Why are they called "Grand Slams"? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why are they called "Grand Slams"?

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 01:42 AM
Why are Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, and US Open called "Grand Slams"? Who started saying this? Has anyone thought about this? Why "Grand Slams"?? Or am I the only one here who doesn't know it???

Your answers will be appreciated, thank you. :worship:

Sjengster
06-09-2005, 01:45 AM
Originally they were just called the major championships of tennis, and then this phrase "doing the Grand Slam" was coined by a journalist in the 20s or 30s, referring to winning all four majors in the same year. The idea gradually took hold, I suppose, but I'm no expert on the historical aspect. A couple of traditionalists still right into ACE tennis magazine now and then complaining that the term "Grand Slam" has been misused to refer to each individual major, rather than the calendar Slam.

buddyholly
06-09-2005, 01:47 AM
Why are Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, and US Open called "Grand Slams"? Who started saying this? Has anyone thought about this? Why "Grand Slams"?? Or am I the only one here who doesn't know it???

Your answers will be appreciated, thank you. :worship:

It comes from the game of Bridge, where winning 12 of 13 tricks in a deal is a Small Slam and winning 13 of 13 tricks is a Grand Slam.

Originally it was applied just to winning all four of the major tournaments (a Grand Slam) and eventually the tournaments themselves were called Grand Slam tournaments.

buddyholly
06-09-2005, 01:52 AM
To add to Sjengster, winning just one or two of the 4 majors is really nothing, but now that they are called Slam tournaments, people refer to winning a Slam.
I suppose winning three of the four could be called a Small Slam, but the term Grand Slam should be reserved for winning all four, no matter what names people now give to the tournaments.

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 01:53 AM
Thank you for your early, but well explained replies. So, it was not an individual who started to call it so.

Does anyone have more thoughts??

buddyholly
06-09-2005, 01:57 AM
The term was coined by John Kieran in 1933.
If you do a Yahoo search for ''grand slam tennis'' and choose the WIKIPEDIA website you can read all this and much more, eg. the ''Serena Slam'' etc.

buddyholly
06-09-2005, 01:58 AM
Thank you for your early, but well explained replies. So, it was not an individual who started to call it so.

Does anyone have more thoughts??

Yes it was an individual, John Kieran, if that is what you meant.

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 02:00 AM
The term was coined by John Kieran in 1933.
If you do a Yahoo search for ''grand slam tennis'' and choose the WIKIPEDIA website you can read all this and much more, eg. the ''Serena Slam'' etc.
Thanks! :)

buddyholly
06-09-2005, 02:02 AM
Your welcome. I am very much in favour of protecting the true meaning of a ''Grand Slam''

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 02:07 AM
Your welcome. I am very much in favour of protecting the true meaning of a ''Grand Slam''
And, I feel you are doing a good job. :cool:

El Legenda
06-09-2005, 02:23 AM
the word Grand Slam has been used in US since the late 1890's in Baseball. meaning a home run with base's loaded.

PamV
06-09-2005, 02:29 AM
One major by itself is NOT a "Grand Slam". To win all four in one calender year is called a "Grand Slam". Technically The 4 Opens are really "Majors". Recently they have started calling them "Slams" but that's not really correct.

jmp
06-09-2005, 03:02 AM
Your welcome. I am very much in favour of protecting the true meaning of a ''Grand Slam''

So am I!

Lady Natalia
06-09-2005, 03:40 AM
.
I suppose winning three of the four could be called a Small Slam, but the term Grand Slam should be reserved for winning all four, no matter what names people now give to the tournaments.

I agree with you. But should be called Majors(like in golf) and when all four are won, then thats a Grand Slam.

Seleshfan
06-09-2005, 04:16 AM
Why are 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon, 2 Sausage, and 2 Pancakes called a "Grand Slam" at Denny's? Who started saying this? Has anyone thought about this? Why "Grand Slam"?? Or am I the only one here who doesn't know it???

Your answers will be appreciated, thank you.

P.S. Who in the f*ck came up with Rooty Tooty Fresh N' Fruity at IHOP?

Adman
06-09-2005, 11:17 AM
The Golden Grand Slam is when you win all four Grand Slams in 1 calender year and Olympic Gold.

