was broken in the fifth game when a clumsy serve and volley was followed by a double fault and an unforced error to give Lopez three break points.

But Hewitt retrieved the break and got back in the match with typical pugnacity.

After he punched a brilliant return to level the eighth game at 30-30, he read Lopez' volley perfectly and moved in anticipation to the backhand court from where he managed to flick up a high lob.

Lopez dumped the overhead into the net and then double faulted to hand back the break and level the set at 4-4.

Hewitt fought to hold his own serve as Lopez took the next game to deuce when he found the lines with his deep and wide groundstrokes.

But when the Spaniard served to take the set into tiebreak, a series of unforced errors, including another volley ending up in the net, gave Hewitt three set points.

Once back in the match, Hewitt released his tight grip. He made few unforced errors and had little trouble holding his serve and although each set was tight, he was always in command.

scythe19pro
06-29-2005, 05:42 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 9
Wednesday, June 29, 2005



Q. Do you feel you went up a few notches today?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I did. I felt like I played pretty well all around today. My whole game came together well. You know, I needed it to. He's a dangerous opponent, especially on this surface with a big lefty serve.

Yeah, I had to try to dictate play as much as possible and I was able to do that.

Q. John McEnroe is full of praise for your performance, said it was the best he's ever seen you play. Would you agree with that? How would you react to that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I didn't put too many feet wrong today. I went out there with a game plan and I stuck to it the whole time. The guy's got a great serve. There's going to be games when you're not going to get a racquet on the ball. Yeah, you've just got to accept that and move on.

I felt like when I got broken, early in the first set I played a couple loose points early, but from then on I played a good game and he got a net cord to break me. I didn't let that affect me. I felt like I still kept hanging in there and waiting for my opportunities.

Yeah, in the end I started seeing the ball really well and I was on his serve pretty much every game.

Q. How much did your greater experience help you today?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm sure it helped a little bit. Yeah, he came out and didn't look nervous from the way he played and the way he started. Maybe end of sets, he didn't get enough first serves in on the key points. But, you know, I thought he handled the situation pretty well. You know, at the start he was aggressive. He was serving big right from the word "go."

Q. What is the key to beating Roger Federer? What has turned the series around against him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure what the key is. I haven't won the last few. Have to try and find something in the next couple of days.

Yeah, he's obviously the best player in the world for a reason. Yeah, he's really taken his game to another level in the last couple of years. Obviously I've lost to him the last couple of years, last six or seven times, but it's all been in the last two years or so when he's really dominated pretty much everyone.

You know, obviously he's got to be very confident against anyone, and especially in Centre Court here where the last two years he's pretty much made his own.

Q. To what degree is there the feeling that he needs to be off his regular game or his best game for somebody to have a chance to beat him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I don't know. I think when he plays ‑‑ you know, he's played some of his best tennis, he's nearly been unbeatable in certain matches. You still got to go out there and try and make him not play his best tennis. You know, you've got to look for it. He doesn't have a lot of big weaknesses out there, but you've got to try and pin something down. Even then, he can still find ways to win when he's not hitting the ball great either.

It's an (indiscernible). You got to go out there, clean your service games up, wait for your opportunities. You're not going to get a whole heap. That's where he's really gone up the last couple years, I think he's playing the big points really well.

Q. The last time you beat him was in the Davis Cup match. Have you noticed since then he's been more confident or intense against you? Anything that changed after that match?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I think he in general as a player is a lot more confident than he was. He just won Wimbledon before we played that tie for the first time. Yeah, next time we played was in the Australian Open Round of 16. I won the first set and had an opportunity to go up a set and a break in that match.

Since then, he's been pretty dominant against everyone. Yeah, he has been the supreme player, especially on this surface.

Q. When you stand across the net from somebody like that, somebody who is nearly unbeatable, where do you get your confidence from?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, from the way I'm hitting the ball. You know, little areas that I think I might have a slight advantage. And you've got to believe in yourself. And I think, you know, I believe I'm capable of winning the match. It's not going to be easy, and I've got to play one of my best matches that I've got.

But, you know, I believe that I can do it.

Q. Where do you feel like you have those advantages?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I won't be telling you.

Q. You believe in yourself. You pump yourself up. Are there times during a match against Roger those doubts come into your mind?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. You know, if he's serving for the match and stuff sometimes, when he's winning pretty comfortably. Apart from that, I've had small opportunities in my match here 12 months ago. I had a lot of small chances and wasn't just quite able to take them. Even late in the fourth set, I was up a break to take it into a fifth set, and I just didn't quite play the big points as well as he did on the day. That's the reason he's won here the last two years, though.

Q. If you play your best tennis, in your own mind you can beat him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Mate, it all depends on the match‑up out there. You can't go out there ‑‑ you only can play as well as your opponent lets you, as well. There's a lot of different scenarios out there, tactics and stuff that come into play. You can't say him at his best, him at his best. There's different weaknesses and different areas of the game that you're going to try to exploit.

Q. What are the challenges to playing him on grass?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, he can just mix it up so well. You know, he's got a great slice, great forehand, a great serve, and he moves extremely well, which is a key on this surface. But he's got a lot of variety to his game, as well: he can serve‑volley, he can stay back. I think that's why he's had such a good record on grass.

Q. Are you any more angry about the seeding at these championships?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, not really. It's a bit strange playing in a semifinal, the No. 1 and 2 player in the world.

Q. Of all the people you've ever faced, when it comes to the biggest points in a match, how would you compare Roger with all those other players?

LLEYTON HEWITT: When I've played him in big matches, he's been as good as anyone. Andre Agassi's been great at that, as well, playing the big points well. And obviously Pete Sampras at his peak was, you know, unbelievable at doing that.

He's definitely up there in that category, though.

Q. Roger, now he's basically a baseliner. Which way would you rather play him, coming in or staying back?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Doesn't worry me either way. I think his serve, he doesn't have such a big serve as a Sampras or an Ivanisevic, these kind of guys. He uses his serve extremely well for his game, though. He gets a high percentage in. He works the angles and makes you hit back where he wants that first hit to go. Then he feels more comfortable a lot of the time coming in on his terms after the first hit rather than coming in, serve‑volleying.

It just all depends on I guess where he's confident and what he's doing. He's a great serve and volleyer if he did that the whole times a well. It's hard to say which is better for it.

Q. As a rule, would you rather play a baseliner or a serve and volleyer?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Doesn't bother me. Everyone's different.

Q. Do you think this is what most tennis fans would want to be the final?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I would definitely like it to have been the final, obviously. But, you know, for me it would be like playing a final, going out there. If you knock the best player off out there, then you've obviously got to be pretty confident going into the final Sunday.

But, you know, it's a strange situation. I don't know how many times it would have happened that the top two ranked players would be playing in a semifinal in a Slam.

Q. Would have been worthy of a final?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, yeah, I've been playing pretty well at the moment. Obviously, coming off a layoff, there were a few question marks. I didn't have too many doubts in my mind.

Q. When you come here, do you relish a shot at Roger? Do you look forward to meeting him, whether it's in the semis, finals, and a chance at knocking him off?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's not something that I've thought about up till now. Obviously now it's a huge opportunity, though. I do like playing the big matches when there's a lot of emotion out there, a great atmosphere. Come Friday, it's going to be no different.

Q. López was saying he was surprised at how well you served. If you go on to win, how important has your improved serve been to you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I served extremely well today. It's been a little bit patchy. I didn't serve that great against Dent I didn't feel for the whole match. It was probably one of my worst serving days. I knew it was something I had to pick up today against López, and I was able to do that.