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 12:11 PM
The Golden Grand Slam is when you win all four Grand Slams in 1 calender year and Olympic Gold.
Has anyone accomplished this?

Shirogane
06-09-2005, 12:18 PM
Steffi Graf, in 1988

Angle Queen
06-09-2005, 02:32 PM
the word Grand Slam has been used in US since the late 1890's in Baseball. meaning a home run with base's loaded.Here I am...with RDucky again. I thought because there were 4 majors just like there are 4 runs-batted-in (RBIs) with a Grand Slam HR. Who knew? :shrug: Thanks Sjengster and Buddy for clearning that up.

Whistleway
06-09-2005, 02:40 PM
Am I the only one who thinks slams are over-rated?

Angle Queen
06-09-2005, 02:49 PM
Am I the only one who thinks slams are over-rated?I wouldn't necessarily call them over-rated...but each year about this time, I come to the realization that'd I'd probably have more fun at Queens than I would at Wimby.

Whistleway
06-09-2005, 03:36 PM
I wouldn't necessarily call them over-rated...but each year about this time, I come to the realization that'd I'd probably have more fun at Queens than I would at Wimby.

Nice, Angle Q.

silverwhite
06-09-2005, 03:43 PM
Golf has Grand Slams too, right?

SwissMister1
06-09-2005, 03:50 PM
From http://scoreboard.wimbledon.org/en_GB/about/grandslam.html

The Grand Slams are made up of the four major tennis tournaments: The Championships, Wimbledon, The French Open, The US Open and The Australian Open.

The term 'Grand Slam' originated from Don Budge's achievement of winning the French Open, Wimbledon, the US Open and the Australian Open in 1938. The distinguished American writer Allison Danzig suggested that like a successful bridge player, Budge had scored a 'Grand Slam' of victories in the four major tennis events in one calendar year.

The phrase gained use in common parlance and now is used to refer to the four most prestigious tennis tournaments in the world. In 1989, the Grand Slams joined forces for the first time to form the Grand Slam Committee which, among other responsibilities, administers the Grand Slam rules.

Pete Sampras of the United States has won the most Gentlemen's Singles Grand Slams with 14 titles (7 Wimbledons, 5 US Opens & 2 Australian Opens), while Margaret Court of Australia has won the most Ladies' Singles Grand Slams with 24 titles (11 Australian Opens, 5 French Opens, 5 US Opens, 3 Wimbledons)

The 'Grand Slam' of all four of the Grand Slam events has been won by two players in the Men's Singles - Don Budge (USA) in 1938 and Rod Laver (AUS) in 1962 and 1969. Three players have won the Grand Slam in the Ladies' Singles - Maureen Connolly (USA) in 1953, Margaret Smith Court (AUS) in 1970 and Steffi Graf (West Ger) in 1988 - Steffi Graf also won a gold medal at the Seoul Olympics in 1988 giving her a 'Golden Grand Slam'.

The Tennis Masters Cup, initiated in November 2000, is co-owned by the Grand Slams, the ITF and the ATP. It features the top eight men in the world, according to the ATP Champions Race, including the Grand Slam winners.

NATAS81
06-09-2005, 04:23 PM
Golf has Grand Slams too, right?
yes, US Open coming up! :D

2nd leg of the PGA slam

4 majors

Denise
06-09-2005, 09:28 PM
Option C... but thanks all for explain it to us! ;)

RogerRocks
06-09-2005, 09:48 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_slam

[b]Grand Slam[b]

Grand Slam is a general sports term applied when achieving something special.

Most common uses:

In tennis, winning the Grand Slam is holding the following titles in the same calendar year: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, US Open. Those tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments. Past winners include Steffi Graf and Rod Laver.

In real tennis, a similar situation pertains, as winning the Grand Slam is holding the following titles in the same calendar year: Australian Open, British Open, French Open, and U.S. Open.

In rugby union, a Grand Slam is the beating of all opponents during the Six Nations Championship (previously Five Nations Tournament); the term was probably first used in 1957 when The Times used the expression ‘Grand Slam’ to describe England's four wins in the (then) Five Nations Tournament. The term is also used when a touring team manages to beat all four home nations (England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland), a feat achieved once by Australia (1984) and New Zealand and three times by South Africa.
See also: Rugby Union Six Nations Championship, Triple Crown, Wooden Spoon

In golf, the modern Grand Slam is winning the following four tournaments in the same year: The Masters, US Open, The Open Championship, PGA Championship. (Before the founding of The Masters and the ascension of the PGA Championship, the U.S. and British Amateurs were considered part of the four majors.)