But, you know, it's something that over the last 18 months or so I've really served pretty well in general. You know, just makes the game that much easier if you're getting some cheap points off your first serve.

Q. How do you improve your serve over the last 18 months? If you're the No. 1 player in the world, how do you make a stroke like that better?

LLEYTON HEWITT: For me it was more Rash and I sat down looking at percentages, trying to get cheap points off my first serve. Obviously, when we get in a rally, I'm feeling pretty confident against most players, regardless. Over five sets, it makes it a lot easier to go out there. You're getting a high percentage of first serves in and also going out there and getting some cheaper points. It just makes it that much easier to sustain that through seven best‑of‑five set matches.

I♥PsY@Mus!c
06-29-2005, 09:20 PM
oh, man. so much hate in GM. so many ppl cheering agains lleyton. these guys really need to get a life.:cuckoo:

Ya,I agree. :ras: That place sucks! :banghead:
Congrats Hewitt! :clap2: I'm sure he could win against girly boy! :lol: Next match is very tough,but come on, :shout: prove to them you're the star! :rocker2:

star
06-29-2005, 11:46 PM
I am the star. :lol:

Socket
06-30-2005, 12:20 AM
I am the star. :lol:
OK, you play Federer on Friday! ;) ;) ;)

Socket
06-30-2005, 12:39 AM
June 30, 2005

Electrifying Hewitt plugs into power from his personal grid
By Giles Smith
YOU would describe Lleyton Hewitt’s 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 quarter-final victory over Feliciano López, of Spain, yesterday as entirely comfortable, if Hewitt looked like someone for whom comfort was even a remote possibility. The No 3 seed must be the biggest fidget to inhabit a tennis court this side of Andre Agassi. Between points, he is forever twitching and picking away at things — his cap, his racket, his sleeves, his shorts, his shoelaces, all in one fast, continuous motion. Slowed down slightly and set to music, it would look like break dancing. Hewitt is one busy Aussie.

Still, it rewrites the usual mythology. Hewitt fiddles, then burns his opponent. Yesterday it was López’s turn to smoulder and look hurt while Hewitt pulled (among other things) his socks up, producing tennis that, at times, must surely have ridden right out to the boundary of his talent and had a good look over the fence. One of Lleyton’s compatriots broke the silence to say, “Go on, Lleyton, you good thing!” — a little Kath and Kim moment on the Centre Court. But, in some of Hewitt’s blindingly powerful play yesterday, “good” wasn’t even the half of it.

It was quite a pairing they made. One for the romantics? Well, there was López with his luxury hair, his long, lithe limbs, his fetching way of hitching his shorts on to his waxed thighs and his boyband profile. And there was Hewitt.

There are players who make tennis look easy and Hewitt is not among them. (López, with his languid service action and extravagant, photo-ready ground strokes, comes far closer.) In Hewitt’s blue-collar version of the game, the wiring and the plumbing are visible: his play betrays the effort that it costs, right from the way that he appears, as he bends and then extends, to be pulling his serve, against its wishes, out of his shoe. It’s popular, though, and it works. López was only seeded No 26 but had entered trailing glory. Two developed powers of the game, Marat Safin and Mario Ancic, had fallen to him in the earlier rounds — in straight sets, no less. López was also known to be a Spanish serve and volley player who was comfortable on grass, which, in terms of rarity, is pretty much the equivalent of being a horse with two heads or an honest politician.

Yet Hewitt, in a concentrated blaze, restricted him to only one opportunity to get a grip on the match and then refused to let him capitalise on it. That chance came in the fifth game of the first set, when Hewitt, who was still range-finding, pretty much dumped his serve, gift-wrapped, into López’s grateful arms. (López, the recipient of many similar gifts against a sulking Ancic, must have been beginning to confuse Wimbledon with Christmas).

Three games later, Hewitt closed the gap. López’s plan appeared to be to try to bring Hewitt lunging to the net whenever possible, exploiting his general antipathy to areas north of the baseline, where the air grows suddenly thinner.

López was charging in behind his serve as well, although in this game it proved costly, with Hewitt managing to send a 133mph serve skimming past his opponent’s shoulder and into the corner. Hewitt had soon advanced to break point, whereupon López gave up his precious lead on a double fault.

Essentially, López’s Wimbledon ended there. Hewitt broke him again in the twelfth game, with an astonishingly quick-handed return of serve that López could get only a small and unresponsive portion of his racket to. That gave Hewitt the first set and a new air of still greater vigour and invincibility. He broke López in the tenth game of the second set and took two mini-breaks off him in the tie-break for the third, a portion of the match that yielded its best rally, won, of course, by Hewitt. It was meant to be López dishing out the heavy service treatment, but Hewitt was even dominating in this area, too.

His reward, if that is the word, is to run into Roger Federer in the semi-finals. What chance Hewitt fiddling and burning in this company? López was touchingly humble about this. “Roger is another level, no? He’s not me.” Hewitt, meanwhile, was addressing himself as phlegmatically as he could to the problem. “You’ve got to clean your service games up, wait for your opportunities,” he said. “

You’re not going to get a whole heap. He doesn’t have a lot of big weaknesses out there, but you’ve got to try and pin something down. Even then, he can still find ways to win when he’s not hitting the ball great.” Sounds positive?

Best pray for an off-day, perhaps. Coupled, preferably, with an on-day like Hewitt had yesterday. Then, who knows what we may see?

Socket
06-30-2005, 12:43 AM
Nice article by Sue Mott.



Hewitt's aces break hearts
By Sue Mott
(Filed: 30/06/2005)

In pics: Day nine action from Wimbledon
Wimbledon seedings in full
2005 singles draw

Typical. No sooner had the Centre Court discovered a new romantic hero than he was off in a swirl of towelling to the sighs of women clutching their hearts and, preferably, a pair of bino-culars. Hello, and goodbye, Feliciano Lopez of Spain.

The 23-year-old conqueror of fifth seed Marat Safin was vanquished in straight sets by the former champion, Lleyton Hewitt, but at least for the two hours of the action the Spaniard was able to showcase a Hollywood repertoire of looks and poses. The overhead reverse backhand smash had to be favourite, even the number of times it swooshed into the net, for pure athletic spectacle. But Hewitt is no art lover.

He knows what he likes - winning. This the Australian duly did: 7-5, 6-4, 7-6, heedless of the pain it might cause in feminine circles, to set up a semi-final clash with the champion, Roger Federer.

It was a shame this quarter-final was not more evenly poised. The players were perfectly contrasted, the fidgety Aussie doing his Billy Whizz impersonation versus the languid Latin with blue-grey eyes and a matinee idol's jawline. Lopez's biggest mistake was admitting the country of his birth. Statisticians before the match computed that Hewitt beats Spaniards for fun. He had won his last 11 matches against opponents from Iberia and Lopez was to round up the dozen.

And yet the player ranked 33 in the world, who lists one of his interests as "nightclubs" (unsurprisingly) was not your typical Spaniard. Like a German surrendering a sunbed, he goes against the stereotype with his love of attacking the net. This preference had brought him great success in previous rounds, including the scalp of Mario Ancic, but Hewitt proved a more obstinate case.

The Australian played well. His serve in particular, with 15 clean aces, was in stinging form, often leaving Lopez looking lovely on the baseline but not actually swinging a racket. "Quite good, no?" said the Spaniard smiling on the subject of his opponent's serve. He did not seem too distraught by his departure. Possibly he had exceeded his own expectations by reaching his first grand slam quarterfinal and there were certainly times when it seemed that he was unnerved to be in such exalted surroundings.

"The nerves, they didn't let me play bad," he said, but perhaps they did in crucial games as he flailed an easy forehand volley into the net to bequeath Hewitt the first set and then surrendered the second with a tame backhand slice. The packed, rapt audience groaned, already captivated by their new discovery.

When Lopez leapt around the court he was reminiscent of a musketeer swinging from the arras. In contrast, if Hewitt ever flew in your window, you would want to swat him with a rolled-up newspaper. He has an irritating buzz about him as far as rivals are concerned. He has already 'blue-bottled' his way to two grand slam titles, the 2001 US Open and Wimbledon in 2002, and is looking increasingly frisky as these championships wear on.

Whether this will extend to troubling Federer remains to be seen. Playing the great man on grass is rather like throwing snowballs at the north face of the Eiger, not likely to make much impression.

"I'm not sure what the key is," Hewitt said honestly. "I haven't won the last few. He's obviously the best player in the world for a reason. He's really taken his game to another level in the last couple of years. He's got to be very confident against anyone and especially on the Centre Court here, which he's pretty much made his own."

It doesn't look as though Hewitt will go into the match with a psychological advantage then. But that's what we thought when the Australian cricket team lost to Bangladesh, then Andrew Symonds cracked 74 off 75 balls in the latest contest against England and no one can be too sure now. "Mate, it all depends on the match-up out there," said Hewitt, speaking boldly for the Antipodes, a pugnacious stub of a pony-tail sticking through his red cap.

So where were we? Ah yes, Lopez. Clearly his presence in international tennis will force Wimbledon to rethink their lady line-judge dress policy. No one expects them to be laced into something that Madonna would think twice about wearing, but there are mutterings about the extreme dowdiness of their grey-green, droop-hemmed garb, the sort of thing your great aunt would wear in the watching window of her old people's home. Never mind incompetence, it makes you think of incontinence.

The fact is, our swashbuckling Spaniard has brightened up the tournament and Wimbledon should repay the compliment. He may have made 29 unforced errors in the match to throw away his opportunity but between points he was splendid.

"Well, Lleyton is a big player, no?" he said, explaining his difficulties out there. Someone should point out to Lopez that he is a big player too (especially across the shoulders) and we look forward to many more years of unbridled admiration.

scythe19pro
06-30-2005, 06:17 AM
Up next for Hewitt: Federer

By Wayne Drehs



WIMBLEDON, England – Feliciano Lopez looked like a man whose ego was bruised and whose body was weakened. He hadn't lost a set in his previous three matches and yet Lleyton Hewitt disposed of him Wednesday in the men's quarterfinals as if it were as simple as flushing the handle on a brand new toilet.

After the match, Lopez's words were soft, his shoulders slumped and he openly admitted he had no idea Hewitt had that sort of game. But he also sent a warning to anyone drawing the conclusion that Hewitt might be the favorite to knock off world No. 1 Roger Federer and end his 33-match winning streak on grass in Friday's semifinals.

"He has a chance," Lopez said. "But Roger is another level. It's not me."

Hewitt knows that. That's why after his 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (2) victory over Lopez, there was little celebration. No running around the court in delight or proudly waving to the Wimbledon faithful. Just a simple pump of the fist in the most confident, Jordan-like fashion, followed by Hewitt's trademark yell.

"Come on!'"

Perhaps it was a message to Federer, the man who has the title that Hewitt craves, world's greatest tennis player. At the age of 20, Hewitt was the youngest year-end No. 1 in the sport's history, but his star has since been eclipsed by Federer. The man Hewitt dominated earlier in his career, beating him in seven of their first nine meetings, is now the world's No. 1 and has won seven consecutive matches between the two. That includes three finals, a semifinal and last year's Wimbledon quarterfinal.

"He's obviously the best player in the world for a reason," Hewitt said. "When he plays some of his best tennis, he's nearly unbeatable in certain matches. I'm going to have to try and find something in the next couple days."

Wednesday's victory was a good start. Hewitt was in control against Lopez, revealing a pinpoint serve that Lopez wasn't prepared for. Not only did Hewitt rack up 15 aces, but he won points on 89 percent of his first serves.

"I know he's quite a good serve," Lopez said. "But not like today. After that first set, he started serving unbelievable. He didn't give me a chance."

Hewitt has said all week that although his serve has been rather inconsistent, when it's on, it's better now than when he last won Wimbledon in 2002.

"I've got more variety," he said. "Those two weeks I served really when I needed to. I'm a good enough returner that I'm going to get opportunities to break if I can clean up my service games."

But will it be enough to beat Federer? Former Wimbledon champion John McEnroe, commentating during the Hewitt-Lopez match for the BBC, isn't so sure.

"This is the best I've seen Hewitt play – that's the good news," McEnroe said. "The bad news is that he's going to have to beat Federer."

The distance between Federer and the rest of the tennis world is just that great. But it doesn't mean that Hewitt, known for his long blonde hair, backwards hat and high-strung emotions, won't be confident.

His body is fresh, after he missed the clay court season because of a pair of cracked ribs he suffered while falling down the stairs at his Sydney, Australia, home.

"I was wearing socks," Hewitt said. "I slipped on my shoes at the bottom of the stairs. It was pretty painful at the time."

And his mind is right, too. This is the chance he's waited for. This is the shot at Federer he wanted. And, believe it or not, Hewitt quietly thinks there are areas of his game where he has an advantage over Federer.

"But I won't be telling you," he said.

The last time Hewitt defeated Federer was in a Davis Cup match in 2003, after Hewitt dropped the first two sets, but came back to win the next three to take the match.

After dropping six of his previous nine matches against Hewitt, Federer said that match turned around his confidence, even though he lost.

"I had the feeling I could dominate for three entire sets against him," Federer said. "And I had never had that feeling before against him. That's when I learned I could turn around this series for me."

This marquee matchup, bringing together the world's top two players, should be taking place in a Grand Slam Final. But Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam not to follow ATP rankings when putting together its draw. This year, the committee awarded fourth-ranked Andy Roddick, who lost to Federer in last year's final, the No. 2 seed. Hewitt slipped to the third seed.

That move didn't sit well with Hewitt, who said in May, "Realistically, [Wimbledon] probably comes down to Roger and myself." He echoed those feelings Wednesday.

"It's a strange situation," Hewitt said. "I don't know how many times it would have happened that the top two ranked players in the world would be playing in a semifinal in a Slam. But if you knock the best player off out there, then you've got to be pretty confident going into Sunday."

And at this point, that's all he can hope for.

"He's beaten me enough to believe in his chances," Federer said. "He knows how to win."

Now the question becomes: Can he?

Turkeyballs Paco
06-30-2005, 03:22 PM
nice articles, marlene & scythe19pro, especially the giles smith writer - he's pretty funny.

:wavey:

scythe19pro
06-30-2005, 04:53 PM
Hewitt's history of Roger and out
Chip Le Grand
July 01, 2005



WITH their semi-final booked, Roger Federer was asked to step into Lleyton Hewitt's shoes and view the world from the other side of the net.

Was there any part of him, albeit long-forgotten, that understood what it was like to walk on to Wimbledon's Centre Court knowing the other guy had spanked you seven times straight?