In baseball, a grand slam is a home run with all the bases occupied, thereby scoring 4 runs, which is the most possible on one swing of the bat. The baseball usage is thought to have been coined by comparison to the term in bridge.

In bridge, it is bidding for and winning all the tricks in one hand.

In snooker, winning the Grand Slam is holding the following 8 titles at the same time: LG Cup, British Open, UK Championships, Irish Masters, Welsh Open, European Open, Players Championships and Embassy World Championship (Sheffield)

In ski jumping, winning the Grand Slam is winning the Four Hills Tournament. These 4 tournaments are held in Oberstdorf, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (both in Germany), Innsbruck and Bischofshofen (both in Austria).

In professional wrestling, especially World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), a Grand Slam winner is an athlete who wins every single title/championship that is available to him or her (meaning that a wrestler has to win every single championship in any category that he qualified in). Past Grand Slam winners in the WWE include Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and Chris Jericho.


Other meanings:

Grand Slam bomb was a larger version of the Tallboy bunker buster bomb developed by Barnes Wallis in World War II for the RAF.

A TV quiz-show shown in the UK in 2003. Contestants had to pay £1,000 to take part.

A 1999 album by Australian band Spiderbait.

A popular, low price breakfast at U.S. nationwide restaurant chain Denny's, consisting of pancakes, eggs, bacon and sausage.

A 1978 Welsh TV movie, starring Windsor Davies and Siôn Probert. It is set in Paris, where a Welsh rugby club visit to see the Grand Slam against France.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Slam"

Shabazza
06-09-2005, 09:55 PM
good to know :)

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 10:43 PM
Thank you all for your (serious) explanations and nice links! You guys are helping not only me but some more people as the poll shows!! :) :worship:

MisterQ
06-09-2005, 10:49 PM
Why are 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon, 2 Sausage, and 2 Pancakes called a "Grand Slam" at Denny's? Who started saying this? Has anyone thought about this? Why "Grand Slam"?? Or am I the only one here who doesn't know it???

Your answers will be appreciated, thank you.

P.S. Who in the f*ck came up with Rooty Tooty Fresh N' Fruity at IHOP?

Moons Over My Hammy is the fifth slam. ;) :angel:

Seleshfan
06-09-2005, 11:21 PM
Moons Over My Hammy is the fifth slam. ;) :angel:

I've always heard that:) :haha:

Lee
06-10-2005, 12:36 AM
Why are 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon, 2 Sausage, and 2 Pancakes called a "Grand Slam" at Denny's? Who started saying this? Has anyone thought about this? Why "Grand Slam"?? Or am I the only one here who doesn't know it???

I love to eat at Denny's in Canada but my first visit at a Denny's in US scared the hell out of me and since then, I never stepped into one.

:drool: I miss the "Grand Slam"

Lee
06-10-2005, 12:37 AM
Moons Over My Hammy is the fifth slam. ;) :angel:

:lol: I remembered there was a TV series called Moon Over Miami but it didn't survive its first season ;)

nitsansh
06-10-2005, 03:08 AM
Since the true grand slam has become very rare, people started giving names to lesser, but still exceptional achievement, so we have:
Non-calendar grand slam: winning the 4 majors (in tennis or golf) in succesion, but not on the same calendar year.
Serena Williams was the last player who achieved that as she won the Australian open in 2003.
Martina Navratilova did that in the mid-80s (won 6 majors in a row IIRC).
Many people consider this achievement as equivalent to a calendar grand slam.
Carreer grand slam: winning all 4 majors during one player's carreer. Andre Agassi is the only male player who achieved that since Rod Laver.

nitsansh
06-10-2005, 03:19 AM
Speaking of the Navratilova slam - the ITF has recognized it as grand slam and awarded her 1 Million$ prize for her acievement (and in those days it was really big money!). Her 6 succesive major titles were from Wimbledon 1983 to US Open 1984 (the Australian Open was held in December that year so she didn't make a calendar grand slam).
Around the same time Navratilova won 8 GS titles in a row in women's doubles with Pam Shriver.