As is his nature, Federer gave the question due consideration. He put on Hewitt's cap, turned it backwards, and scanned his distant past for a time when he wasn't the best player in the world.

He considered his early years on tour, when giants like Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi roamed, and he was nothing more than a bright young talent with a slightly girly hair-do. Had he ever known this feeling?

"No, I never lost seven consecutive matches against a player," Federer said. "I have very few bad records against players, you know. Maybe the most, maybe four. Max, maybe five, I'd reckon."

http://www.news.com.au/images/advertisement.gif






According to Hewitt, the feeling goes something like this: each time you walk on court you think you can win, because that is your job and what you do best. You always believe in yourself, because if you don't you may as well stay in the locker room. You know your opponent has no weaknesses, but he can't be perfect. You have to take your chances, because you know you won't get many.

At the same time, you try not to listen to that other voice in your head which keeps telling you that if Federer plays at his best, you probably can't win; that the guy is a freak and probably as good a player in big matches and on big points as Agassi and Sampras in their prime. That all you can hope is to get Federer on a slightly bad day. And the last one was ... umm ...

"He's obviously the best player in the world for a reason," Hewitt said yesterday. "He's taken his game to another level in the last couple of years. I've lost to him the last couple of years, the last six or seven times, but it's all been in the last two years or so when he's really dominated pretty much everyone.

"Obviously he has got to be very confident against anyone and especially on Centre Court here where the last two years he has pretty much made his own. When he has played some of his best tennis he's nearly been unbeatable in certain matches. You still have to go out there and try to make him not play his best tennis."

If Federer really wanted to empathise with Hewitt, he could recall his feelings when he shared a court with Hewitt early in their careers.

Hewitt never beat Federer seven times in a row, but he was the better player between 1999, when they first met at a small tournament in provincial France, through to 2003 at Melbourne Park, when Hewitt came back from two sets to love and a break down in a remarkable Davis Cup performance. Federer was already Wimbledon champion but after that match, Hewitt had beaten Federer seven from nine times.

The events that day in Melbourne are a celebrated part of Hewitt lore. It was seen as irrefutable evidence that Hewitt could win against anyone, from anywhere. For Federer, it was significant for a very different reason.

Federer believes the tennis he played against Hewitt to nearly win that match taught him that Hewitt was beatable and, by extension, that he had the game to be the best player in the world. If Wimbledon was the making of Federer, that Davis Cup rubber was the start of the Federer era.

"That match in a way gave me a lot of confidence because he beat me on many, many occasions before that," Federer explained.

"I really had the feeling I could dominate almost for three entire sets against him. And that feeling I never had before against him. I was up two sets to love, a break, serving for the match, you know, and I was really playing incredibly well. Then he fought back and we all know what happened.

"That match in a way, you know, of course it was a killer for me, but in that moment it gave me a lot of confidence knowing that against Lleyton I can actually get my act together for three or even more sets in a row. I think that's why I could turn around the series for me."

Since walking off Rod Laver Arena that day, Federer has won the Australian Open, Wimbledon for a second time, the US Open, two Masters Cups and 20 ATP titles.

Against Hewitt, the wins have become thrashings.

On three separate occasions, Hewitt has failed to win one game in a set. Only once, in last year's Wimbledon quarter-final, has Hewitt managed to win a set. After Federer wiped him from the court in Houston to win last year's season-ending Masters Cup, Hewitt came to the net and said: "You're the best, mate."

This year Federer has begun working with Tony Roche, a coach who should know Hewitt's game inside and out from their time together in the Australian team. Indian Wells this year, their only meeting so far, produced another straight-sets walloping.

Yet despite the lop-sided nature of their rivalry, Federer has a deep respect for what Hewitt can do. Perhaps not by coincidence, much of the Federer era has coincided with Hewitt playing less tennis and being fit to play less often.

In 2003, when Federer won Wimbledon for the first time, Hewitt had downsized his tour commitments to save his energy and focus for Australia's Davis Cup campaign. This year, Hewitt did not play for three months after surgery to have a cyst removed from his foot and cracking two ribs in a fall at his Sydney home.

Last year, Hewitt was fit. His only failing was to keep running into the best players at the biggest tournaments: Federer at the Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open and the Masters Cup, and eventual winner Gaston Gaudio at Roland Garros.

"He has beaten me enough to believe in his chance," Federer said. "He knows. He hasn't been playing any tournaments. We don't know how hard he worked, how much he has changed his game, and what he has got. And on grass I think anything can happen against him. He knows how to win the title here."

For Hewitt, the one consolation is that his losing streak to Federer has come at a time when Federer has dominated every other player on tour.

Since that fateful Davis Cup tie, Federer has beaten Andy Roddick four times straight. He has beaten Andre Agassi seven times. He has played Marat Safin five times and lost just once: in their five-set semi-final at this year's Australian Open. Hewitt has not done much wrong, it is just that Federer has done everything right.

"It is probably a weird dynamic for guys like Lleyton and myself because we're pretty much expected to beat everyone else except for him," Roddick said. "You've heard throughout the years that guys win matches in the locker room and Federer is definitely deserved that kind of respect now. But at the same time, I haven't seen Lleyton intimidated by too much. It will be a good one."

If tonight's match had been scheduled as a Wimbledon final, it may have been one of the greats. Two weeks after the fact, Hewitt is still annoyed by the vagaries of the All England Club seeding policy which demoted him below Roddick and placed him on the same side of the draw to Federer.

"It's a strange situation," Hewitt said. "I don't know how many times it would have happened that the top two ranked players would be playing a semi-final in a slam."

Tonight's match will be played on Federer's favourite court and on the surface which best suits his game. It will be played with Federer at the height of his powers and world tennis in a state of resignation. As Roddick said: "Roger is the favourite until someone proves otherwise."

scythe19pro
06-30-2005, 09:30 PM
Centre Court 1.00 pm Start

1 Gentlemen's Singles - Semis
Roger Federer(SUI)[1] vs Lleyton Hewitt(AUS)[3]

2 Gentlemen's Singles - Semis
Thomas Johansson (SWE)[12] vs Andy Roddick (USA)[2]


c'mooon lleyton :bounce: play the match of your life tomorrow!

I♥PsY@Mus!c
06-30-2005, 10:05 PM
I am the star. :lol:

:lol::rolls::lol:

:rocker: Hope he at least takes a set,then yells "COME ON" extra loudly! :rocker:

bavaria100
07-01-2005, 12:37 AM
Just wanted to wish Lleyton good luck for his match against Roger today. I hope he puts up a great fight and wins at least one set. Although I like Roger, I just don´t want to see Lleyton get bagelled again. He doesn´t deserve it.

NOMAD
07-01-2005, 04:09 AM
Mentor now plots Lleyton's downfall

01jul05
TONY Roche was among a handful of Australian greats to nurture Lleyton Hewitt's talents.

Along with close friend John Newcombe, Roche helped take 15-year-old Hewitt into Grand Slam and Davis Cup lore.

By the time Hewitt was 21, he had reached the No. 1 ranking, won a major and a Davis Cup.

Today at Wimbledon, Roche will plot Hewitt's semi-final downfall as his new charge, Roger Federer, pushes for a third consecutive All-England Club title.

And Roche is torn between past and present and national and personal allegiance.

"It's going to be hard to watch," said Roche.

"I mean Lleyton is very special to me. I just hope that they both play very well and they have a great match.

"It was going to happen at some stage that they played and with their rankings it was always going to be a semi-final or final. I'm pretty happy for both of them."

SomL.
07-01-2005, 11:01 AM
Go Lleyton against Federer ^_^ Come on Lleyton ^_^

scythe19pro
07-01-2005, 03:42 PM
lleyton lost :sad: . well, i didn't have any expectations. he looked so nervous, his first serve wasn't there when he needed it, he made lots of UEs. played better the 3rd set, but... it's sad that he can't win a set against federer.

but congrats to him for reaching semis !

do you guys know what tournament he'll play after the wedding? Montreal TMS maybe?

I♥PsY@Mus!c
07-01-2005, 03:53 PM
As expected but I always hope the miracle.
Maybe he will beat Federer on clay in the future.
Anyway good luck to Hewitt. :)

scythe19pro
07-01-2005, 04:24 PM
Lleyton fined for umpire abuse
July 2, 2005

LLEYTON Hewitt has been fined $3295 for verbally abusing Spanish umpire Enric Molina.

Wimbledon officials took the action after reviewing Molina's report into a code violation warning he issued the Australian during a rugged fourth-round win over Taylor Dent.

Angered by an inaudible overall from Molina in the sixth game of the second set, Hewitt exploded on the following point when he dug out a backhand off the baseline.

The Australian considered Dent's drive was out, but continued onto the win the point regardless. He then vented his fury on Molina.

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Roger too hot for Hewitt
By Leo Schlink
July 2, 2005

FAMILIAR hopes, familiar opponent, familiar outcome - that was the crushing storyline for Lleyton Hewitt last night as nemesis Roger Federer obliterated the Australian's Wimbledon dreams with a devastating semi-final victory.

Extending his winning run to eight successive matches over Hewitt, Federer stands on the brink of grand slam immortality after his pulsating 6-3 6-4 7-6 (7-4) thumping of his closest rival.

"I'm really, really happy to make my third Wimbledon final," Federer said. "I really can't believe it was so smooth into the final."

Coached by Australian Tony Roche, Federer will tomorrow attempt to become only the eighth man in history to complete a hat-trick of All-England Club crowns when he faces either American Andy Roddick or Swede Thomas Johansson.

Englishmen William Renshaw, brothers Reggie and Laurie Doherty, Fred Perry and Kiwi Anthony Wilding, Swede Bjorn Borg and American Pete Sampras are the only other players to have sealed a Wimbledon treble.

Federer, 23, has now won 15 sets in a row against Hewitt and 21 of the past 23 the pair has disputed.

Rarely has there been a greater statistical gulf between the two top-ranked players in the sport.

The winner of his past 20 finals, Federer has now won 35 consecutive matches on grass since his first-round loss to Mario Ancic at Wimbledon in 2002 - the season Hewitt claimed the title.

The Dubai-based right-hander is now closing rapidly on Bjorn Borg's record of 41 matches consecutive grasscourt wins,

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Hewitt, 24, simply had no answer as Federer unleashed a breathtaking fusillade of exquisite skill and power.

In the end, it was a rout.

Federer totalled 44 winners to Hewitt's 31 and committed 23 unforced errors to 20.

If not for Hewitt's tenacity, the match would have been over even quicker - 127 minutes - than it was. Watched by several Australian cricketers, including Adam Gilchrist and Andrew Symonds, Hewitt and Federer traded service breaks in the second and third games before a familiar pattern took hold.

Federer took every opportunity to open up his withering forehand while Hewitt probed the Swiss conjurer's backhand. It quickly became a case of who pulled the trigger first. And it was Federer.

When Hewitt netted a backhand off an impossibly low Federer approach in the eight game, the first set was effectively lost.

Under increasing pressure to forge his way back into the contest, Hewitt dropped serve in the fifth game of the second set when he floated a backhand long.

It was a terminal blow. Trailing by two sets to love, Hewitt hoped to replicate the famous 2003 Davis Cup revival he produced against Federer in a Davis Cup semi-final in Melbourne.

It remains Hewitt's most recent win over the Swiss and a career-shaping millstone.

Federer said that loss - he served for the match in the third set - convinced him he could dominate Hewitt for long periods.

And he proved it against last night in the highest arena in tennis, imperiously casting aside the sport's most stubborn contender.

Closing in for the kill, Federer reduced Hewitt to 15-40 in the fifth game of the third set but was denied. Hewitt shaped to steal the set when he cut Federer to 0-30 at 5-6 on the defending champion's serve, but the chance quickly vanished.

Only three players - Marat Safin (Australian Open), Richard Gasquet (Monte Carlo) and Rafael Nadal (French Open) - have beaten Federer this season.

And given the respective win-loss records of Roddick (1-8) and Johansson (0-7), it will take a miraculous upset tomorrow to deprive Federer of a fifth major.

Federer's triumph provides Sydneysider Roche with the chance of finally enjoying the spoils of Wimbledon victory. Beaten in the 1968 final by Rod Laver, Roche has suffered as a losing coach in five other finals - Chris Lewis (1983), Ivan Lendl (1986-87) and Pat Rafter (2000-1).

scythe19pro
07-01-2005, 04:36 PM
L. Hewitt - Day 11
Friday, July 1, 2005



Q. What was the key point for you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure. You know ‑‑ you know, the longer the match went, the better I felt I hit the ball and got into the match. Yeah, in the first set, I just lost my serve obviously early, but then broke back. I had a couple of Love‑15 chances, and I just didn't quite go after it maybe enough on those small opportunities that you get.

But, yeah, he served so well into the corners and gets a lot of lines out there on his first serve that, you know, it always makes it tough. So, yeah, he was able to break pretty early in the second set and get that set‑and‑a‑break lead, and I didn't really have a look in on any of his service games in the second set.

Q. Did he out‑psych you or out‑play you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: What do you mean "out‑psych"?

Q. He seemed to be playing so well, it must be intimidating to play against someone who plays that well. Even when he makes a mistake, he just appears so cool and relaxed. Was it a psychological loss do you think or you just didn't make the shots you wanted to make?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's no doubt he was a better player. I don't think psychologically it had much to do with the match. You know, he served better than me today. He dictated play better than me. That's basically where he got the win.

Q. Did you sense improvement in your game? You came up to the net more than we've seen you do. You've done well there.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I felt like I hit the ball pretty well today. I didn't serve maybe as well as I would have liked. But he puts a lot of pressure on your service games, as well. He gives you have he few points. I think that's been the biggest turnaround in his game over the last couple of years. That's why he's really gone up a couple of notches because he used to give you a lot more cheap points on your service games, and you just don't get those any more.

On his service games, he can rely on getting out of trouble if he's 15‑30 down or Love‑30 with big first serves. That's why he's the best player going around.

Q. Is it sort of hard being one of the best players in the world when like a freak like Roger comes along?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's a little bit, but you've just got to bide your time, keep grinding away, you know, try and look for answers, I guess.

But it's not easy. I felt like I've lifted my game the last 18 months or so. I've got no doubt that I feel like I'm the second best player going around right at the moment. It's just that the best player going around is pretty bloody good.

Q. You play a match against him, then you go back and come up with another plan, that plan doesn't work? Is it hard to keep trying find ways to beat him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's not like I've gone out there with absolute extreme game plans against him. At the end of the day I've still got to play my strengths. And I've got to back my serves and my strengths. There's very small changes that you try and make out there. But it's not something that I'm capable of going and serve‑volleying every point out there. You know, it would be stupid.

For me, there's slight opportunities out there that you've got to take advantage of it. Yeah, he's got very few weaknesses out there.

Q. Is there anything more you can add to your game to match him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure. You're always looking for ways to improve. I've got no doubt that I can improve ‑‑ keep improving my game, otherwise there's no point in keep playing. You know, as long as I've got small areas there that I can work on, it's got to be a positive. But, you know, obviously I don't know what he's got to really work on.

Q. You don't get into many semis, a lot of players don't. How disappointing is it to lose?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's always disappointing to lose, first round or semifinal.

Q. You've seen and played a lot of the great players over time. Is he the best you've seen?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. You know, when Pete was probably at his best, it was probably just before I got on the Tour and was competitive against those top guys, so it's hard to say. Because when I'm playing at my best now, obviously Roger is one of the best players that I've ever seen.

Andre Agassi at his best, he was great as well. Totally different players, though. You know, obviously since Roger's been playing his best tennis the last couple of years, Andre hasn't quite been what he was maybe five years ago.

It's hard to pinpoint, but there's no doubt he's in the top few with the greats.

Q. I know you're going to fight to the end no matter what it is. When you're two sets down against this guy, is there a sense of inevitability?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I actually felt like I had more opportunities in the third set. It's not like if you sit back now and you think, "Shit, I was two‑sets‑to‑love down," it does seem like a long way to come back. But when you're actually out there and just focusing on trying to somehow get that third set. I came close at 6‑5. I saved breakpoints throughout the third set. At 6‑5 I had Love‑30, that was my biggest chance of the match. If I could have squeezed out the third set, then you start fresh for the fourth set again.

That's the way I was looking at it right now. Obviously anyone on the outside, yeah, sure, it's a long way to come back against anyone.

Q. Is it demoralizing coming up against that or do you see it as a challenge, looking for those extras that you can improve to try and beat him the next time?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's definitely a challenge.

In some ways, it's a huge positive that I can keep putting myself in these positions. I can't really remember the last time in the last 18 months or so that I've lost a bad match to an average player. So in that way, that's a huge positive. But, of course, when you get to a semifinal, final of Slams, you want to try and take that next step and hold up the trophy. Anyone does.

I'm obviously doing something right. But, you know, to come awfully close so many times now...

Q. I'm not sure if you watched last year's final or not, but what would you make of a Federer/Roddick rematch?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to go past Rodge. He's the best player in the world. Yeah, it would be very hard to go against him.

Q. Do you think your match with Federer should have been the final?

LLEYTON HEWITT: On paper it should have been.

Q. Looking ahead to the Davis Cup, with Todd's retirement the other day, injury to Mark, Australia up against it now against Argentina?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's always going to be a tough tie, no matter who is in the team, I think, just because it's on grass. They've got obviously Nalbandian, Coria. He's won matches here, made the fourth round. You know, it's not going to be easy at all for any of our guys.

It's going to be another challenge.

Q. Looks like perhaps it will be you and Wayne in the doubles, playing the whole tie yourself.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I haven't even thought about it so far. That's something I'm not going to dwell on till I get there, see how I'm feeling, play it by ear.

Q. How do you stay so relentlessly positive? A lot of times if they lost to Federer eight times in a row, they might be a lot more disconsolate than you are right now. Where does that come from?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. That's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there.

Socket
07-01-2005, 04:43 PM
Lleyton's last answer . . . You tell 'em, Rocky! :yeah:

You had a great tournament, Lleyton, it took the best player in the world to stop you. Thanks, as always, for the great tennis -- it's a privilege to watch you fight out there. :worship:

Yasmine
07-01-2005, 04:55 PM
I agree Marlene, he did well to get there! :hug: and the good thing about it is that he had to get the best out of Federer's game so he beat him anything less and the result would have been different;)
I just wanted to let you know guys that in the Fed's forum there is a dining wagon where some of us enjoy cocktails and food, and here is one of the last posts of the thread;) http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=1922920&postcount=1027

mitalidas
07-01-2005, 04:58 PM
i posted on the gm that had this match been against anyone but Roger, lleyton would have won it or at most lost it in tight 5 sets
this is just a bad matchup for lleyton and he has nothing to be embarrassed about his tournament and everythign to be pissed about after the seeding issue

NOMAD
07-01-2005, 05:11 PM
LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. That's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there.

Lleyton :worship: :worship: :worship:

A great tournament again :hug:
I'm sad that he lost :sad: ,but he is always improving and fights to the end. :worship: Hope he can hold another Grand Slam trophy soon.He deserves it. :angel:

Turkeyballs Paco
07-01-2005, 05:22 PM
good interview! like that last answer too. I guess he must have stunned the interviewer with that one.

mitalidas
07-01-2005, 05:26 PM
Question for people who understand seedings/rankings (will also post in GM):

If Federer wins the final and defeats roddick there, next year will the seedings committee take into account that it was partly determined by this year's seedings that lleyton did not get to the final? Or is he going to be penalized again for reaching "only" the sf while roddick got further (if he does)?

Socket
07-01-2005, 05:27 PM
good interview! like that last answer too. I guess he must have stunned the interviewer with that one.
I truly hope it was Patrick McEnroe or Cliff Drysdale whom Lleyton slapped down.

Socket
07-01-2005, 05:33 PM
Question for people who understand seedings/rankings (will also post in GM):

If Federer wins the final and defeats roddick there, next year will the seedings committee take into account that it was partly determined by this year's seedings that lleyton did not get to the final? Or is he going to be penalized again for reaching "only" the sf while roddick got further (if he does)?
The commentators on Radio Wimbledon mentioned this, and it was clear to me that the formula will NOT take into account that Lleyton was demoted from No. 2 to the No. 3 seed; it would simply show his SF finish. One of the commentators said that the seedings formula just makes it harder for him NOT to get demoted every year.

If the final Sunday is a complete blowout (and especially if ToJo upsets Roddick), then maybe Wimbledon will re-consider whether they should use a formula, or give the Seedings Committee the discretion to NOT use it, if they think the formula would produce inappropriate or inequitable results.

Turkeyballs Paco
07-01-2005, 05:45 PM
In Roddick/Hewitt's case, I think this was just uncalled for. They both have had good results on grass, and I don't remember Roddick winning the championship before. I mean, fickle fickle fickle. They have really short term memories, huh. It's all about "what have you done for me lately".

I mean, if the difference between the #2 and #3 seeds was something like, the #2 is really more a clay specialist who has never come close to winning on grass, then maybe I would have understood, but, not this.

Socket
07-01-2005, 06:14 PM
In Roddick/Hewitt's case, I think this was just uncalled for. They both have had good results on grass, and I don't remember Roddick winning the championship before. I mean, fickle fickle fickle. They have really short term memories, huh. It's all about "what have you done for me lately".

I mean, if the difference between the #2 and #3 seeds was something like, the #2 is really more a clay specialist who has never come close to winning on grass, then maybe I would have understood, but, not this.
I agree, but it's all spilled milk now. We can only hope that the attention from this year will give the Seedings Committee something to think about.

Socket
07-01-2005, 06:16 PM
lleyton lost :sad: . well, i didn't have any expectations. he looked so nervous, his first serve wasn't there when he needed it, he made lots of UEs. played better the 3rd set, but... it's sad that he can't win a set against federer.

but congrats to him for reaching semis !

do you guys know what tournament he'll play after the wedding? Montreal TMS maybe?
Sorry, I haven't seen anything about his schedule. He didn't commit for the Washington, DC event, which I was sorry to see, but since he rarely plays here, I didn't really expect him to. I do hope he plays a lot of tournaments during the summer, given how many points he has to defend (back-to-back wins in Washington and Long Island, and then finalist at the US Open).

star
07-01-2005, 06:57 PM
The commentators on Radio Wimbledon mentioned this, and it was clear to me that the formula will NOT take into account that Lleyton was demoted from No. 2 to the No. 3 seed; it would simply show his SF finish. One of the commentators said that the seedings formula just makes it harder for him NOT to get demoted every year.

If the final Sunday is a complete blowout (and especially if ToJo upsets Roddick), then maybe Wimbledon will re-consider whether they should use a formula, or give the Seedings Committee the discretion to NOT use it, if they think the formula would produce inappropriate or inequitable results.

Playing Queens and winning it will take care of the formula. :)

sprinterluck
07-01-2005, 08:33 PM
Q. How do you stay so relentlessly positive? A lot of times if they lost to Federer eight times in a row, they might be a lot more disconsolate than you are right now. Where does that come from?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. That's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there.

:lol: Our boy hasn't lost any of his charm. I wonder why he got so snippy. Could be he's really sensitive about losing eight straight to Federer and/or it was some annoying reporter who's on his shit list. I mean, did the reporter really have to rub it in by mentioning the 8-match losing streak? :rolleyes: It's like Bud Collins asking Andy Roddick at the Tennis Masters Houston last year...do you remember ever losing a match like that losing 20 consecutive points. :o Even I felt sorry for Andy and I'm not a Pandy fan.

Good luck to Lleyton and the Aussies with Davis Cup. He'll need it especially with Woodbridge retiring. :sad:

Socket
07-01-2005, 09:06 PM
:lol: Our boy hasn't lost any of his charm. I wonder why he got so snippy. Could be he's really sensitive about losing eight straight to Federer and/or it was some annoying reporter who's on his shit list. I mean, did the reporter really have to rub it in by mentioning the 8-match losing streak? :rolleyes: It's like Bud Collins asking Andy Roddick at the Tennis Masters Houston last year...do you remember ever losing a match like that losing 20 consecutive points. :o Even I felt sorry for Andy and I'm not a Pandy fan.

Good luck to Lleyton and the Aussies with Davis Cup. He'll need it especially with Woodbridge retiring. :sad:
I think he definitely thought that the reporter was rubbing it in. Many of the questions asked at the tail end of a press conference are questions that they won't ask at the beginning, such as the ones they know/think will piss the player off. But kudos to Lleyton for making his point clear.

I didn't know that Bud asked Roddick that question; he's usually much more player-friendly than that. Since the answer is an obvious "no," you have to wonder why it's asked. There are reporters who specialize in being wise guys, but Bud isn't one of them. I'm not a Pandy fan, either, but I agree that it was a mean-spirited question.

bavaria100
07-01-2005, 11:08 PM
I am so sorry for Lleyton. Although I like Roger very much, I would have loved seeing Lleyton take one set off of him. But I am sure that Lleyton´s gonna come back stronger and he´s gonna win a Grand Slam title in the near future. Don´t give up Lleyton !!!

Socket
07-02-2005, 02:17 AM
You know, it's funny. I'm reading all these articles about Lleyton's losing streak against Federer, and that made me curious about whether another top player, Roddick, had a similar losing streak. So I checked out their H2H on the ATP site.

2004 Bangkok, Hard, F Thailand Hard F Federer 6 4 6 0
2004 Canada AMS, Hard, F Toronto, Canada Hard F Federer 7 5 6 3
2004 Wimbledon, Grass, F England Grass F Federer 4 6 7 5 7 6 6 4
2003 Tennis Masters Cup, Hard, S Houston, TX, USA Hard S Federer 7 6 6 2
2003 Canada TMS, Hard, S Montreal, Canada Hard S Roddick 4 6 6 3 6 7
2003 Wimbledon, Grass, S England Grass S Federer 7 6 6 3 6 3
2002 Basel, Carpet, Q Switzerland Carpet Q Federer 7 6 6 1
2002 Sydney, Hard, S Australia Hard S Federer 7 6 6 4
2001 Basel, Carpet, Q Switzerland Carpet Q Federer 3 6 6 3 7 6

What struck me was that, like Lleyton, Andy last beat Roger in 2003, and then has lost to him ever since.

Also, two of Lleyton's losses to Roger came after Lleyton beat Andy in a SF (at the 2004 US Open and 2004 Masters Cup). So, assuming that Lleyton had lost those matches, and Andy advanced, and also assuming that Andy then lost to Roger, his losing streak to Roger would have 6 straight, while Lleyton's would have been 5 straight (not including today). So it would be Roddick that the articles would be labeling as having this incredible losing streak against Roger, not Lleyton.

Maybe I'm nuts, but I thought that this was a fascinating perspective on Lleyton's H2H against Roger. Frankly, I'd rather he was putting himself in a position to be beaten by the best player in the world than losing earlier to lesser players. It's like the fact that he's lost to the eventual winner of the slams last year. While the Hewitt haters think this is the most hilarious thing they've ever heard, if you're going to lose, it should be to the eventual winner. Is losing to a qualifier more of a badge of honor?

Sure it would be nice if Lleyton had a better H2H against him, but Roger may very well go down in tennis history as the best player ever. I don't think Lleyton has anything to be ashamed of, and, based on how feisty he was during this post-match interview, I think he understands what's going on and has a good perspective on events.

Socket
07-02-2005, 02:32 AM
This is from Peter Bodo's Tennis World blog (peterbodostennisworld.com). For once, he has something nice to say about Lleyton.

Lleyton Hewitt: Futility and Fire

8:25 P.M. BST (3:25 P.M. EDT)

Roger Federer is in his third consecutive Wimbledon final (he’s been champ two years running) thanks to his flawless performance today against Lleyton Hewitt. The skinny: on a day when Lleyton Hewitt, one of the toughest competitors of this (or any other) era, was playing great tennis, Federer waxed him in straight sets--three, three and six (the final set was decided in a tiebreaker).

I don’t want to write much about the Mighty Fed, though. I want to focus on the combative and gnarly little Aussie, Rusty, who is as sublimely inspirational as he is plainly annoying. The guy gets whacked like some punk in a bad mob movie and he comes into the interview room and delivers an inspirational performance the equal of anything he’s ever done on a court.

The nut of it: This guy loves tennis with a passion nobody can match; this guy does not know what it’s like to throw in the towel and cry “no mas” (a la the redoubtable Andre Agassi at a comparable stage of his career) or explode in frustration (a la Marat Safin). This kid is full of fierce, impersonal pride that has nothing to do with ego or vanity, and everything to do with craftsmanship and purpose and a deep, if unconscious, understanding of an often overlooked and counter-intuitive (for this level) fact: Tennis is just a game. You do your best, you try like hell, and if you get knocked down, you pick yourself right up, dust yourself off, and get ready to try again.

But you don’t give up. You never give up. The only sin is giving up.

When Hewitt was asked about the key element in his loss, he answered, honestly:

I’m not sure…Yeah in the first set I just lost my serve obviously early, but then broke back. I had a couple of love-15 chances , and I just didn’t go after it maybe enough on those small opportunities that you get…

Okay, what are you going to do, suggest a reality check for a guy who looks at love-15 on the other guy’s serve as a “chance”? Are you going to be a deadbeat and tell a guy who considers love-15 a “small opportunity” instead of a minute and remote long shot, that he’s dreaming. Are you going to be the one to tell a guy determined to find a foothold in order to climb a 2000-yard tall panel of smooth stainless steel, “No way, dude, just chill…”

A short while later, Hewitt was asked a borderline insulting question:

He seemed to be playing so well, it must be intimidating to play against someone who plays that well. Even when he makes a mistake, he just appears so cool and relaxed. Was it a psychological loss do you think or you just didn’t make the shots you wanted to make?

His answer:

There’s no doubt he was the better player. I don’t think psychology had much to do with the match. You know, he served better than me today. He dictated play better than me. That’s basically where he got the win.

And Hewitt can remain positive despite the realities his brilliant tennis mind (for Hewitt is as fine an analyst of the game as anyone) keeps throwing up at him about how good Federer is, and how much better he’s getting. Here’s what Hewitt has noticed about Federer; here’s what he has to digest and process and move out of his system before it hits him like a bad virus:

He gives you very few points. I think that’s been the biggest turnaround in his game over the last couple of years. That’s why he’s really gone up a couple of notches, because he used to give you a lot more cheap points on your service games, and you just don’t get those anymore.

Later, another guy asked him if it was hard being one of the best players when a “freak” like Federer comes along. Hewitt patiently replied:

It is, a little bit. But you’ve just got to bide your time, keep grinding away, you know, try and look for answers, I guess. But it’s not easy. I felt like I’ve lifted my game in the last 18 months or so. I’ve got no doubt that I feel like I’m the second best player going around right at the moment. It’s just that the best player going around is pretty bloody good.

It was abundantly clear what many of the reporters really wanted Hewitt to say. Something like this: “Federer is great, I really can’t beat him and it’s really a bummer to have to try. I don’t have any solutions to the problems he poses, I have no idea of where to turn or what to do next.”

In fact, one guy asked how Hewitt managed to stay so unrelentingly positive in the face of the harsh facts (eight losses in a row to Federer, this one in straights -- with Hewitt healthy and firing on all cylinders). He concluded, “You’re not so disconsolate right now, where does that come from?”

Hewitt replied:

I don’t know. That’s probably why I’m sitting here and you’re sitting there.

star
07-02-2005, 02:33 AM
The interview was a good one.

I listened to PMac and then to NBC and I have to say that PMac had more insight into what Lleyton was doing than did Carillo even though I think Carillo is entertaining.

Socket
07-02-2005, 02:39 AM
The interview was a good one.

I listened to PMac and then to NBC and I have to say that PMac had more insight into what Lleyton was doing than did Carillo even though I think Carillo is entertaining.
I have taken to listening to Radio Wimbledon for the (slightly delayed) play-by-play because I find their analysis very insightful. When she first starting commentating tennis, Carillo used to be very, very good, but these days, she seems to be more interested in gossip and funny comments than analyzing what's going in the match. There are times when I want to shout at the screen, "please shut up and talk about the match!" She's simply distracting at times.

mitalidas
07-02-2005, 03:46 AM
I have taken to listening to Radio Wimbledon for the (slightly delayed) play-by-play because I find their analysis very insightful. When she first starting commentating tennis, Carillo used to be very, very good, but these days, she seems to be more interested in gossip and funny comments than analyzing what's going in the match. There are times when I want to shout at the screen, "please shut up and talk about the match!" She's simply distracting at times.


happened to remember you had asked when I found this online. wasn't pmac but some ozzie guy covering wimbledon for his local news station. Also, they cut it off so it made him look crusty, but he seemed to have been much nicer about it:



RAFAEL EPSTEIN: How do you stay so relentlessly positive? A lot of people, if they lost to Federer eight times in a row, they might be a lot more disconsolate than you are right now. Where does that come from?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don’t know, that's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there (laughter from media). It's not like – if you sit back now and you think, "Shit, I was two sets to love down", yeah, it does seem like a long way to come back. But when you're actually out there, and just focusing on trying to somehow get that third set, then you start fresh for the fourth set again. That's the way I was looking at it out there.


http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2005/s1405383.htm

Socket
07-02-2005, 04:11 AM
happened to remember you had asked when I found this online. wasn't pmac but some ozzie guy covering wimbledon for his local news station. Also, they cut it off so it made him look crusty, but he seemed to have been much nicer about it:



RAFAEL EPSTEIN: How do you stay so relentlessly positive? A lot of people, if they lost to Federer eight times in a row, they might be a lot more disconsolate than you are right now. Where does that come from?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don’t know, that's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there (laughter from media). It's not like – if you sit back now and you think, "Shit, I was two sets to love down", yeah, it does seem like a long way to come back. But when you're actually out there, and just focusing on trying to somehow get that third set, then you start fresh for the fourth set again. That's the way I was looking at it out there.


http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2005/s1405383.htm
Great detective work, thanks for posting that link!

star
07-02-2005, 04:58 AM
Actually, I didn't think it made him appear "crusty" in the first place. I was imagining the smile on his face when he said it.

Lleyton's a pretty great guy. :)

Socket
07-02-2005, 05:05 AM
Actually, I didn't think it made him appear "crusty" in the first place. I was imagining the smile on his face when he said it.

Lleyton's a pretty great guy. :)
The more I see him compete, and the more I learn about him, the more I respect him.

bad gambler
07-02-2005, 05:08 AM
That's the thing, people think Hewitt on court is what he is like off the court :shrug:

I've met him several times and he really is a top guy, always giving of his time for his fans

star
07-02-2005, 05:28 AM
Lleyton is not one to back down from a fight. :lol:

I don't mind that quality. :)

As Marlene says: I'd love to be his lawyer.

I haven't had the pleasure of meeting Lleyton, but the respect he has for other players... his hero worship of Rafter... his dedication to Davis Cup... His determination and hard work.. He's quite the guy.

Lisbeth
07-05-2005, 01:56 AM
Lleyton is a fantastic guy. I have never spoken to him personally, but the first time I ever saw him in person (before I even knew much about him), I watched him literally run after Pat Rafter who was leaving after practice to ask him to come back and sign an autograph for a disappointed child he had noticed. Plus you don't have to be a genius to work out that a special ambassador for the special olympics is not going to be a jerk ;) (let alone all his other charities he just quietly helps out without expecting any praise).

Socket
07-05-2005, 04:51 AM
Oh, please post that story about Lleyton running after Pat the next time somebody goes after him in GM! That'll shut folks up.

Lisbeth
07-05-2005, 05:18 AM
I have before, I think, and the usual (read: pleasant, normal) people responded well and the usual (read: closed minded) people just ignored me :lol: But you know he probably only did it to suck up to Pat ;)

star
07-05-2005, 01:27 PM
:lol: :lol: Becausse Lleyton is such a suck up kind of guy. :haha: :haha:

Socket
07-05-2005, 02:08 PM
:lol: :lol: Becausse Lleyton is such a suck up kind of guy. :haha: :haha:
:rolls: :rolls: :rolls: :rolls:

Yasmine
07-05-2005, 03:04 PM
But you know he probably only did it to suck up to Pat ;)
:haha: duh obviously! :rolls: :lol:

Lisbeth
07-06-2005, 12:54 AM
:lol: :lol: Becausse Lleyton is such a suck up kind of guy. :haha: :haha:

:haha: Thanks Christina, I just inhaled coffee thanks to that comment ;) :lol: