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~EMiLiTA~
04-20-2005, 03:16 PM
El entorno, lo mejor de Rafa
Por Jordi Arrese

Qué hace diferente a Rafa Nadal del resto de los tenistas? Tengo muy claro que lo que marca la diferencia es el entorno, la familia que le ha dado una educación exquisita, y un tío, Toni que, además es su preparador, y le dice las cosas tal como son. Nadal es un chaval de 18 años, humilde, sencillo que, gracias a esa educación, valora todo en la vida y está pendiente de que todo el mundo esté a gusto. Los tenistas, por lo general, de por sí se vuelven egocéntricos, y llegan a ser mimados por todo el mundo. Les dan casi todo hecho y encuentran todas las cosas fáciles. Si el entrenador fuera el que pagara, seguramente serían mejores y más fuertes de lo que suelen ser.

Con Nadal no pasa eso. Desde su entorno no han entrado afortunadamente en esta dinámica. Lo tratan como a un chaval de 18 años, sea o no campeón, cuando él razona como uno de 25 años. Lo educan para la vida y potencian esa parte salvaje que tiene y que, para mí, han convertido a Rafa en el jugador mentalmente más fuerte del mundo junto con el australiano Lleyton Hewitt.

Para mí no es una sorpresa que Nadal se presente en el Tenis Barcelona entre los once primeros del mundo. Desde que tenía 14 años ya dije que Nadal iba a ser un número uno, y creo que si no hubiese sido por la lesión que sufrió el año pasado, que lo apartó de la temporada de tierra, Rafa estaría en lo más alto. Porque antes de esa lesión había demostrado que podía ganar a todo un número uno como Roger Federer.

Pero Rafa todavía tiene mucho margen por delante para mejorar. Creo que tras cada torneo que juega, tras cada partido que gana, tras cada título que obtiene, Rafa Nadal es mejor jugador y persona, donde para mí merece un 10.

Rafa Nadal es, además, un buen jugador de equipo, que será muy útil al tenis español. Con su forma de ser, con su personalidad, con esa humildad y sencillez que tiene, Rafa ha conseguido que no haya un tenista que no quiera que gane; el que no lo desea es porque no tiene un buen corazón.

The environment, the best thing about Rafa
By Jordi Arrese

What does Rafa Nadal do differently to the other tennis players? I can clearly see that what makes the difference is his environment, his family who has given him an excellent education, and an uncle, Toni, who is also his coach, and he tells him things straight. Nadal is a young lad of 18, humble, simple, who, thanks to that education, appreciates everything in life, always makes sure everyone else is ok. In general, tennis players at the best of times become egocentric and they get mollycoddled by everyone. Everything is pretty much done for them and they find things very easy. If it were the coach who was the one paying, they'd definitely be better and stronger than what they usually are.

With Nadal, that doesn't happen. Fortunately, in his environment, they have not become involved with this sort of dynamic. They treat him like a young lad of 18, champion or not, when he speaks like a 25 year old. They educate him in life skills and strengthen that wild part of him that for me, have made Rafa the strongest player in the world mentally along with the Australian, Lleyton Hewitt.

It doesn't surprise me that Nadal is coming to the Barcelona tourament being in the top 11. Since he was 14, I always said Nadal was going to be number 1, and I think that if it hadn't been for his injury last year, which forced him out of the clay season, Rafa would be even higher. Because before that injury, he had shown he could beat a #1 like Roger Federer.

But Rafa still has a lot of room for improvement. I think that after every tournament he plays, after every match he wins, after every title he gets, Rafa Nadal is a better player and person and for me he deserves a 10.

Rafa Nadal is also a great team member, which will be very useful to Spanish tennis. With the way he is, his personality, his humility and simplicity, Rafa has made it such that there is no player who doesn't want him to win. For those that don't want him to win, it's because they don't have a good heart.

knight_ley
04-20-2005, 03:45 PM
Great article! Thanks :yeah:

Lenka
04-20-2005, 03:46 PM
Very nice article!!! Thanks Emilita! :)

ayena
04-20-2005, 07:33 PM
I love that article :) Thank you!!

Mimi
04-21-2005, 03:36 AM
thanks for the article, i am curious if any one knows Rafael is still at school :confused: i guess he already quit right, otherwise how can he has time to travel around the world to play the tourneys :confused:

Daniela_CABJ
04-21-2005, 05:30 AM
thanks for the article!

He said he quit school... there was no way he could do both

ataptc
04-21-2005, 06:37 AM
awesome article :yeah:

Daniela_CABJ
04-24-2005, 06:00 AM
I didn't know where to post this, I guess this is the place... today i went to buy "solo tenis" magazine (from Argentina) and Rafa is in the cover :)
inside there's a poster of him and Federer.
Here's the cover...

ataptc
04-24-2005, 03:08 PM
nice cover! Thanks! :)

crimson
04-24-2005, 05:43 PM
Article from The Independent:
http://news.independent.co.uk/people/profiles/story.jsp?story=632470

Rafael Nadal: Sleight of hand as Rafa-lution sweeps the world of tennis

For once tennis has bounced football off the front pages. Ronald Atkin in Barcelona speaks to a clay-court prince keen to show grass distinction.

24 April 2005

An incredible thing has happened in Barcelona over the past few days. The faces of Ronaldinho and his Nou Camp team-mates have been swept from their accustomed position on the front pages of the city's multiple daily sports papers and replaced by that of an 18-year-old tennis player. Nadal Mania has hit town.

Spain was already in love with Rafael Nadal after he won the crucial singles for his nation in last December's Davis Cup final against the United States, but the romance has soared to giddy heights as the teenager from Mallorca capped what is already a fantastic year by winning the Masters Series title in Monte Carlo and climbing to 11th in the world rankings.

Last Sunday, 24 hours before the Godo tournament got under way on the manicured acres of the Real Tenis Club de Barcelona, the magazine Tenis A Fondo put on display a thousand posters of Nadal at their sales kiosk to give away as inducements to buy the publication. They were gone inside an hour.

Nadal's first emergence from the clubhouse en route to a doubles match was a revelation. He was followed by a gaggle of adoring, beautifully dressed people of an age to have known better, and greeted outside, almost reverently, by kids whose only wish was to touch him as he passed.

Nadal's arrival in the city could not have offered clearer indication of the young man's attitude and commitment. After Sunday's victory ceremony in Monte Carlo, the family Nadal - Rafael and his uncles, his coach, Toni, and Miguel Angel, his fitness trainer - made the journey back to Spain by car, arriving in Barcelona at 4am on Monday. By 8am, Nadal was breakfasting with Pedro Muñoz, president of the Spanish Tennis Federation, who calls him "a model of comportment", and, at noon, he was taking part in a sponsor's clinic for children at the Real Tenis Club. When approached by tournament officials with the suggestion that, after Monte Carlo, he might like to withdraw from the doubles, he simply said: "Are you crazy?"

As if he hadn't already crammed enough into 24 hours, the boy known to everyone as "Rafa" was happy to sit down afterwards and talk about the wondrous things that have been happening to him of late.

"I don't spend a lot of time thinking about what I have achieved at 18," he said, swigging a soft drink straight from the can. "But, if I don't win another match this year, I will have accomplished the goal I set in January of getting into the top 20 in 2005.

"Last year, I reached my first goal of winning an ATP tournament at Sopot [in August]. Then, this year, I won the Brazil and Mexico Opens back to back in February. So, to win again in Monte Carlo, and to beat a great clay-court player like Guillermo Coria in the final, was a huge moment.

"Winning the Davis Cup for Spain made me very happy, but this is incredible, my first big singles title. It is a key moment in my career, but I am only too aware that there will be bad moments to come. I won't always be able to play like that. It is not normal to win the sort of matches I have been winning, and I know a bad patch will come, so it is important to maintain the form I'm in now for as long as I can."

Nadal, who has now won 34 of his 40 matches this year, did not drop a set in reaching this afternoon's Barcelona final where he will meet the man who preceded him as Spain's tennis pin-up, Juan Carlos Ferrero. After a week's rest, he will head for the Masters Series tournaments in Rome and Hamburg before making his debut at the French Open. It is a prospect he relishes, since, in each of the past two seasons, injuries, first to an elbow and then, last year, a stress fracture of the left ankle, kept him away from Paris. Even last January at the Australian Open, Nadal was busy working out what he might need to do to earn a seeding for his French debut. Now there is no need to fret about such matters.

"After last year's injury, which kept me out from April to July, things are going well again, but I know very well that one moment of ill fortune and everything can change. So far, I have managed to avoid such moments. I don't know if I'll still be playing like this in a month's time, so my priority is to maintain form and stay fit."

Clay is the natural playing surface for a youngster brought up in the town of Manacor, on the island of Mallorca , but Nadal insists his main Grand Slam target is Wimbledon, which has only once been won by a Spaniard, Manuel Santana in 1966, not only because it is the world's No 1 event but also because of the challenge it presents. "I want to do well on grass because it is a very special surface, so different to all the others," he said. "Not many players from Spain have done well there, so that is an extra motivation for me."

On his Wimbledon debut in 2003, Rafa defeated Tim Henman's nemesis, Mario Ancic, and then Britain's Lee Childs to become, at 17 years and three weeks, the youngest to reach the third round since the 16-year-old Boris Becker in 1984.

The ankle damage which caused him to miss Wimbledon in 2004 was sustained in April during a tournament in Estoril, apparently because of unsuitable footwear. So keen was Nadal to keep fit until he could run again that he practised for hours sitting on a stool and, a month after his return, had won the Sopot clay-court title.

Nowadays, no risks are taken about things like tennis shoes by a family who guard their prize product closely by the simple expedient of living alongside him. In a house looking out on to the massive, 18th-century church in Manacor, a town of 20,000, grandparents Rafael and Isabel are installed on the ground floor. The first floor is occupied by Uncle Toni, his wife and three daughters, and the second floor by his parents, Sebastien, the owner of a double-glazing factory, and Anna Maria. The top floor is the domain of Rafa and his sister, Maria Isabel.

Toni Nadal, his coach, is a former tennis professional, while his other uncle, the 39-year-old, Miguel Angel, is one of Mallorca's most famous sportsmen, having played nine years for Barcelona and been a member of Spain's 2002 World Cup squad. Rafa came close to following Miguel Angel into football. "He was undecided for a long time whether to play tennis or football," said the uncle, "but, when he started to win all these junior tournaments, it convinced him he had a bigger guarantee of success in tennis. Rafa also has another problem. In tennis, you are your own boss, you make your own decisions. In football, it's the coach who does that. Rafa didn't like that very much."

One massive decision was made for the young Nadal by Uncle Toni. Rafa is a natural right-hander, but Toni was convinced his two-fisted backhand would be helped by using the stronger right arm. So he taught his nephew to play and serve left-handed, to such effect that Lleyton Hewitt calls Nadal's forehand "exceptional".

Wickedly top-spun forehands of lethal pace have been drawing gasps from the Barcelona crowds. To the young people in the audience, however, Nadal's gear is on a par with his shots. The shirt is a garish orangey-yellow, sleeveless with black piping. Though the calf-length white shorts and broad white headband lend a piratical air, the tightness of his trousers is more in keeping with a matador's uniform, though any lack of comfort doesn't show in his whirlwind tennis.

To describe Nadal as exciting would be a serious understatement. Pedro Hernandez, the editor of Tenis A Fondo, has followed his career since the earliest days and says: "He has the spirit, the talent, the fight, the brains. He has everything, and he will be better than most Spaniards because he can play on all surfaces. He is not big-headed but he is very confident and he wants to compete at everything. He will even challenge you to a sandwich-eating contest."

His doubles partner, Feliciano Lopez, reckons Nadal is already the No 1 on clay, while Albert Costa, the Roland Garros champion in 2002, says: "Rafa is in another world. He is able to aspire to whatever he wants and he will probably get it." The Spanish greats concur. Manuel Orantes predicts Nadal will become the best-ever Spaniard, Santana says he is "an authentic phenomenon" and Andres Gimeno, French Open champion of 1972, is certain Nadal will be the world No 1 within a year.

The youngster, who likes to make practice more demanding by having four opponents in the opposite court at the same time, does not buy that last prediction. "I see myself a long way from being No 1. Many players aspire to that, and Roger Federer is a long way in front of everyone.

"All I know is that, if I want to get there one day, I will have to improve," said the teenager, who beat Federer in Miami last year and took him to five sets at the same tournament in this year's final.

"My only thought every day is to become better. My intention is to give 100 per cent every time I play. Sometimes I will win, sometimes lose, but I can always go to sleep knowing I have done my best. I always play with the same humility."

And he might add, with enough eye-catching talent to keep Ronaldinho off the front pages.

Biography

Rafael Nadal-Parera

Born: 3 June 1986 in Manacor, Mallorca.

Family: parents Sebastian and Ana Maria, sister Maria, aged 14.

Current rankings: ATP Race - 2nd. ATP Entry - 11th.

Career progression: turned pro 2001. End of 2002: 235th. End of 2003: 49th. End of 2004: 51st. Began playing at four; current coach is Toni Nadal, his uncle. Other: favourite player is Carlos Moya. Managed by Carlos Costa, IMG.

Hobbies: football, PlayStation, fishing and watching films.

Wimbledon watch: on his All England debut in 2003, beat Mario Ancic en route to reaching the third round, the youngest to do so since Boris Becker in 1984.

Carlita
04-25-2005, 01:13 PM
:eek: :eek: :eek: OMC!! The Little Guy is the new Spanish No.1 :eek: :eek: :eek:


:bigclap:! WOW!

Moya dropped to 9th :sad: :sad: :sad:

Carlita
04-25-2005, 02:15 PM
Including the pics here's the Iberia article.



Iberia Magzine April 2004 (of course the statistics here aren't right anymore;) )

RAFAEL NADAL: "I FEEL VERY PRIVILEGED BECAUSE I'M HAPPY WITH WHAT I DO"


When players of the stature of Carlos Moya or Juan Carlos Ferrero are still at the height of their careers, this 18-year-old from Manacor in Mallorca has become the man to watch in Spanish tennis.

His list of achievements include three tournament wins as well as a Davis Cup won in December. This run of successes has placed him 31st in the world rankings and 6th in the annual ranking.



*Aren't you frightened by such rapid progress?
RAFA: Not at all. Since I was little I have alwasy stood out from the crowd and this is a situation that you have to accept. It's good luck.

*What would you have done if you hadn't become a tennis player?
Rafa: I would have liked to be a footballer

*How would you describe yourself?
Rafa:As a normal kid who lives in Mallorca and who spends little time at home because of his profession. A boy like any other who likes to play golf, fish and have fun with his friends.

*Do you think that you are priviliged?
Rafa: Of course. I'm lucky to be able to work at what I like and that things are going my way.

*Now that you are famous do you like being stopped in the street or does it bother you?
Rafa: Neither one nor the other. I accept it and I try to treat people kindly and with modesty.

*Do you think that your popularity could go to your head?
Rafa: I don't think so. I have my feet on the ground. Maybe some people think I am conceited, but that is because they don't know me. When they get to know me, they realise that I am just an ordinary guy.

*You Have now won nearly one million euros just in prizes. Are you worried about the future?
Rafa: Not at all. I never notice what I earn. I"m young and I think I have many years ahead to secure my future.

*Is it true that you don't have any idols?
Rafa: I don't admire anyone in particular. Well, maybe the only one is Fernando Alonso, a great racing driver and he's the sportsman I follow most.

*What are your goals in tennis?
Rafa: To go on improving and to go as high as possible. That is why I work one hundred per cent.

*What defects do you have to eliminate to improve?
Rafa: Especially my serve and short backhand. Oh and I do have to make my shots more accurate.

*To what do you attribute your succes?
Rafa: Especially to work. I practise tennis for 3 and a half hours every day and work out for an hour and a half. obviously, my natural talents also have an influence, something of a genetic origin. My coach, my uncle Toni, has had a great influence on me.

*You're an example of precocity. This is because you were the youngest Davis Cup Champion at 18 years and 187 days, surpassing Pat Cash's 1983 record of 18 years and 215 days. Have you ever seen yourself as a child prodigy?
Rafa: No. Things happen this way. I have to thank my family for my normality. The family has always helped me a lot and given me the right mentality.

*What do you feel when you win a Davis Cup?
Rafa: It's an incridible feeling. Nothing like anything I have done before. I have always said that after winning the four Grand Slams it's the highest thing that a tennis plyer can aspire to.

*After this year's fiasco, will Spain win the cup again?
Rafa: There's always a chance. Spain is a great tennis power and we have some very good players. The thing is to have luck in the draw and be able to play at home.

*You were a junior semi-finalist at Wimbledon and reached the third round in the seniors event. Does this mean that you don't fear grass?
Rafa: I don't mind playing on this surface. Feliciano Lopez, Moya and Ferrero have shone on grass in the past few years and I believe that I can also do well, although as I couldn't go last year I have almost forgotten what it's like.

*What does a star like Carlos Moya mean to you?
Rafa: Apart from being a good friend, he's a great guy. An example to follow. He's modest, friendly and has helped me a lot. When I joined the Circuit I didn't know anybody and he introduced me to other players and trained with me when I was an unknown.

*What is the thing you like least?
Rafa: Without a doubt, travelling, continuously moving from one point to another.

*Great football fan and a confessed supporter of Real Madrid, although your uncle was a die-hard Barcelona follower. Would you have exchanged your Davis Cup triumph for a decisive goal in a league championship football final?
Rafa: They are very different things, without any possible comparison. There's no doubt that it would be exciting to score a decisive goal in a final, but I wouldn't change places. I am happy with what I do.

*Spanish fans will be able to see you at the Conde de Godó Trophy in Barcelona from 18 to 24 April. What does this competition mean to you?
It's a very important tournament played at home and the major competition in Spain along with the Madrid Tournament. I'd be delighted to play well there.........

Undoubtedly fans enjoy the fighting spirit, power and quality of this young player who seems to be destined for the highest spots in world tennis***

~EMiLiTA~
04-25-2005, 02:47 PM
thanks for the interesting articles guys!!!

NicoFan
04-25-2005, 03:01 PM
Love the pictures from the magazine!!! Gracias...thanks so much for posting those!!!

~EMiLiTA~
04-25-2005, 04:30 PM
a sweet article from El Mundo that i've translated for u...

Toni Nadal, el hombre que forjó al campeón

Después de Rafa, no se plantea entrenar a ningún tenista más

Ángela Lara / BARCELONA


25/04/05 03:00 h.Rafa Nadal dedicó su triunfo en la final del Open Seat Godó a su tío y entrenador Toni, así como a todos sus familiares, algunos de los cuales, como su padre Sebastián o el hermano de éste, Miguel Ángel, presenciaron en directo la final. “Sin él no podría haber hecho esto”, dijo el mallorquín en refencia a su preparador. Y no es para menos, ya que Toni Nadal fue su decubridor y quien se hizo cargo de su preparación desde que cogiera la raqueta por primera vez.

De casta le viene al galgo

Toni Nadal era de aquellos niños que, en su etapa como escolar, dedicaba el tiempo libre a practicar deporte, daba igual cual fuera, el caso era hacer deporte. El segundo de cinco hermanos, Toni hizo gala desde pequeño de sus dotes deportivas para destacar en varias dispciplinas. Estudiante en un internado en Palma, se proclamó varias veces campeón balear de ping pong, a pesar de que acabó encarrilando su vida profesional hacia el tenis.

En el aspecto académico, Toni no era tan aplicado como para los deportes y dejó a medias dos carreras, la de derecho y la de historia, por lo que, finalmente no se sacó niguna licenciatura. Durante los años ochenta jugó a tenis en la Segunda Categoría Nacional y, años después, empezó a ejercer de entrenador en un club en Manacor, su ciudad natal.

Como si por obra y gracia de un gen familiar se tratase, su hermano Miguel Ángel también se decantó por el mundo del deporte, en su caso, por el futbol, triunfando en equipos como la selección española o el F.C. Barcelona, mientras que en la actualidad milita en las filas del R.C.D. Mallorca. Ahora es el turno de la siguiente generación. Su Sobrino Rafa, con tan solo 18 años, está triunfando en el mundo del tenis y, como no podía ser de otra manera, Toni fue su descubridor y ahora su entrenador.

“A Rafa le gustaba mucho el tenis y el fútbol, pero como vivía cerca del club donde yo entrenaba, vino un día y se empezó a aficionar”, explica Toni. Enseguida, el joven tenista mallorquín corroboró aquel dicho de que “la genética nunca falla” y pronto empezó a despuntar en ambos deportes. Toni asegura que “desde el primer día vi las condiciones de Rafa. Desde pequeño fue ganando todos lo torneos de su edad a todos los niveles. Así, cuando cumplió los 11 años, me dediqué en exclusiva a él”, añadió.

A tan corta edad, el técnico mallorquín vio claras las dotes tenísticas de Rafa y asumió el doble rol de tío y entrenador. “Nuestra relación familiar lo hace todo fácil; además, Rafa es uno de los jugadores más fáciles de llevar de todo el circuito: es obediente, respetuoso...”, reconoce Toni. Pero, esta situación también conlleva sus inconvenientes y obligaciones extra. “Por un lado, en los partidos me pongo más nervioso que el resto de entrenadores, porque lo veo más como familiar que como preparador”, señala el segundo de los hermanos Nadal, quien añade: “Además, como tío, tengo la responsabilidad de educarle, porque pasamos muchas horas juntos desde que él tenía cuatro años”. Para Toni, ante todo, lo más importante es la formación de su sobrino como persona y los éxitos deportivos son algo circunstancial. Su objetivo es inculcar a Rafa “responsabilidad, humildad y agradecimiento a la vida”.

El tenis se acaba con Rafa

Sin comerlo ni beberlo, la buena progresión deportiva de su sobrino en el circuito tenístico metió a Toni en el ritmo frenético de la competición, algo que, en un principio, ni siquiera entraba en sus planes. “Me gusta estar en casa e ira a algunos torneos, pero no dedicarme 'full time'”, admite el entrenador del campeón del Gódó.

Por ello, cuando finalice su labor con Rafa, Toni no tiene previsto dedicarse a la preparación de otros tenistas. “Después de Rafa, no me planteo seguir. No vivo del tenis, tengo negocios a medias con su padre”, explica. Y es que, de espíritu hogareño y con tres hijos pequeños en casa, Toni no acaba de llevar muy bien lo de estar casi todo el año viajando de un sitio a otro, donde le lleve la competición. “Me gusta conocer sitios nuevos, por eso procuro hacer turismo en las ciudades que visitamos, pero también me gusta la vida tranquila. Además, tengo tres hijos”, destaca el técnico mallorquín. Por todo ello, Toni reconoce que no le entusiasma la idea de que sus retoños puedan dedicarse algún día al tenis de forma profesional. “Juegan a tenis, pero como hobby. Puestos a ser deportistas profesionales, preferiría que se dedicasen al futbol”, bromeó.

El futbol, motivo de debate

Si el deporte es uno de los denominadores comunes de la familia Nadal, el futbol, concretamente, puede convertirse en un motivo de discusión. Esta familia, muy bien avenida y ejemplo de unidad, se divide en dos bandos en lo relativo al deporte rey. Mientras la mitad de sus miembros son seguidores del Real Madrid, la otra mitad defiende los colores azul y grana de la camiseta del Barcelona. Miguel Ángel Nadal fue jugador barcelonista, por lo que encabeza el sector seguidor de este equipo, en el que se encuentra el propio Toni. Rafa, por su parte, es la cabeza visible de los madridistas



Toni Nadal, the man who formed the champion

After Rafa, he doesn't contemplate coaching any other player

Rafa Nadal dedicated his victory in the Open Seat Godó to his uncle and coach, Toni, as well as to all his family, some of whom like his father Sebastian or Sebastian's brother, Miguel Angel, were live at the final. "Without him I could not have done this", the Majorcan said referring to his coach and rightly so, since Toni Nadal was the one who discovered him and who was in charge of his preparation right from when he first held a racquet.

It's in the genes

Toni Nadal was one of this kids who, during his time as a student, dedicated his free time to playing sport, regardless of what sport it was, the point was just to do sport. The second of 5 brothers, Toni showed off his sporting talents from a young age, shining in various sports. A boarding school student in Palma, he was the Balear ping pong champion several times, even though he ended up turning his professional life towards tennis.

In the academic sphere, Toni wasn't as conscientious as he was when it came to sports, and he left 2 careers half done, one in law and the other in history, in which he didn't end up getting a degree. During the 80s he played tennis in the Second National Category and, years later, started being a coach at a club in Manacor, his home town.

As if it were thanks to a family gene, his brother Miguel Angel also opted for the world of sport and, in his case, for football, being successful in teams like the Spanish national team and FC Barcelona, while he currently helps out at the RCD Mallorca team. Now it's the second generation's turn. His nephew, Rafa, at just 18, his triumphing in the world of tennis and, like it couldn't be any other way, Toni was his discoverer and is now his coach.

"Rafa loved tennis and football a lot, but since he lived close to the club where I coached, he came one day and started to like it," Toni explains. Immediately, the young Majorcan tennis player lived up to the saying that "genes never fail" and he soon started to shine in both sports. Toni assures us that "ever since the first day, I saw Rafa's condition. At a young age he was winning all the tournaments of his age group at all levels. So, when he turned 11, I dedicated myself completely to him", he added.

At such a young age, the Majorcan coach saw Rafa's clear tennis talent and took on the double role of being uncle and coach. "Our family relation makes everything easy; what's more, Rafa is one of the easiest players to take around the tour: he's obedient, respectful...". Toni recognises. But, this situation also has its disadvantages and extra obligations. "On one hand, in the matches, I get more nervous than the rest of the coaches, because I see it more as a family member than as a coach", the second of the Nadal brothers indicates, and adds: "What's more, as an uncle, I also have the responsability of educating him, because we've spent a lot of time together since he was 4 years old". For Toni, above all, the most important thing is his nephew's education as a person and the sporting successes are something incidental. His goal is to instil into Rafa "responsability, humility and appreciation of life".

Tennis ends with Rafa

Without really knowing how, his nephew's great rise in professional tennis thrust Toni into the frenzy that is competition, something that, at first, hadn't even entered into his plans. "I like to be at home and go to some tournaments, but not dedicate myself "full time"", the Godó champion's coach admits.

That's why, when he finishes working with Rafa, Toni doesn't plan to dedicate himself to coaching other tennis players. "After Rafa, I'm not thinking of continuing. I don't live off tennis, I have half negotiations with his father", he explains. And it's such that, being a homebody with 3 small children at home, Toni doesn't end up liking travelling almost the whole year from one place to another, wherever the competition takes him. "I like to see new places, that's why I try to do some sightseeing in the cities we go to, but I also like the quiet life. I also have 3 children", the Majorcan coach points out. For all that, Toni admits he's not wild on the idea of his kids one day dedicating themselves to professional tennis. "They play tennis, but as a hobby. If they had to be professional athletes, I'd prefer them to play football", he joked.

Football, reason for debate

If sport is one of the common denominators in the Nadal family, football, definitely, can become a cause of discussion. This family, very close and an example of unity, divides into 2 when it comes to the king sport. While half its members are fans of Real Madrid, the other half defend the azul grana colours of Barcelona. Miguel Angel Nadal was a Barcelona player, so he leads the followers of this group, in which Toni is also a part. Rafa is, however, the head of the Madrid supporters.

Eruwen
04-25-2005, 06:13 PM
Great articles, thanks! :yeah:

Omg... Rafa's mom has the same name as mine! :eek: :lol:

Though the calf-length white shorts and broad white headband lend a piratical air, the tightness of his trousers is more in keeping with a matador's uniform, though any lack of comfort doesn't show in his whirlwind tennis. :lol:

ayena
04-26-2005, 07:32 PM
Thanks for great articles :hug:
And this is the one from ATP site.


Nadal Joins Prestigious Group of Teenage Winners

After winning two consecutive titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona, Rafael Nadal joined an elite list of young and talented players who were able to capture five or more titles in their teenage years.

As history shows us, this accomplishment usually bodes well for their future success.

Of the previous 15 players to win at least five titles as a teenager, ten of them went on to be ranked No. 1.


Teenage Title Winners in Open Era

Bjorn Borg .................16
Mats Wilander............13
Boris Becker...............12
Andre Agassi..............10
Andrei Medvedev.........8
Lleyton Hewitt.............7
Michael Chang............6
Jimmy Arias................5
Jimmy Connors...........5
Stefan Edberg.............5
John McEnroe..............5
Rafael Nadal...............5
Yannick Noah..............5
Guill. Perez-Roldan......5
Andy Roddick..............5
Pete Sampras.............5

Daniel
04-26-2005, 11:23 PM
Dominant Nadal continues heady rise
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 25/04/2005)



Rafael Nadal won his fourth title of the season yesterday, the only appropriate finish to a week-long love-in at Barcelona's elegant Real Club, and the Spanish boy wonder will today continue his exhilarating, irresistible surge towards the sport's elite, becoming the youngest player to break into the top 10 for over a decade.

The smart, worldly-wise Catalonian crowd were on their feet for one more standing ovation, savouring another display of highly-charged, veins-pumped tennis from the 18-year-old, who defeated Juan Carlos Ferrero, a fellow Spaniard, with some ease to win the Barcelona Open. All of those titles have come on the clay; the teenager is quite the force on this slow, heavy surface.

Nadal went through the tournament without dropping a set, out-hitting and bamboozling Ferrero, a former world No 1, 6-1, 7-6, 6-3 in the best of five-sets final. Nadal has won 35 matches so far this season, the same number as Roger Federer, the world No 1. Only Federer has more titles this year, with five. No wonder the Spanish press have been talking of "Nadalmania", "Rafa" the boy-star.

His aggressive on-court manner, his charisma and his dynamism, have enthralled Spain. The way he has been marketed, with the cartoon poses and the T-shirt slogans, has been confrontational, adding edge to his baseline tennis. Nadal, who had one title at the start of the year, won two events in South America and then the Masters Series in Monte Carlo before yesterday.

Nadal also came within two points of defeating Federer in the Miami final, a Masters Series played on cement courts. "To win here in Barcelona has been a dream. It's been an amazing two months," Nadal said. "I'm delighted and feel incredibly happy." Nadal is preparing for his first French Open, having missed the European clay-court season last year with a damaged ankle, and will have a week's rest before planned appearances at the back-to-back Masters Series tournaments in Rome and Hamburg. He will be hoping to earn a top-eight seeding for Roland Garros.

"Nadal's in great form at the moment," Ferrero said. "When you're on a high like he is everything seems to go right - but it doesn't last forever."

Daniel
04-26-2005, 11:24 PM
Master of clay
Rafael Nadal builds his case as French Open favorite
Posted: Monday April 25, 2005 12:04PM; Updated: Tuesday April 26, 2005 12:52AM


Rafael Nadal won his fifth career title in Barcelona and second in two weeks on clay.
AP

• Let's give the player of the week award to Rafael Nadal, who won his fourth title of 2005. Yesterday he beat Juan Carlos Ferrero to win the Open Seat Godo in Barcelona, and didn't drop a set the entire week. This of, course, comes a week after Nadal won the Monte Carlo tournament. As if he weren't industrious enough, he also teamed with Feliciano Lopez to reach the doubles final. Some of you already have suggested he is peaking too early, but boy, Nadal builds his case as the Paris favorite every week

Daniel
04-26-2005, 11:25 PM
Marauding Nadal bears down on Federer in Roland Garros run-up

Tue Apr 26, 3:31 AM ET Top Stories - AFP



BARCELONA, Spain (AFP) - A week of rest before the Rome Masters may just give red-hot Rafael Nadal the extra energy he needs to threaten the reign of Roger Federer.


AFP/File Photo



The 18-year-old Spaniard has been on fire this season, with the flames most recently burning Juan Carlos Ferrero in straight sets at last week's Barcelona Open final.


Back-to-back titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona have moved the teenaged Nadal to within 110 points of Federer in the season points race while landing him on a career-best seventh in the rankings with a first-ever breakthrough into the Top ten.


The Raging Bull of the clay has won his last 11 matches to stand 35-6 - the same number of victories as Federer. He's already in possession of four titles in 2005, one less than the Swiss.


But Nadal has also been schooled in the realities of tennis.


"I'm aware that a bad run could come," he admitted as he took the week off before travelling to Rome as the run-up to Roland Garros starting May 23 turns serious, with Masters in Italy and Germany.


"Maybe there will be more required of me now, but I'll just go out and play my tennis. It's not normal to win so many matches," added Nadal, one of whose uncles Miguel played in the 1994, '98 and 2002 World Cup finals.


Nadal's run of form began in February with back-to-back trophys in Brazil and Mexico on clay. he then took a week off before reaching the final on hardcourt in Miami, where he led Federer two sets and was 4-1 up before the Swiss worldbeater recovered for the victory.


Nadal's nadir over his magic month came in Valencia, where he beat Ferrero handily in the first round before going out in the quarter-finals to Igor Andreev.


His dream sprint began with his Monte Carlo title, becoming the youngest man in 15 years to lift a Masters crown.


A year ago last week, Nadal suffered a stress fracture in his left ankle wile playing in Portugal which kept him off the clay for three months.


That pause in 2004 could be deadly for Federer in 2005: his newest rival has no ranking points to defend until July and goes to Roland Garros as one of the top favourites with a Top eight seeding all but guaranteed.


Paris remains the weak point for the flawless Federer, the lone Grand Slam that he didn't win in 2004.


But Nadal, coached by his uncle and grounded in the realities of the game, knows that his spell of good fortune cannot be guaranteed.


"If I want to be the number one I'm going to have to improve a lot of things, including my serve. Everyone is fighting for the same thing - and Federer is well ahead of everyone else right now."

Daniel
04-26-2005, 11:25 PM
NADAL IS NEXT TO SHINE
By Jon Fisher, PA Sport

Spanish tennis has always been synonymous with great clay-court players and in Rafael Nadal it looks as though another gem has been uncovered.

The teenager from Manacor, the second biggest city in Mallorca, is starting to make waves on the ATP Tour having secured his second successive title at the Open Seat Godo event in Barcelona.

His triumph in Catalonia came just seven days after arguably an even more impressive victory when he claimed the Masters Series Monte Carlo, seeing off a field which included world number one Roger Federer.

Nadal's recent achievements mean he will climb into the top 10 for the first time in his career this week when the new rankings are released.

And at 18 years and 10 months, he will be the youngest player to break into the top 10 since Andrei Medvedev on June 7, 1993.

Despite the recent praise which has been showered in his direction, Nadal has vowed to take everything in his stride.

"I'm thankful to everybody for all the attention and support, but I don't think about it. I'm only 18 and the important thing for me is to enjoy being on the tennis court," he said.

"I'll keep being humble and working hard. It is important not to be satisfied and keep improving."

His Barcelona success also hinted at a new order among Spain's top players.

Nadal beat compatriot Juan Carlos Ferrero, the former French Open champion, 6-1 7-6 (7/4) 6-3 in the final - his 13th straight win against a fellow Spaniard.

Ferrero has been plagued by injury over recent seasons, leaving the door ajar for Nadal to burst into the limelight.

And with his trademark headband, sleeveless t-shirt and knee-length shorts, Nadal cuts a dashing figure.

It is not just a case of style over substance, however.

Prior to his back-to-back wins in Europe, Nadal had already claimed titles in Costa Do Sauipe and Acapulco this season and he showed his all-court game by taking Federer to five-sets in the final of the Masters Series Miami.

His next major target is the French Open in Paris, where Nadal, whose uncle is former Spain and Barcelona defender Miguel Angel Nadal, is likely to be among the favourites.

Rafa, as he is known by his ever-increasing fan club, is keen to play down his chances though.

"Those that get to Roland Garros in better condition will be the favourites," he insists.

"I don't know how I'm going to be by then. For now, my priority is Rome and Hamburg, which are very important events since they are ATP Masters Series and then I'll see how things are heading into Paris."

An interesting footnote to Nadal's burgeoning career is that of the previous 15 teenagers to have won at least five ATP titles, 10 went on to become world number one.

Don't bet against Nadal making it 11.

Jennay
04-26-2005, 11:54 PM
Thanks for all of the fantastic articles. :hug:

helena
04-27-2005, 12:20 AM
http://www.ole.clarin.com/jsp/v3/pagina.jsp?pagId=964818

Juan Mónaco. Amigo de Nadal. (1'4")


En el Play lo tengo de hijo

Siempre que coincidimos en un torneo, con Nadal nos matamos al fútbol del Play Station. ¿Quién gana? Yo, siempre. ¿No lo dijo él eso? Que no mienta, eh, porque lo mato... Incluso cuando él juega con el Real Madrid, que tiene a los mejores, no me puede ganar. Yo siempre elijo el Inter y él se termina calentando porque le hago un planteo bien defensivo, un 4-4-2 a lo Mostaza Merlo. Antes, él jugaba con el Manchester, pero se pasó al Real para tener más chances. La última vez que me ganó fue en Montecarlo, antes de que él jugara con Rochus: 3-2 cuando yo ya estaba aburrido. Pero antes le había ganado 4-0, 9-2, que fue la mayor goleada de la historia, jaja. Y ese último partido lo jugó a muerte, me hizo el gol del 8-2 y lo gritó con todo. Una vez hasta rompió el control tirándolo contra una heladera... Estaba recaliente.
Con Rafa soy amigo desde que comenzamos en profesionales. Coincidíamos en juniors, pero él tenía su grupito. Hablo siempre con él y lo que hizo en esta gira no me sorprende. En Barcelona vi sus partidos con Hrbaty y con Muller, y la verdad que la rompió. Está indomable. Se lo anticipé el primer día de Montecarlo. El no había ni entrado a la cancha, y yo le aposté que iba a llegar a Roland Garros como ocho del mundo. Está siete, así que le gané todas las cenas en París. Ahorré 50 euros por comida, ja. Apenas terminó la final del Godó le mandé un mensaje que decía: "Andá preparando la guita". El me respondió al toque: "¡Me quiero morirrr!".

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Juan Mónaco. Nadal’s friend

Everytime we meet each other on a tournament, we play soccer on the Play Station like if we were giving our lives in it. Who wins? Me, always. He didn’t say that? He shouldn’t lie, because I’ll kill him… Even when he plays with Real Madrid, which has the best players, he can’t beat me. I always choose Inter and he ends up being upset because I have a great defensive plan, a 4-4-2 like Mostaza Merlo. Beofre, he used to play with Manchester, but he change to Real Madrid to have more chances. The last time he beat me was in Montecarlo, before he played against Rochus: 3-2 when I was already bored. But before that, I had won him 4-0, 9-2, which was the biggest victory ever, haha. And in that last match he gave everything, he scored the 8-2 goal and he screamed like mad. Once, he even broke the control throwing it to a freezer… He was really upset.
I’m friends with Rafa since we began in pros. We used to meet in juniors, but he had his gang. I always talk with him and what he did in this last tour doesn’t surprise me. I watched his matches against Hrbaty and Muller in Barcelona, and he really did awesome. He’s untaming. I already told him the first day in Montecarlo. He haven’t already entered the court, and I bet with him that he’d arrive as the 8th in the ranking to Roalnd Garros. He’s the 7th, so I’ve won all dinner in Paris. I’ve saved 50€ per meal, lol. I sent him an sms as soon as the Godó final finished which said: “Come on, prepare the money”. He answered me: “I wanna die!”

translated by elisa.es @ vamosrafael.com

Mimi
04-27-2005, 03:45 AM
thanks for the lovely articles, i love this cutie boy so much coz he is so humble and thoughful :yeah: :yippee: :bowdown: :inlove:

~EMiLiTA~
04-27-2005, 02:52 PM
haha thanks for the great articles!!!

alexito
04-27-2005, 03:19 PM
I like nadal because his mind is strongest of the rest players, the same mind lleyton. mind champion.

sonia
04-27-2005, 03:54 PM
Great articles!!! Thanks guys!! and nice pics! :)

Blanco y Negro
04-28-2005, 05:00 AM
EM,

Thanks for the article and thanks for putting them in spanish :)

Argentine girl
04-28-2005, 05:43 AM
ฟCrees que Fernando Alonso y Rafa Nadal marcarแn una ้poca en sus respectivos deportes?

Would someone please translate the sentence above to me? Thank you in advance.

~EMiLiTA~
04-28-2005, 06:46 AM
well some of the letters didn't come out in your quote..but basically it says

Do you think Fernando Alonso and Rafa Nadal will mark out a new era in their respective sports?

chocc0
04-28-2005, 09:45 AM
thanx for the article emily!

RogiFan88
05-02-2005, 09:55 PM
In case you haven't seen this article:

Fearless Nadal leads new wave of teenage talent
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 19/04/2005)

Up close, he looks far smaller, like a kid. Rafael Nadal has hidden those biceps of his under a sweatshirt, and is remarkably shy, perhaps a little awkward. When his mobile phone starts a sudden and loud beeping, he sits up straight in his chair, waving his arms in profuse apology. Nadal is hardly the brute he looks on court.

In with a shout: Rafael Nadal is a favourite for the French Open
The attention is clearly not changing Nadal, the teenage wonder of men's tennis. He wants to ensure that he is "not too snobby or anything", and it seems that this unstarry behaviour might have been inspired by the most unlikely of people. His mentor has been his uncle, Miguel Angel Nadal, the former Spanish centre-back who delighted in his nickname "the Beast of Barcelona".

Nadal can be so aggressive on the court, so totally uncompromising that he flattened more experienced clay-courters to win his first Masters Series title in Monte Carlo at the weekend. But it seems that he has acquired more from "the Beast" than a blood-lust in competition, limitless energy and a talent for inciting the crowd (footballers are charged, tennis players praised).

"My uncle is a very important person for me - he has helped me keep my feet on the ground," Nadal said. "He has been a big part of my family and my life because he was the first professional sportsman in the family. He is a very calm guy and knows how to keep everything balanced, and he makes sure that I do not get carried away with myself."

Nadal is now in the bizarre situation of being rated as one of the leading prospects for the French Open, the second grand slam event of the season, without having even stepped on to the clay of Roland Garros for anything other than a one-day coaching clinic for his sponsors. His level-headedness may become a considerable advantage.

"The Beast" has undoubtedly been the dominating influence on Nadal's sporting life. Miguel Angel's brother, Toni, coaches Rafael, or "Rafa" as he is known by other players in the locker-room. "Of course I really liked tennis when I was younger, but I didn't like watching too many matches. Football was much better. I didn't have tennis heroes," he said.

"The Beast" also plays a decent game of tennis. Nadal's breakthrough at the Masters Series came in the Miami final earlier this month, when he came within two points of beating Roger Federer, the world No 1, and it has been said that his only warm-up game was against his uncle. Not bad for a player who missed a penalty kick against England during Euro 96.

Family is clearly important for the Nadals. "It gives me more satisfaction as an uncle than as a coach to watch Rafa play like this," Toni has said. "All his life, since he started to play at three years old, he has always had this aggressive style of play. And that is why he is so spectacular now."

Nadal has some unorthodox ambitions, coming as he does from a nation of out-and-out baseliners who learn their tennis on clay courts. He wants to win Wimbledon, the grass-court grand slam. Nadal loves an adventure, a few trips to the net, and unlike some of his compatriots, it does not look as though he is wearing a pair of oven gloves when he attempts to play a volley.

"I love the atmosphere at Wimbledon and the grass," Nadal said. "I want to win Wimbledon, but it might be difficult with my style of tennis. I hope to improve my serve and volley." He showed on the Miami cement, in that epic of a final against Federer, that he can adapt his aggressive brand of tennis to all surfaces.

Teen spirit and talent abounded in Monte Carlo. It was "a beautiful week" for Richard Gasquet, the 18-year-old and totally fearless French qualifier who sent Federer crashing into the baseline dust in the quarter-finals. The toughest match for Nadal last week was the semi-final against Gasquet, who strikes his single-handed backhand with such pace, freedom and verve. "Gasquet has a great future," Federer said.

Nadal also encountered Gael Monfils, an 18-year-old with charisma, energy and far more power than his long, loose limbs would suggest (only his taste for American hamburgers might stop him). The French teenager loves nothing more than to engage the crowd with slightly cartoonish, totally overdone celebrations. The remonstrations are even better. Monfils loves his theatre, as all of this generation do.

Monfils won three of the four junior grand slams last season. The only one to escape was the junior version of the US Open, which was won by Andrew Murray, the Scottish teenager with so much hope invested in him. But it would be grossly unfair to start making comparisons between these fast-tracked teenagers and Murray. Players mature, and regress, at different rates.

Murray is, at 17, a year younger than the other three, and it is only today that he will make his first appearance on the ATP Tour, with a wild card into the clay-court event in Barcelona. Murray has time. He recently broke into the world's top 400, and will play Jan Hernych, a top-100 player from the Czech Republic.

Boris Becker, who was a Wimbledon champion at 17, believes that Nadal is the leader of the new generation. "Nadal has such great attitude, you can tell that he loves to compete," Becker said. "Young players have to want to go out into a big stadium and play in front of thousands of fans. If you don't enjoy that, then you might as well give up and become a clerk in a bank."

18 April 2005: Nadal's masterful display on the clay

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;sessionid=HJ1GPU0OVWQRBQFIQMGCM54AVCBQU JVC?xml=/sport/2005/04/19/stnada19.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/05/01/ixtenn.html

Jennay
05-02-2005, 10:09 PM
Great article, thanks! :hug:

~EMiLiTA~
05-03-2005, 01:25 PM
interesting! thanks for the article!

~EMiLiTA~
05-10-2005, 01:50 PM
an interview from Hamburg...

RAFAEL NADAL: "NO PUEDO GANARLO TODO DURANTE CADA SEMANA"

Humeante su triunfo en el Masters Series de Roma, Rafael Nadal viajó a Hamburgo sólo para que el médico de la ATP certificara su abandono del Masters germano, a causa de una dolorosa ampolla en la mano izquierda. Hoy regresará a Palma, donde velará armas antes de afrontar Roland Garros.

De una noche ardiente en Roma, al abandono en Hamburgo, en sólo horas. ¿Cuál es la explicación?
Es una de las peores cosas que me ha podido ocurrir y una de las peores noticias, pero mi mano empeora cada día. Es una ampolla que se está abriendo, se va convirtiendo en corte y tengo que parar completamente al menos durante tres días. Si jugaba aquí, me iba a causar problemas. No hubiera estado al 100%, y para eso, mejor no jugar. Si digo que es una de las peores cosas que me ha podido ocurrir, es porque sólo hay tres Masters Series sobre tierra, mi superficie favorita. Hamburgo es uno de ellos y aquí jugué muy bien en 2003.

Volvamos a Roma. ¿Qué se piensa durante una final tan épica como la del Foro Itálico, y cuando la última volea de Coria se marchó larga? ¿Se piensa en la derrota, en qué cosas...?
Ufff...claro que pensé que podía perder: si no, hubiera sido tonto perdido.. Ya ve: 0-3 abajo en el quinto set, y luchando para no verme 0-4 o 1-4, con golpes al límite. Bueno, pues el último punto fue muy largo, con golpes que van y vienen, hasta que le tiro el último al cuerpo, y esa volea se va. En ese momento, no pienso nada, no me creo nada. Me quedo tumbado, me parecía increíble.

Y después...
Tuve cantidad de compromisos, hasta que ya casi de medianoche, en el hotel, pude analizar el partido con mí tío Toni y mi agente Carlos Costa. Me fui a la habitación, y como no podía dormir con la adrenalina, me tuve que poner a jugar con la Playstation. Al final, acabé durmiendo un rato, pero puse el despertador temprano, tenía claro que no se me podía escapar el desayuno. Desayunaba... o moría.

(Durante el diálogo, ante más periodistas, en una "suite" junto a la pista central del Rotherbaum Club, Nadal devora un plato tras otro: "rosbif", gambas y fresas).
Vamos a la pregunta que todo el mundo se hace. ¿Aguantará el fenómeno Nadal este tirón endemoniado hasta ganar Roland Garros en partidos a cinco sets? ¿O se quemará como una brasa?
Una de las razones por las que no podía dormir en Roma es que pensaba lo lejos que veía todo esto hace cinco meses... y me veía como ahora estoy entre los diez primeros del mundo: esas cosas no se olvidan y quedan para la historia, para tu satisfacción personal. Dicho esto, creo que el plan de trabajo físico que hicimos en la pretemporada va funcionando a la perfección: mi físico me está ayudando y va respondiendo. Ahora voy a descansar dos semanas. Si no gano Roland Garros, no será por el desgaste físico, sino porque tenga que pasar. No será porque esté mal físicamente, sino porque no puedo ganarlo todo, todos los torneos, todas las semanas. No he jugado tantos torneos, sólo que he llegado a las finales y parece que juego mucho más.

No se va a replantear nada, entonces...
No: no me tengo que replantear nada, no porque una ampolla me haga abandonar en Hamburgo. Yo estoy bien físicamente. Cansado un poco, lo normal tras un partido de cinco horas y cuarto. Pero ojalá tuviera que parar por ganar demasiadas veces, como le pasa a Federer.

¿Le asusta la 'Nadalmanía'? Va siendo un crack mediático casi como uno de los galácticos de "su" Real Madrid o su admirado Fernando Alonso...
No me asusta, porque no veo eso. Sigo viviendo igual y disfrutando cuando puedo hacer mis cosas de siempre, como jugar al golf o pescar. No me compararía con Alonso ni con ningún galáctico. Agradezco a mis seguidores que piensen eso, pero no es así. Soy un chico que empezó a jugar a tenis a los 14 años y que estaría muy sorprendido, por ejemplo, si ganara Roland Garros. Lo mejor que tengo es que lucho hasta el final. Hay gente que se rinde antes, eso es todo.


RAFAEL NADAL: I CAN'T WIN EVERYTHING EVERY WEEK

Hot from his triumph in the Rome Masters Series, Rafael Nadal travelled to Hamburg just so that the ATP doctor could authorise his withdrawal from the German tournament, because of a painful blister on his left hand. Today he'll return to Palma where he'll look after his weapons before facing Roland Garros.

From a blazing night in Rome to the withdrawal in Hamburg in just a few hours. How do you explain it?
It's one of the worst things that has happened to me and one of the worst pieces of news, but my hand is getting worse every day. It's a blister that's opening up, becoming more of a cut and I have to completely stop for at least 3 days. Playing here was going to cause me problems. I wouldn't have been 100% and so for that, it's best not to play. If I say it's one of the worst things that's happened to me, it's because there are only 3 Masters Series on clay, my favourite surface. Hamburg is one of them and I played very well here in 2003.

Let's go back to Rome. What do you think about during such an epic final like the one in the Foro Itálico, and when Coria's last volley was long? Do you think of the defeat? What do you think about?
Uff...of course I thought I would lose, if not, I'd have been stupid...You see, 0-3 down in the fifth set and fighting hard not to make it 0-4 or 1-4, with shots pushing the limit. Well, the last point was very long, with shots coming and going until I hit the last one to the body and that volley goes out. At that moment, I don't think of anything, I don't believe anything. I'm overwhelmed, it was incredible.

And then...
I had lots of commitments, until almost midnight, when in the hotel, I could analyse the match with my uncle Toni and my agent Carlos Costa. I went to my room, and since I couldn't sleep because of the adrenalin, I had to play the Playstation. I finally ended up sleeping a bit, but I set the alarm early. I made sure I didn't miss breakfast. I had to eat breakfast...or else I'd have died.

(During the interview, in front of lots of journalists, in a suite next to centre court at the Rothenbaum Club, Nadal devours plate after plate: roast beef, prawns, strawberries).
Moving onto the question that everyone's asking. Will the Nadal phenomenon be able to ride this wild wave until winning Roland Garros with best of 5 set matches or will it burn itself out like a hot coal?
One of the reasons I couldn't sleep in Rome was because I was thinking about how far away all this seemed 5 months ago...and I saw myself now, in the top 10 in the world: you don't forget those things and remain in history, for your personal satisfaction. Having said that, I think the physical work plan that we made in the pre-season is working perfectly: my physical state is helping and is responding to it. Now I'm going to rest for 2 weeks. If I don't win Roland Garros, it won't be because I'm worn out physically, but rather because it's destined to be that way. It won't be because I'm not well physically, but rather because I can't win everything, every tournament, every week. I haven't played that many tournaments, it's just that I've got to the finals and it seems like I'm playing a lot more.

So you're not going to be reconsidering anything...
No, I don't have to reconsider anything, not just because a blister forces me to withdraw from Hamburg. I'm good physically. A bit tired, which is normal after a match lasting 5 hours and 15 minutes. But I wish I could just stop because of winning too much, like what's happening with Federer.

Does 'Nadal mania' frighten you? You're like a media star like one of the "galacticos" from "your" Real Madrid or your idol, Fernando Alonso...
I doesn't frighen me because I don't see that. I keep living the same way and enjoying myself when I can do the things I always do like playing golf or fishing. I wouldn't compare myself with Alonso or with any of the Galacticos. I'm grateful that my fans think that, but it's not true. I'm a guy who started playing tennis at age 14 and would be very surprised, for example, if I won Roland Garros. My best asset is that I fight 'til the end. Some people give up earlier, that's it.

adelaide
05-10-2005, 02:12 PM
Thank you so much Emilita :smooch:

hahaha he's always eating at press conferences!

adelaide
05-10-2005, 02:48 PM
Rafael's Interview after winning Roma :D

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. You must be absolutely thrilled with that performance today.
RAFAEL NADAL: Yes, I am very happy. Is my second Masters Series. I played today one of the toughest match in my life. I am very happy because is a very important tournament for me, no.

Q. How did you get the energy to come back from 0-3 in the last set?
RAFAEL NADAL: I don't know. I think the public is very important for me because when I stay 3-0 in the -- 0-3 in the fifth, my energy is finish. But the public all the time apported (sic) me (laughing)... supported, supported me. For that, I can win the match.

Q. Did you think your chance had gone after the fourth set?
RAFAEL NADAL: No, no. I think I can won in the fifth set, no? But he play very well the first three games, and I was a little tired. And if he play well and I am a little tired, it's normal he come to for 3-Love and the match is very difficult for me, no, with 3-Love in the fifth. But I can won. I can won thanks to the public.

Q. Which is more difficult: Playing for five and a quarter hours, or speaking English? (omg lol :rolls: )
RAFAEL NADAL: I think play five hours, huh (smiling)? So I don't speak nothing English and I speak now, eh (smiling)?

Q. What was the problem with your hand? Was it a factor?
RAFAEL NADAL: Nothing. Only (showing his hand). You can see? The other one is the same.

Q. Was it a problem? Did you have difficulty to hold the racquet or what?
RAFAEL NADAL: No, no, no.
THE INTERPRETER: It's a blister.

Q. What are you doing between now and the French Open?
RAFAEL NADAL: I go to Hamburg tomorrow. No, I will see tomorrow. But after Hamburg I have one week off, and after play Paris, no?

Q. In the tiebreaker, 6-5, matchpoint, and then you double-fault.
RAFAEL NADAL: Double-fault.

Q. Was that nerves (laughter)?
RAFAEL NADAL: Little. Little nervous, yes. I think about the ace in the first set -- in the first serve, but I don't have nothing ace today, no? But I think with the ace in the first serve, was out like this. And in the second serve, I can't, I can do nothing.

Q. How does this match compare to Davis Cup?
RAFAEL NADAL: The Davis Cup is different, no? But today is fifth set, is five sets, the same like Davis Cup, and against one of the best players in the world, no, in clay? And in Davis Cup always is difficult matches because you play against the best players in the world, too, no? But is different. Is different, the Davis Cup, to the rest of tournaments.

Q. When you go to Hamburg tomorrow, will you see how you will feel before you decide to play?
RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, yeah. I will see.

Q. More than ever, you are the favorite for Roland Garros. You don't agree, I suppose?RAFAEL NADAL: Every time when I won a match I am favorite for Roland Garros, no? I don't know. I playing good, but after two weeks I don't know if I play the same like now, no? So the favorites of Roland Garros is the players when in Roland Garros play better, no?

Q. Were you close to cramping, do you think, in the fifth set?
RAFAEL NADAL: No, only in the toe.

End of FastScripts….

Argentine girl
05-12-2005, 11:57 AM
Would someone please translate this interview? Thank you in advance.

http://www.as.com/articulo.html?d_date=20050512&xref=20050512dasdaimas_2&type=Tes&anchor=dasmas

"NADAL ES ÚNICO, NO HE VISTO A NADIE COMO ÉL"

Andre Agassi, ya un gran veterano de 35 años, compareció en Hamburgo como un venerable padre de familia enamorado de sus dos hijos y de su esposa, Steffi Graf. A las primeras de cambio, Agassi cayó ante Feliciano López, pero antes respondió a cuestiones sobre el nuevo fenómeno: Rafa Nadal.

Le fue muy bien en Roma, pero el tiempo parece volar más rápido que sus deseos. ¿Qué le mueve a seguir jugando? ¿Hasta cuándo? ¿Aún se siente capaz de ganar a Federer?
Disfruto con los retos (la palabra exacta en inglés es "challenges" y Agassi va a pronunciarla infinidad de veces durante esta comparecencia: como hacía el Jordan de los últimos años)... y el mero hecho de seguir planteándome jugar bien contra los mejores, ya es un reto que me exige al máximo. Aún tengo ganas de afrontarlo, aunque es cierto que va siendo más y más duro. El tiempo está cada vez menos de mi lado. Y menos, con este clima tan frío de Hamburgo: cuando nos hacemos viejos...

¿Tan viejo, tan viejo se ve?
No, es que cuando hace en las pistas un frío como el de aquí, y se llega de otro torneo inmediatamente anterior, todo es más difícil si eres mayor. El que es mayor y está a la intemperie, lo sufre más que el que es joven. Y más aún con el paso del tiempo. Para mí es muy duro moverme y reaccionar bien en estas condiciones. Mi cuerpo no responde como el de los más jóvenes.

Viene del calor de Roma, donde se las tuvo tiesas con Coria y donde testificó la batalla del argentino con Nadal. ¿Qué le pasó con Coria?
Me quedé muy decepcionado con él por todo lo que pasó. Tuvo dos gestos inaceptables y ya lo dije allí mismo. Agitó el dedo diciendo que una bola mía se había ido fuera antes de que botara y después rodeó la marca y se marchó como si no hubiera más que hablar. Entiendo que se pueda cometer un error, pero no que una bola tan dudosa se dé como out con esa seguridad... y encima, antes de tiempo. Es una conducta inaceptable y no precisamente de agradecer. Son los jueces quienes deciden sobre bolas tan ajustadas.

(Tras esta jugada, con Agassi al servicio y 5-3 en el segundo set, Andre dio por buena una bola de Coria que el juez había cantado mala. Se repitió el punto y fue para Coria, que también acabaría llevándose este juego vital).

Después apareció el rayo de Nadal y carbonizó a Coria. Aquí llegamos todos: a Nadal.
Lo que está haciendo Nadal es increíble. Ya captó mi atención cuando le vi en Miami, y eso que no era su superficie predilecta. Ahora mismo es el favorito en cualquier torneo que se juegue sobre tierra batida. ¿Cuántos años tiene? ¿18, 19...?

Rafa tendrá 19 antes de un mes. ¿Le recuerda a alguien, por algo...?
No he visto nada semejante, nadie como él. Es único. Es rápido en todo lo que hace. Tiene manos rápidas, piernas rápidas, mucha velocidad en la bola. Es más difícil jugar contra él porque es zurdo. Y encima quiere ganar siempre, a toda costa. Verle jugar es una alegría. Da gusto.

Lleva usted, Andre, 20 años por las pistas del mundo, desde aquel debut de 1985, en los mejores días de John McEnroe e Iván Lendl. Tras la batalla terrícola de Roma entre Coria y Nadal, McEnroe, SuperMac, dijo que daba "gracias a Dios" por no tener que verse envuelto en partidos así, ante esos jugadores. Pero usted sigue...
Ahora he empezado a sentirme cómodo en la tierra batida y a pensar que puedo jugar bien ahí. En tierra, has de ser muy paciente. Hay muchas opciones que tomar en cada golpe. Si no estás adaptado, eso es lo más difícil que tiene jugar en tierra. Pero es una parte más del reto al que me refería antes, porque todo junto es algo muy duro de conseguir. Pero si lo haces, te deja muy satisfecho, porque sabes que es algo verdaderamente difícil. Aunque lo más difícil no es eso...

Entonces...
En este juego, eres lo que eres en la pista. Es difícil esconderse. No es lo que uno diga o lo que la gente diga de uno. O lo haces, o no lo haces. Si lo haces, disfrutas. Y no tengo mucho tiempo más para seguir disfrutando de estas sensaciones. Jugar torneos consecutivos a buen nivel nunca más será fácil para mí. En conjunto, lo que intento es responder a todos estos retos.

Hay una decisión, la de su retirada, que se antoja cercana. ¿Hasta qué punto su familia va a influir en que siga o no jugando?
Cuando estoy en Alemania, mi mujer decide cualquier cosa (risas)... pero, llegados a este punto, disfruto del tenis cada día y veo qué viene después. Mi familia sabe que el tenis es una parte muy grande de mi vida. De nuestra vida, diría. Sabe que ahora me lo tomo año por año. Cada año a su tiempo. No sé: aún tengo el deseo. Pero también está el tema de mi físico. Mi familia me apoya en todas mis decisiones. Lo que decidamos sobre el tenis, lo decidiremos juntos. Y será, sin duda, lo mejor para mí.

Después de esto, la explicación de su derrota ante Feliciano López cae por sí sola...
En esa pista (la central cubierta del Rothenbaum Club) hacía demasiado frío para mí, y no sólo se trataba ya de este asunto, sino del nuevo proceso de aclimatación tras llegar de Roma. Hay que darle crédito a López, que jugó un gran partido, pero a mí me costaba moverme y tenía problemas con la distancia y la penetración de los golpes. Me sentía vulgar, fuera de sitio. Fue muy duro.

¿Hasta cuándo...?
Año por año: ése es el reto.

~EMiLiTA~
05-12-2005, 04:02 PM
ok sure i can translate it now

~EMiLiTA~
05-12-2005, 04:51 PM
ok, translated it for you...there's not that much about Rafa...but if you're also interested in Agassi, then you might like this...

"NADAL IS UNIQUE, I HAVEN'T SEEN ANYONE LIKE HIM"

Andre Agassi, now a great veteran at 35, looked like a venerable father in Hamburg, in love with his 2 children and his wife, Steffi Graf. In the first round, Andre fell to Feliciano Lopez, but before that, he answered some questions about the new phenomenon: Rafa Nadal.

You did very well in Rome, but time seems to fly by quicker than your dreams. What keeps you going on? Until when? Do you still feel capable of beating Federer?
I enjoy challengers...and the mere fact of keeping on seeing myself play well against the best is a very demanding challenge. I like to face up to it although it'll definitely become tougher and tougher. Time is increasingly not on my side. Let alone, with this cold climat in Hamburg: when we get older...

You see yourself as being so old?
No, it's just that when it's as cold on the court like it is here, and you arrive directly from the previous tournament, everything is more difficult if you're older. If you're older and weatherbeaten, you find it harder than the younger ones. And even more so as time goes on. For me, it's very hard to move and react well in these conditions. My body doesn't respond like the youngers ones' do.

You come from the heat of Rome where you put up a great fight against Coria and where you witnessed the Argentinia's battle with Nadal. What happened with Coria?
I was very disappointed with him for everything that happened. He had 2 unacceptable gestures and I said so there and then. He moved his finger saying one of my balls had gone out before it bounced and then he circled the mark and walked off as if there was nothing more to be said. I understand it's possible to make mistakes but not that a ball as dubious as that can be called out so surely...and even more so, ahead of time. It's unacceptable behaviour and I don't really appreciate it. It's up to the umpires to decide on those tight calls.

(After that point with Agassi serving 5-3 in the second set, Agassi called one of Coria's balls good that the umpire had called out. The point was replayed and Coria won it, and also ended up winning that vital game)

Then came the Nadal the ray of light who toasted Coria. So now we come to Nadal.
What Nadal is doing is incredible. He caught my attention when I saw him in Miami, which wasn't even his favourite surface. Right now he's the favourite for any tournament he plays on clay. How old is he? 18-19?

Rafa will be 19 in just under a month. Does he remind you of anyone...?
I've haven't seen anything like it, anyone like him. He's unique. He's quick in everything he does. He has quick hands, quick legs, lots of speed on the ball. It's harder to play again him because he's lefthanded. And what's more, he always wants to win, at all costs. He's a joy to watch. It's great.

Andre, you have been playing for 20 years, since that debut in 1985, during the best days of John McEnroe and Ivan Lendl. After the battle in Rome between Coria and Nadal, McEnroe "Supermac" said he "thanked God" he didn't have to contend matches like that, against those players. But you keep going...
Now I've started to feel comfortable on clay and think I can do well there. On clay, you have to be very patient. There are lots of options on every shot. If you're not adapted to it, that's the most difficult thing about playing on clay. But that's one more part of the challenge I was talking about earlier, because everything together is something very hard to achieve. But if you can do it, it leaves you feeling very satisfied, because you know it's something truly difficult. Although that's not the most difficult thing...

So...
In this game, you are what you are on the court. It's difficult to hide. It's not about what you say or what other people say about you. Either you do it, or you don't. If you do it, you enjoy it. And I don't have much more time to keep enjoying these feelings. Playing consecutive tournaments at a high level will never be easy for me anymore. On the whole. what I try to do is respond to all those challenges.

There is a decision, the one regarding your retirement, which seems near. To what extent will your family influence whether you'll keep playing or not?
When I'm in Germany, my wife decides anything (laughs)...but having got to this point, I enjoy tennis every day and I see what comes afterwards. My family knows tennis is a very big part of my life. Of our life, I would say. They know that now, I'm taking it year by year. Each year as it comes. I don't know: I still have the desire. But there's also the physical issue. My family supports me in all my decisions. Whatever we decide about tennis, we'll decide together. And it'll definitely be the best for me.

After this, the explanation of your defeat to Feliciano Lopez speaks for itself...
On that court (the covered centre court of Rothenbaum club), it was too cold for me and it wasn't just about that, but also about trying to reaclimatise after Rome. I have to give credit to Lopez, who played great, but it was difficult for me to move and I had problems with the distance and penetration of my shots. I felt ordinary, off. It was very tough.

Until when...?
Year by year: that's the challenge.

Mihret
05-13-2005, 01:36 PM
Does anybody have access to the article on Rafael Nadal that is posted on the cnn.com/si/tennis website? It is only for subscribers but it seems like a great piece.

RogiFan88
05-16-2005, 10:03 PM
May 15, 2005
Tennis: Prince of the court
BARRY FLATMAN
A few weeks ago it would have been unthinkable, but Rafael Nadal’s form makes him a French Open contender

Those who purport to know about matters of adolescence maintain that much can be gleaned of a youth’s characteristics by table manners. Teenagers who bolt their food are likely to be impetuous; eating too slowly may depict hesitation. Denied sustenance by the pressures of fame, Rafael Nadal contemplated a late lunch with a calculated plan of strategy and meticulously set about the task of satisfying his ravenous hunger.

Most people his age would opt for a burger or the like after being deprived of dinner the previous night by the demands of work and then forced to rush breakfast. Fittingly, however, a plate of seafood lay before the 18-year-old who was raised on the Mediterranean island of Majorca; slivers of salmon, crab, scallops and king prawns.

Selecting the rarest of tuna steaks, Nadal neatly cut the fish into six equal strips with the same precision with which he has carved up most of his tennis opposition over the past few months. He eats his food in the same way he plays his sport; deliberate, assured and in a manner beyond his years.

And the fact that most of the tennis world expects him to become the most successful debutant at a Grand Slam tournament for almost a quarter of a century is not about to cause even the faintest twinge. “It is good, I like,” he says with a smile, spearing a piece of fish, but knowing that another session of interrogation on the matter of his sensational rise over the past six months is about to begin.

Laying down his fork to answer the initial and most obvious question, he brushes away the thick mop of black hair that perpetually shades his left eye and answers: “No, I don’t really believe what is going on for me right now, because everything is falling my way, but the sensible thing is not to think about it too much. Five tournament wins is great, no? And big titles, in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome. It makes me very happy, but I know I don’t win these things through luck. I win because I work hard and play good. All I can do is make sure those things carry on and then maybe I will win some more. If I got to the French (Open) and keep playing like this, I have a good chance, because nobody has beaten me recently, but I don’t know if that’s going to happen.”

Youthful exuberance has had little to do with the trail of success Nadal has left through the showpiece clay courts of the world this year. He may be a player who has prematurely come of age since scoring the pivotal win over world No 2 Andy Roddick that heralded Spain’s victory in last December’s Davis Cup final.

But he is perfectly at ease with the situation, and although Roger Federer is the world’s top-ranked male player and Gaston Gaudio the defending champion, it is the boy with the body and mind of a grown man who is expected to lift the Coupe des Mousquetaires in three weeks.

Yet those closest to Nadal remain amazed by the demeanour of the player who started the year ranked outside the world’s top 50 and is now No 5. “He just doesn’t seem affected or bothered by it all,” says his agent, Carlos Costa, a top 10 player in the early 1990s who says he is now far busier dealing with the business side of sport’s newest superstar.

“I notice no pressure in his mind, just a maturity that I have never seen in somebody so young.”

Benito Perez-Barbadillo, the ATP’s director of communications and Latin relations, agrees, but adds: “Watching the way he handles everything to do with his tennis, you would never realise how introverted he can be off the court. Rafa is the most famous thing ever to happen in his home town of Manacor, but when he goes home he is still shy when it comes to talking to the girls he likes. He can do whatever he likes on a tennis court, but back home, being a normal teenager, he has the same problems as so many other kids.”

Perhaps the French Open title and its potential financial rewards might improve his attraction, although Nadal is already doing pretty well in that department, with career prize-money to date of more than $2m. He is following a proud Spanish tradition, established more than 40 years ago by Manolo Santana and repeated by Andres Gimeno, Sergi Bruguera, Carlos Moya, Albert Costa and Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Yet Nadal refuses to put undue pressure on himself and riles at the suggestion that it has always been his ambition to follow this line of succession. “Nunca (never),” he snaps. “It is wrong to think so high at a young age. It is not clever for me to hear what the people are saying about me going to Roland Garros this year. Right now I’m just thinking if I lose, it’s because nobody can win every week.

“If I don’t win another match this year, I will have accomplished the goal I set in January of getting into the top 20 in 2005. Last year it was the same, I just wanted to win my first ATP tournament and I did that in August after missing three months. Then there was Davis Cup final, and now to win Masters Series finals twice against a player like (Guillermo) Coria, who people said was the best in the world on clay last year, is a great thing. But I know I won’t be able to keep playing like this all the time. It is not normal to win the sort of matches I have been winning. I know a bad patch will come. The important thing is that this will be my first year playing in Paris, not my last.”

Such a defence mechanism is understandable. Public expectation has long been a factor in Nadal’s life. Almost from the time he chose to concentrate on tennis rather than football at 12, he has been the focus of media attention in his homeland.

When fellow Majorcan Moya was the champion of Roland Garros in 1998 and subsequently the world No 1, he was quick to recognise the youngster’s talent and volunteered for the role of mentor to a player he was convinced would ultimately succeed him. A year later, Nadal was chosen as the Spanish flag-carrier as Barcelona staged the Davis Cup final against Australia, at which patriotism and subsequent ill-feeling courtside resulted in the away team’s captain, John Newcombe, giving serious consideration to silencing his antagonistic opposite number, Javier Duarte, with a well-timed right hook to the jaw.

Nadal has been groomed for the test to come, being pitched into men’s tournaments at 14 rather than playing on the junior circuit. With his 16th birthday still several months distant, he registered his first ATP Tour victory over Paraguay’s Ramon Delgado on the Majorcan clay of Palma. “What was the need for Rafa to play against boys when he was already strong enough to take on the men ?” says Perez- Barbadillo.

Everything was on the upward curve until almost 12 months ago, when he found himself, sad and dispirited, hobbling on crutches at Roland Garros after fracturing an ankle in a build-up tournament at Estoril. “At the time I was feeling very down and the idea was to make me feel happier by seeing what I would experience,” Nadal recalls, pondering added misfortune because a year earlier he had been prevented from competing because of an elbow injured during practice. “I watched my friend Carlos (Moya) win his first-round match and I was glad for him, but not being able to play made me feel bad and I just wanted to go home.”

Nadal will be in the same place this weekend, again far away from tennis. For a time he will be sitting on a fishing boat a couple of kilometres off the Majorcan coast. Together with a group of childhood friends he will have made the 15-minute drive from his hometown, heading east away from tourist traps of Magaluf, Cala Major and the capital, Palma, instead setting sail from Porto Cristo, intent on catching a few halibut or perhaps even a swordfish. His beloved Real Madrid’s match against Seville also has huge importance (and the fact that his uncle, the recently retired Miguel Angel, was a Barcelona legend has no bearing on whom the youngster wants to win La Liga).

And of course there will be the Pro Evolution game on his PlayStation, a near obsessional method of relaxation that eventually allowed him to calm down in the small hours of Monday morning after five hours and as many sets of intense confrontation against Coria to win the Master Series title in Rome.

Tomorrow or the day after he will return to the courts, although he will be careful not to aggravate the cut on his left hand which he suffered in that concentrated struggle against Coria, the reason for his perhaps timely inability to contest the Masters Series tournament in Hamburg. A photoshoot for the American magazine People will be a brief distraction before he flies to Paris on Wednesday.

The consensus among those who know first-hand what it takes to succeed in the ultimate test of clay-court play is he will return as French champion. Even the wily Coria, perfectly qualified to make a discompassionate judgment between the chances of Nadal and Federer after losing to both in the past week, is insistent: “Sometimes you think Roger is impossible to beat, but of the two, Rafa is far the stronger on clay.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2094-1612598,00.html

adelaide
05-16-2005, 10:48 PM
Excellent. So it is going to be the US version..... :D:D:D:D

~EMiLiTA~
05-17-2005, 04:06 PM
wow...great article RogiFan...thanks!!

Clara Bow
05-17-2005, 04:49 PM
Here is an article from the front page of today's USA Today. This is a national newspaper that is very widely read. There are a couple of errors in it but overall it is pretty good and I think it's great that he's getting such coverage in a US paper.

USA TODAY

May 17, 2005, Tuesday, FINAL EDITION

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 1C

LENGTH: 1809 words

HEADLINE: Phenom will inject flair into French;
Streaking Nadal, 18, ready for Grand Slam glare

BYLINE: Doug Robson

BODY:
No man has captured the French Open in his debut since Swede Mats Wilander came out of nowhere to win in 1982.


Rafael Nadal can count on no such anonymity.


With his flowing hair and boyish good looks, strapping frame and warrior's heart, Nadal enters next week's French Open riding a wave of anticipation not seen since Boris Becker captured Wimbledon at 17.


Nadalmania has taken the tennis world by storm.


Since losing an epic five-set final to No. 1 Roger Federer at Florida's Nasdaq-100 in early April, the 18-year-old Spanish sensation has won three consecutive clay-court titles, including Masters Series events in Monte Carlo and Rome. The left-hander has risen into the top five, built a 17-match winning streak and posted an ATP tour-best 31-2 record on clay.


Despite having never struck a ball on the red dirt of Roland Garros, home of the season's second major, the kid known as "Rafa" arrives as the player to beat.


"He's got to be one of the favorites, if not the favorite," U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe says.


Wilander, who was an unseeded 17-year-old when he won in Paris 23 years ago, says lack of experience isn't necessarily a disadvantage. "He will be hungrier than anyone," the three-time French Open champion says.


"I know it's my first, but I don't think about it right now," says Nadal, who came back from a 0-3 deficit in the fifth set against 2004 French Open runner-up Guillermo Coria nine days ago to become the youngest winner in Rome since Jimmy Arias in 1983.


"When I have to play Roland Garros, I'll start thinking about it."


How impressive has Nadal's spring been?


*Since losing in Valencia to Igor Andreev of Russia in early April, he has won 17 consecutive matches in 27 days, the second-longest winning streak on the tour this year and the longest heading into Roland Garros since Thomas Muster's 23-match streak in 1995.


*His ranking has jumped from No.31 to No.5 in less than two months.


*He is the youngest player, at 18 years, 11 months, to break into the top five since Michael Chang (17 years, 5 months) in 1989.


*He is the first teenager to win five ATP titles in a season since Andre Agassi won six in 1988. Nadal is one behind top-ranked Federer for the most titles won this year.


The hyper Nadal, who can barely sit still in the locker room before his matches, insists the sudden success hasn't changed him an iota.


"No, no, nothing has really changed in my life," he says. "Not even my cell (phone) number."


Another Mallorcan star is born
Born on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca, east of the Spanish mainland, Nadal began playing tennis at 5 with his uncle, Toni, who remains his coach today.


An only child in a family with athletic prowess -- his uncle Miguel Angel Nadal was a member of Spain's national soccer team and had stints with top clubs FC Barcelona and Real Mallorca -- Nadal quickly rose up the junior rankings in Spain.


Fellow Mallorcan and 1998 French Open champ Carlos Moya first hit with Nadal when he was 12 and has said since that Nadal was destined for stardom. The two became close, and Moya has served as a behind-the-scenes mentor as Nadal has improved since turning pro in 2001.


"To start your career and have a friend like that who can give you advice and tips and also a chance to socialize, it's obviously important," says Nadal, who is still learning English and spoke through an interpreter.


True to Moya's prediction, Nadal began making headlines early in his teens. He was so good he barely played any major international junior events. He competed only in the Wimbledon boys tournament, where he reached the semifinals in 2002.


He won his first ATP match that same year, at 15, becoming one of nine players to win their first at that age in the Open era (since 1968). Then, in 2003, he upended Moya in the Hamburg Masters and finished the season in the top 50 at No. 47.


After reaching as high as No. 34 in March 2004, Nadal suffered a stress fracture in his left ankle joint. That forced him to miss nearly three months, including the French Open and most of last year's clay-court season.


Disappointed, Nadal stayed at home and watched the major clay tournaments on TV.


"They were difficult moments, but I've had them and they are behind me now," he says. "Obviously it was not nice because I was playing very good on clay."


All the tools, all the emotion
Unlike such teenage prodigies as Wilander, Bjorn Borg, Arias and Chang, Nadal is stamped more in the Becker mold. At 6-1, 188 pounds, Nadal is as big as a bull and just as strong, with a swagger in his step and boldness in his personality that match his physical presence.


"I mean, me at 18 (and) looking at Nadal at 18, from the neck down you would think one person was 26 and another person was 12," Agassi said jokingly at the Nasdaq-100.


Although his serve is not a significant weapon yet, Nadal hits some of the heaviest groundstrokes in the game and comes up with angles most players can imagine but not execute.


He can take control of points with his whippy topspin forehand, but he's also an excellent mover who can scramble his way from defense to offense.


"His forehand is huge," Federer says, "and because he's a lefty, it changes so many things."


What sets him apart even more is his never-say-die attitude and big-match mentality.


A surprise choice by Spanish captain Jordi Arrese in December's Davis Cup final in Seville, Nadal came out and beat then-No. 2 Andy Roddick in four sets in the opening match, propelling Spain to the championship.


This month, after capturing back-to-back titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona, Nadal dug himself out of one-set deficits in consecutive matches to reach the Rome final.


Sipping cola and munching on bananas, an exhausted Nadal then overcame a fifth-set deficit and blisters to his playing hand to knock off Argentina's Coria 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (8-6) in a match that lasted more than five hours.


"You have to start with his competitive instincts. He just loves the battle, and it doesn't matter whether he wins or loses the first set. He comes right back in the second ready to go," two-time French Open champ Jim Courier says.


Nadal says, "I've always been a guy who is mentally stable and centered."


Charisma and fame's glare
Nadal will need to maintain his stability. His success, coupled with his natural flair and charisma, has thrust him into the international limelight.


After his win in Monte Carlo, Nadal arrived in Barcelona as the new king of Spanish tennis. His every movement was daily news in local papers. He was inundated with autograph requests. For the first time, he needed protection from fans and onlookers while walking around tournament grounds, ATP officials said.


In his spare time at tournaments, he plays soccer and PlayStation 2, listens to Spanish music and current pop and dance music and has a voracious appetite -- he munches lots of cookies and loves to go out to eat, particularly if it's for seafood. Other hobbies include deep-sea fishing and golf.


Despite the media glare, Nadal, who is single and has no girlfriend, says he is surprised by his success and the attention but remains unfazed.


"I don't know much about how the public perception is or if some other people have changed. What I can tell you is that I have not changed," he says. "I'm exactly the same kind of guy, and I have the same kind of life. I don't have more or less pressure. I try to be the same, act in the same way. ... I have to work every day 100% and try to forget the rest."


He concedes, however, that his confidence has never been higher. "Maybe what has changed is that I know how to be more calm on court. I know how to control better the important moments in a match."


Tantalizing rivalry
As his run on the hard courts in the Nasdaq-100 attests, Nadal can't be pigeonholed as simply a clay-court grinder. He made the third round on grass at Wimbledon in his debut two years ago and reached the third round of the Australian Open this year on hard courts.


He was one of six players to beat Federer in 2004, and he did so on a hard court.


"He's going to be one of the great players," seven-time Grand Slam champ John McEnroe says. "It just remains to be seen how quickly he'll learn to play on grass and the faster surfaces."


If he continues at the same pace as this year, Nadal could be the perfect foil to Federer and provide the kind of contrast the game has lacked since John McEnroe and Borg clashed at the top of the sport a quarter century ago.


*The right-handed Federer employs a one-handed backhand and plays a classic style reminiscent of earlier eras, while southpaw Nadal typifies the modern backcourt game with heavy topspin and a two-fisted backhand.


*Whereas Federer is cool and collected, the swashbuckling Nadal is prone to frequent fist pumps, cries of "Vamos" ("Let's go") and other emotive displays.


*The clean-cut, gentlemanly Federer comes off as a former altar boy. Nadal, with his shoulder-length hair, white headband and trademark white clam digger shorts, looks like an island warrior swept in off the high seas.


"We'll see, of course, very much from him in the future," Federer said after his comeback 2-6, 6-7 (7-4), 7-6 (7-5), 6-3, 6-1 victory in the Nasdaq-100 final. "For me this was a big match because I know what a great player he will be one day."


Reign of Spain in Paris One day has come quicker than Federer imagined.


Indeed, whether Nadal can pull off a win at Roland Garros seems only a matter of time. Whether he can do it on his first try is another question. The stakes will be higher, the target on his back bigger and the pressure to live up to the public's growing expectations even greater.


"He's playing great this year, and we'll have to see how much energy he has left for the French," says fellow left-hander Muster, an Austrian who won the French Open in 1995. "He's very young, and there are a lot of things for him to cope with mentally. He's a young kid with lots of expectations."


Some have wondered if Nadal, with all his long matches and titles since March, might have played too much heading into the grueling two-week clay-court major, where matches are best-of-five sets and points are longer on the sticky, red clay.


Nadal discounts that idea. "I know I've played a lot, but I'm feeling well and I'm very excited."


Then again, recent history is on the youngster's side: Spanish men have won five of the last 12 French Opens, more than men from any other country.


Wilander, for one, wouldn't be surprised to see Nadal win if he gets out of the early rounds.


"You can burn yourself out," Wilander says, "but when you come in with that much confidence, you can feel untouchable."

ayena
05-17-2005, 05:56 PM
Thanks for articles guys :D :D

~EMiLiTA~
05-18-2005, 12:23 PM
thanks for the article!!

just one thing...it said he's an only child...but he actually has a younger sister...

sonia
05-18-2005, 04:10 PM
Great articles!! Thanks!


just one thing...it said he's an only child...but he actually has a younger sister...

Yes, he has a younger sister...:confused:

adelaide
05-19-2005, 04:07 AM
okay, this is not news news, nor is it an article, but:

http://www.atptennis.com/nadal/

WHAT THE EFF? :eek: I'm scared. I mean it's great, but it's freaky. ATP loves him. So so so so so much.
there is no such thing for any other players......... that i can find. :confused:

Clara Bow
05-19-2005, 04:52 AM
These video feeds are temporary. They have had similar ones for other players in the past, such as Federer. I wouldn't get too worried.

Carlita
05-19-2005, 09:44 AM
Nice!:D

but , why would you promote Nadal???????? People know who he is! There's no need for promotion! (or do they need a reminder outside of Europe????? Like with Federer??) :shrug:

~EMiLiTA~
05-19-2005, 12:09 PM
hahaha that's funny

i just hope they don't boost him too much...i mean too much nadalmania is not good either *shields rafa from the limelight*

Carlita
05-19-2005, 12:25 PM
*helps to shield Little Naranja Man and also supplies him with :cool: sunglasses in case the light gets too bright*


:lol:

adelaide
05-19-2005, 01:55 PM
thanks clara bow :) I feel better. :lol:

but the brochure and the video are really nice, eh? :D:D:D

smucav
05-19-2005, 05:14 PM
Nadal the first since Wilander to win French debut? (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/french05/columns/story?id=2062663)

RogiFan88
05-21-2005, 03:39 AM
Baptism of fire awaits the kid king of clay

The Spanish 18-year-old Rafael Nadal goes into his first French Open on Monday as favourite but his taste for big-match pressure is well proved

Stephen Bierley
Saturday May 21, 2005
The Guardian

Sunday morning at the Foro Italico in Rome and the 37-year-old Thomas Muster, the 1995 French Open champion and the outstanding clay-court player of his generation with 40 titles, was getting in a little gentle practice before his veterans' Delta Tour of Champions final against Jim Courier.

His hitting partner, dressed in red shorts, a plain white short-sleeved shirt and white baseball cap was a fellow left-hander of no obvious distinction, and who appeared rather stiff in the joints and a touch less than enthusiastic.

Midway through the mildest of rallies Muster looped a backhand short and, with a sudden, uncharacteristically rapid dart forward, the other man whacked a forehand deep into the corner, the ball fizzing and thudding into the advertising hoardings. As he turned he lifted his cap and his long black hair spilled out to shoulder length. It was like suddenly recognising a policeman in civvies. It was Rafael Nadal.

Mention of his name and the image is instant. White pirate length trousers, or clamdiggers as the Americans call them, sleeveless orange shirt, and white bandanna. The 18-year-old Spaniard has taken the tennis world by storm this year, rushing up the rankings to No5 in winning five tournaments, including two Masters Series titles in Monte Carlo and Rome.

He could be forgiven for looking a little jaded as he practised with Muster on the morning of the Italian Open final, for he had just completed a 16-match winning streak on clay. Yet any doubts about his stamina were dismissed that afternoon when, in the most wonderfully dramatic of matches, he defeated Argentina's Guillermo Coria, last year's French Open runner-up, over five sets lasting more than five hours.

"This guy has such a sharp mind. He's so focused on tennis and he so wants to win," said the admiring Muster, who admitted to seeing a mirror image of himself when hitting with Nadal.

"Everything he does turns around tennis and that's exactly the attitude you need."

Muster shares the view, widely held, that Nadal will not merely be a great Spanish player, or a great clay-court player, but one of the world's all-time greats. "What he has is unusual and rare. He has that determination and willpower that singles him out."

The intensity of Nadal's play is almost frightening. His speed around the court is phenomenal, even by the standards of Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, while his forehand is devastating. "Against a right-hander he will kill them with that forehand. They are going to jump out of the stadium," said Goran Ivanisevic, the 2001 Wimbledon champion.

"It's a huge shot," admits Roger Federer, the current world No1 whose own full-powered forehand is a wonder to behold. "Rafael is an outstanding athlete as well and moves totally differently to most players. Yet even on the run he can hit with spin."

"I've not seen another player like him since Boris Becker. He's a real pearl," said Ion Tiriac, who guided the German prodigy in his formative years. That said, there is more of the kid about Nadal than Becker.

Tennis is up to the gills in youngsters who look terrific from the baseline in practice, but what has singled out Nadal, who will be 19 a week next Friday, is his ability to embrace the big occasion at such a young age and with such unfettered exuberance. There are fist pumps, scissors kicks and huge joyous leaps off the ground - though for the most part any overt intimidation is restricted to his shots.

Unlike Hewitt there is nothing of the brat. Nadal's enthusiasm is endearing and, if his steadfast aggression is atypical of Spanish players, then it was integral to his game from an early age. Sergi Bruguera (twice), Carlos Moya, Albert Costa and Juan Carlos Ferrero have all won the French Open title since 1993 but all, in their different ways, have epitomised a somewhat reserved and self-contained persona.

Nadal, in sharp contrast, is outgoing and gregarious. When he beat Andy Roddick to give Spain what proved to be a decisive 2-0 lead in the Davis Cup final last year, Moya sagely remarked: "He's the kind of guy that likes to play these kind of matches. So I really trust him. I believe in him."

His father's brother, Miguel Angel Nadal, was a defender for Spain, for whom the word uncompromising might have been coined (his nickname was the Beast of Barcelona) while his other paternal uncle and coach, Toni, gave "Rafa" his first racket when he was four: "I was a defensive player and not all that successful, so the idea was for Rafael to be aggressive. As it turned out, that style fitted his personality perfectly."

When Nadal was 14, the Spanish federation suggested he move to Barcelona. But his parents declined, wanting to remain involved in their oldest child's education. Staying in his native Majorca meant Nadal received less financial support but his father, a successful businessman, was prepared to pay for training.

At 15, Nadal won his first Tour-level match, beating the Paraguayan veteran Ramon Delgado in the opening round of the ATP event in Majorca in 2002. And so the wheel of success began to spin. There have been setbacks, including elbow and foot injuries that prevented him playing at Roland Garros for the past two years. Now, suddenly, he is this year's French Open favourite without having played there and having not gone beyond the fourth round of any major.

Muster sounds a word of caution. "Now it's the next step. He has to deal with all the pressure of being the favourite and it's a lot for a young brain to cope with. Some players become negative about it, some are very positive. You never know, so that's what we have all still got to see with Rafael. But his potential is just enormous."

Teenage Tennis Champions

Boris Becker As a fresh-faced 17-year-old in 1985 the German won Wimbledon at his second attempt. Retained title the next year and went on to win four more majors but never got beyond the semi-finals of the French.

Bjorn Borg Won the French Open title at the second attempt as an 18-year-old and retained it as a teenager, the second of six triumphs at Roland Garros. Equally at home on grass, he won the Wimbledon title five times, doubling with the French from 1978-80.

Michael Chang Won his only grand slam title, the French, as a 17-year-old in 1989, the youngest male winner of a major. Runner-up at Roland Garros in 1995 and in the Australian and US Opens the next year.

Ken Rosewall Won the Australian and French Open titles as an 18-year-old in 1953. Winner of eight grand slam titles in total, although never Wimbledon where he was runner-up four times.

Mats Wilander Won the French as a 17-year-old in 1982, the first of three titles at Roland Garros and seven grand slam titles in all, although never Wimbledon where he failed to get beyond the quarter-finals.

Pete Sampras Won the first of his 14 grand slam titles at Flushing Meadows as a 19-year-old in 1990 when he became the youngest US Open champion since the previous century. Best at Roland Garros was semi-final.

Stefan Edberg Won the Australian Open as a 19-year-old in 1985, the first of his six grand slam titles. Best at Roland Garros was runner-up in 1989.

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1489069,00.html

RogiFan88
05-21-2005, 03:46 AM
Rafael Nadal: Beast in the blood
Spanish prodigy Rafael Nadal talks to John Roberts about his remarkable rise, his sporting pedigree and his hopes for the French Open which starts on Monday
21 May 2005

You do not have to stray far from Rafael Nadal's home in Majorca to find a blood relation with the athletic qualities and mental strength required for success in great arenas. One of the tennis prodigy's uncles is Miguel Angel Nadal, the former Barcelona and Spain central defender.

Miguel Angel is not alone in being excited about Rafael's prospects of winning the French Open, which starts on Monday, at the first attempt. "Rafa", as the sturdy left-hander is known, is one of the favourites, even though he does not turn 19 until a week next Friday, the day of the men's semi-finals.

As a footballer, Miguel was no Angel. Lacking pace, he was often late in the tackle. Even so, "Beast of Barcelona" seems rather harsh. Rafa sprang to his uncle's defence. "Miguel Angel was not rough," he said. "He was a technical player. I used to go to the stadium all the time to see him when he played for Real Mallorca. And I kicked a ball in the garden with him lots of times."

Perhaps Miguel has been confused with Andoni Goicoechea, the "Butcher of Bilbao", who, in 1982, put Barcelona's Diego Maradona out of the game for four months and proudly covered the boot that did the damage in Perspex.

Not that Miguel needs his nephew to stand up for him. "Before I played in the European Championship with the national team in 1996," he recounted, "the English put in the newspaper that I was the 'Beast of Barcelona'. That sort of nickname was not right. I was known in Spain as somebody who played elegantly from defence, not dirty at all. I was not like Goicoechea, who went for the legs of people."

Rafa played football until he was 12. "We had a good team," he recalled. "I was a striker, and we won an inter-league championship. I spoke with Miguel Angel sometimes when he played football. We have a very good relationship, but not a professional relationship."

For that, Rafa relies on Miguel's brother, Toni. "My uncle Toni tells me everything I know," he said. "Apart from being an excellent tennis coach, Toni has been a fantastic educator for him," Miguel concurred. "He has taught him to appreciate things and keep his feet on the ground. He not only teaches him tennis, but also he teaches him life."

Tennis was Miguel's first love. "I used to play tennis until I was 15," he said. "In fact everybody thought I would play tennis instead of football. I always liked tennis more than football.

"A few days ago I was hitting balls with Rafael for an hour and 15 minutes. Last week Spanish television showed again the Roland Garros final between Arantxa [Sanchez Vicario] and Steffi Graf, and I stayed up until 3.30 in the morning watching it. If Rafael gets through to the second week, at Roland Garros, I would love to go."

His nephew is the Spanish No 1, and is obviously No 1 in Majorca, where the No 2 is his friend Carlos Moya, a former world No 1 and the 1998 French Open champion. Moya was born in Palma and now lives in Geneva. Nadal was born in Manacor and still lives there.

"In Manacor, I'm normal," Rafa said. "People have known me since I was a little kid. They congratulate me when I win something, but treat me like everybody else."

Do some of the other Spanish players resent the fact that someone so young has supplanted them in the world rankings?

"I don't really worry about the others, if I'm beating them or not," he said. "For me the important thing is that I win tournaments. If the other Spanish players are winning tournaments too, that's great, because that means I'm going to have more friends on tour."

Miguel has fond memories of Rafa as a child. "He was a kid who loved to play any kind of sport. Even at midnight he didn't want to stop. Being the first nephew that I had, and the first grandson for his father, he was always a centre of attention. He was a little kid who got on with everybody, a very open little kid, and he loved to play football and to watch football."

Did he have the potential to be a professional footballer? "You never know that, because football is not an individual sport, it's a team sport and there are a lot of factors that do not depend on yourself. Obviously, he had a lot of qualities and abilities, and he still does.

"My bother Toni has always been a funny guy and he was always kidding Rafael when he was a little kid. One of the things Toni told him was that he used to play in the Milan football team, and Rafael always thought it was true. But then one time there was a summer football tournament and Rafael saw his uncle Toni play football, and the team lost the match. Rafael was very disappointed and said: 'There's no way he was able to play in Milan. He's not that good - he's pretty bad, actually'."

Young Nadal is a Real Madrid supporter. "That's a very strange thing," Miguel said. "It's probably because when he was a little kid his father put a Real Madrid shirt on him. He's one of the few Real Madrid fans who was happy when Barcelona won the title when his uncle was playing."

When Nadal began kicking sand in the faces of big-name opponents, I tempted him with a top-spin lob. How would he react to being told that he has the physique of a Boris Becker and the fighting qualities of a Jimmy Connors?

"I hope I have, of course," he replied, smiling, "because those two players are great. If I were a mixture of both, I would be really high. I am thankful for the comment, but I don't think so."

He was wise to be doubtful about the comparison. Apart from anything else, Becker and Connors never won the French Open. Nadal, ranked No 5, may not be quite ready to win the world's premier clay-court title this time round, but it seems only a matter of time before he does.

Many European and Latin American players grow up on clay courts, but few look so completely at one with the surface as Nadal, who is au fait with its nuances and in dread of none.

This season, in the space of 27 days, he won 17 matches and three singles titles on clay: the Masters Series championships in Monte Carlo and Rome either side of the Barcelona tournament.

After defeating Guillermo Coria, of Argentina - last year's runner-up at the French Open - in five sets over five hours and 14 minutes in the Rome final (having already beaten Coria in four sets in Monte Carlo), Nadal was forced to take a break and missed the Hamburg Masters.

A blister on the index finger of his racket hand needed to heal, and his mind and body were on the verge of exhaustion. Although the finals in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome were played over the best of five sets, the earlier rounds were over the best of three sets.

To win the French Open, or any of the three other Grand Slam championships, a man must win seven matches over the best-of-five-sets.

In common with many of his compatriots, Nadal, while exceptional on clay and formidable on concrete, needs to adapt his baseline style for grass. "I can play good on hard courts," he said. "I played in the fourth round at the Australian Open and in the final in Key Biscayne. At some point I would love to also play good on grass, because there is a special atmosphere at Wimbledon. I have to improve my serve and my volley and my return."

That would seem to amount to a major overhaul but for the fact that Wimbledon's lawns - as Tim Henman would be the first to agree - are more durable nowadays and offer an even bounce. This time last year Nadal was unable to play because of a stress fracture to the left ankle. "After being injured it makes you think much more when you are doing well. It makes you realise how great it is to win and how great it is to be healthy. You remember those bad times when you were injured and life was more difficult. I like to play tennis. I enjoy the competition, and I am very lucky to be able to do what I like to do."

And to have such a supportive family.

Nadal's trials, titles and titanic struggles

Rise through the ranks

January 2004

Reaches first ATP final in Auckland in January, but loses to Dominik Hrbaty of Slovakia, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5.

August 2004

Wins first ATP title at Sopot, Poland.

December 2004

Inspires Spain's Davis Cup final victory against the United States by defeating the world No 2, Andy Roddick, 6-7, 6-2, 7-6, 6-2. That makes Nadal the youngest player, at 18 years and six months, to record a singles victory in a Davis Cup final for a winning team.

February 2005

Wins back-to-back ATP titles in Costa do Sauipe, Brazil, and Acapulco, Mexico.

March 2005

Loses epic match against the world No 1, Roger Federer, 2-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3, 6-1 at Nasdaq-100 tournament in Key Biscayne after coming within two points of the title.

April 2005

Wins his first Masters Series title in Monte Carlo, defeating the 2004 French Open runner-up, Guillermo Coria, 6-3, 6-1, 0-6, 7-5, in the final. A week later wins the Barcelona title, defeating his compatriot Juan Carlos Ferrero, the 2003 French Open champion, 6-1, 7-6, 6-3.

May 2005

Wins second Masters title at the Italian Open, defeating Coria 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 in five hours and 14 minutes - the longest final ever played in Rome.

http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/story.jsp?story=640013

RogiFan88
05-21-2005, 04:04 AM
Nadal refuses to dine out on success, fearing just desserts
Barry Flatman
May 21, 2005

THOSE who purport to know about matters of adolescence maintain much can be gleaned of a youth's characteristics by table manners.

Teenagers who bolt their food are likely to be impetuous; eating too slowly may depict hesitation.

Denied sustenance by the pressures of fame, Rafael Nadal contemplated a late lunch the day after claiming the Rome Masters with a calculated plan of strategy and meticulously set about the task of satisfying his ravenous hunger.

Most people his age would opt for a burger or the like after being deprived of dinner the previous night by the demands of work and then forced to rush breakfast. Fittingly, however, a plate of seafood lay before the 18-year-old who was raised on the Mediterranean island of Majorca; slivers of salmon, crab, scallops and king prawns.

Selecting the rarest of tuna steaks, Nadal neatly cut the fish into six equal strips with the same precision with which he has carved up most of his tennis opposition over the past few months. He eats his food in the same way he plays his sport; deliberate, assured and in a manner beyond his years. And the fact that most of the tennis world expects him to become the most successful debutant at a Grand Slam tournament for almost a quarter of a century is not about to cause even the faintest twinge.

"It is good, I like," Nadal says with a smile, spearing a piece of fish, but knowing that another session of interrogation on the matter of his sensational rise over the past six months is about to begin.

Laying down his fork to answer the initial and most obvious question, he brushes away the thick mop of black hair that perpetually shades his left eye and answers: "No, I don't really believe what is going on for me right now, because everything is falling my way, but the sensible thing is not to think about it too much.

"Five tournament wins is great, no? And big titles, in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome. It makes me very happy, but I know I don't win these things through luck. I win because I work hard and play good. All I can do is make sure those things carry on and then maybe I will win some more.

"If I got to the French (Open) and keep playing like this, I have a good chance, because nobody has beaten me recently, but I don't know if that's going to happen."

Youthful exuberance has had little to do with the trail of success Nadal has left through the showpiece clay courts of the world this year. He may be a player who has come of age since scoring the pivotal win over world No.2 Andy Roddick that heralded Spain's victory in last December's Davis Cup final. But he is at ease with the situation, and although Roger Federer is the world's top-ranked male player and Gaston Gaudio the defending champion, it is the boy with the body and mind of a grown man who is expected to lift the Coupe des Mousquetaires in three weeks.

Yet those closest to Nadal remain amazed by the demeanour of the player who started the year ranked outside the world's top 50 and is now No.5.

"He just doesn't seem affected or bothered by it all," says his agent, Carlos Costa, a top-10 player in the early 1990s who says he is now far busier dealing with the business side of sport's newest superstar.

"I notice no pressure in his mind, just a maturity that I have never seen in somebody so young."

Benito Perez-Barbadillo, the ATP's director of communications and Latin relations, agrees, but adds: "Watching the way he handles everything to do with his tennis, you would never realise how introverted he can be off the court. Rafa is the most famous thing ever to happen in his home town of Manacor, but when he goes home he is still shy when it comes to talking to the girls he likes. He can do whatever he likes on a tennis court, but back home, being a normal teenager, he has the same problems as so many other kids."

Perhaps the French Open title and its potential financial rewards might improve his attraction, although Nadal is already doing pretty well in that department, with career prizemoney to date of more than $US2million. He is following a proud Spanish tradition, established more than 40 years ago by Manolo Santana and repeated by Andres Gimeno, Sergi Bruguera, Carlos Moya, Albert Costa and Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Yet Nadal riles at the suggestion that it has always been his ambition to follow this line of succession. "Nunca (never)," he snaps. "It is wrong to think so high at a young age. It is not clever for me to hear what the people are saying about me going to Roland Garros this year. Right now I'm just thinking if I lose, it's because nobody can win every week.

"If I don't win another match this year, I will have accomplished the goal I set in January of getting into the top 20 in 2005. Last year it was the same, I just wanted to win my first ATP tournament and I did that in August after missing three months.

"Then there was Davis Cup final, and now to win Masters Series finals twice against a player like (Guillermo) Coria, who people said was the best in the world on clay last year, is a great thing.

"But I know I won't be able to keep playing like this all the time. It is not normal to win the sort of matches I have been winning. I know a bad patch will come. The important thing is that this will be my first year playing in Paris, not my last."

Such a defence mechanism is understandable. Public expectation has long been a factor in Nadal's life. Almost from the time he chose to concentrate on tennis rather than football at 12, he has been the focus of media attention in his homeland.

The consensus among those who know first-hand what it takes to succeed at Roland Garros is he will return to Majorca as French champion. Even Coria, perfectly qualified to make a dispassionate judgment between Nadal and Federer after losing to both recently, is insistent: "Sometimes you think Roger is impossible to beat, but of the two, Rafa is far the stronger on clay."

The Sunday Times

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,15355617%255E2722,00.html

Argentine girl
05-21-2005, 05:02 AM
http://www.as.com/articulo.html?d_date=20050521&xref=20050521dasdaimas_11&type=Tes&anchor=dasmas

]"RAFA NADAL MARCARÁ UNA ÉPOCA EN EL TENIS MUNDIAL[/U]"
Manolo Santana

Nos invade la Nadalmanía ¿Sorprendido?
No, en absoluto. Tuve la visión de darle hace dos años la invitación para que disputara el Masters Series de Madrid. Es un ganador. De Rafa me gusta todo: cómo lleva la popularidad, su naturalidad y cómo se ha quitado de encima el sambenito de ser favorito para ganar Roland Garros. Me impresiona su humildad y como se manifiesta.

¿Cree que este año ya será el número uno del mundo?
Está muy cerca de serlo. Su presente es fantástico y su futuro no se puede predecir. Lo tiene todo para triunfar y por su ambición marcará una época en el tenis mundial; seguro. Es un superdotado. Además, mientras que para otros es un martirio disputarlo, le ilusiona ganar Wimbledon. Y algún día lo ganará.

Nadal debe mejorar en...
Tiene que perfeccionar su volea y mejorar su servicio. Todo lo demás es formidable: su juego desde el fondo de la pista, el revés, la derecha... Y tiene un toque extraordinario para hacer las dejadas.

Parece que fuera el mánager del mallorquín.
Desde hace años he seguido su evolución y sabía que iba a triunfar. Y me encanta todo lo que rodea a Nadal: su entorno familiar, su naturalidad, sus entrenadores, su preparación física... Y es que por muy bueno que sea un jugador, como no tenga el entorno adecuado, se va al garete.

¿Nadal será el mejor tenista de las últimas décadas?
Para serlo todavía tiene que ganar muchas cosas, un Grand Slam como Moyá o Ferrero. Por cierto no entiendo como algunos ya descartan a Juan Carlos cuando es un jugador como la copa de un pino. No obstante espero que algún día Nadal llegue a ser tan bueno y regular como Federer.

¿Qué le falta para ser como el campeón suizo?
Tiempo, experiencia y madurez. ¡Si solo tiene 18 años! Para ser como Federer hay que ganar el US Open, Australia, Wimbledon... Lo bueno es que tiene el entorno ideal y está muy arropado para conseguirlo.

Y en Roland Garros otra vez se hablará español
Seguro. Nuestros jugadores se superan en París y siempre dan la talla. Es un torneo que se nos da bien: Bruguera, Albert Costa, Moyá, Ferrero... Federer lo tiene todo, pero mi favorito es español: Nadal, Moyá si está recuperado, Ferrero... Cualquiera de ellos.

¿Le afectará a Nadal disputar los partidos a cinco sets?
Hay que verlo. Contra Coria en Montecarlo ganó muy justito. Aunque el entorno mediático de Roland Garros es muy especial no creo que le afecte la presión. Si Rafa es fuerte fuera de la pista lo puede ganar.

Duarte es el nuevo director técnico del tenis español.
No opino. Si Pedro Muñoz le ha nombrado es porque creerá que es bueno y le va a ayudar.

En septiembre España se juega en Italia la permanencia en la Copa Davis.
Vamos a ganar seguro. Hoy por hoy, juguemos donde juguemos, somos superiores a los tenistas italianos.

Daniela_CABJ
05-22-2005, 04:56 AM
Solo Tenis Magazine - May 2005
hope you like it!
Sorry I could't scan the whole poster! it was too big!

casillas_girl
05-22-2005, 01:33 PM
Hey guys,

there's an interview with Rafa on the Eurosport website!!!
http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/e7332/multimedia_lng0_spo57_evt7332.shtml

tousledbaby
05-29-2005, 10:17 PM
Hey I just scanned an interview with Rafa. Its in german and the translation will follow.

adelaide
05-29-2005, 10:21 PM
Thanks! those look great :)

tousledbaby
05-29-2005, 10:21 PM
So here is the translation of the interview. I hope you can understand everthing, because my English is really bad:sad:.

adelaide
05-29-2005, 10:26 PM
your english is just fine! thanks so much :):):) :hug:

Proposals of marriage?
Rafa: No. (laughs)
:lol:

~EMiLiTA~
05-30-2005, 12:58 PM
danke für den interessanten Artikel tousledbaby!!! und dein Englisch ist sehr gut...mach dir keine Sorgen!!!

this bit was pretty interesting:

You are in Spain No. 1 and you have outpace all your compatriots. Do you feel any envy from the other players?

Rafa: From most players not. They are just pleased with me. But there are some enviers,too. I will not tell names. I don’t care.

Iza
05-30-2005, 04:07 PM
Enviers :( this is bad... they should all be proud of Rafa :kiss:

ayena
06-01-2005, 04:51 PM
Cash: Nadal will be a king

- I don't care anymore that I had lost with 14 year old kid - said Pat Cash in his last interwiev for "The Sunday Times". 40 year old Australian who had won Wimbledon and Australian Open met with Rafael Nadal in 2001 at Mallorca. Cash was about to play in final of oldboy tournament with Boris Becker, but German got injury. - People had paid, match has to be played - tells Cash - Organizators picked up some boy saying: "That is the best tennis player on island". I was in pretty good shape and I weren't even thinking that I can loose. However I have never seen player who is so determinated and is so great fighter. Lleyton Hewitt with his famous "c'mon" is no one when you see Nadal. Spanish looked like a kid but he was playing like an adult. I was furious after that match. Later I understand that I have lost with someone incredible and unusual. They also told me that Nadal didn't liked to play with people in his age. He thought that matches with "kids" are waste of time. Today everyone are afraid of him and he's not afraid of anyone. And that's good. When he'll win Roland Garros I can tell that I was beaten by king. - said Cash at the end.

adelaide
06-01-2005, 10:44 PM
oh lord :rolls:

Nadal tackles English, one word at a time
Associated Press

PARIS (AP) - Rafael Nadal of Spain seems to get better with every match, and his English is improving, too.

"I'd like to thank the public for supporting me," he said after his latest victory at the French Open.
The phrase could come in handy if the 18-year-old Nadal, who faces top-seeded Roger Federer in Thursday's semifinals, winds up on the winner's stand Sunday.

Speaking English will help the marketability in the United States of the sport's newest star. While Nadal's hectic schedule leaves little time for formal language lessons, he learns a lot from the locker room.

"He invents words. He speaks a funny Spanglish of his own," said Benito Perez-Barbadillo, ATP Tour director of communications and Latin American relations, who has become one of Nadal's language coaches. "From there he learns because they make fun of him in the locker room."

In postmatch news conferences, the charismatic young player switches between languages. Often, he starts in English and apologetically asks after a couple questions if it's OK to speak Spanish.

Nadal told one recent news conference he was feeling a bit "mareated."

"What he meant was mareado. In Spanish, it means dizzy," Perez-Barbadillo said. "Every day he learns a new word."

Pronunciation is something else he's working on.

"In Rome he said, 'I want to thank the poo-blic.' I told him 'public,"' Perez-Barbadillo said. "'They apoyar me.' He wanted to thank the public for supporting him."'

Nadal's competitive drive and ambition help his language skills.

"He wants to learn and do better, like he does on the court," Perez-Barbadillo said.

Nadal is doing pretty well on court with 22 straight wins, all on clay. He's seeking his sixth title of the year in his first French Open.

Nadal's biggest test comes Thursday when he faces Federer, who is 46-2 with six titles this year.

Federer, 23, speaks fluent German, Swiss-German, French and English. But being a linguist is time-consuming, often turning his news conferences into marathons.

Federer starts with English language print media, then French, followed by German. Then radio journalists arrive, followed by TV cameras.

"It really does take a long time for me," Federer said. "Every language I would say, takes 10 or 15 minutes. So it's a little bit of a problem. But I think I owe that to the fans and the experts and the game itself. So for me it's no problem to invest say an hour every day."

knight_ley
06-01-2005, 11:31 PM
:haha:

tousledbaby
06-02-2005, 09:21 AM
great article:):):)

~EMiLiTA~
06-02-2005, 11:41 AM
awwww that is just too cute...hey i'll give him english lessons anytime!!

chocc0
06-02-2005, 12:03 PM
awwww that is just too cute...hey i'll give him english lessons anytime!!
damn straight and he can teach me spanish :devil:

Carlita
06-02-2005, 10:15 PM
:hug: aaaaaaaaaaw!!!!! sweeeeeeeet :)

Iza
06-04-2005, 04:58 PM
:haha: what a nice article! yeay Rafa :yeah:

jazz_girl
06-07-2005, 12:28 PM
I've just translated this part of an article for the David fans, but I thought you might like to read it as well :)
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/710733
Latin Impact
The Spanish tennis player Nadal will participate with Nalbandian in a promotion campaigne in the USA.


Nadal will also be in sight for being one of latin tennis impact faces. There's an expansion plan intended to new markets. David Newman, in charge of the US Open Public Relations, announced that an agressive campaigne will start in different comunications media to promote non american players.
And the estimated investment is of 3.000.000 dollars. Apart from the logic presence of Nadal, the king of Paris, there are two spanish speaking players: the argentine David Nalbandian and the also spanish Carlos Moyá.

~EMiLiTA~
06-07-2005, 12:33 PM
thanks!!! so that will be around the time of the US Open?

jazz_girl
06-07-2005, 12:37 PM
Apparently, and in addition they'll make some sort of reality show with Agassi, Roddick, Davenport, Sharapova, Kuztnesova, Safin, Federer, Henin and Ancic. :lol:
I hope I can get to see that! But it looks like the Zabaleta tv show.

~EMiLiTA~
06-07-2005, 12:39 PM
yeah! i read that in the Spanish article too! sounds interesting!!

Iza
06-07-2005, 12:42 PM
i am sure i won't see it :bigcry: :mad:

But it's good that they wanna promote non-american players...cos while I was in the States all I saw was Agassi, Andy, Dent, Fish, Robby, Blake, the Bryan bros and the really boring Lisa Raymond :yawn: :yawn: !!! Not to mention the Williamses :rolleyes: !

jazz_girl
06-07-2005, 12:43 PM
I don't think I'll get to see it either :sad:

jazz_girl
06-07-2005, 12:55 PM
I forgot to show you this as well:
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=1791838&postcount=631

jazz_girl
06-08-2005, 01:28 PM
I don't know if Atenea has already told you this, but Juan Monaco gave an interview for ESPN yesterday and he told many things about Rafa. Apparently they've comitted to play doubles together in Bastaad, but since every time they see each other they start laughing, it will be hard to concentrate. He also said that Rafa invited him to his house, and they'll probably spend a lot of time playing Play Station, golf or something else.
He also said that they play to the Play Station every time they meet, and during the AO, they played together against Robredo and his PT, and since they lost they had to do a dare: it was to go to the lobby in their underwear and do some push-ups. Apparently, this situation was even worse for Rafa because the DC captains were all in a meeting right there :lol:

adelaide
06-08-2005, 01:45 PM
I don't know if Atenea has already told you this, but Juan Monaco gave an interview for ESPN yesterday and he told many things about Rafa. Apparently they've comitted to play doubles together in Bastaad, but since every time they see each other they start laughing, it will be hard to concentrate. He also said that Rafa invited him to his house, and they'll probably spend a lot of time playing Play Station, golf or something else.
He also said that they play to the Play Station every time they meet, and during the AO, they played together against Robredo and his PT, and since they lost they had to do a dare: it was to go to the lobby in their underwear and do some push-ups. Apparently, this situation was even worse for Rafa because the DC captains were all in a meeting right there :lol:
that is pure gold :rolls: Thanks Jazz! :D

knight_ley
06-08-2005, 02:54 PM
I don't know if Atenea has already told you this, but Juan Monaco gave an interview for ESPN yesterday and he told many things about Rafa. Apparently they've comitted to play doubles together in Bastaad, but since every time they see each other they start laughing, it will be hard to concentrate. He also said that Rafa invited him to his house, and they'll probably spend a lot of time playing Play Station, golf or something else.
He also said that they play to the Play Station every time they meet, and during the AO, they played together against Robredo and his PT, and since they lost they had to do a dare: it was to go to the lobby in their underwear and do some push-ups. Apparently, this situation was even worse for Rafa because the DC captains were all in a meeting right there :lol:


:haha: That is great! thanks for that! :lol:

connectolove
06-16-2005, 09:20 AM
Boy, oh boy! Rafa will become such a publicity icon! I don't know if this is good though. I guess for tennis.

I thought that the idea of the reality show was a joke until I read the article, how nut!

chocc0
06-16-2005, 09:41 AM
I don't know if Atenea has already told you this, but Juan Monaco gave an interview for ESPN yesterday and he told many things about Rafa. Apparently they've comitted to play doubles together in Bastaad, but since every time they see each other they start laughing, it will be hard to concentrate. He also said that Rafa invited him to his house, and they'll probably spend a lot of time playing Play Station, golf or something else.
He also said that they play to the Play Station every time they meet, and during the AO, they played together against Robredo and his PT, and since they lost they had to do a dare: it was to go to the lobby in their underwear and do some push-ups. Apparently, this situation was even worse for Rafa because the DC captains were all in a meeting right there :lol:
:haha: thats class!

Saumon
06-16-2005, 12:36 PM
He also said that they play to the Play Station every time they meet, and during the AO, they played together against Robredo and his PT, and since they lost they had to do a dare: it was to go to the lobby in their underwear and do some push-ups. Apparently, this situation was even worse for Rafa because the DC captains were all in a meeting right there :lol:
:drool:

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 02:49 PM
News
June 16, 2005
ATP Insider - For the Week ending June 17, 2005

->> – NADALMANIA … RAFAEL NADAL returned home to Spain last week, and he found the country still buzzing over his Roland Garros triumph. The 19-year-old spent last Friday fulfilling a number of media and sponsor obligations. His day included a press conference as well as round table interviews with various radio and television stations and a lunch with the Spanish tennis media. Nadal also did one-on-one interviews with The Daily Telegraph , CNN International, Reuters TV, People Magazine , VOGUE Spain , MARCA , Sport, El Periodico and Mundo Deportivo. In addition, this week's Time magazine profile Nadal in a story called “Court Conquistador.” “Men's tennis can get giddy once again,” proclaimed the story. “With his powerful ground strokes, hunky looks and seductive playfulness – not to mention the fluorescent shirts and white Capri pants – Nadal could give tennis its next real box-office star.”

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/Insider_0617.asp

Mimi
06-18-2005, 04:14 AM
thanks rogifan88 for the article, poor nadal, now he has little time to leave for fishing or other activities :mad: :p

News
June 16, 2005
ATP Insider - For the Week ending June 17, 2005

->> – NADALMANIA … RAFAEL NADAL returned home to Spain last week, and he found the country still buzzing over his Roland Garros triumph. The 19-year-old spent last Friday fulfilling a number of media and sponsor obligations. His day included a press conference as well as round table interviews with various radio and television stations and a lunch with the Spanish tennis media. Nadal also did one-on-one interviews with The Daily Telegraph , CNN International, Reuters TV, People Magazine , VOGUE Spain , MARCA , Sport, El Periodico and Mundo Deportivo. In addition, this week's Time magazine profile Nadal in a story called “Court Conquistador.” “Men's tennis can get giddy once again,” proclaimed the story. “With his powerful ground strokes, hunky looks and seductive playfulness – not to mention the fluorescent shirts and white Capri pants – Nadal could give tennis its next real box-office star.”

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/Insider_0617.asp

crimson
06-18-2005, 02:58 PM
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1509442,00.html

Nadal thrives on home help

Family team behind the remarkable Spaniard hope to guide him to his great dream of victory in SW19

Stephen Bierley and Peter Jenson
Saturday June 18, 2005
The Guardian

Rafael Nadal's mum, Ana María, had other things on her mind on the Sunday that her 19-year-old son was playing in the French Open final. "I watch him on court and the way he behaves is the way he behaves in life - all heart, very responsible, hard-working and much more mature than most boys his age. But he is very untidy and disorganised. On the day of the final I went into his room and I was shocked ... it was a complete mess."
Unlike the rest of his life. At the beginning of this year Rafa was ranked outside the top 50 with one title. Now, after less than six months, the young Spaniard is the French champion, the winner of five other titles, including the Monte Carlo and Italian Opens, and poised to challenge Roger Federer for the world No1 spot. It has been a remarkable rise.

The Nadals are a close-knit family. As Rafa's manager, Carlos Costa, puts it: "They have not only educated him to be a mature tennis player but also to be a mature person." The head of the family is Nadal's grandfather, also called Rafael. Heis a musician, the director of the orchestra in his home town of Manacor in Mallorca.

He wanted his five children to live close by him so bought a stretch of land at Puerto Cristo on the Mediterranean coast where Rafa lives with his dad, Sebastián, his mum, and his sister, Maribel. The extended family live in the same complex, including his three uncles: Rafael, who played third division football in Spain, and Miguel Angel, an uncompromising defender in Johan Cruyff's Barcelona team that won four Spanish titles and the 1992 European Cup.

However, it has been Uncle Toni, a top-30 Spanish tennis pro in the 80s, who has been the major influence. As Nadal's grandfather recalled: "Rafael was a good attacking midfielder who could play the perfect pass and score goals. He could easily have chosen football but with advice from his Uncle Toni it was decided that he would go further with a racket in his hand than with a ball at his feet."

He was bought his first racket at four. "I was amazed at how well he handled it," Uncle Miguel remembered. "Even though it weighed more than he did." By eight years old Rafa had won his first title - the Community of Baleares under-12s, a victory gained by playing all of his shots two-handed.

But it was not something of which his uncle Toni approved. "Have you ever seen a great tennis player playing with two hands?" he asked, and so Nadal began practising his forehand shots with his stronger right hand. It was then that Toni encouraged his ambidextrous nephew to play his forehand shots with his slightly weaker left hand. This gave him the full weight of his powerful right arm behind his double-fisted backhand.

Jofre Porta, who worked at the same tennis club and now forms part of Rafa's coaching team, was one of the first to notice his raw power. "He was just brutal. The first time I saw him I could see he was going to be a great player. It didn't take much for him to master playing with his left hand because he was so disciplined. He would sometimes deliberately play to his weaknesses so as to improve them even at the expense of winning matches."

At 12 Nadal reached the final of Europe's most prestigious under-14s tournament in Barbès, France and two years later the Spanish federation offered him the chance to train in Barcelona. He turned it down, feeling more comfortable with his Uncle Toni, Porta and Carlos Moyá, the 1998 French Open champion, who was also born in Mallorca.

In 2000 Rafa was chosen as a flag bearer at the Davis Cup final in Barcelona when Spain won the trophy for the first time against Australia. But the public in Spain took no more notice of him than those at Wimbledon two years ago when, as a 17-year-old, Nadal reached the third round, the youngest man to advance that far at the All England Club since a 16-year-old Boris Becker in 1984.

Last year he won his first ATP title at Sopot, while also becoming the youngest man in the history of the Davis Cup to win a singles match in a final for the winning team, his victory over Andy Roddick giving Spain the momentum to defeat the US. His aptitude to play at his best on the big occasion was immediately apparent, though few would have guessed how quickly he would rise this year.

Some already worry that his star may burn brightly but briefly in the tennis firmament. Not Toni and the family. "Once when he had just won a big tournament I spent the whole night going over the match in my head," said Costa. "But Toni and Rafa had forgotten about it almost immediately and were talking about other things besides tennis."

His grandfather further highlights the relaxed relationship between Rafa and Toni. "He was playing one of his first matches against a professional and his uncle told him: 'Don't worry, just stay calm and relaxed. If things don't go well I will make it rain and get the game stopped.' Rafa was behind and then pulled back to level, and it started raining. He went over to his uncle and said: 'It's OK, you can stop the rain. I think I can beat this guy.'"

Grandad Rafael led the cheering in Manacor when the French Open final was beamed live to the town's 30,000 residents on a huge screen in the main square. "We buy the newspapers and then we notice that some of the pages seem to have gone missing," says Rafa's auntie, María Elena, of her father's habit of keeping all Rafa's cuttings.

For all the natural exuberance of Nadal's play on court - the fist-pumping, the bounding leaps, and the stentorian shouts of "Vamos", there is nothing of the brat about his behaviour. "He has never broken a racket in anger," said Toni. "It would be showing a lack of respect to people who actually have to buy the equipment to play the sport."

"It's a long road ahead. He has to keep his feet on the ground and his head out of the clouds," said his grandfather. "But he will. He has always been someone who is able to come off the court happier having lost and played well than having won and played badly. And you know something else - despite being a clay-court player his great dream has always been to win the title at Wimbledon."

Rising star

June 3 1986 Born in Mallorca, Spain

September 2001 Aged 15, reaches second round at Seville Challenger, turns professional

April 2002 Wins first ATP match, becoming only ninth player in open era to do so before age of 16

January 2003 Reaches final in Hamburg ATP tournament without dropping a set, loses to Mario Ancic in final

June 2003 At 17 becomes youngest player to reach third round at Wimbledon since Becker (aged 16) in 1984

September 2004 Wins first ATP singles title at Sopot, Poland

December 2004 Wins Davis Cup, becomes youngest player ever to record singles victory in cup final, beating Andy Roddick in four sets

February-May 2005 Wins five ATP singles titles

May 2005 Wins French Open to become youngest winner of a major since 1989. First player since 1982 to win French title on debut. Undefeated in 24 matches during clay-court season.

linny28grace
06-18-2005, 03:59 PM
a very nice article! thanks

casillas_girl
06-18-2005, 07:36 PM
I've read an article in a dutch tennis magazine and Rafa said in that article that he's addicted to chocolate and that he sometimes eat so much of it that he gets sick of it!!! :lol:
How cute, still a little boy!!! :kiss:

Jennay
06-19-2005, 01:33 AM
That was a fantastic article. Thank you very much, crimson.

:worship: :bowdown: To Rafa's family for keeping him so level-headed.

Eruwen
06-19-2005, 08:00 AM
His grandfather further highlights the relaxed relationship between Rafa and Toni. "He was playing one of his first matches against a professional and his uncle told him: 'Don't worry, just stay calm and relaxed. If things don't go well I will make it rain and get the game stopped.' Rafa was behind and then pulled back to level, and it started raining. He went over to his uncle and said: 'It's OK, you can stop the rain. I think I can beat this guy.'" :lol: That's so sweet! It's nice to know he has that team behind him, watching over him. Please don't ever change Rafa! :hug:

desdemona
06-21-2005, 12:35 AM
http://vamosrafael.smugmug.com/gallery/598648/1/25494114/Original
Hey guys I'm new (as u might figure out since I have not posted on these boards before.). But, anyways, I was just browsing around on VamosRafael when I found the article. Enjoy and sry if it's been posted here before!

veyonce
06-21-2005, 06:16 AM
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/deuce_exclusive_4.asp

It will be available this week!! Exclusive excerpt on Rafael Nadal from Summer's Issue Of Deuce:-

Rafael Nadal: Spain's Raging Bull

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/nadal_deuce.jpg

From DEUCE, Summer 2005:

By Pedro Hernandez

The kid’s timing, like his shotmaking, is impeccable. Just when it appeared that Roger Federer would dominate the game for the foreseeable future, young Rafael Nadal appeared in a blaze of orange to shake the sport’s foundation.

Boasting the muscular body of a kick boxer and a lethal left-handed forehand that he rips with ruthless brutality, the shaggy-haired Spaniard is an intimidating force despite his tender age—he turned 19 on June 3, when he dispatched Federer in the Roland Garros semifinals. Complemented by an eye-popping outfit of white pirate pants and sleeveless green and orange shirts that showcase his bulging biceps and Mediterranean complexion, Nadal is unquestionably the hottest personality in the game, if not all of sport.

By spring 2005, after dismantling nearly everyone who dared face him on clay, the then-18-year-old had become the youngest player in the ATP’s Top 5 since Michael Chang 16 years prior. That was before Roland Garros, where he stormed to the title in his first appearance, rocketing himself into the world’s Top 3, and creating a wave of attention that the sport hasn’t seen since 1985, when Boris Becker won Wimbledon at age 17. “My only secret is that I like this sport, I like getting better every day,” says Nadal. “Then, once I’m on court, there is no other secret but to fight ’til the end.

“I’m just a young guy who plays tennis, and I like to see people enjoy themselves and have a good time when I’m on the court. I’d like to shake all of their hands, give them all the autographs they are asking me for, but it is impossible.” As he talks he looks at his arms, lined with the marks from the felt-tips of the fans who swarmed him after one of his matches, while security guards scrambled to get him to the locker room.

Nadal mastered tennis with amazing precocity. Boys his own age couldn’t challenge him, and he couldn’t have cared less about the birth certificates—or the résumés—of the rest. “I remember that he came to my academy one day, when he was barely 12 years old,” says Emilio Sanchez Vicario about his first encounter with Nadal. “I rallied with him for a while and we decided to play a set. Each time he won a point, he celebrated as if it was the best one of his life, and when we changed sides, he didn’t look at me at all. He had one desire and that was to beat me.”

That fire is nothing new to Carlos Moya, Nadal’s friend from the Spanish island of Mallorca, with whom Nadal has an almost brotherly relationship. “A few years ago I asked him if he would like to have a career like mine,” Moya says. “He looked at me with the sincerity that you usually find in small children and said, quite seriously, that he aspired to more. And I knew that he would be a better player than I.”

What's In DEUCE Magazine Summer Issue? (http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/deuce_exclusive_3.asp)

Argentine girl
06-24-2005, 11:58 AM
Ya es el más popular de España

Rafa desbancó a Alonso en la encuesta sobre los preferidos de la afición deportiva

Efe / Á. R. / MADRID / LONDRES


24/06/05 03:00 h.La eclosión internacional de Rafa Nadal, sellada sobre todo con su reciente triunfo en Roland Garros, le ha convertido en el deportista más popular y admirado en España, según los datos de junio del barómetro mensual elaborado por la firma Havas Sports, firma de márketing deportivo integrada en la empresa Media Planning Group (MPG). El tenista manacorense, nº 3 del ránking mundial y ganador de seis torneos en 2005, encabeza ambas encuestas por delante del piloto asturiano Fernando Alonso, que era el primer clasificado en mayo avalado por sus victorias y su liderato en el Mundial de Fórmula-1.

Nadal, de 19 años, ocupó el mes pasado la 6ª posición en términos de popularidad con un 16,24% de votos, pero su primera victoria en un torneo del Grand Slam le ha catapultado a lo más alto de la lista con un 46,34%, mejor que Alonso (41,88%) y los futbolistas Raúl, Ronaldinho, Beckham y Ronaldo, el delantero del Real Madrid que ha bajado de la 2ª plaza de mayo a la 6ª de junio. Los pilotos de motociclismo Dani Pedrosa (7º) y Sete Gibernau (13º) y el jugador de basket Pau Gasol (12º) son los otras figuras no futbolistas en la lista de los 15 deportistas más populares en España. En admiración, Nadal fue 3º en mayo (4,99%), pero ha subido en junio al primer lugar (18,43%) por delante de Alonso, Ronaldinho –el 'crack' del Barça–, Pedrosa, Raúl, Zidane, Casillas, Ronaldo, Eto'o y Carles Puyol.

“Estoy agradecido a todos. Es un halago que la gente esté pendiente de mí y se interese por mí. Son cosas que yo valoro mucho”, comentó ayer Rafa sobre su nº 1 en popularidad y admiración

Would someone please translate this article to me?

Castafiore
06-24-2005, 12:28 PM
This is what the Google Language Tool feature comes up with:

He is already most popular of Spain Rafa supplanted to Alonso in the survey on the favourites of the sport liking

Efe/Á. R./MADRID/LONDON
24/06/05 03:00 h.

La international appearance of Rafa Nadal, sealed mainly with its recent triumph in Roland Garros, has turned to him the most popular and admired sportsman in Spain, according to the data of June of the monthly barometer elaborated by the company Havas Sports, sport company/signature of márketing integrated in the company Media Planning Group (MPG).
The manacorense tennis player, nº 3 of ránking world-wide and winning of six matches in 2005, heads both surveys in front of the Asturian pilot Fernando Alonso, who was first classified in May guaranteed by his victories and their leadership in the World-wide one of Formula-1.

Nadal, of 19 years, occupied the last month 6ª position in terms of popularity with a 16.24% of votes, but his first victory in a match of the Grand Slam has to him catapult to highest of the list with a 46.34%, better than Alonso (41,88%) and the soccer players Raul, Ronaldinho, Beckham and Ronaldo, the forward of the Real Madrid that has lowered of 2ª May seat 6ª of June.
The pilots of motociclismo Dani Pedrosa (7º) and Sete Gibernau (13º) and the player of basket Pau Gasol (12º) are the other figures nonsoccer players in the list of the 15 more popular sportsmen in Spain.
In admiration, Nadal was 3º in May (4,99%), but has raised in June the first place (18,43%) in front of Alonso, Ronaldinho - ' crack' of the Barça -, Pedrosa, Raul, Zidane, Squares, Ronaldo, Etóo and Carles Puyol.

"I am been thankful to all. It is a flattery that people are pending of me and she is interested in me. They are things that I value much ", commented yesterday Rafa on his nº 1 in popularity and admiration

Castafiore
06-26-2005, 10:45 AM
Quite an article this, from a man who seems quite taken by Nadal:
I want a cashmere armband and a pair of Nadalians

Bud Collins
Sunday June 26, 2005
The Observer

Did Rafael Nadal's tailor make his shorts too long or his trousers too short? We are left to ponder this sartorial teaser at least until the US Open two months' hence. Then it should be clear whether the piratical pantaloons will complete a circumnavigational groan slam that began in Australia where he almost beat Lleyton Hewitt, and continued through his French championship.
Many were the traditionalists' groans of disapproval, similar to those heard in 1919 when the French goddess, Suzanne Lenglen, raised her hemline (and much British blood pressure), flashing calf, even thigh, liberating female colleagues from whalebone corsets while winning the first of her six Wimbledons.

But many more this year were the ecstatic groans of maidens (and otherwise) who would gladly embrace the beguiling Spanish lad in whatever he is or isn't wearing.
'He's a cuddly puppy dog with those soulful eyes,' suggested an American woman saddened by his departure from the Big W. All right, but a great-dane puppy, wouldn't you say. Alas, he is gone for a year. Of the passing parade of first-week losers, I miss most ' El Niño ', the kid, the storm out of Mallorca.

Oh, of course I'll miss Tiny Tim, and the daily soap opera, 'As the Henman Turns/Yearns/Burns'. And I've ordered a black cashmere armband from Turnbull & Asser out of respect. (Wouldn't his clothier, Adidas, be well advised to put Henman hairshirts, with polo collars, on the market for the faithful?)

We from the Colonies were never able to understand how much one tennis player could mean to these isles. John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, whether enraging or engaging, never had that kind of grip on their compatriots.

But Henman is the past. Nadal is the future. And young Murray? He reminded some of us colonial ignoramuses (namely me) that he is a Scot. Not to be confused with anything English, although he generously lends his body to an otherwise English enterprise called the British Davis Cup team. Should he come along as well as Henman, can you doubt that Scotch will be an added ingredient in Pimm's Cup?

But Nadal. I thought he would go farther, and so did he - although I can't imagine why the committee seeded a man with so little grass experience (four matches) as high as fourth. Totally illogical. Still, he did deliver one decent win, over seasoned world number 41 Vinnie Spadea, before falling to the left-handed Luxembourger Gilles Muller in four sets. Who knew that Luxembourg was large enough to contain a tennis court? Further, Nadal, who had defeated another southpaw, Mariano Puerta, to capture the French title, learned that left-handedness on green grass is a much dirtier proposition than on the crimson dirt.

But he will learn. That's one of the things I like about Nadal. He was eager to write his own tale of two cities, knowing full well that the guillotine awaited him at the London end. He wanted to assault those grassblades to see if they'd slash him back, which they did. But that only made him more anxious to return.

So different from such grassophobes as Guga Kuerten, Albert Costa and Gaston Gaudio, recent winners of the French who ducked the hazardous journey to Wimbledon. Perhaps they dreaded seaward sickness on the Channel as well as chlorophyll poisoning from groundsman Seaward's lawn.

Whatever the excuse, Nadal will never use it. He lusts to be in a class with those who have conquered both Paris and London. His lone countryman to carry it off was Manolo Santana: French '61, '64, Wimbledon '66. Rafael's quest to catch up underlines the greatness of Björn Borg, who Channel-hopped to double-dip, winning both in 1978-79-80, and Rod Laver, doing the same in 1962 and 1969.

I believe Nadal will win Wimbledon one day because he believes it. He has a heart the size of Luxembourg, determination that could paint the White Cliffs of Dover Spanish red and yellow and a rare speed and athleticism.

Gianni Clerici of Italy's La Repubblica , an ex-Wimbledon player and Europe's leading tennis journalist, disagrees. 'Never with those grips.' Beyond the striking of small, yellow rubber balls, Rafael is blessed with the quality that Spaniards call duende. This is flair, style, poise, a certain magnetism. It's one reason Rafa, as he's called, can get away with those raffish leggings. They should be called Nadalians. But anybody else who dons them will be branded a shameless copycat. At least by me.

Loaded with presence, Nadal, on the victory stand after his magnificent triumph in Paris, gestured toward one of his fans among the 15,171 witnesses and introduced the crowd to Juan Carlos, the king of Spain. What teenager - or anybody else for that matter - would be so cool and collected to do that, especially after labouring three hours to reach the moment of his life? His warm, good-humoured personality spills over. Wonderboys have come along periodically in tennis. The Aussies Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall, Borg, Connors, McEnroe, Boris Becker, Michael Chang, Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras. But none with duende at so tender an age as Nadal.

On alien ground, separated from his native clay, he hasn't the knack for grass yet. He says: 'I need improve my serve, my volley, my confidence in grass. And my English. I think when I improve a lot of myself I can won a lot of matches here because I am fast.'

He will. Nadal plans to 'build a grass court near my home in Mallorca'. There's a guy who really wants to get ahead. Mallorca isn't that far from Trafalgar. But Rafa won't be celebrating the current anniversary of Lord Nelson's last battle because Spanish sailors (probably early wearers of Nadalians) were one of the losing sides. That was 200 years ago. They won't lose often these days wherever Nadal is involved.

Admired by men, fantasised by women, El Niño has blown out of town leaving them panting.

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2005/story/0,16055,1515063,00.html

veyonce
06-27-2005, 03:10 AM
Telegraph
27 June 2005
By Sarah Edworthy

What a funny article... ;)

Shorts taken in

Result! Rafael Nadal's shorts will go down in history. Following an appeal made by Radio Wimbledon on behalf of the museum, a plastic dirty laundry bag was surreptitiously dropped into the studio at the weekend. Inside were a pair of Nike Dri-Fit, 100 per cent polyester, GB size 31-33" white shorts, made in Taiwan - complete with grass stain and black felt-pen autograph.

"I've never seen anyone so interested in a pair of dirty shorts," laughed the station editor Steve Butterick, triumphant in procuring the cool Spaniard's pirate shorts for curator Honor Godfrey.

Each year Godfrey collects a time-capsule box of notable items from players. Last year she obtained the outfits worn in the finals by Maria Sharapova and Roger Federer. Number one on her 2005 wish-list was Nadal's kit, particularly the below-the-knee shorts, as they were a length last modelled by Sidney Wood in 1927.

She plans to wash Nadal's shorts by hand, taking care to keep the autograph and stain intact. The fabric would deteriorate faster if left sweat-soaked. They will be on display in the museum later in the summer.


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veyonce
06-27-2005, 03:48 AM
Not sure if this is posted before.. Excerpts from the article:-

The New York Times

A Champion and the People's Champion Fall
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: June 24, 2005

WIMBLEDON, England, June 23 -

The most prominent victim Thursday was Rafael Nadal, the 19-year-old Spaniard who turned the clay courts of the world into his private playground this season, winning four consecutive titles, including his first Grand Slam title at the French Open.

Unlike many of his clay-loving predecessors, Nadal seems genuinely excited by the prospect of plying his trade on grass.

"If Federer can do well on grass hitting topspin from the baseline, why can't I do well someday?" he said earlier this week of Roger Federer, the two-time Wimbledon champion.

But Nadal, though seeded No. 4, was always quick to dismiss his own chances of winning this year, and he proved himself right on Court One by losing to a much more anonymous fellow left-hander, Gilles Muller of Luxemburg, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.

On clay earlier this year, Muller won two games in two sets against Nadal, but on quicker surfaces he is more dangerous, as he demonstrated by reaching the final in Washington on hardcourts last August, defeating Andre Agassi along the way.

Nadal did not sound dejected on Thursday and was even considering the possibility of financing the construction of a natural grass court on his home island, Majorca.

"Not at my house," he said with a laugh. "I don't have a big enough yard. But I think it's something to consider doing because this is such an important tournament, and it would be good to prepare for it the best I can. If you want to be good at something, I think the most important thing is to want it. Winning this tournament will be my goal until the end of my career."


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soso
06-27-2005, 11:16 AM
Telegraph
27 June 2005
By Sarah Edworthy

What a funny article... ;)

Shorts taken in

Result! Rafael Nadal's shorts will go down in history. Following an appeal made by Radio Wimbledon on behalf of the museum, a plastic dirty laundry bag was surreptitiously dropped into the studio at the weekend. Inside were a pair of Nike Dri-Fit, 100 per cent polyester, GB size 31-33" white shorts, made in Taiwan - complete with grass stain and black felt-pen autograph.

"I've never seen anyone so interested in a pair of dirty shorts," laughed the station editor Steve Butterick, triumphant in procuring the cool Spaniard's pirate shorts for curator Honor Godfrey.

Each year Godfrey collects a time-capsule box of notable items from players. Last year she obtained the outfits worn in the finals by Maria Sharapova and Roger Federer. Number one on her 2005 wish-list was Nadal's kit, particularly the below-the-knee shorts, as they were a length last modelled by Sidney Wood in 1927.

She plans to wash Nadal's shorts by hand, taking care to keep the autograph and stain intact. The fabric would deteriorate faster if left sweat-soaked. They will be on display in the museum later in the summer.


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Great article :wavey:

It's the size "31-33" of Rafael :confused:

veyonce
06-27-2005, 05:14 PM
Wimbledon Official Website
Monday, 27 June, 2005

Nadal Consigns His Togs to Posterity

French Open champion Rafael Nadal has lost his trousers in his bid to win the Gentlemen's Singles title at Wimbledon this year.

Rafael, the 6th youngest Grand Slam winner of the open era and first man in 23 years to win the French Open on his debut has agreed to donate his trousers to Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum, to be displayed alongside exhibits such as the Williams' sisters winning dresses and Anna Kournikova's underwear.

The 'pirata' style trousers which Nadal wore at Wimbledon this year were delivered to the museum on Saturday. But Rafael won't be playing future matches without his trousers as he does have another pair.

The pirata pants were recently cited by Honor Godfrey, Curator of the Wimbledon Museum, as the one exhibit she would most like to display in the Museum from this year's Championships.

Honor says of the donation: "We are absolutely delighted that Rafael has decided to give us his trousers - he's the first person to wear three-quarter length trousers on Centre Court since 1927 and a true champion. We are confident that there will be many more firsts from this young man."

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum, located within Centre Court, Wimbledon, is home to what is amongst the world's greatest collections of tennis memorabilia, with the oldest exhibit dating from 1555. Many items are of immense historical importance and some, not least the Championship Trophies, are unique.

Visitors can enjoy the views of Centre Court (outside of The Championship), the audio-visual theatre, and the Gallery, which currently exhibits some real gems from the poster collection from 1890 to 1940.

The Museum does not simply recount the history of the game of tennis, Wimbledon and The Championships, but reflects the state of the current game and champions of today, hopefully providing inspiration to the potential champions of tomorrow.

Outside of the tournament period the Museum runs award-winning behind-the-scenes tours of the grounds for individuals and groups which give access to areas out-of-bounds even during The Championships.

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rue
06-30-2005, 05:29 AM
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1509442,00.html

Nadal thrives on home help

Family team behind the remarkable Spaniard hope to guide him to his great dream of victory in SW19

Stephen Bierley and Peter Jenson
Saturday June 18, 2005
The Guardian

Rafael Nadal's mum, Ana María, had other things on her mind on the Sunday that her 19-year-old son was playing in the French Open final. "I watch him on court and the way he behaves is the way he behaves in life - all heart, very responsible, hard-working and much more mature than most boys his age. But he is very untidy and disorganised. On the day of the final I went into his room and I was shocked ... it was a complete mess."
Unlike the rest of his life. At the beginning of this year Rafa was ranked outside the top 50 with one title. Now, after less than six months, the young Spaniard is the French champion, the winner of five other titles, including the Monte Carlo and Italian Opens, and poised to challenge Roger Federer for the world No1 spot. It has been a remarkable rise.

The Nadals are a close-knit family. As Rafa's manager, Carlos Costa, puts it: "They have not only educated him to be a mature tennis player but also to be a mature person." The head of the family is Nadal's grandfather, also called Rafael. Heis a musician, the director of the orchestra in his home town of Manacor in Mallorca.

He wanted his five children to live close by him so bought a stretch of land at Puerto Cristo on the Mediterranean coast where Rafa lives with his dad, Sebastián, his mum, and his sister, Maribel. The extended family live in the same complex, including his three uncles: Rafael, who played third division football in Spain, and Miguel Angel, an uncompromising defender in Johan Cruyff's Barcelona team that won four Spanish titles and the 1992 European Cup.

However, it has been Uncle Toni, a top-30 Spanish tennis pro in the 80s, who has been the major influence. As Nadal's grandfather recalled: "Rafael was a good attacking midfielder who could play the perfect pass and score goals. He could easily have chosen football but with advice from his Uncle Toni it was decided that he would go further with a racket in his hand than with a ball at his feet."

He was bought his first racket at four. "I was amazed at how well he handled it," Uncle Miguel remembered. "Even though it weighed more than he did." By eight years old Rafa had won his first title - the Community of Baleares under-12s, a victory gained by playing all of his shots two-handed.

But it was not something of which his uncle Toni approved. "Have you ever seen a great tennis player playing with two hands?" he asked, and so Nadal began practising his forehand shots with his stronger right hand. It was then that Toni encouraged his ambidextrous nephew to play his forehand shots with his slightly weaker left hand. This gave him the full weight of his powerful right arm behind his double-fisted backhand.

Jofre Porta, who worked at the same tennis club and now forms part of Rafa's coaching team, was one of the first to notice his raw power. "He was just brutal. The first time I saw him I could see he was going to be a great player. It didn't take much for him to master playing with his left hand because he was so disciplined. He would sometimes deliberately play to his weaknesses so as to improve them even at the expense of winning matches."

At 12 Nadal reached the final of Europe's most prestigious under-14s tournament in Barbès, France and two years later the Spanish federation offered him the chance to train in Barcelona. He turned it down, feeling more comfortable with his Uncle Toni, Porta and Carlos Moyá, the 1998 French Open champion, who was also born in Mallorca.

In 2000 Rafa was chosen as a flag bearer at the Davis Cup final in Barcelona when Spain won the trophy for the first time against Australia. But the public in Spain took no more notice of him than those at Wimbledon two years ago when, as a 17-year-old, Nadal reached the third round, the youngest man to advance that far at the All England Club since a 16-year-old Boris Becker in 1984.

Last year he won his first ATP title at Sopot, while also becoming the youngest man in the history of the Davis Cup to win a singles match in a final for the winning team, his victory over Andy Roddick giving Spain the momentum to defeat the US. His aptitude to play at his best on the big occasion was immediately apparent, though few would have guessed how quickly he would rise this year.

Some already worry that his star may burn brightly but briefly in the tennis firmament. Not Toni and the family. "Once when he had just won a big tournament I spent the whole night going over the match in my head," said Costa. "But Toni and Rafa had forgotten about it almost immediately and were talking about other things besides tennis."

His grandfather further highlights the relaxed relationship between Rafa and Toni. "He was playing one of his first matches against a professional and his uncle told him: 'Don't worry, just stay calm and relaxed. If things don't go well I will make it rain and get the game stopped.' Rafa was behind and then pulled back to level, and it started raining. He went over to his uncle and said: 'It's OK, you can stop the rain. I think I can beat this guy.'"

Grandad Rafael led the cheering in Manacor when the French Open final was beamed live to the town's 30,000 residents on a huge screen in the main square. "We buy the newspapers and then we notice that some of the pages seem to have gone missing," says Rafa's auntie, María Elena, of her father's habit of keeping all Rafa's cuttings.

For all the natural exuberance of Nadal's play on court - the fist-pumping, the bounding leaps, and the stentorian shouts of "Vamos", there is nothing of the brat about his behaviour. "He has never broken a racket in anger," said Toni. "It would be showing a lack of respect to people who actually have to buy the equipment to play the sport."

"It's a long road ahead. He has to keep his feet on the ground and his head out of the clouds," said his grandfather. "But he will. He has always been someone who is able to come off the court happier having lost and played well than having won and played badly. And you know something else - despite being a clay-court player his great dream has always been to win the title at Wimbledon."

Rising star

June 3 1986 Born in Mallorca, Spain

September 2001 Aged 15, reaches second round at Seville Challenger, turns professional

April 2002 Wins first ATP match, becoming only ninth player in open era to do so before age of 16

January 2003 Reaches final in Hamburg ATP tournament without dropping a set, loses to Mario Ancic in final

June 2003 At 17 becomes youngest player to reach third round at Wimbledon since Becker (aged 16) in 1984

September 2004 Wins first ATP singles title at Sopot, Poland

December 2004 Wins Davis Cup, becomes youngest player ever to record singles victory in cup final, beating Andy Roddick in four sets

February-May 2005 Wins five ATP singles titles

May 2005 Wins French Open to become youngest winner of a major since 1989. First player since 1982 to win French title on debut. Undefeated in 24 matches during clay-court season.



Thats a really nice and interesting article there. I believe that his dream of winning Wimbledon will one day come true.

casillas_girl
06-30-2005, 03:44 PM
Thanks for the article!!! It's great!

veyonce
07-04-2005, 07:46 AM
Nadal Has Pull Back Home

Striking while the iron is hot, Rafael Nadal met with the Mayor of Manacor, Toni Pastor, this week. Pastor announced that before the end of the year construction of a tennis complex with eight courts would begin on municipal land. One court would be reserved for the exclusive use of Nadal (hopefully he'll at least let Carlos Moya share). Most of the courts would be clay, but they also left open the possibility of putting in one grass court.

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LaTenista
07-04-2005, 10:34 PM
Thanks for sharing, veyonce! I wonder if the money to build the courts is coming from the government or from Rafa. I think Rafa wouldn't mind others using "his" court as long as they were respectful of it and moved to another court when Rafa is there to practice.

veyonce
07-10-2005, 07:20 AM
Rafael Nadal also made it into Sports Illustrated's double summer issue as part of their featured list of 25 guests (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/magazine/) to their summer party. If you're an SI Extra member, you can read the article at that link.

While in Bastad this week, Rafael Nadal did a photo shoot and interview with Vogue magazine which will run in the September issue. (I'm pretty sure Nadal has never looked at a Vogue magazine - I'm thinking his teenage buddies in Spain will have a fun time teasing him.) :drool:

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parissima
07-10-2005, 11:47 PM
Thanks for the info! I guess that for once, i'm gonna buy the Vogue magazine. What wouldn't i do for Rafa? :p Gotta see the good side of it : we'll have some more beautiful pics of him :)

Fi-Fi
07-11-2005, 01:50 AM
yay! more pics....always a good thing!

Mimi
07-11-2005, 04:52 AM
did nadal get paid for making photos for these magazines :confused: , i think they shuold pay him coz nadal is so busy, he has no time for magazines but training and winning titles :banana: :music:

parissima
07-11-2005, 02:58 PM
mimi, are you talking about the Vogue photoshoot and interview? if so, it's likely Rafa got pretty well paid for these, lol, don't worry.

adelaide
07-11-2005, 07:56 PM
Nadal Has Pull Back Home

Striking while the iron is hot, Rafael Nadal met with the Mayor of Manacor, Toni Pastor, this week. Pastor announced that before the end of the year construction of a tennis complex with eight courts would begin on municipal land. One court would be reserved for the exclusive use of Nadal (hopefully he'll at least let Carlos Moya share). Most of the courts would be clay, but they also left open the possibility of putting in one grass court.
that's a great news... thanks for sharing! hopefully he'll get that grass court :banana:

Mimi
07-12-2005, 03:34 AM
hi parissima :D

yes i am talking about vogue etc, oh happy that he got paid :D
mimi, are you talking about the Vogue photoshoot and interview? if so, it's likely Rafa got pretty well paid for these, lol, don't worry.

veyonce
07-12-2005, 04:47 AM
Can anyone translate this Elpais.es (http://www.elpais.es/articulo.html?d_date=&xref=20050710elpepspor_4&type=Tes&anchor=elpepspor) article??? Thanks.

http://img307.imageshack.us/img307/5885/recorte28ub.th.jpg (http://img307.imageshack.us/my.php?image=recorte28ub.jpg)

Iza
07-12-2005, 09:29 AM
I can't get Vogue magazine here but I'm sure one of you will be very nice :angel: and will scan the pix :hearts: :kiss:

parissima
07-13-2005, 08:13 PM
hey mimi ;) yeah, such a famous boy like Rafa gets paid for making us the honor to appear in magazines, being oh-so-handsome :worship:

anyways, Iza, i could scan the pix for you. I could even get your a copy of the magazine if you want, actually.
but i wonder... when will it come out?

adelaide
07-13-2005, 10:27 PM
it was said to run in the September issue :)

parissima
07-13-2005, 10:37 PM
yeah, i know... but... oh well, i go buy magazines every other day, i'll just have to check at the "Vogue-Elle-Cosmo" corner of the shop to see when the Sept issue comes out. :p

Carlita
07-13-2005, 10:37 PM
Which Vogue would that be??? Spanish? French? American? English?

parissima
07-13-2005, 10:40 PM
Oh... Good question, Lady Carlita... :/
Sometimes the different versions of the magazine have the same contents. Let's hope Rafa'll be in all the Vogue magazines.

Carlita
07-13-2005, 10:48 PM
:) that would be best ;)

veyonce
07-14-2005, 03:31 AM
Can't wait for September's Vogue issue...

RogiFan88
07-14-2005, 10:38 PM
maybe it'll be the new Men's Vogue

alsace
07-15-2005, 01:25 AM
Can anyone translate this Elpais.es (http://www.elpais.es/articulo.html?d_date=&xref=20050710elpepspor_4&type=Tes&anchor=elpepspor) article??? Thanks.

http://img307.imageshack.us/img307/5885/recorte28ub.th.jpg (http://img307.imageshack.us/my.php?image=recorte28ub.jpg)

Hello, Veyonce, I really like your news items and photos! Here is a translation of the El País article. It just appeared in the International Herald Tribune, in the inadaily service. The URL is: http://www.iht.com/getina/files/261112.html

A highly-strung boy from next door
Meet both Rafa Nadals: the ultimate competitor on court and the humble son of Majorca off it

El Pais Spain | Carlos Arribas

At tennis schools these days, before being handed their certificates, children are required to do one last exercise.

"Let's see, Pepito," says Ricardo, the tennis teacher at Santo Domingo school, in Madrid, to a shy boy with glasses - snatching the kid's certificate out of his hands. "How does Nadal do it?"

And for a split second, Pepito forgets his shyness, makes a fist and raises it into the air, forming a right angle between upper arm and forearm, trying to show some biceps, and shouts: "Vamos!" leaping into the air with a twist; the whole Nadal deal.

"Perfect!" says Ricardo, "now you're a real tennis player.

As if he was Rafael (Rafel, in Catalan, to his friends and family; Rafa to the media) Nadal - a very good left-handed tennis player with a devastating forehand, a hypertrophied biceps, a sleeveless shirt, pants down to his calves, a white band over his dark hair and forehead, a fist in the air, a very imitable image, very imitated. There is no reporter, English, French, or Italian, who does not make reference to his long shorts, his long, wavy hair, his muscles, his fist.

As if Rafa Nadal cares.

"I only think about playing, about my match; I'm not worried about fashion and all that," he says. "I've never liked to give the impression of being distant; I've always wanted to be just another normal 19-year-old who plays tennis; not an international celebrity."

He sips ice-cold water on the hot and sunny roof terrace of a Madrid hotel. He's come to the capital for a photo session and a press conference. His photographer, makeup artist and stylist are waiting for him at the door. Nadal reminds you of Mowgli, the kid who had no choice but to grow up, leave the jungle and endure human civilization.

"Sometimes they call me Mowgli. I don't care what they call me. I don't particularly like it, but it doesn't bother me either... I'm sort of clueless about what my image is. I can't evaluate it; the people around me do that better. I always say that if there are people who take a genuine interest in me, I appreciate it with all my heart."

He might not care about his image, but Nike - the brand that has dressed and taken care of him since he was 12, since he was the best junior tennis player in the world - certainly does. It was Nike that decided that sleeveless shirts, showing off his triceps, were the most appropriate model for him, after the look had worked successfully with Carlos Moyà - another Majorcan player and a friend of Nadal's. Moyà's uniform is all set off with a spectacular tattoo. But Nadal's trademark would be below the waist: his white pants almost bursting at the seams from his powerful gluteus, the secret to his stability and speed when it comes to shifting direction.

"Yeah, these pants suit me; they're suitable and comfortable, and if the brand wants me to play in them, I'll keep wearing them. I'll do what they tell me. I always wear the same model, the same color for an entire tournament; not out of superstition, but because that's what Nike wants."

In the upper echelons of today's tennis scene is a loutish, rude, complainer; the direct descendant of John McEnroe, mad at the world, with a constant pout on his face. He's Lleyton Hewitt, a young Australian who likes to wear his cap backwards. Until very recently, he was the dream of salespeople who wanted to make tennis a sport not only for well-to-do adults. A bad boy. Does it get any better?

Then Switzerland's Roger Federer came along; the exact opposite of Hewitt. A quiet and methodical winner, without scandals. Surrounded by his family at all times, his girlfriend, his mother and father make up the company Roger Federer Ltd; total control. Not much substance for a good marketing campaign, in theory. However, just as Björn Borg back in his day was capable of taming a passionate spirit and a messy personal life to appear on the court as an ice man without emotions, Federer also has the stigma of a champion; a transgressive personality.

It is common knowledge that no one stands out in any discipline if they don't challenge the establishment (and forget ethics). And in his own way, family and all, Federer was able to say no to the Swiss federation, split from his previous coach, who had been imposed upon him. He dared to spend a season without a trainer, in a world full of schools and teachers, where the rule is you can't be anyone without a technician sitting in the stands, making tiny corrections. A mature, serene transgressor; clean and polished. Could there be anything better?

"No athlete embodies the values and image of the Nike brand better than Rafa Nadal," says Teresa Rioné, who runs the Spanish office of the US giant. "He's young, irreverent, disobedient; he's a fighter that never gives up, not a single ball; an incredible competitor, a gladiator. And on top of that, he's the ideal son, respectful and well-mannered, a family guy, very mature for his age... He's got it all, he's a model of good conduct. And there's nothing artificial about him. Everything is a product of genetics, his upbringing and education."

"My arms, my physique; that's all natural. I work out, but I don't lift weights like you might think. Just a normal workout. And a good head on your shoulders; that's something that either you've got or you don't. My family has instilled values in me since I was a kid. My uncle has always made me give 100%, and that's surely the reason why I'm a player with a good mentality."

Transgressor ma non troppo. Really? Tiny details make all the difference. Everything becomes clearer if we understand what Rafa Nadal is not, and what he would have been if he had done what other people wanted. Rafa Nadal does not play the trumpet for the Manacor municipal band, as his grandpa Rafael would have liked, head of the family and conductor of the group; Rafa Nadal is not a soccer player like his uncle Miquel Àngel, who played for Barcelona, even though at school he was a skilled lefty, a great shot and a sound goal-scorer. Rafa Nadal does not play with his right arm even though he's right-handed in other arm-based activities like eating, writing and playing golf.

Rafa Nadal was never a junior champion of anything, even if he was the most gifted tennis player born in 1986. Not because he failed in the attempt, but because he went pro in 2001, just after his 15th birthday. Rafa Nadal does not live in Barcelona, training alongside Moyà at the CAR in Sant Cugat, as the Spanish federation has been begging him to do for years. He still lives with his family in downtown Manacor, not far from where they make artificial pearls and sell handicrafts made out of olivewood and leather. He lives with his parents, Sebastián and Ana María, and his sister Maribel; in another flat in the same building lives his Uncle Toni, who is also his tennis coach and teacher in life.

-Your uncle Miquel Àngel was junior tennis champion in the Balearic Islands, and then he gave it up for soccer. And you've done the opposite, trading in the soccer ball for the racket.

"Everybody's different. My uncle plays tennis well, but I think he was better at soccer, and in my case it's the other way around. I was okay at soccer, but I was the world tennis champion at 12, and European champ too. I decided to do what I was better at."

On top of it, he's tall, handsome, nice, a very good tennis player... And at 19 he's won the French Open championship, five tournaments in just over a year, all on clay courts, number three in the world and rising...

"I don't consider myself a cool-headed player at all. On the court, I'm a fighter. And when I score a point, I celebrate it. These are things I can't control. I don't annoy my rivals because I never do anything against them. I do it for myself and for my people, and my rivals it. Maybe at certain moments, depending on the match, but no one has ever complained... When you are in a tie break and you do a tough passing shot down the line on the run, it's almost impossible not to celebrate it. For me at least. Some people are very cold and can contain themselves, but I just can't.

Doesn't this perfect player have a single flaw? They say that Rafa Nadal will be another victim of the system that has created him, that he has reached the top too soon, that there will be injuries, psychological exhaustion, growth problems... That he would have been better off living a normal kid's life, instead of becoming a child phenomenon like Mats Wilander, Björn Borg or Boris Becker before him.

"I don't know if all this has come too early or too late," says Nadal, "but this is the way things are. When it comes, it comes; you can't decide when you're going to win or not. Tennis is a very competitive sport and I'm very happy that it's come at my age. And anyway, I don't think this is the top. I've won a tournament that is the biggest for every player, one of the Grand Slams. Of course, that's a dream you have since you're a kid. You always talk about winning it, and when you finally do, you're really happy and all that. But it's clear that you have to keep training every day, just like always. If you want to reach the top and keep winning important tournaments, you have to keep working every day with the same humility and calmness as always.

Humility. Work. These are basic tenets in Rafa Nadal's life, qualities that his image sometimes conceals. When Rafa Nadal talks about his Uncle Miquel Àngel, who won it all when he played on the Barça soccer team, he does so with admiration and respect, but not because of his victories.

"My uncle is great because he was able, at the end of his career, to come back to Mallorca and give everything," he says, shaking his right arm, sporting two bracelets, one red and the other green - the first in support of the Madrid 2012 Olympics candidacy and the other from the Olympic sailing venue in Palma de Mallorca (the kid doesn't miss a beat).

"Sometimes I look at the newspapers, the magazines, the articles on me, the photos, but I don't go crazy. When I've got time, I have a look, but if not, I don't. The front covers of all the print media in the world that followed my win at Roland Garros - I see them as a reality that I have to assimilate, no more. I have kept on being the same person I've always been, day after day."

Maybe there are two Rafa Nadals. One quiet, hard-working Rafa that beats his hands into a pulp during practice under the silent watch of his uncle; always on his toes next to the net. His hands full of cracks and calluses; a worker's hands after months of beating a pickaxe and a chisel against a concrete wall. The same Rafa Nadal who, two or three hours later, heads to the gym to work with Joan Forcades, his physical trainer. With him, Rafa Nadal has discovered that he has a sixth sense, the gift of proprioception, the ability of the muscles to remember the position of the body's joints at all times and vary their contractions accordingly, to respond immediately to external stimuli. Proprioception exercises on unstable surfaces, such as giant balls, are the basis of his physical training, not weightlifting or bench presses as one might think from looking at his giant biceps.

"With Rafa, more than anything, we've done preventative work," explains Forcades. "We've got to prevent injuries, which are very frequent in tennis because of changes in surface, because of the huge number of matches played in a year, the constant trips..."

Rafa Nadal has had two major injuries in his career that kept him off the courts during key months during 2003 and 2004. Luckily, these problems have not reappeared so far in 2005, with six tournaments and seven finals under his belt, perhaps because the proprioception exercises are starting to pay off. His muscles, speed, the fierceness of his starts, his changes in direction, he works on all of these things with strange materials at the gym; conical pulleys, yoyos, vibrating platforms...

Then there's the other Rafa Nadal who is fiery and impatient, who will storm the court to play a match, any match. All those factors combined are what instill fear in his opponents, at least when they're playing on clay courts. That's what you call intimidation capacity, terror in the eyes of his adversary, who lowers his arm, offering peace, cedes points. Although Rafa Nadal seems to be unaware of the devastating effect of his stare.

"I have no idea what my opponents might be feeling. I do my thing, which is to always give it 100 percent. My opponents can do whatever they want. I have no idea what they're thinking. The match is won on the court; it's won by playing."

The match begins, and Rafa Nadal turns into a whirlwind, a chaos of smashes, a man in a hurry. Not true. Rafa Nadal is in another dimension, concentrating on his own little bubble, controlling every last aspect. The legendary Björn Borg used to blow on his fingertips while he waited for his rivals to serve. Then, before serving, he would adjust his headband, wipe off the sweat from his forehead and squint between the strings of his racket. He had that capacity - the same capacity that Nadal has - to distract himself with tiny details after playing the most important points of his life.

"I never get angry after making a bad shot, missing a point, losing a match. I celebrate the good points, but I don't do anything after the bad ones. I've never thrown the racket on the ground because I lost a point. I control my emotions pretty well."

-And what about the interruptions like the ones you had to go through at Roland Garros, against Grosjean, when the crowd booed at the umpire, or against Puerta when he took an injury break in the final; what was going on in your head?

"The ten minutes with Grosjean were tough, it was a terrible feeling because the crowd was wrong. It was not a pretty situation and it got out of my hands. I wasn't able to control it very well. But after that, I recovered and I managed to get the game back on track, didn't I?"

-But what were you thinking about?

"The only thing I try to think about is the next point that has to be played, and that I have to win it. I tried to concentrate on my own game, but it's not easy. But there I was, and when I lost the set I started the next one concentrating 100 percent, knowing that if I didn't, I'd lose. That's what happened, and I won."

He won because Rafa Nadal, like all great tennis players, distinguishes himself from mere mortals when he's able to deliver the best shots in the most challenging moments of a match; where he's able to transform situations of maximum risk into magical, victorious returns.

"In fact, this year I've played very well at the key moments. At Roland Garros, during those moments, I played bravely, and that's why I won."

-How far does Rafa Nadal want to go?

"My aspiration is to be number one in the world. To achieve that, I know I have to play well on all surfaces. And I'm going to go as far as I can. If as far as I can is number two, well number two; if it's number three, three; and if it's number one and winning another Grand Slam tournament, which is what I'd like, to retire with the satisfaction of having done things well."

And he says all this at 19, with his biceps, his muscles, such a mature head on his shoulders... Because a smart head is like so many other things: either you've got it or you don't.

http://www.elpais.es
© 2005 El Pais

chocc0
07-15-2005, 03:26 AM
Great article thanx fro the translation :)

Nene
07-15-2005, 03:27 AM
Thank you,alsace :yeah::hug:
haha~~Rafa can do it as what he said ;)

veyonce
07-15-2005, 04:08 AM
Hello, Veyonce, I really like your news items and photos! Here is a translation of the El País article. It just appeared in the International Herald Tribune, in the inadaily service. The URL is: http://www.iht.com/getina/files/261112.html


Hi alsace, thanks for the link and posting the translation!!! Finally I know what the article's about.. Lol...

veyonce
07-15-2005, 04:56 AM
Nadal Has Pull Back Home

Striking while the iron is hot, Rafael Nadal met with the Mayor of Manacor, Toni Pastor, this week. Pastor announced that before the end of the year construction of a tennis complex with eight courts would begin on municipal land. One court would be reserved for the exclusive use of Nadal (hopefully he'll at least let Carlos Moya share). Most of the courts would be clay, but they also left open the possibility of putting in one grass court.

Tennis courts "a la carta"

Manacor Town Council is going to construct a municipal tennis complex with all type of court surfaces to help in the preparation of Rafael Nadal, who will supervise the project.

EMILIO PÉREZ DE ROZAS
PALMA DE MALLORCA
Translated by nou.amic

The Nadal family's word is law in Manacor. And a wish expressed by one of its most illustrious members, the new 19-year-old tennis champion Rafael, has turned into almost a command. "If it's necessary, I'll construct a grass court on Mallorca, but I've got to be successful at Wimbledon," he said last week in the locker room of the London club, the day he was eliminated in the second round of Wimbledon by the practically unknown Luxemburger, Giles Muller.

However, it won't be necessary for Rafael, personally, to put his shoulder to the wheel. Antoni Pastor, the mayor of Manacor, promised him last week - after receiving him at the townhall to congratulate him in the name of all his neighbours - that he would construct a tennis complex in the town with all of the specifications that the player thought necessary to get the very best out of his preparation.The champion of Roland Garros will have tennis courts "a la carta", a choice of clay, grass and cement, whatever he needs to prepare for all of the Grand Slams.

Wimbledon, the prime objective

Rafael was really disappointed in London. Two days after debuting with a victory on Wimbledon Centre Court -the only one he hadn't played on in the four big tournaments- he was eliminated, victim of his lack of preparation on grass, the surface worst suited to his defensive top-spin game. "Wimbledon will be my objective until the day I retire," he said that very day, proof of the huge ambition of the player from Mallorca.

Before travelling to London, the lefthander trained for a few hours on an artificial grass court in Cala d'Or, but that was far from enough. Now there is the possibility that Nadal will be able to prepare for Wimbledon at home, in the municipal tennis complex that Manacor town council, together with the Balearic Government sports committe, have promised to construct on a plot of land at Sa Torre des Enegistes, very close to the football pitch where his uncle Miguel Àngel was first put through his paces.

A grass court

The player was informed about the tennis project by Antoni Pastor in person and he offered him the possibility of, together with Toni Nadal his uncle and trainer, having a direct say in the determining of the technical specifications of the complex. Another of the player's uncles, who is also called Rafael, is a member of the executive of the Manacor town council.

The project envisages the construction of a complex with a minimum of eight courts, with sufficient capacity for also staging championships and other tournaments. Until now the youngest Nadal has trained off and on at the Club Tenis Manacor, sometimes even with his great Mallorcan friend, Carlos Moyà.

Looking for financing

The old club has half a dozen courts but they are all clay. If the wishes of the tennis player are met, the new installations will even have a covered court. The Balearic president Jaume Matas has committed himself to finding, together with the Manacor Town Council, the formulae to finance the project. So Nadal will be able to have courts fit for a champion.

Pepote Ballester, the member of the government in charge of sport on Mallorca, yesterday confirmed that, at the moment, the island has no plans to reintroduce the Mallorca Open: "Among other reasons, because all our attention is focused on organising the World Cycling Championships and Eurobasket-2007".

7/3/2005 El Periódico


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veyonce
07-15-2005, 05:24 AM
Not sure if this article was already posted..

Nadal breaks records and makes the battle for the top more interesting

Spaniard, 19 years old, he is the most young tennis player to win a Grand Slam since Pete Sampras’s title on USA in 1990. He crashes his opponents on clay court and, within four months, he becomes top 3 of the world and arises as a threat for Swiss Roger Federer’s throne, who leads the world ranking easily since 2004.

Marcos Pereira
In Sao Paulo
Published on June 10, 2005

Four months and a half ago, when he battled for four hours against Lleyton Hewitt, on Australian Open, Rafael Nadal was treated as a promise that would be soon between the best of the world. Today, days after winning Roland Garros, he is already called as the only threat for Swiss Roger Federer’s reign, the leader of world ranking.

In this period, Nadal, who just turned 19 years old, collected records. On clay, his speciality, he was equal to two ex-players, winners of three of the main tournaments on clay. The Rumanian Ilie Nastase, in 1973, and the Austrian, Thomas Muster, 22 years later, won in one year the tournaments of Monte Carlo, Rome and Roland Garros.

Nadal repeated the same feat and didn’t complete the sequence, in Hamburg - another high level tournament on clay - because blisters on his left hand stopped him from competing. The Brazilian Gustavo Kuerten, for example, raised these four tournaments’ trophy, but he never won two of them in the same season.

In his 24 matches of invincibility that he holds on slow surface, Nadal defeated the most different rivals. He won over Gastón Gaudio (champion of Roland Garros in 2004), beated Guillermo Coria in two Masters Series finals, humiliated his fellow countryman Juan Carlos Ferrero (ex-king on clay) and, to finish it, he defeated Federer on his birthday.

There are 56 won-sets against only nine lost, which put Nadal on the third place of world ranking. And he finished this impressive sequence with the title in Paris, where he was equal to Swedish Mats Wilander, in 1982, winning Roland Garros in his debut.

Guga won Roland Garros in his second time playing there, in 1997. In his debut, in the previous year, he was defeated in the first round by Czech Slava Dosedel.

The Nadal’s overpowering success wasn’t on the Spaniard’s plans, who expected to go to Roland Garros “just” between the 25 seed, like he said during the Brasil Open, in Costa do Sauipe (BA). However, beyond winning two Masters Series on clay in the last months, he was champion in Barcelona, Acapulco, and runner-up in Masters Series of Miami (hard court), losing the final for Federer, after five sets.

One of Nadal’s victim in Bahia was Ricardo Mello, who is the best Brazilian tennis player in the ranking, at 56 position. On semifinals, Mello was leading the third set in 4-2, but he lost concentration for one moment and Nadal recovered.

This “chance” in the match is quoted by Mello as one of the main characteristics of Nadal. “When he sees one neglect of his opponent, he takes advantage of it because he plays with a lot of intensity”, said Mello, who lived his best moment in Sauipe, in 2005.

From that moment on, Nadal has been winning his matches more easily, but the Brazilian tennis player doesn’t think he changed the way he plays. “What changed for him is the confidence. After winning in Sauipe, he was champion in Acapulco and didn’t stop until he got to Roland Garros”, he finished.

Comparisons

Nadal’s performance in the beginning of this year gave him comparisons to one of the most renovated tennis players of history. According to the North American John McEnroe, an ex-leader of the ranking, the Spaniard reminds him of German Boris Becker (champion of Wimbledon at 17 years old) because of his physical strength.

“He has a lot of energy and enthusiasm in all shots. Maybe he needs to improve some of them and especially his serve”, analyses McEnroe. “He probably won’t be able to slip on grass like he does on clay, but if Lleyton Hewitt won Wimbledon, there’s no reason Nadal can’t make it someday.”

To Jim Courier, twice champion of Roland Garros and ex-leader of the ranking, one of the main virtues of Nadal is his “pact” with success. “He likes to fight and it doesn’t matter if he lost the first set. He comes back for real in the second one. Besides, he hits heavy the ball, moves well and knows how to counter-attack.”

Nadal’s ascent was already predicted by Brad Gilbert, an ex-top 10 player and ex-coach of the North Americans Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick, in January, during the Australian Open. “If Nadal had stocks on stock exchange, it would be good to buy them now because the price will begin to raise”, he said, at that time, to an Australian TV station.

The compliments also reached players who are still playing. “His forehand is impressive and, even in unfavourable position during a point, he makes “winners”, and that over his opponent”, said Federer. “It’s easy to watch the development of a tennis player, how he improves, getting faster and beating better the ball. And that’s Nadal’s case”, commented Andre Agassi, who won all the four Grand Slams.

Development

It doesn’t matter in what part of the world he plays, Nadal will always be recognized as a tough tennis player, who fights over all the points until the end. His courageous way of “reaching all the balls”, however, is the result of the physical trainer Joan Forcades.

His job is to avoid serious injuries, like the one that happened last year. Nadal suffered a sprain on his ankle and stayed three months out of courts, missing big tournaments, like the Masters Series of Monte Carlo, Rome and Hamburg, besides Roland Garros. In his return, he won his first title, in Sopot.

With 1.86m and 81 kg, Nadal has been through a development process, which, according to his trainer, impede an exaggerated work with weights. “His body is still growing and now, he’s in full hormone’s change. It’s a very delicate moment and, because of that, we can’t take any risk.”

Following Forcade’s orientation, Nadal works with oriental techniques, lengthening, flexions and practices not to increase the volume of his muscles. Daily, he spends one hour doing lengthening to prevent himself from injuries and practices with a huge ball.

With a confirmed power on clay, Nadal tries now to don’t let Federer rise on the Champions Race. They are drawn with each other in points, but the second half of the season benefits the Swiss’s style, who likes to play more on fast surfaces, where happens two more Grand Slams – Wimbledon and US Open.


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veyonce
07-15-2005, 05:31 AM
Toni's description of Rafa and Federer is hilarious...

NADAL PREPARES TO LAUNCH HIS ATTACK ON THE US HARDCOURTS

ALEJANDRO DELMÁS 12.07.2005
Translated by nou.amic

Midday Monday, Rafa and Toni Nadal, nephew and uncle, landed at Palma airport. They were arriving from Stockholm after another triumphant victory. Rafa said: "Nobody would ever have thought that I could produce 30 consecutive wins on clay, but that's the way it's turned out. I still think I've got things to improve in my game overall, like my service and my aggressiveness."

Despite his victory in Bastad, Rafa knows by memory the lesson in humility that his uncle Toni has instilled into him: "My nephew will never break a racket on court, because he has been taught the value of things. He is conscious that he, because he earns what he earns, has things that for others are much more difficult to obtain."

After seeing Rafa settle in with his parents in Manacor, until another publicity trip, Toni went off to be reunited with his family and to study the hot summer calender: Rafa Nadal will play two tournaments on clay, in Stuttgart next week and in Umag in Croacia. If he wins one of these, he will beat Muster's records of seven tournament victories on clay, in 1996.

Then, Rafa will not be defending his title in Sopot, Poland, but, instead, concentrate on adjusting his game to suit the US hardcourts. There his duel with Federer could reach epic proportions.

Hard courts

The experts claim that: "Hard court surfaces are where Nadal and Federer compete on most equal terms. On clay, Rafa has the advantage of his high bouncing top spin shots. On grass, nobody can touch Federer." The great precedent is that fantastic final in Miami, which Federer won with great difficulty and effort: it is the only time he has beaten Nadal in their three head to head matches.

Toni Nadal's analysis: "On hardcourts Federer has a certain advantage. Rafa needs to do a few more things to be able to beat him. We will be playing in the Masters series in Montreal and Cincinnati before the US Open." In the USA, Rafa is known as Popeye, for his big biceps. In the US Open in New York, Popeye will be taking on a peculiar Brutus: Roger Federer.

Orantes, Spanish ATP record

Manuel Orantes is the Spanish player who holds the record for ATP tournaments won in a single year : a total of eight in 1975. Orantes' high point was in New York, in the US Open final, when it still took place at Forest Hills. There, after mounting a historic comeback against Guillermo Vilas in the semifinals, Orantes defeated Jimmy Connors.

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chocc0
07-15-2005, 08:31 AM
Thanx for all the articles Veyonce :hug:

Nene
07-15-2005, 09:00 AM
I'm really touched...Thx!!:hug:

veyonce
07-15-2005, 10:55 AM
Thanx for all the articles Veyonce :hug:

It's ok, just want to share the translated spanish articles wz u guys.. At least we know what the articles' about... Sometimes feeling lost as dunno what the article's about..

Nene
07-15-2005, 10:59 AM
It's ok, just want to share the translated spanish articles wz u guys.. At least we know what the articles' about... Sometimes feeling lost as dunno what the article's about..
You are so wonderful!:yeah:Really thank you:hug:
I think I've known you for a long time!( if I can say that;) )haha~
Glad to see you~~~~

veyonce
07-16-2005, 05:48 AM
You are so wonderful!:yeah:Really thank you:hug:
I think I've known you for a long time!( if I can say that;) )haha~
Glad to see you~~~~

Hi Nene,

Kekeke... Yes.. Think you can say that... You'll be going to Shanghai Open??


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veyonce
07-16-2005, 05:50 AM
Homage to one of the greats of football

Miquel Àngel Nadal, surrounded by ex-team mates, will be honoured for his sporting career

S. ADROVER. PALMA.
Translated by nou.amic

This weekend, the best Majorcan footballer ever, Miguel Àngel Nadal, will be paid homage to by all the people who have accompanied him during his long sporting career in Manacor, Real Mallorca, Barcelona and the Spanish national team.

The celebrations begin tonight at 21.30 (GMT+2) with a gala dinner in S'era de Pula (Son Severa) with Dr Bartolomé Beltrán as master of ceremonies. During the banquet, music will be provided by Los Valldemossa, Diabéticas Acelerados and the violinist Serafín Nebot. On top of all that, we have to add one of the star attractions of the night, the moment when tennis' - and our national sport in general's - new icon, Rafael Nadal, will dedicate some words to his uncle.

500 people will attend the dinner including many of the ex-footballer's former team mates like Zubizarreta, Ferrer, Beguiristáin, Guardiola, Stoitchkov, Chichi Soler, Marcos, Hierro, Luis Enrique, among others. One of the most important managers in the Manacorian player's long career, Javier Clemente, will also be there to lend his support to his former 'pupil' on this very important occasion.

The second part of the homage to Nadal will take place tomorrow, Saturday, when Son Severa municipal stadium will be officially inaugurated with a football match between the so-called Barcelona 'Dream Team' coached by Johan Cruyff and a combination of ex-players from the Spanish national team, Mallorca and Manacor with Javier Clemente in charge. For those who cannot get along to the stadium, the match will be shown live from 18.30 (GMT+2) on IB3 for the Balearic Islands and on TVc Canal 33 for Catalunya.

It will be a unique occasion for Mallorca to see the members of that Barça team that marvelled culés (Barça fans!) and the whole footballing world as they won the European Cup and four league championships. Alexanco, Busquets, Sergi, Goikoetxea, Eusebio, Miguel Soler, Bakero and Julio Salinas will turn out against the likes of Camarassa, Akorta, Fran, Kiko, Alfonso and Manjarín. Miguel Àngel Nadal will play one half of the match with each team and he will be joined on the field by the ex-footballer and mayor of Manacor, Toni Pastor, who used to play for Real Mallorca, and the tennis player Rafael Nadal.

The last of the celebrations will take place on Sunday with a golf tournament at Pula Golf in which many of the ex-footballers will also take part. Golf is another of this weekend's protagonist's great passions.

http://www.diariodemallorca.es/

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Nene
07-16-2005, 07:27 PM
Hi Nene,

Kekeke... Yes.. Think you can say that... You'll be going to Shanghai Open??


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Nice article again!!:yeah:
:tears: That's what I'm alway thinking about and crying for!!!! :sad:
I'm in senior 3..It means I'll be dead for the college entry exams!! :crying2: :mad: :fiery: I really want to go..but my family and school will keep me in my place :sad: :sad: so sad...Next year!!!!!!!I be there!!!!!!! No doubt!!!!!!!!!!!! :devil: Longing for it....

Carlita
07-24-2005, 08:34 PM
24.7.2005
Rafael Nadal cancelles
http://www.croatiaopen.hr/templates/croatiaopen/images/dummy.gif
Rafael Nadal, Semifinalist in 2003, due to knee injury will not attend this year‘s tournamet. Late sunday afternoon, after winning the Stuttgart tournament Rafael called from Stuttgart and said he was awfully sorry, but that he couldn‘t play because of a knee injury, explained Slavko Rasberger the tournament director at the press conference

Despite the withdrall, Nadal is expected to visit Umag on monday and hold a press conference explaining reasons of his retirement. Nadal‘s place at the top of the draw will be appointed to the nineth seed Alberto Martin, and his abbandoned place will be awarded to the lucky looser, meaning that Felix Mantilla will play either the qualifier or the player who lost the last round of qualification



:sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :fiery:

Saumon
07-24-2005, 08:38 PM
awww thank carlos his knee didnt bother him today :rolleyes: :angel: :tape:

veyonce
07-25-2005, 07:45 AM
Nadal Qualifies for Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai

Spanish tennis sensation Rafael Nadal has qualified for Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai, becoming the youngest player in more than a decade to win a berth at the prestigious $4.45 million circuit finale. He joins World No. 1 and INDESIT ATP 2005 Race leader Roger Federer as the only two ATP players to have qualified so far for the elite eight-man and eight-team circuit finale in Shanghai.

Nadal ensured that he would play in his first Tennis Masters Cup after another stellar performance on clay this week at the Mercedes Cup in Stuttgart. The 19-year-old won his eighth title of the season on Sunday, defeating Gaston Gaudio 6-3, 6-3, 6-4 to improve his 2005 clay court record to 48-2 and keeping his 34-match clay court winning streak alive.

“For me it’s a dream. Now I’m amongst the eight best players in the world, which is very important to me,” said Nadal. “Shanghai is an exotic and nice place. Carlos Moya told me that it was a very, very nice tournament three years ago. For me this is unbelievable. It will be my first Masters and I hope to enjoy the experience and to play well.”

The 19-year-old Spaniard remains in second position in the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race, more than 250 points clear of third-placed American Andy Roddick and now within 173 points of Federer. Nadal, who is 59-8 on the season, has enjoyed a history-making run in 2005, winning eight titles including Roland Garros and back-to-back ATP Masters Series titles in Monte-Carlo and Rome. Indeed, the two Shanghai qualifiers, Federer and Nadal, have shared all five ATP Masters Series titles this year, with Federer winning back-to-back crowns in Indian Wells and Miami and a third title in Hamburg.

Nadal is the youngest qualifier for the men’s circuit finale since Andrei Medvedev in 1993. On Monday Nadal, at 19 years, 1 month and 22 days, will become the third teenager in history (since 1973) to reach No. 2 in the INDESIT ATP Entry Ranking. He joins Boris Becker (18 years, 9 mos., 17 days) and Bjorn Borg (18 years, 10 mos., 2 days) as the only teenagers to rank No. 2.

This year’s Tennis Masters Cup, the culminating event of the men’s professional tennis circuit, will be held November 13-20 in Shanghai, China.

Nene
07-25-2005, 07:56 AM
Yup,he's sure to come!:yeah:We'll make good preparations for his coming here:bounce:
haha Longing for it...

~EMiLiTA~
07-25-2005, 03:38 PM
well done Rafa! now take some well deserved days off!

veyonce
07-25-2005, 04:35 PM
Knee injury forces Nadal to pull out of Croatia Open

UMAG, Croatia -- French Open champion Rafael Nadal announced Monday that he pulled out of this week's Croatia Open because of a knee injury. The Spaniard, who has become the youngest player in more than a decade to qualify for the season-ending Masters Cup, aggravated a knee injury during Sunday's Mercedes Cup final victory.

"I have had problems with my knee for a few tournaments and it is hurting more now, so I have to cancel to not finish on the operating table," Nadal told reporters.

Nadal, who won his eighth season title on Sunday at the Mercedes Cup with a 34th straight victory on clay, traveled to the tournament to explain his withdrawal -- and apologize on center court later in the day.

"I played here two years ago and really love this tournament. I keep planning to come back but something happens," Nadal said.

The 19-year-old Spaniard said his injury is not serious but could be aggravated if not rested.

"It is tendinitis and it could get serious if you do not take care of it," he said.

"I have had problems with my right knee, tendinitis. By itself, it's not so serious but could become so if I go playing from one tournament to another without rest," Nadal told reporters in Umag, the venue of Croatia's only ATP tournament.

"I am really sorry for not playing here where there are so many top players."

Guillermo Coria, who helped Argentina defeat Australia in the Davis Cup quarterfinals last weekend, took over as the top-seeded player at the tournament.

The field includes three-time French Open champion Gustavo Kuerten, Carlos Moya and clay-court specialist David Ferrer.

veyonce
07-27-2005, 04:40 AM
Translation: vamosrafael.com

This is a translation of the interview with Moya and Nadal that was published last weekend in "Magazine", the weekend supplement 24/07/05 with Diario de Mallorca.

http://img286.imageshack.us/img286/9475/magazineg12dg.jpg

Moya and Nadal, Mallorca's two tennis stars

Carlos Moya and Rafael Nadal : top sportsmen, champions of Roland Garros, two different success stories but both with their origin in Mallorca. There is an age difference of ten years between them, one is on the way in and the other is on the way back, the older Moya is all experienced calm; the nervy youngster Nadal is anxious to conquer the world. The Magazine brought them together in Mallorca.

The images the two men project could not be any more different:

Nadal, who has just turned nineteen, has made an extraordinary impact on tennis, just as Fernando Alonso has on F1. Nadal may be young but the fierce look in his eyes is that of a champion. He punches the air with his muscular left arm after every victory, celebrates every point he wins, and he always wins on clay. He is the third best tennis player in the world after Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt, but he says he still has to improve his game considerably if he wants to be number one. He knows exactly what he wants to achieve and how to go about achieving it.

Moya, who is about to be 29, has already been the world's number one tennis player, Spain's first. His handsome, slim, elegant physique, his way of thinking, always trying to be genuine, his powerful game suited to all surfaces, with those precise forehands, made him a worthy succesor to Sergi Bruguera. But he has never had the killer instinct that can be seen in one look from Nadal. He seems to have given just the necessary on court, always bearing in mind that a tennis racket was not the be all and end all of everything in his life.

Moya signs autographs with his left hand, but plays with the right. Nadal, who is right handed, plays left-handed.

At a time when tennis needs outstanding figures, Nadal is admired in the US as Andre Agassi's successor, and legends of the game like John McEnroe applaud the fact that we can once again enjoy watching fantastic tennis players with character, who love winning, who connect with the public, but who, above all, are humble and well mannered.

Moya and Nadal are champions at that as well.


Reporter: How has Mallorcan tennis managed to produce two Grand Slam winners in seven years?

Nadal: It's a happy coincidence. First a player like Carlos Moya appears, and even reaches the world number one spot, and now I've come along. I'm full of illusion and working very hard because playing tennis is what I like most. It's also a coincidence that two Mallorcans have won RG, in 1998 and 2005. If only, in the next few months, there could be two Mallorcans together in the world's top ten. That would be incredible, really historic for Mallorca.

Moya: I must say it's incredible that in such a short period of time the island has produced two champions of Roland Garros, the Grand Slam tournament that all Spaniards want to win, and that we have both been in the world's top ten. The difficult bit's been done. There's a long tradition of tennis on Mallorca, and the fact that two players like us have sprung from the Balearics means that the kids not only want to play football but tennis, too, and that the sport's becoming more popular. All that is very positive for the country in general. I think that all the hype's being put to good use and that there are other youngsters following in our footsteps. For example, not long ago the Spanish junior final was fought out between two kids from Mallorca. There's a lot of good work being done and it has to be kept up to ensure that we keep on producing champions in the future.

MOYA : IF YOU DON'T DEVELOP YOUR GAME, YOU CAN RAPIDLY DROP OUT OF THE TOP TEN. EVERYBODY KNOWS YOUR GAME, SO EVERY YEAR YOU HAVE TO TRY TO IMPROVE IT A LITTLE.

NADAL : YOU HAVE TO MAINTAIN YOUR ILLUSION AND BE VERY HUMBLE.

R: Carlos Moya, you are an established player, you know what it is to be at the top, you know what fame is; and you, Rafael Nadal, have just reached these dizzy heights. What does a top player have to worry about once he's up there?

Moya: You have to be prepared for lots of things, many good ones and some bad. If you work hard, are lucky enough not to get injured, have a good level and are not a conformist, then I think you can last up there. Of course, there's lots of competition, every year new young players come out on court with one desire - to beat you, because they get more points for defeating someone above them in the ranking. If you don't work hard, if you don't develop and improve your game, you can very rapidly fall out of the top ten. Everybody knows your game well so every year you have to try to improve a little, even if it's only 1%. You have to introduce something different so that your opponents don't get used to you and can easily find your weak points.

Nadal: I think what you have to try to maintain most is the illusion to go on improving and you have to have the humility to keep on doing the hard day-in day-out work that has taken you to the top. What Carlos says is true. But I also think that you have to know how to deal with the situation, how to enjoy it, because there are moments for everything. The most important thing for oneself is to be happy. When you are happy, everything is bound to go much better for you. Everybody tries to find a job at what they like most and we are lucky to work at this sport that excites us so much. We love the competition, we can compete almost every week. Not everyone is as fortunate as us.

Moya: Rafa has mentioned some very important values and you have to be able to fall back on them. I think that we both hold the view that the greatest victory is being happy. How to be happy? Well that depends on each one. I have been happy, I have enjoyed my career very much, and I still enjoy it. I have tried to make friends, and I have, and to realise that tennis is my job but there are more important things than a tennis racket. At present we have many advantages, we are very privileged, but one day this will come to an end and you will reap what you have sown. It's the person you are that really counts.

R: Moya has been in love with tennis and now he is in love with something more important, the truth. Nadal is at the moment experiencing absolute passion for tennis...

Nadal: I think we both still enjoy competing but perhaps we now have different aspirations. I'm younger than Carlos and I imagine that he had similar goals to mine when he was my age, now perhaps he's fighting to remain among the best while my ambition is to maintain my position at the top for several years. We both love our work and I don't only enjoy competing at tennis, I'm very competitive at everything. I love it, and moreover I can do it every week!

Moya: What you have to have quite clear is that you can go up or down and it's easier to go down. Rafa will find it difficult to be any higher up than where he is, but the moment he relaxes a little or gets injured.... In this aspect tennis is a very hard demanding sport. Having a ranking every week has its advantages. You are exactly where you deserve to be, you have to work to get there, and no matter how many 'contacts' you have, if you don't win, you don't climb the rankings. You are there on your own merits. The bad thing about it is that you cannot relax: if you are injured, you are bound to slip down the table; if your confidence goes, the same thing happens. Tennis is not like a team sport where they don't have these rankings; you can be injured for a whole year and not know if you're still one of the best players in the world or not. In tennis, the ranking list is there, and if you deserve to be high up on it you'll be there, and if not, you won't.

Nadal: I agree. Last year something like that happened to me, at a different level. I had started the season really well and was climbing the rankings. I was 33rd in the world when I got injured and when I returned I had slipped to number 70, and had neither the game nor the confidence I had had before. So it was a great effort to get back to where I had been. Through hard work and constancy, I've gradually won back the placings I had lost when I thought I was doing fine.

MOYA: EIGHTY PER CENT OF MY FRIENDS ARE NOT FROM THE TENNIS WORLD. I'VE ALWAYS KNOWN WHO I HAD AT MY SIDE.

NADAL: I KNOW I'M GROWING AND AT THE MOMENT I'M CLIMBING, BUT I ALSO KNOW THAT I MAY FALL.

R: You live surrounded by fame, money and self-interested "friends"......

Moya: You have to keep your wits about you. There are many people interested in being your friend when you are at the top. But often it's only when your success goes that you realise it. I've always known who I had at my side, in my team, and perhaps because of this I've not experienced any deceptions in my life as a tennis player. Eighty or ninety per cent of my friends are not from the tennis world, they are from here in Mallorca, from school. I've known them since I was ten years old. Only about ten per cent of my friends come from this latest period of my life. If you have your feet on the ground and know what's out there, it's difficult to get swollen headed and let yourself get carried away by the fame and the money

Nadal: I think rather the same. I haven't been in this for so long, I don't yet know what fame is, but most of my friends are from my hometown, from Manacor, from school, since when I was four years old. I also have friends from tennis, but they're the minority. I think it's true that you have to keep your feet on the ground. I know that I'm growing and at the moment I'm climbing the rankings, but I could just as easily fall back down. In my view, it's important not to get frustrated and to be as happy now that I'm up at the top as when I was lower down. You have to be ready for anything. I think that at Carlos' age, for example, the people you have around you are not so important...

Moya: What's wrong with my age, kid?!

Nadal: ..... But, at my age, it's very important to have a good group of people around you. If I've got this far, it's thanks to my family who have helped me, who have protected me, and have taught me that tennis is only a sport, that there are more important things in life, that above all you have to be very humble to keep on working whatever happens, whether you're successful or not. This is very important to me, especially as regards my general upbringing, outside of tennis.

Moya: Here in Mallorca family tradition is very strong, people from here are very close to the family. I know I was, and still am even at my age. I think that the family instill values and, as Rafa says, they help you to see that there's more to life than tennis. A member of his family, the footballer Miguel Angel Nadal, has been an extremely successful sportsman and perhaps they already knew how to behave, how to cope with something like that. In my family, on the other hand, celebrity was new to them. I think they have borne it well, they have been very much involved, which I appreciate as much as their inconditional support at the most difficult times.

MAGAZINE Diario de Mallorca 24/07/2005

adelaide
07-27-2005, 04:39 PM
thanks veyonce!! was a good read. :D and thanks VR.com for translating :)

Carlita
07-27-2005, 05:52 PM
:worship: thanks for that!!!! :D lovely article!!!

veyonce
07-28-2005, 04:10 AM
From Pro Tennis Fan:-

No Driver's License for Nadal Yet

That driver's license will have to wait for Rafael Nadal even though he won that Mercedes yesterday:

"I will try. I don't have a lot of time, traveling every week. I have one month in Mallorca in December after finishing the Tennis Masters Cup and then I want to do that," said Nadal.


Apparently Kia has given him 2 cars already...

veyonce
07-28-2005, 04:53 AM
Translation by nou.amic

VOGUE España agosto 2005

Written on cover:

Cita con Rafa Nadal - A date with Rafa Nadal
A solos con el chico del año - Alone with the boy of the year

Days of Glory

They call him "The Wonder Boy" and the whole world loves him.

Rafael Nadal, the nineteen-year-old tennis player, speaks exclusively to Vogue after winning Roland Garros.


"I'm very tired but I'll give it all I've got." With these words Rafael Nadal greeted us at 17.00 on a sweltering afternoon on the rooftop terrace of Madrid's Hotel Imperatriz, both a wonderful vantage point from which to view the city and high enough to emulate the dizzy heights that this new young tennis giant has scaled. Thinking of just what he has achieved so far produces as much vertigo as looking down at the ant-like figures of the pedestrians far below on Madrid's Gran Via. Nadal has just turned 19 and he already has an enviable clutch of titles. Serious and powerful looking, he arrived with his team of closest advisors with whom he kept exchanging conspiratorial glances. His is the fashionable face of the moment and behind that timid smile of his lies tremendous physical power that makes him capable of seemingly impossible sprints and unthinkable effort.

Nobody can deny that Rafael Nadal has dominated tennis so far this season. His talent has exploded in an amazingly successful run of victories. He has been crowned champion in Acapulco, Costa du Sauipe, Monte Carlo, Barcelona, Rome and Roland Garros. His opponents have been conquered by his game and the public by his youthfulness. A new reference figure has emerged - he is the player chosen to end Federer's reign. His image says it all - his shirts are sleeveless because he does not need to hide any aces.

Q: In most of your childhood photos you have a racket in your hand. It's difficult to imagine you doing anything else.

If I hadn't taken up tennis, I would almost definitely have been a football player. I played a lot when I was small, but the moment came when I had to make a decision... and the racket won.

Q: Since you were small everything has been planned so that you could become one of the world's best tennis players. Have you had moments of doubt?

I've never had any doubts. I was absolutely certain that I wanted to play tennis for a living. But it's true that I've had good moments and some not so good, like everone else. I'm a very normal person.

Q: How have you managed to combine your studies with a career like yours?

It's very complicated because you don't always have time to study and you can't really concentrate on the books. I did what I could because I really wanted to complete my secondary education (4ºESO).

Q: Do you still enjoy yourself as much on court as you did in the beginning?

Yes, definitely. Now of course there's much more pressure around me, but that's only to be expected if you're having good results. I love the pressure.

Q: Gladiator, Geronimo, Hercules, Wonder Boy, Toro.... Which of these names do you identify with most?

That's the press for you.... In Barcelona during the Conde de Godó tournament, they called me Killer. I'll have to put up with a lot of nicknames in the future. (laughs)

Q: You're the winner of Roland Garros, the youngest player to win the Davis Cup and the only threat to Federer's reign. Are your dreams coming true?

This year has turned out to be very good, better than expected. My intention was to finish up in the top 20, but all of the work and illusion we have put into it has been rewarded right from the beginning. But, I've still got a lot of goals to achieve.

Q: Several of the players that have become famous very young have had to rethink their career to maintain themselves at that level and others have had to abandon the circuit because of injuries. Do you feel ready to be at the front?

I hope so. What I've got quite clear is that by working hard and preparing myself physically and mentally, I'll be able to chalk up the stages to obtain the objectives that we have set.

Q: A lot of people hope that your matches against Federer will be repeats of those that McEnroe and Borg used to have.

I've seen lots of videos of those matches.... but what worries me most is working hard to improve my level.

Q: Are you obsessed with records?

No. I only think about doing things well and getting good results. At the Halle tournament I was one match away from equalling Federer's record of 25 consecutive wins, but, obviously, you don't think about these things when you step out on court.

Q: What would you choose to eat on a day when you don't have to keep to your usual strict diet?

Without any doubt, Coca-Cola and shellfish. It's a treat to have them now and then.

Q: When you were a junior you weren't able to go and play at Roland Garros because it coincided with your school examinations. Did that upset you especially?

I had to study. First I had to complete my schooling and as Roland Garros always coincided with the final exams, I had to stay home with my books. I took it calmly... there were other tournaments to play in.

Q: Your physical condition really impresses your opponents. There has been a lot of talk about the training techniques that you use. What's your secret?

There's no secret. I've got an ordinary normal body and do the same training as the others. What they say about my training techniques is more invention than anything else. Maybe the difference lies in the way I've developed naturally, in the genes, in what's hereditary, or whatever you want to call it.

Q: Tennis legends have praised your game and see you as producing the shake up that tennis really needs these days. How do you feel about this expectation that you raise?

It's flattering that great players like them see you as a new reference in modern tennis. I hope I don't disappoint them, but all I really think about is working hard.

Q: What has changed in your life?

I didn't expect to get such good results, at least not all one after another. But I don't think too much about it, I live for the moment and don't look any further than what is happening this year. I take each day as it comes and I'm aware that there will be periods when things may go wrong.

Q: Your close-knit family is around you in support and your Uncle Toni has always been at your side to lend a helping hand on the circuit. What percentage of your success do you owe to them?

A very high percentage. Of course, I've made a lot of effort but, if it had not been for my family and above all for my Uncle Toni, I would not have been a tennis player and I would not have got to where I am now.

Q: The best piece of advice that you have ever been given?

My family has instilled many values in me and they have commented that playing tennis is not the most important thing in life, that there are other things.

Q: Nike uses your image, your trousers and sleeveless shirts are the latest trend in tennis gear. Are you aware of "the Nadal effect" around you?

I'm better known than I was before but not so much as to notice "the Nadal effect". In any case, you'd be better asking the public if they notice that effect.

Q: What do you like most and what do you like least of what has been said about you?

To tell you the truth, I read practically nothing of what is published about me, so I cannot give my opinion of it. I prefer to keep concentrating on my work and to let others give their opinions.

Q: What helps you to relax?

I've always got a CD with music with me, at the moment I'm reading 'La Tapadora' (John Grisham's The Partner). But, above all, the main thing is to enjoy myself whatever I'm doing, forget about everything else.

Q: A place to get away from it all?

Mallorca. It's my refuge.

Q: What ritual do you have before going out on to the court to play a match?

I always jump up and down, give myself encouragement while warming up. Then I have a shower and go out on to the court to give my all.

Q: What do you most like doing in your spare time?

I love football, playing golf and going fishing. I also like going to the cinema whenever I can.

Q: Your sleeveless shirt and pirata pants have broken sales records. Is the image your own thing or has it been imposed on you by Nike?

No, they give me the gear and if I feel comfortable in it, as is the case with these, it is fine with me. If you don't like it, you can change, choose other models.

Q: Are you aware that from now you'll be expected to win all of your tournaments?

Everyone is aware that you can win or lose. I try to give my maximum in all of the matches and to keep improving to maintain my level.

Q: In an advertisement for a car make you are seen hitting tennis balls that are raining down from the sky. When are you going to get a driving license?

I need to get down to it. I'll do it as soon as I have time. I need a couple of weeks to devote to it... it's about time!

Q: What do your childhood friends say about what you are achieving?

They don't see me any differently, just a normal boy who's a friend to his friends. Our relationship hasn't changed.

Q: You're one of the video game generation. Do you really know you have made it big when you can choose to be yourself in the latest generation tennis video game?

I'm not very addicted to video games, but, in any case, I wouldn't choose to be myself.

by Carlos Ita


Photograph titles:

pp.98/99 FUERZA INTERIOR - 'INNER FORCE'
pp.100/101 CENTRADO - 'FOCUSED' 19 year old Nadal is tremendously mature
both on and off the court.
p.103 LA CIUDAD A SUS PIES - 'THE CITY AT HIS FEET'
pp.104/105 BAÑO DE EXITO - 'BATHED IN SUCCESS' Nadal combats the heat
of the photographic session by pouring a bottle of water over his face.

Photos by Nico

ayena
07-29-2005, 02:20 PM
Thanks for the article it's lovely :D

veyonce
07-31-2005, 08:23 AM
Marie Claire Espana
August 2005

24 HOURS WITH NADAL SUPERSTAR
by Virginia Galvín
photos: Ana Nance
Translation: Salsa
I did some further editing...

On court he’s an agressive and lethal warrior. From near, a guy that has barely waved goodbye to adolescence. We were with him 24 hours on a Grand Slam tournament. This is how the latest wonder of tennis is.

From near, in the interview, Rafa Nadal listens to you without looking at you. Clearly uncomfortable if the question borders the personal limits. Like those impossible tennis balls that fall in the boundary at the end of the court. He then threateningly returns them to you, beats around the bushes with common answers and economizes words until exasperation. That is, he returns the long smash as a short one and brushing the net, with a ‘let’ that he shots with his nineteen year-old fury. And my humble self tries to then run and return it, changing the subject. Or the conversation. But it doesn’t matter. Because you end up gasping out of breath from the effort while he doesn’t even mess up his ‘made in Nadal’ hair. And without looking at you. Will I loose this match from sudden death?

Not even an hour ago, we have seen the other Nadal. The warrior one. From the row of seats of court 7 at the mythical All England of Wimbledon, where he would wave goodbye five days later, in second round. Grown over his 1.83m height. Lethal body. Not a trace of Rafa’s teenager ticks. Surrounded by a public that’s intoxicated by the aroma of the hero. With that air of recent winner of the Roland Garros. Last trophy of a series of battles on clay that have boosted him to the glorious top-ten of the ATP (Professional Tennis Association). Not even Marat Safin – the sexiest tennis player now according to the international press or the terrorific Williams sisters – training with semi-orgasmic screams on a court nearby, under their father’s supervision cause such a revolution around them. Because this tennis player from Manacor is to tennis what Fernando Alonso is to Formula One. A galactic phenomenon that grows and expands despite his will. Feeded by that racial physique, testosteronical and striking, that excites men, women and sponsors equally. “Will you help me get a picture with him, please?”, begs Wang Ting, journalist of the New Times China, sharing the row of seats and the waiting with us. “He’s so handsome!” His professional profile doesn’t talk about beauty and hormones, of course. But it does reveal his 75 kg of muscle and him being ‘a lefthanded with a backward ball with two hands’. Although he offers ressistance to return the balls the type that go:

“You listen of ‘Nadalmania’ and what do you think?” “Well, I don’t think that is true. You say it, I hear it and that is it. I don’t think about all that because it would be a bad thing”. He doesn’t pay attention either to the names that the sports press use to describe him: “extra-terrestrial”, “shiny Ferrari” or “Don Quijote of La Mancha”. “I have never read that. I hardly ever read past the headline of what it is written about me”.

We are sitting down in a terrace (café) on that perfectly-cut unreal-green grass of Wimbledon. He's still sweaty from an hour training session with his uncle, Toni Nadal. His same trainer from his childhood. His creator. To many, the key stone of his success. The same one that, as a kid, convinced him that he was able to turn invisible. Pure magic. The tenderness of a serious and reconcentrated man that hardly exchanges a few words with his nephew, always in Mallorcan and with a soft voice. Unaware of the audience. Unaware of the guy that is painting the fence green. Unaware of the correspondent of Spanish public television, TVE, that, with the camera on “on”, waits to steal a few words from him. “Before it was much easier to catch him on the mycrophone”,says cameraman Rafael Porro. "Since he’s famous, things have changed”. He denies the change. He states his personal mantra: humbleness. “I always repeat it because I don’t want to change. I want to be the same person I’ve been all my life and I think I’m going to achieve it. I have the same friends since school, in my town, and they treat me the same as before”.

WITH AND WITHOUT MONEY

I receive a ball and I throw it: “So you have enemies already, in and out the courts?”
“No, no. Not even on the court. There I have colleagues, that, at some point, are rivals”. I fit the service and I return it as I can. He said: “I’m a very normal person in Manacor”. And outside Manacor? “I’m also normal. Sometimes it seems that when you are a bit famous maybe it makes you look like you are not normal. I’m just a regular 19 year-old that plays tennis. Nothing else.”

And nothing less. Because his game only in Paris meant a trophy, many covers full of panegyrics and 880,000 euros! Three hours and 24 minutes of a match that his bank account will not forget either. Although his relationship with money seems to be very cold and the Communications Director of the ATP, Benito Pérez-Barbadillo, fusses at me saying “But don’t you see that they don’t care about the money?”. Rafa speaks. “If I have any idea of how much money I made? Well, yes, I do have an idea, but I don’t know exactly because I don’t take care of it myself. And the tax returns and all? Ask my father. For me, the most important thing is to do things in exchange for nothing, because what makes you truly happy is not material.”

His parents can also explain his indifference towards money. Sebastián, owner of a glass business and a restaurant in Manacor, and Ana María, a full-time housewife. They explained that when he was younger and went out to play tournaments he used to take a certain amount of money with him for expenses, and used to write down all he spent in a piece of paper. The rest he used to return it religiously. Only a few months ago, he asked them for permission to buy a laptop computer. And he didn’t want an expensive one. He doesn’t spend an euro and he doesn’t show off. But sponsors fight among themselves to have him. He reflects perfectly all those values that connect with many brands. The automobile brand KIA is one of them. “Last year we searched for a tennis player that could associate well with the values of our brand and to our motto, ‘Power to Surprise’”, explains Juan Carlos Moya, Marketing Director of KIA Motor Iberia. Young, strong, a sportsman, family-oriented... Features of Rafa that fit with the product philosophy. Regarding the economic agreement, the company spoke with Rafa’s father and his manager Carlos Costa, manager and former tennis player. His bastions. The ones in charge to preserve the integrity, the image and the finances of the boy. With Toni Nadal, a steel triumvirate. “Costa made us see that the boy was the perfect candidate: good-looking, with that modern style of dressing and that internal and external strenght”, adds Moya. They convinced him, although by that time the tennis player was injured. A year later they can’t be more satisified. The ‘boom’ Nadal is a gift from the sky. And on top of that, the boy is aware of his compromise with the brand. “In the Conde de Godó (Barcelona) trophy, the Organization gave them cars to move around with. He called us up to ask for us to send him a KIA.” Quite a gesture considering he doesn’t have a driver's license yet. The contract, until 2007, includes a fixed and a variable depending on the position he is in in the world ranking. Besides two cars, gifts from the Korean brand. “They have told me your father carefully chooses your sponsors”, I insinuate. He looks at me like if I had told him a story about aliens in Albacete (it’s a region in Spain). Obviously, he prefers not to talk about business issues. His main focus is to play tennis. The confidence and passion of the warrior. That same one that pushes him to assure that he’s the best model of himself. That he still has to learn. That he admires the big ones – Federer, Roddick or Hewitt. And if I ask him “so what if the “flute starts playing”, and you win?” He will answer looking somewhere else, “But for the flute to play you need to have a flute, and here, in Wimbledon, there is no flute at the moment.”

Press conference at 3.30pm. (not o’clock: the British myth has fallen). We went up with Rafa on the elevator. We follow him through the hallways of the All England’s. We drink water from the same water fountain that he drinks from (like myth-makers). The unruffled British journalists want to know it all of the Spanish star. Rafa, who doesn’t have an English teacher, doesn’t get scared: “I do like the attention that I get, yes, and I appreciate it. That is what they have asked me, right?” asking Benito Pérez-Barbadillo with confidence. And with an efficient Spanglish he makes himself understood or finishes his ‘speech’ with an “what does it matter!” that awakes some smiles around him.

WOMEN AND SEX

Tennis issues then give way to more frivolous issues: Women’s chapter. The journalist: “How are you handling the interest that you provoke in women?” And he answers: “Don’t care.”

Us, later in a one-to-one interview for which many of his fans would sell their soul to Lucifer, we give it a try: "What have women taught you?" “Nothing special. I have never had a girlfriend in my life, so...”. So, the next volley is definitely going to crash: "Sex and sports, do they get along well?" “Ha, ha, ha, they are asking me about sex and sports, what do you think, Benito?” At this point, he gets up, uncomfortable. He takes some steps, comments something with his colleagues and returns with a magazine in his hands, from which he won’t lift his eyes from from then on. It is Rafa the boy, almost teenager, who gets uncomfortable. He hasn’t had time for girlfriends, so how can we talk about sex? His childhood is that of his first racket at the age of 4, that first big victory at age 15, his goodbye to school at 4th grade of ESO and a really big family, the Nadal family – the most famous member, Miguel Angel Nadal, former player of the Barcelona soccer team, tightly-knitted family.
At home, his parents and sister decided to surround the not-normal life of the guy with normality. Not too fond of seeing him play, but attentive watchers from the distance. His room, a trophy museum.

"Why do you still need your mom for?" “My mom is just my mom. I need her just like everyone does. Generally, the family is what’s important. I have always been in Mallorca, with them, I haven’t gone training outside.” And it is them, his parents, the only ones whom know that when he’s nervous on court, he pulls his underwear. But he has never broken a racket on a fury attack, McEnroe style. “I’m quite easy-going, and when I show my fist on court I do it for myself.”


NOT WITHOUT HIS ‘PLAYSTATION’

"Do you cry more due to a victory or a defeat?" “I haven’t cried for a long time now. Yes, sometimes when I was younger. Since I’m a professional I’ve only cried once, but not due to the defeat in itself, but because I felt really bad with myself”, he answers with sincerity. His off-court activities tend to be more like guys of his generation. “I like fishing, playing golf, going to the movies and going out partying with my friends.”

He arrives with tennis player, Feliciano López, at 8.30pm to the party at the Hard Rock Café. On a taxi, that he paid for himself. Two handsome guys that quickly caught the attention of the cameras around them. Red carpet, flashes, and juices. One hour of shy socializing, and back to the hotel, to his inseparable PlayStation.

“I play for a while when I get to the room. I also switch on to Messenger in the computer and... little else.”

The ‘little else’ that he explains to us reveals that: a) he’s not at all spiritual; b) he doesn’t feel overwhelmed by the fan phenomenon; and c) if professionally he seems to be a god that moves forward with secure steps, his ideas are still being built.

Ideologically, are you more conservative or liberal? “I haven’t the slightest idea, girl.”

Nene
07-31-2005, 09:27 AM
Really wonderful article:yeah:Thank you so much Veyonce:hug:and our Rafa baby is really a nice boy:yeah:

~EMiLiTA~
07-31-2005, 12:12 PM
great article! he goes on msn hahaha

he is so cute...hope he stays that way.

thanks veyonce!

knight_ley
07-31-2005, 02:15 PM
great article!!!!!! thanks :yeah:

Saumon
07-31-2005, 03:24 PM
great article! he goes on msn hahaha

many players go on msn ;) :p

Saumon
07-31-2005, 03:25 PM
Us, later in a one-to-one interview for which many of his fans would sell their soul to Lucifer, we give it a try: "What have women taught you?" “Nothing special. I have never had a girlfriend in my life, so...”. So, the next volley is definitely going to crash: "Sex and sports, do they get along well?" “Ha, ha, ha, they are asking me about sex and sports, what do you think, Benito?” At this point, he gets up, uncomfortable. He takes some steps, comments something with his colleagues and returns with a magazine in his hands, from which he won’t lift his eyes from from then on. It is Rafa the boy, almost teenager, who gets uncomfortable. He hasn’t had time for girlfriends, so how can we talk about sex?

our lil innocent rafa :angel: :hug:

~EMiLiTA~
07-31-2005, 03:46 PM
many players go on msn ;) :p

lol i know...i have some on my list ;)

Saumon
07-31-2005, 03:51 PM
lol i know...i have some on my list ;)
any famous ones? we want names!! (well at least I do :o )

~EMiLiTA~
07-31-2005, 03:55 PM
yes some famous spanish ones hehe

Saumon
07-31-2005, 04:02 PM
tommy? nando? feli? carlos? juan carlos? :drool:

~EMiLiTA~
07-31-2005, 04:06 PM
i have 2 out of those ones

Saumon
07-31-2005, 04:07 PM
tommy and feli? :scratch:

~EMiLiTA~
07-31-2005, 04:17 PM
well i used to be friends with tommy so....

Saumon
07-31-2005, 04:45 PM
used to? :awww: what happened? :sad:

i have a friend who has ancic on her list but she wont give me his addy :banghead:

veyonce
07-31-2005, 04:51 PM
Are their nicknames on msn messenger weird?? As in funny etc??

Nene
08-01-2005, 04:28 AM
msn:sad:

chocc0
08-01-2005, 09:08 AM
well i used to be friends with tommy so....
lucky girl!

Nene
08-01-2005, 09:13 AM
Agree:sad:

parissima
08-04-2005, 03:46 PM
Oh, Veyonce, thank you so much for posting the translations of the two articles from Marie Claire and Vogue.
I've bought these magazines two days ago, and read them. But i didn't get some sentences (and i was getting tired of searching for vocabulary in my dictionnary :p)...
So yeah, thanks sooo much :)

parissima
08-04-2005, 03:48 PM
Emilita, hehe, you're one lucky girl ;) And i see you're not the type of girl who'd give away the players' addresses on the internet, so that's cool =)

veyonce
08-04-2005, 04:04 PM
Oh, Veyonce, thank you so much for posting the translations of the two articles from Marie Claire and Vogue.
I've bought these magazines two days ago, and read them. But i didn't get some sentences (and i was getting tired of searching for vocabulary in my dictionnary :p)...
So yeah, thanks sooo much :)

Hi parissima, you are welcome... I just posted the translations.. You can get both mags in France?? Is it possible that you scan the Marie Claire photos??

parissima
08-07-2005, 11:16 PM
Yeah, we can get almost any foreign magazine in France. (i'm addicted to buying magazines, so yeah i know where to find them ^^) Even, i could get you both mags (i guess they're still available in store, right?) if you want, and, like, mail them to you or whatever.

Oh and sure, i'll scan the Marie Claire photos once i'm back at home (so that'd be on Wednesday, or on Thursday if i'm not lucky). ;)

veyonce
08-08-2005, 03:16 AM
Yeah, we can get almost any foreign magazine in France. (i'm addicted to buying magazines, so yeah i know where to find them ^^) Even, i could get you both mags (i guess they're still available in store, right?) if you want, and, like, mail them to you or whatever.

Oh and sure, i'll scan the Marie Claire photos once i'm back at home (so that'd be on Wednesday, or on Thursday if i'm not lucky). ;)

Hi parissima,

Really??!!! :eek: Can you help me get both mags??!!!! I have just pm you..

parissima
08-08-2005, 02:04 PM
Well, i've just pm-ed you back (i hope it worked, i still didn't get used to these forums ^^)

As for the Marie Claire pix, they'll be posted here on Wednesday :)

veyonce
08-08-2005, 06:23 PM
Well, i've just pm-ed you back (i hope it worked, i still didn't get used to these forums ^^)

As for the Marie Claire pix, they'll be posted here on Wednesday :)

Yes, I've received your pm... :)

parissima
08-10-2005, 07:05 PM
Ok, let's go ^^

here are the links to the pics of the article which where too big to be attached to the post ^^

Rafa with British journalists (http://img103.imageshack.us/img103/7184/rafawithsomebritshjournalists3.jpg)

Rafa concentrating ^^ (http://img103.imageshack.us/img103/271/marieclaireespconcentracion2px.jpg)

Rafa strikes the pose :P (http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/714/mcespmiraalacamara7es.jpg)

Carlita
08-10-2005, 09:56 PM
:D thanks for those!!!! :hug:

parissima
08-10-2005, 10:09 PM
My pleasure, Lady Carlita :)

veyonce
08-11-2005, 05:39 AM
Thanks, parissima!!!

veyonce
08-13-2005, 06:48 AM
FANS GAGA FOR RAFA
JACK TODD
The Gazette

Friday, August 12, 2005

The second-best male tennis player in the world is a left-handed Spanish teenager of somewhat more than medium height, moderate scruff and maximum charm.

He plays from somewhere so far behind the baseline that he has a separate postal code, possesses a serve that wouldn't crack a soft-boiled egg and can pack more excitement into 100 minutes of tennis than a baker's dozen of hard-serving lummoxes with cannon overhands and cannonballs for feet.

Rafael Nadal, the man they call "Rafa," the fist-pumping, ground-stroking phenom who has climbed from 51st to second in the world already this year, put on another display of grit, hustle and precision at the Jarry Tennis Centre yesterday in a 6-4, 6-4 win over Sebastien Grosjean that was equal parts finesse and fire. The two sets were a matched pair. In both, Nadal had to fight off a break point early, fought back on his own to win a break and then held steady until his final strut when, with Grosjean defeated, he lobbed a ball into the crowd, whipped off his headband and pranced off the court and into the quarterfinals.

High above, a cluster of hard-bitten and cynical journalists made a sacred bonfire of old John McEnroe racquets and prayed to the tennis gods: Let us have one dream final on Sunday, please. Nadal vs. Andre Agassi for all the marbles.

Roughly 16 hours after making short work of the Brazilian Ricardo Mello in Wednesday night's match, Nadal was back to make more converts yesterday, from the gaggle of young things in the cheap seats snapping away at him with their digital cameras to the greybeards in the pressbox ready to snap at him with their laptops.

If there was any danger of that, it vanished when Nadal's cellphone rang early during yesterday's session with the press; he picked it up, disposed of his caller with three quick words in what was either Italian or Spanish and a dismissive "ciao." No boorish NFL type Nadal, treating his questioners to a weight-lifting exhibition a la Terrell Owens. Just a lively kid whose English is not bad and will get better.

Nadal, who was one year old when Agassi won his first Tour tournament, said he would take delight in such a matchup: "If I play against Andre Agassi, is unbelievable, no? I want to play against him because he is a legend of tennis and I've never played him before. For me, play against him is a new experience. I hope to play him before he retires."

We hope he plays Agassi before next week.

Yesterday, in tough against Grosjean and tricky winds on a balmy but breezy afternoon, Nadal dipped into the Rafa sampler and offered up a variety of treats. Early on, there was the winner struck from 20 feet behind the baseline, tucked neatly behind Grosjean at the far corner. Leading 2-1 in the first set, Nadal charged the net (something he does rarely) and chipped a deft little shot at Grosjean's toes.

Leading 3-2, he polished off a brilliant, sustained volley with a delicate lob that sailed just over Grosjean's head and landed a palm's width inside the baseline with the delicacy of a hummingbird lighting in a birdbath.

From that point on, it was not at all difficult to imagine Nadal wearing a black beret and dangling a scarlet cape, toying with a particularly fast and dangerous bull. Grosjean can play Nadal's game and he can play it well - just not quite as well as Nadal. Grosjean had his moments, but at the end of most of their swashbuckling exchanges, it was Nadal who prevailed - sometimes with a well-aimed groundstroke from somewhere around Rivieres des Prairies, sometimes with a lob, at least twice with a drop shot.

With a serve that barely cracks 150 km/h, Nadal doesn't blow people away. He also doesn't give away points; he runs and runs and just when his opponent seems to have him pinned, he runs down one more ball and places it like a Chinese calligrapher executing an especially delicate brush stroke.

He was threatened yesterday, but not once in this tournament has he lost a service game; not to countryman Carlos Moya, not to Grosjean. Still, the toughest defence he put up all day might have been against persistent journalists trying to tell him that he's a clay-court specialist who can't play hard-court tennis.

"I think the hard court is good. Is not a big change like the clay. Is a little bit, but not too much different. The change is a little, but I feel good. If I am playing good, I feel good in this court. If I am playing bad, I play bad here, in clay, all like this."

Even after playing three fine matches here and despite his No. 1 seeding, Nadal insisted that he is not the favourite here. That, he said, would be Agassi.

First, Nadal has to get past today's match against Argentina's Mariano Puerta as he continues his world tour through this draw. His goal, he said yesterday, is to finish the year with his current No. 2 ranking.

From what we've seen here, Roger Federer might be feeling a tad nervous about that No. 1.

© The Gazette (Montreal) 2005

__________________________________________________ ___

Nadal uses the present
jean-francois_chabot@radio-canada.ca

Aug. 12, 2005 – Rafael Nadal recognizes that he’s going through the most productive period of his young professional career. This exceptional athlete at the age of just 19 years old knows all too well that nothing lasts forever.

Does he sometimes pinch himself to make sure that he’s not dreaming?

“I can’t really explain the reasons of my success. It sometimes depends on just a few things. Last year, I started the season very well. I rapidly climbed from place 50 to 32 in the world ranking. But an injury forced me to abandon the game during three months. When all goes well, that often is because of your state of mind at the time. So, sure, I’m using that to my advantage at the present time.”

Thursday evening, André Agassi answered to Nadal’s declaration that he wants to play against him before he retires. Agassi replied that he’d like to play against Nadal before Rafael finally hangs up his tennis racquet.

Nadal smiled. “Sure, I’d be very happy to find him in front of me in the final here. Me too, I hope it’s before my retirement (sic)…After all, he’s 35 and I am 19. I would have to be totally injured (laughter in the press conference).

Nadal came back to reality quickly by reminding us that every match is important en that he has to take his match on Saturday against Paul-Henri Mathieu very seriously. “Mathieu is playing excellent tennis at the moment. He repeatedly won his matches with 6-1 and 6-2, indicating that he’s in full possession of his capabilities. I will have to be ready for him.

Left or right?

Left-hander in tennis, but right-hander for all the rest. That’s how Nadal describes himself when we ask him to explain his ambidexterity.

“When I started playing tennis, I played both my backhand and my forehand with two hands. I simply needed to make the choice. However, I write and I throw with my right hand. Maybe that’s why my serve is not as powerful as the ones of certain others.”

Nadal knows that he has to master every aspect of tennis to compensate for that first serve that rarely goes faster than 150 km/h. Judging by his results, one would give him maximum points already.

And Montreal?

Asked for his first impressions of Montreal, Nada humbly admits that he hasn’t yet had the time to discover its charms. “I have only seen the tennis court, my hotel and the restaurant of my hotel. And I will have to leave the city quickly to go to Cincinnati to prepare for the next Masters. But I hope to one day have the opportunity to come back in more relaxed circumstances.”

On the topic of the support of the crowd, Nadal admits that he likes the feeling of the enthusiasm he causes. “I always play my best tennis when I can feel the support of the crowd. That contributes to my energy and my style of game. It gives me confidence and that’s very important”.

He sure is one we’d love to see return in two years.

parissima
08-13-2005, 11:12 AM
Thanks for the articles Veyonce ;)

These quotes about Agassi retiring and everything, haha, i love them ^^ it's so cute of both of them. (i used to be such an Agassi fan :/)

Rafa vs Mathieu? Why hasn't anyone told me about it? :crying2:

adelaide
08-18-2005, 02:10 AM
Exhausted Nadal confident of good run at U.S. Open
Wed Aug 17, 2005 07:31 PM BST

By Simon Cambers
CINCINNATI, Aug 17 (Reuters) - A leg-weary Rafael Nadal was confident of performing well at this month's U.S. Open despite being knocked out of the Cincinnati Masters in the first round.

The French Open champion's 16-match unbeaten streak was snapped on Tuesday when he squandered three match points before losing 6-7 6-2 7-6 to Tomas Berdych.

Having won 65 matches this year, including nine titles, the 19-year-old believes he will not be short of match practice when play begins at Flushing Meadows on August 29.

"I don't like losing matches but I am happy because I can prepare better the U.S. Open," said Nadal, whose two previous trips to New York have ended in second-round defeats.

"I can stop and calmly prepare for the Open, and that's a positive. I can go to Mallorca. That's a positive too because I can see my friends, my family."

"I think it is better mentally that I stay in Mallorca for one week and then go to the U.S. Open.

"I am going to practice on a hard court in Mallorca and then go to New York four days before to prepare better."

Having won his first Masters Series hardcourt title in Montreal on Sunday, Nadal was understandably tired against Berdych.

The Spaniard said that it was his success, rather than the number of tournaments he had played, which had left him so drained.

"I had to play six matches in winning the tournament (in Montreal). I don't play too many tournaments. I've played too much because I reached 10 finals this year."

from reuters.co.uk

veyonce
08-18-2005, 04:31 AM
NADAL CRASHES OUT
Sporting Life

Rafael Nadal crashed out of the Cincinnati Masters after a thigh injury hindered his chances against Czech Tomas Berdych.

The teenager will be given a chance to recuperate ahead of the US Open after losing 6-7 (4-7) 6-2 7-6 (7-3).

A combination of the injury and inconsistent serving saw the Spaniard struggle against his little-known opponent.

He is not scheduled to play next week in New Haven, the final hardcourt tournament before the tour shifts to Flushing Meadows on August 29.

With nearly two weeks off, Nadal may have a chance to rest his left thigh, which twice required massage treatment from the trainer.

Nadal won a first-set tie-breaker but was not as fortunate in the third set, when he committed all six of his double-faults. Taking a pair of water breaks, he lost five of the first seven points of the tie-breaker.

Berdych sailed a forehand long before Nadal again double-faulted, then was unable to handle a powerful serve-and-volley return by Berdych for the match.

doubleafan
08-18-2005, 04:58 AM
Rafa lack guts !! He had to resort to gamesmanship to win against Agassi.
But one thing is for sure. The punishment he got from Agassi meant he had to loose early at cincy.

Shame on you Rafa !!!

veyonce
08-18-2005, 05:03 AM
Since Rafa left for Mallorca, I will post this interview here. Time for another dosage of Rafa-English... :)

Cincinnati Official Website:

T. BERDYCH /R. Nadal

6‑7, 6‑2, 7‑6

RAFAEL NADAL

THE MODERATOR: Andre from the ATP is here to translate if we need some help.

Questions, please.

Q. You fought very hard. Do you think you were a little unlucky to come up against someone playing like that in the first match?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes, I think I don't have good luck in the draw. I say that in Montreal because today I was play against Tomas Berdych, so I know he's very good player. For the first round if you play against any player when he play with a little bit topspin, you can improve your game.

Because is the same court, but is not the same. Is same surface, but not always is the same because here is a little bit more slowly. The ball with the humidity stay little bit more tough.

So the changes, and I am little bit tired. I don't have the same explosion when I run. So for that, and because for ‑‑ because Tomas Berdych play very, very good match. So for that I lose today.

Q. Did you hurt your hamstring? You were getting it massaged at one point.

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, I have very (charge?) here, very tired, yeah.

Q. Was there anything different that you could have done, do you think, to save that match?

RAFAEL NADAL: No, I have all. Because today I can't play more. I know is the first match. Change conditions. And with all change, I have four matchpoints or three matchpoints, unbelievable. Because he serve one, the first, he serve in the middle unbelievable; I can't return. The second, he serve very good first serve; I return here, and he play one forehand unbelievable, winner. And after, in the third, he mistake the first serve and in the second serve he serve ace in the second serve. So I can do nothing. I don't have good luck in the matchpoints and in the break points for 5‑3 and 4‑3 and serve on.

Berdych don't have good luck, too, because I have four points and is the same history so...

I can't do it. I am...

ANDRE SILVA: (From Spanish.) He was very comfortable with himself. He knew it was very tough to come here, a change of conditions, and the first match against Berdych is very hard.

He did everything he could to win, but he came up short. He was very confident about himself and knows how hard it was.

For a guy like Federer, who is the best in the world on this surface, the same thing happened to him last year when he came here and played against Hrbaty.

So for me, it was not the best hard court in the world. It was also difficult.

Q. How well do you know each other? He talked about playing you when you were 12 years old, seeing you growing up together on the Juniors circuit.

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, we know because we play in the World Cup for teams, so we know. He is one or less than me. So we know, we know all about. We play three times in the Juniors, I think.

Q. It would benefit you to have some longer rallies. He was obviously trying to shorten the points. Is that a key to what he was doing, that he was able to have some short points and have some winners?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes, of course. I am ‑‑ I try do the rallies. But, you know, if I have a little bit ‑‑ if I feel little bit more good physical, I can improve my game because I can play little bit more aggressive. But I don't feel very well. Physically I have this problem, too.

And he play very tough. If he play very tough and I feel very good physically, I can play with him, be more aggressive. But today I can't because he play very tough and I can do nothing.

Q. Did you not feel well physically beside your hamstring? Were you just tired?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes, tired.

ANDRE SILVA: Physically tired. Didn't have the same explosion to go to the balls. Also couldn't see the ball as well as he was seeing it last week. Maybe mentally a little tired, too.

RAFAEL NADAL: I think Berdych is one future Top 10 player, I think. He play very well. He is very young.

Q. Is it your first tournament on the American soil since the French Open, your victory?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes.

Q. Could you tell us a little bit about this American crowd and your popularity today.

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah. But, no, because I arrive yesterday in the morning. I only stay today, today morning in the hotel preparing for the match.

And in the court, well, very, very good atmosphere. But I don't feel nothing especial because I lost in the first round so I can't have time, no? I don't have time.

Q. Many people call out your name by your nickname Rafa. Some kids, I was watching Hewitt's match this afternoon, and one little girl was waiting to get an autograph. When she heard that you were practicing, she left Hewitt right away and ran for your practice game. Has fame changed your life?

RAFAEL NADAL: No, I don't think. I think I am the same. I want to continue doing the same. So I think the famous ‑‑ I am a little bit more famous now, but I don't have change in my life. I live in the same place, I have the same friends. Nothing, nothing change for me, and I don't want change.

Q. When we were waiting for you to come, we were joking that Rafael Nadal spends a lot of time on the mobile phone talking to friends.

RAFAEL NADAL: I don't speak a lot with my friends when I stay here. I speak one time in the week normally, and today I was speak with my uncle and my father. Nothing more.

Q. Do you feel you have played a little bit too much? Do you feel tired?

RAFAEL NADAL: I don't play too much, but I won (smiling). So I play too much because I won the tournament. I play six matches.

But I don't play too much tournaments, I know. I play too much because I play ten finals this year. For that I play too much matches, but not too much tournaments.

Q. How will you prepare for the US Open now?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, I think I go to Mallorca and to Spain tomorrow I think because if I stay one week, two weeks here before the US Open, I think is better for the mental I stay in Mallorca for one week, and then to come to the US Open with a lot of illusion. And I gonna practice in hard court in Mallorca for one week, and after I go four days before to New York for prepare better the US Open.

Q. You're not worried about the time difference, jetlag?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, is not easy, but I think you can put the good things and the bad things. And for me I think now is better go to Mallorca.

Q. So that's the good part of losing the match; you can go home now?

RAFAEL NADAL: Always I can watch the good thing, so I am positive. I am a little bit disappointed because I lost today and I don't like lost the matches. I have four matchpoints. A little bit more tough for me.

But now I think I can stop, I can prepare the US Open with calm, and that's the positive. I can go to Mallorca. That's positive, too, because I can watch my friends, my family.

I am disappointed for the match, and I am happy because I can prepare better the US Open.

Q. The last time you played him it was also a three‑setter. Do you enjoy playing him? What is it like playing him?

RAFAEL NADAL: Is difficult match. Is a difficult match. He play good and I can win and I can lose. In Bastad in the final I win; today I lose.

So it's okay. Every match is difficult. Every match have difficult moments. Every player is a good player because we have a lot of...

ANDRE SILVA: The feud is equal. Tennis feud, the players are all equal.

RAFAEL NADAL: And if you want to stay 100%, you can lose every, every match. And if you stay 100%, you can lose, too. So that's the real.

Q. Do you think this could be the start of maybe another new rivalry on the tour if you face each other more often?

RAFAEL NADAL: No, I don't think so. Nothing else, because we are a lot of players. We are a lot of players. All players play good, and I don't like the rivality in the two players because we are...

ANDRE SILVA: We have all these good players on tour that should all be respected, so there is no one rivalry.

Q. Will Tony be with you at the US Open?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes, of course.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

_________________

Excerpts from Tomas Berdych's interview.

Q. What was going through your mind when he had the matchpoints up 6‑5?

TOMAS BERDYCH: So when he took his first matchpoint, yeah, I was ‑‑ it was in my mind was very ‑‑ it was everything in my mind. Because after that point what he did was like I think so lucky, the shot. He was so late there and he hit with the frame the lob over me and it fells to the court like 10 centimeters from the baseline. So I think it was quite lucky shot.

So only what was point to do was concentrate for the next point and try to make a good serve and then win the point.

Q. You had some really big serves on those matchpoints in the tiebreak. I mean, can you talk about your serve. Do you feel like it can do that for you regularly, get you out of tough spots?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Yeah, I think the service, yeah, the serve is one of my best shots. So I have to make my style of the tennis on the serve and then not to play long rallies like Rafael is doing. So I needs to play something different than he's like, and I think I make it today.

Yeah, I'm happy with my tennis today.

Q. You survived five breakpoints to keep it tied at 4‑4. Did that do a lot for your confidence and your emotion at that point?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Yeah, I think so. Because if you came from the situation where you down and you save some breakpoints, yeah, of course it's very good to your confidence.

And then but anyway in these matches every point is so tough, so I was only concentration for one or two points. So nothing special like I was thinking that I save four breakpoints or I lost one easy shot or something like this so...

Q. What was the difference playing him this time than the first time you met?

TOMAS BERDYCH: So I think the biggest difference was the surface, because we play on the clay court and that's the ‑‑ I think the surface that Rafael like the most. And it was so close. So I was really waiting for the rematch on my surface so...

And I make it for myself, so I am happy. We will see.

Q. What does it mean for you, being a teenager yourself, to beat one of the most successful teenagers in years?

TOMAS BERDYCH: I think for me this match is not that different ‑‑ no. I think is, yeah, not that different like the match let's say with Federer. Because the Federer, you know, he is older guy, I never play with him like in my category in the Juniors or something like this.

But with the Nadal, I know him so long. I saw him when we were, I don't know, 12 years old. So we was on the same tournament and we go every category up so we know each other so well.

And I don't think it's that ‑‑ I don't know how to say. With the Federer, it was like something amazing. Of course this match is perfect for me, but it's not ‑‑ you know? You understand? Because he is the same age like me, so it's not like you play with Agassi; he is a legend. But, you know, Rafael, we are same age so there is no like this different.

Q. How often did you play him growing up in Juniors?

TOMAS BERDYCH: I think we played twice.

Q. Do you remember who won those two?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Oh, I think one was when we was like 12 or 13, and one was, yeah, something around ‑‑ I don't know. I think it's 1‑all or 2‑0 for him, but I'm not sure.

Q. Do you think that you have highlighted a slight weakness in his game in that he doesn't have a really big game and he can't stop players like you from attacking him?

TOMAS BERDYCH: So I think no. I think his kind of the game is very, very good on the clay courts because he is so great moving. He is like, yeah, I said it, like machine ‑ he is everywhere. He's so fast.

On the hard court, if you really good serving and then you don't try to play the long rallies like he wants to play with you, that's only chance how to beat him. I don't think it's like some special tactics to play with him or something.

But he's playing all the time the same. He's moving well. He's everywhere. And if you make mistake, you make the mistake. If not, you play the short points or not so strong so he just push it and he make the points so...

Q. When you got matchpoints, were you very excited, or were you able to stay calm?

TOMAS BERDYCH: When I went to matchpoint I was so tired, so I didn't think about it. So I just serve and that's all.

I think this is ‑‑ sometimes this is better way than you think about the matchpoint and whether you can beat him or something.

Q. You said when you beat Federer last year it was a really important thing for you. Does this maybe not seem as big of an upset to you? How big is this particular win for your confidence or whatever?

TOMAS BERDYCH: No, no, no. I think this is the, I think, the same like with the Roger, but only the difference is the player is the different. Because I was ‑‑ I have much more respect with Roger than with Rafael because ‑‑ I don't want to say it, you know, nothing bad Rafael, but it's like, you know, we are growing up, same age, and is the same. It's like when the Roddick is playing with some guy who is same age, it's the same. When he was playing with Mathieu, is the same. They are the same age. And it's ‑‑ I think for tennis it's so, so important if you play with some guy you know him or no, so...

ataptc
08-18-2005, 05:23 AM
:lol: another cute interview :) Thanks veyonce!

GonzoFan
08-18-2005, 10:58 AM
Thanks for the interview :yeah: I just can't get tired of reading his interviews ... he is so cute :inlove:

Carlita
08-18-2005, 01:56 PM
:lol: aaaaaaaaaaaaaw he's just so lovely!!!http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y35/Lady_Carlita/blinkies/cutie44.gif

veyonce
08-19-2005, 05:26 AM
From Terra:

TENIS-NADAL - 18-08-2005
Toni Nadal: 'Aconsejé a Rafael que no jugara en Cincinnati'
Toni Nadal, entrenador y tío del tenista mallorquín Rafael Nadal, aconsejó a su pupilo que renunciara a jugar el Master Series de Cincinnati tras vencer en el de Montreal, pero éste ignoró la recomendación porque se veía 'fuerte y bien', según declaró hoy a EFE el preparador del tenista número dos del mundo.


'Le dije a Rafa que parara, pero no me escuchó. Es mejor renunciar a un torneo que perder en la primera ronda (ante el checo Tomas Berdyich', dijo Toni Nadal.

Rafael Nadal llegó esta mañana a Palma para preparar el Abierto de Estados Unidos, y lo hará, 'en una pista similar a la superficie en la que se jugarán los partidos que tiene un amigo suyo en Manacor (Mallorca)', explicó Toni Nadal.

'Rafa está muy cansado, pero va a preparar a conciencia su participación en el Open de Estados Unidos. El está muy ilusionado y no quiere fallar, aunque tampoco sería bueno que se metiera mucha presión de forma innecesaria', explicó el entrenador.

El tenista balear suele alternar en su Manacor natal los partidos de preparación con salidas al campo de golf cercano a su domicilio, un deporte que 'le relaja muchísimo', comentó su tío.

Antes de perder frente a Berdych, Nadal había ganado sus últimos 16 partidos, incluidos los de los torneos de Bastad y Sttutgart, donde obtuvo los títulos. Ha conquistado nueve torneos en esta temporada en 10 finales, ocho de ellos en tierra batida.

En 2005, el tenista manacorense ha obtenido 65 victorias y ha sufrido sólo nueve derrotas.
Terra Deportes - EFE

___________________________________________

My not good translation via babel fish translation....

TENIS-NADAL - 18-08-2005
Toni Nadal: ' I advised Rafael not to play in Cincinnati’
Toni Nadal, trainer and uncle of the Majorcan tennis player Rafael Nadal, advised his pupil that he withdraw to play the Masters Series of Cincinnati after winning in Montreal, but Rafael ignored the recommendation because he was seen ' strong and, according to today declared to EFE the preinn of the tennis player number two of the world.

‘I said to Rafa to stop playing in Cincinnati, but he did not listen to me. It is better for him to pull out from the tournament than to lose in the first round (before Czech Tomas Berdyich)', Toni Nadal said.

Rafael Nadal arrived this morning at Palm to prepare for the US Open, and he will do it on a track similar to the surface in which a friend of his in Manacor has (Majorca), explained Toni Nadal.

'Rafa is very tired, but he is conscientiously going to prepare for his participation in the US Open. He is very deluded and he does not want to fail, although it would not be good either that much form of pressure was put unnecessary’, explained the trainer.

The Balearic tennis player usually alternates in his native Manacor for preparation with exits to the golf course near his home, a sport that relaxes him, commented his uncle.

Before losing to Berdych, Nadal has won 16 matches, including in Bastad and Stuttgart where he won the titles. He has won 9 titles out of 10 finals in this season, 8 of them on clay.

In 2005, the majorcan tennis player has gained 65 victories and has suffered only nine defeats.

veyonce
08-19-2005, 05:28 AM
Polo.com, 1 of the sponsers of US Open.

Excerpts..

Take It from a Pro
By Paul Fein
Jim Courier, twice the French and Australian champion, world No. 1 in 1992 and now a top-notch TV tennis analyst, on 19-year-old rising Spanish star, No. 5 Rafael Nadal:

“Rafa’s strength is his competitive spirit. He loves the battle, and he loves the spotlight. He has a monster forehand. His phenomenally angled inside-out forehand is a shot Sergi Bruguera used to great effect in the ’90s. He generates vicious spin with his brute strength and very loose string tension. For a guy who hits such a heavy ball, he moves like a guy who is much lighter. Being lefty is another advantage.

“He’s raw in the sense that he’s still developing his serves and his volleys and his shot selection on other surfaces. It’s very sound on clay, but at times on hard courts he has played a little too defensively considering how much power he has. He’s shown he’s adept on hard courts by making the Nasdaq final this year and beating Federer there last year. Grass will be more of a challenge because of his [Western] grips. Nadal has the makings of the next great clay-court player. Time will tell whether he’s the next great player, period.”

Clara Bow
08-19-2005, 06:20 AM
Thanks for the links veyonce.

So Toni wanted him to pull out of Cinci....interesting. I think it's good thought that Nadal played there- even if he lost first round. It was a good match and I'm glad he showed up instead of pulling out with an "injury."

The Courier analysis looks like it's from a bit way back since at the time of Jim's comments was ranked number 5.

Mimi
08-19-2005, 07:43 AM
but isn't you can only not play when you have injuries :confused: , rafa is only tired, so its not the formal reason for withdrawal right :confused:

Castafiore
08-19-2005, 07:53 AM
So, Toni advised him not to play?
On the one hand, I wished he had listened. How is this going to affect his confidence towards the USO?
On the other hand, it will perhaps motivate him even further.

Anyway, I found a report of an interesting conversation. Here's the link (you'll have to scroll down a bit and look for the post #110 of VamosRafa:
Brad Gilbert talks about Nadal (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=63756&page=8&pp=15)

veyonce
08-19-2005, 10:12 AM
So, Toni advised him not to play?
On the one hand, I wished he had listened. How is this going to affect his confidence towards the USO?
On the other hand, it will perhaps motivate him even further.

Anyway, I found a report of an interesting conversation. Here's the link (you'll have to scroll down a bit and look for the post #110 of VamosRafa:
Brad Gilbert talks about Nadal (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=63756&page=8&pp=15)

Think Rafa really needed the break/rest, maybe he should listen to Uncle Toni.. He's looking relaxed back home now. :D

Not sure what's the reason Andre gave to pull out from the Cinny tournament... He wanted to rest to prepare for the US Open something like that rite?

Here's the full interview on what Brad Gilbert's opinions on Rafa. Credits to Susan of vamosrafael.com!! :)

Nadal according to BRAD:

- The thing about Nadal is that he's only going to get better. He's a great athlete with a great attitude. He notes that in 2003 he posted on his website that Nadal was the player to watch.

- Notes he's a great mover on clay, but things that his movement will shine even more on hardcourt. He says most claycourt players rely on their slide, and don't make the appropriate adjustment on hardcourts. Rafa doesn't do that. He thinks Rafa's speed is going to be more apparent on hardcourt. He said the guy moves like a gazelle.

Brad said that sky is the limit with Rafa in terms of greatness. The big thing he has in his favor is TIME. He's only 19 years old. And Brad has never seen a 19-year-old player that didn't not improve by the time he was 21, 22, 23. He said no player at age 19 is complete.

As to what Rafa has to improve, Brad says nothing in particular, although he likely will improve all aspects. He says the thing that may keep him from being a superstar here in the USA is his English. He believes he actually speaks English better than he understands it. But he's working on that, and Brad thinks it is good that his handlers are making him do so.

- I mentioned Rafa's "weak" serve. And he said, again, that will improve in time. But it works pretty well even now.

- He believes Rafa has a great support team, and that's huge. He's handled well. He's a nice kid, and well liked on Tour. He says there's nothing not to like about him.

- As for a rivalry between him and Roger -- he says they both are going to great players. He notes that even though people say Roger is the next Sampras. In truth, he's the first Federer. He believes it will be the same with Nadal. In a few years, people will be talking about the "next" Federer and the "next" Nadal the way they do about other great.

- He said it's very rare for a guy to show such promise at age 19 and not go onto be a great -- such as Borg, Wilander and others. He said that Chang is really the only exception. And he said, "Nadal is no Chang." He says that guys who post these results so early go on to be Hall of Famers. He expects that from Nadal.

- He said he loves watching Rafa play. He is the most fun player to watch on Tour. I asked about his strokes, and said many think they are ugly, and he said, "Who cares" They are fun to watch."

- I asked about future injuries, and said folks thinks he'll injure his risk because of his racquet head speed, and that his body will wear out He said, "Have you seen that kid?" He's a Mack truck. He's in great shape. He said all players have injuries, but didn't see that Rafa would be any more prone than others. He noted that people are still waiting for Andy's serving arm to fall off.

- I noted that many are comparing Nadal to Muster and expect a similar career. Brad said "Nadal is no Muster." He said Rafa is way better than Muster ever was.

- He said he first saw Rafa play in 2002. Carlos Costa told Brad, "I have this kid who is really special." When Brad saw him, he said he saw the same promise in Rafa that he saw in Andre at the same age.

- I asked what major events does he think Rafa can win. He said, "All of them." He believes he is among the Top 3 faves for the U.S. this year, and perhaps the No. 2, after Federer. He says he can win in Australia, and even at Wimbledon. The latter one will take more time to conquer. He said that Rafa made a mistake this year by playing Halle literally the day after winning the French. He should have adjusted his schedule a bit before going to Wimbledon. Admits grass will be Rafa's greatest challenge.

- He does believe Fed and Nadal will continue to lead the current pack of players. I told him that some folks believe Rafa can't adjust to "faster" hardcourts on a consistent basis. His response, "They obviously haven't played pro tennis." He said I know the game, and this kid can play on anything he chooses to. And he's going to improve.

- I said, "Can't you say anything negative about him?" And he reiterated, yes, "He needs to improve his English."

- So we were about done then. And then he quizzed me. "Now what is the thing that Rafa has most going for him?" I answered, "TIME." And he said, you got it. Don't think about all the negative things that could possibly happen to him -- just know that time is on his side.

Castafiore
08-27-2005, 11:13 AM
Here's the entire article from that interview with Gilbert:

Gilbert: The sky is the limit for Nadal
Brad: 'He's a Mack truck. If he were American, he'd be a football linebacker'
By Susan Seemiller, Special to TennisReporters.net

During Cincinnati, ESPN commentator Brad Gilbert spoke to TennisReporters.net's and VamosRafael.com's Susan Seemiller about the prospects of 19-year-old Rafael Nadal, who had just come off his first Tennis Masters Series hard court title in Montreal. The No. 2 ranked Nadal has won nine titles this year, including Roland Garros and two other TMS events.

Tennisreporters.net: Are you surprised at Nadal's success this year, rising from No. 51 to No. 2 in just six months?
Brad Gilbert: No. In 2002, Carlos Costa [Nadal's agent] told me, "I have this kid who is really special." When I saw Nadal, I saw the same promise in him that I saw in Andre Agassi at the same age. In 2003, I posted on my web site that he was someone to watch. I said even then, "If he were a stock, he would be a definite buy."

TR.net: Nadal has nine clay court titles, and just won his first hardcourt title at the Rogers Masters in Montreal. Do you think he will continue to have success on surfaces other than clay?
BG: Yes. He can play on any surface. The thing about Nadal is that he's only going to get better. He's a great athlete with a great attitude. He's a great mover on clay, but I think his movement shines even more on hard courts. Most clay court players rely on their slide, and cannot make the appropriate adjustment on hardcourts. This is not true with Nadal, who moves like a gazelle.

TR.net: How great do you think Nadal's career will be?
BG: The sky is the limit with Nadal in terms of greatness. The biggest thing in his favor is time. He is only 19-years-old. I have never seen a 19-year-old player who did not improve by the time he was 23 or 24. No player at age 19 is complete, and it is very rare for a player to post these results at age 19 and not go on to be a Hall of Famer. Boris Becker, Mats Wilander, Bjorn Borg and others had early success, and I expect Nadal will follow the same path. Michael Chang is an exception, but Nadal is no Chang.

TR.net: Nadal has already won Roland Garros. What other majors do you think he can win?
BG: All of them. Nadal is among the top three favorites for the US Open this year and perhaps even the second favorite after Federer. He can win in Australia, and even at Wimbledon. That one will be his biggest challenge. I think he may have made a mistake by going to Halle right after Roland Garros this year. Next year Nadal may want to make some adjustments to better prepare for Wimbledon.

TR.net: Some folks have been calling Nadal the next Thomas Muster. Do you agree?
BG: No. Nadal is better than Muster. I believe Nadal is going to be a great player. Many people say Roger Federer is the next Pete Sampras. I think he's the first Federer, and I think it's the same with Nadal. In a few years, people will be calling some other player the "next Nadal."

TR.net: Some people don't like Nadal's strokes, especially in comparison to Federer's.
BG: Who cares? They are fun to watch.

TR.net: Do you think that with his style of play, Nadal will be more prone to injuries?
BG: Have you seen that kid? He's a Mack truck. If he were American, he'd be a football linebacker. He's in great shape. All players have injuries, but I don't see Nadal being more injury prone than others. Many people are surprised that Roddick's serving arm has held up this long.

TR.net: You are so positive about Nadal. Is there anything you don't like about him?
BG: No. I just love watching him play. I think he's the most entertaining player to watch on the ATP. He has a great support team, and that's huge. He's handled well, and he's a nice kid. There's nothing not to like about him. He just needs to improve his English. That is the one thing that will keep him from being a superstar here in the United States. With respect to his game, all aspects, including his serve, will improve in time.
Source: http://www.tennisreporters.net/qa_gilbert_082605.html

Castafiore
08-27-2005, 11:17 AM
Another fine article:

Rafael Nadal – Tenacious, Ferocious, One of a Kind
by Jim McLennan

The Kid turned pro at age 15, and now in his break out year on the pro tour he has to date captured nine titles, including the French Open. With the US hard court season in full swing Rafa has his sights set on overtaking Roger Federer. Yes I did say that.

Remember, at Wimbledon many of the games greatest players (Laver, McEnroe, Connors and Laver) dared to suggest Federer may very well be the greatest talent the game has ever seen. And now “Rafa” challenges all that and more with the ruthless efficiency of his punishing backcourt game.

Nadal captured the Rogers Cup in Montreal with a three set victory over Andre Agassi. Agassi was interviewed prior to the final, and recalled a similar situation years before when he, then a teenager, met Jimmy Connors, at that point still the “Aging King” of the tennis world. Then, after the bruising three set match, Agassi observed, “He's just a great mover on court, and he gets good power from stretched positions so you're never sure if you have control of a point.” Well this is pretty high praise from a player that generally punishes all his opponents with pinpoint groundies into the corner, the opponent scrambling from side to side while Andre dominates the center of the court.

Rafa moves better than anyone I believe I have ever seen. Not exactly powerful, not necessarily explosive, but rather, to my eye, his movement is just tenacious. He runs down nearly everything, drives the ball with incredible power and accuracy from totally outstretched positions, and with such balance that he recovers immediately for the next shot, no matter what or where. It is just that simple, you cannot get the ball by him. He is dangerous from any part of the court at any time, he recovers in the wink of an eye, and the Kid is rarely out of position.

A glance at the Ricoh ATP match facts, clarifies Rafa's skills. Within the serving category, Nadal is second in percentage of points won on his second serve (Federer leads at 60%; Nadal is a few ticks behind at 57%). Nadal is third overall in first serve percentage, averaging 69% on his first serve. On the return of serve, however, Nadal dominates every category. He is first in points won returning first serve at 39%, he is first in break points converted at 48%, he is first in points won returning the second serve at 57%, and he is first in return games won at 40%. True, most of his matches were on clay where returns and service breaks are more common, but still, these are pretty heady numbers. If and when the Kid can dominate the service stats as well, we have someone who would be nearly impossible to play.

In the recent Rogers Cup final, the tale of the tape provides similar insight. The score was 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, and though the first two sets, the match swung back and forth, the third set was all Nadal. Overall the numbers tell the same story. First serve percentage, Nadal 67%, Agassi 57%. Both men served 7 aces. Both won 72% of the points when they got their first serve in. A larger gap occurred on the second serve, with Nadal capturing 70% of the points on his second serve, and Agassi winning only 50% of the points on his second serve. And overall Nadal won 86 points in the match to Agassi's 70.
The third set, however, tells a different story. On first serve, so critical as the match goes down to the wire, Nadal was at 65% and Agassi at 48%. On points won on the first serve, Nadal was at 85% and Agassi at 60%. On points won on the second serve, Nadal was at 71% and Agassi at 55%, and finally and most importantly, Nadal won 43% of the points when returning serve and Agassi only managed 20%. Put simply, Agassi served poorly in the third set, and Rafa made him pay for it.

As we observe Nadal's talent flourish over the coming months and years, he has a special something that in many ways does not truly compare to the others. First, I would say that no one, truly no one, has covered court quite like Nadal. Hewitt is quick and scrappy, Michael Chang was all over the court, Borg was an excellent retriever – but somehow Nadal is leagues ahead of these guys and all the others when it comes to getting to the ball and doing something with it.
Second, when I think back to the game's most intense competitors, certainly Connors and McEnroe come to mind. But in today's game I cannot think of anyone else who brings such ferocity to the court – this kid comes to battle, he comes for the battle, and he loves the battle. We have questioned the “guts” of certain players, how much does Federer “want it”, what will Safin “give” to win a match. But Nadal has answered this question in the affirmative.

And though I am not sure that you and I can match Rafa's intensity or incredible court coverage, there are a few things worth observing, which may trickle down into your own game. When someone is described as a “Great Mover” there are a number of distinct skills that are brought to bear. Starting quickly, hitting on balance, recovering quickly, and timing the split step to the opponent's contact, each and every time. Rafa brings a dancer's awareness to the court, for he is master of the dynamic instability required to run quickly, and in the replays of some of his amazing shots he is leaning into his running strides much like a sprinter coming out of the blocks. When he punishes the ball from the corners from what appears to be a dead run, he is impeccably on balance, no longer leaning out to the ball but now totally upright. Then a moment after contact as he is following through, he totally reverses body weight back to the center of the court, again - the dynamic instability helps him recover better than anyone in the game. Finally, as he readies for the opponent's reply, he times each and every split step to the opponent, totally engaged, ready to run laterally or move forward for the kill.

Interestingly, walking is a simpler form of dynamic instability, in that one's balance and resulting momentum propels the motion and the feet simply follow. And for those skeptical about that comment, consider when someone walks into a plate glass window, do they hit their head, their foot, or their knee."
Source: tennisonenews.com - TennisOne Newsletter, 8.22.05

Castafiore
08-27-2005, 11:25 AM
John MacEnroe's opinion and I think it's important that he emphasizes 'long term' because things are going fast right now but Nadal does not have to prove everything within one season.

McEnroe: Nadal Can Challenge Federer Long Term
By Tennis Week
08/25/2005



Nearly three decades ago, a long-haired lefthander with a distinctive style of play took the tennis world by storm as a fearless force who played through qualifying to surge to the semifinals of Wimbledon at the age of 18.



John McEnroe has watched another talented teenager whipping lethal left-handed strokes rise to the Roland Garros title and the second spot in the world rankings and believes the infusion of intensity Rafael Nadal brings to tennis is as energizing as an injection of adrenaline.

"I think this guy's incredible," McEnroe said of Nadal today. "This guy's been a huge injection into the men's game. The guy's only 19 and he plays with unbelievable intensity. He loves competing. He's not afraid to go out and lay it on the line. He's a totally different style than Federer. His look is unusual, to put it mildly, but I think it adds some interest. He's incredibly physically strong for a guy as young as he is."

Slowing Nadal has been as easy as silencing thunder: he has claimed nine tournament titles this season and has won two of three career meetings with Federer. Fresh off conducting an interview with world No. 1 Federer that will air during next week's U.S. Open, McEnroe, who has called Federer "the most talented player I've ever seen in my life" stopped short of saying the second-seeded Nadal can dethrone the defending champion in New York. But he suggests Nadal has the game to challenge Federer for the top spot in the future.

"He's the best bet, if he can keep up this level of play, to really challenge Federer on a somewhat regular basis particularly on a slow court," McEnroe said. "I think Nadal is the best thing to happen to men's tennis this year, without question. He won a tournament in Montreal, OK Roger wasn't there, but he beat Andre in the final who was playing good tennis. I'm not quite sure he's ready to go all the way yet, but he's proven to be a very legitimate contender even on this (hard) court. I'm amazed at how quickly he's advanced. This guy's been an incredible boost for the game."

Another talented teen who has attracted attention is Scottish sensation Andrew Murray, the 2004 U.S. Open junior champion. The USTA was reportedly negotiating with the LTA in a wild card exchange that would have given Murray a wild card into next week's Open in exchange for a future Wimbledon wild card for an American player. James Blake was awarded a wild card into Wimbledon this year and there were rumors that LTA officials sought a Murray wild card into the Open as reciprocation for the Blake wild card. When a mutual agreement could not be reached, the USTA opted against awarding Murray a wild card and McEnroe said he was surprised by the move.

"In short, yes I was surprised based on a couple people I saw who got wild cards," McEnroe said. "I've followed his results and heard he's playing some good tennis. He'll probably get in (through qualifying) because he's playing well, but I was surprised he didn't get a wild card. I think he deserved one, personally. Listen, the guy's a good player and I like him a lot so I'm hopeful he will improve his conditioning, but he's got a good future, potentially."

Asked if he had been contacted recently to work on a part-time basis with Murray, McEnroe replied: "I checked my messages and I haven't heard any messages recently. Just join the list of people who aren't calling me."

Castafiore
08-27-2005, 11:32 AM
And to conclude, other nice quotes from Brad Gilbert:
Tennis Week: Of all the teenagers not named Nadal — Berdych, Monfils, Gasquet, Murray — who has the biggest upside and who will have the best career, assuming they stay healthy?

Brad Gilbert: Not named Nadal? That's tough because I would pick Nadal. Umm. You want 'em in chronological order?

Tennis Week: Sure, whatever your gut feeling.

Brad Gilbert: I think of those guys Monfils is the best athlete by far. Gasquet's got the biggest shot like he's a great ball striker. Murray's a little bit like Mecir. I think Berdych has the biggest upside of them all.

Tennis Week: I think tennis sometimes now gets a bad rap as just a game of big bangers from the baseline, but to me Federer plays with a lot of feel and thought. Obviously an Agassi, Santoro, even a guy like Pavel, there is thought going on there. Do you see anyone out there who you recognize as a real thinker on court?

Brad Gilbert: You know who is an awesome thinker? Rafael Nadal. That guy's got a swollen brain; Allen Fox would love him. The kid's so smart for his age I don't even know how his brain fits in his head. (in the article in the link I've added beneath, he talks some more about that other swollen brain "Allen Fox")

Tennis Week: If you had to coach against Federer on a hard court, what's the best way to attack him? Assuming the player has the skill in the first place, of course.

Brad Gilbert: Give me Rafael Nadal. I'll take him and do not pass go, do not collect $200. The guy's just a stud. You know how they say someone's got "it" like LeBron James? Rafael Nadal has got it. He knows how to play and he's got skills to back it up and he's lefty to make it more difficult. I think Andy has a little fear playing against Federer, Rafael Nadal goes on the court: no fear. He has no fear and plus he hasn't taken a lot of beatings. He's beaten Federer two out of three times and the one time he lost he was up two sets to none. I mean, that's the thing you love most about Nadal: he has no fear.

Read the entire article here: http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=13672&bannerregion

veyonce
08-28-2005, 09:22 AM
It's so funny that Toni described Miguel's like a bull... lol

2 Articles From South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Swashbuckling style

Nadal's pirate pants are all the rage in the tennis world

By Sarah Talalay
Staff Writer
Posted August 28 2005


Winning this year's French Open didn't just propel Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal to superstar status. It also made his signature three-quarter length pirate, or Capri, pants a hot commodity.

Although they haven't become de rigueur on tennis courts these days, tennis stores can't keep the unusual long pants, which Nike makes in white and black, on the shelves.

"I haven't seen anyone wear them, yet we've sold a ton of them," said Heidi Gotchal, apparel buyer for Tennis Warehouse, a California online retailer that has sold more than 400 pairs.

Gotchal said the pants became popular after Nadal wore them at the Nasdaq-100 Open in April.

"I know a lot of people probably passed on them, thinking `They're Capri pants, they're never going to sell,'" Gotchal said.

Jeff Miller, owner of Pro Tennis World in Davie, said he has sold 20 pairs at $50 apiece, but estimated he could have sold 50 if Nike hadn't had them on back order.

"They are definitely a lot more popular than I anticipated," Miller said.

Also popular are the colorful sleeveless shirts Nadal wears, but he isn't the only player driving those sales. ATP players James Blake and Robby Ginepri also wear sleeveless shirts.

Jorge Ramón, fashion director of Teen People, said he thinks it's the combination of the 19-year-old Nadal's on-court success, teen idol good looks and charisma that have led to interest in the pants. While Capri pants have been fashionable among women, Ramon said, Nadal has pushed the trend into the sports world.

"Now it's legit because it's a sports uniform," Ramon said. "He is redefining style with bright shirts and long pants. He's really just a dreamboat for young girls, as well as young guys who want to be the next big thing in tennis."

Tennis fashion makes "ripples around the world," Ramon said, pointing to Serena Williams' cat suits and Ivan Lendl's argyle shirts.

"I think we've always kind of pushed the envelope of design and aesthetics in sports," Nike spokesman Nate Tobecksen said of the pants. "It's a bit out of the traditional look."

At Evert Tennis Academy in Boca Raton, a few international players wore the pants this spring.

"Two days after the Nasdaq, kids from Russia showed up in these pants," said Loretto Vella, the academy's director of sales and marketing.

Meanwhile, Vella's husband, Duby Petrovich, 50, the head tennis pro at Boca West Country Club, said he recently ordered himself three pairs, not for the fashion statement, but for the protection from the sun, since he's teaching seven hours a day and already wears a big hat and long sleeves.

"I'm kind of thinking of it more that I can cover up," Petrovich said, chuckling. "And if I can pretend I'm styling, maybe I can get a few brownie points with a few of these kids."

---------------------------------


Nadal makes powerful statement

Physical game is basis of teen's astonishing success

By Charles Bricker
Staff Writer
Posted August 28 2005


NEW YORK · "Vamos, chico!"

Another winning forehand crashed off the racket of Rafael Nadal, and he was screaming to himself over the applause. Then, as he often does, he clenched his fist as if it was wrapped around a 50-pound dumbbell, his bicep expanding to the size of a softball.

"His biceps are bigger than my head," cracked fellow pro Andy Roddick a few days ago as he contemplated the rapid rise of the most photographed man in tennis.

The game has known some oversized teenagers, but none who combined such a supreme gift for the game and an imposing physical presence as the 19-year-old prodigy from Mallorca, who has risen in one astonishing season to No. 2 in the world.

He's not going to make up the 2,655 points required to overtake No. 1 Roger Federer at the U.S. Open, which begins Monday, but there are a substantial number of wise tennis people who believe he can make the final, and not a few who believe that the strength of his body and game will be enough to win the championship when he gets there.

"You can't ignore power in this game," says Gil Reyes, who has been Andre Agassi's personal trainer for years. "You just can't, and what Nadal does embodies that. You'd better take heed that this is no longer a game of rallying. It's power ball. You've got to have that and Nadal does."

Rodney Harmon, the director of men's tennis for the USTA's High Performance program, first saw Nadal on court three years ago. "He looked like that when he was 16," Harmon said. "He was already a man."

In winning nine tournaments this year, including the French Open, Nadal's scorching forehand, pronounced topspin backhand and tireless running have been analyzed a million times.

But it is his physical strength that is the foundation of his talent and, incredibly, he says he has spent comparatively little time in the weight room.

"One time in the last three weeks," he said Saturday. His uncle and coach, Toni Nadal, says the kid's powerful stature is purely genetic.

"The family is all strong people. My brother was a soccer player for Barcelona and on the national team," Nadal said. "He looks like a bull."

"And Rafa ... he was always strong. At 16, his body just exploded. But he has been very little in the gym. Just some resistance work with rubber bands for injury prevention."

Nadal doesn't run the hills of Mallorca. There isn't a workout center where you'll find him between tournaments. Toni, who has nurtured his nephew's tennis for 13 years, says the best place to train is on court.

Tennis isn't unlike other sports. People copy success, if they can. And it's not difficult to imagine thousands of juniors around the world making a bigger commitment to emulate Nadal.

If they can't, genetically, look like Nadal, then they can bench press and curl their way to a higher level of strength.

There could be dangers in that. Torry Hawkins, the linebacker-sized Atlantan who coaches young American prospect Scoville Jenkins, says it's important for coaches and parents to confer extensively with doctors before stepping up a teenager's weight program.

Nadal's physical strength shows up most importantly in his running. The triceps and biceps are obvious in the sleeveless muscle shirts he wears, but it's the tree trunk legs that are more significantly connected to his performances.

Lleyton Hewitt and Guillermo Coria can move as quickly around the court or cover the wide shots, but when Nadal has to dig into the corners, his next shot isn't defensive.

Two weeks ago, in the Canadian Open final against Agassi, Nadal sped into his right corner to track down a ball and blazed a cross-court winner that left Agassi gaping. Put that shot and dozens of other Nadal shots like it down to his personal strength.

"You've got guys that are tremendously fast, but they only use their speed defensively," Agassi said. "Nadal has the ability to run as fast as the best of them, but on the stretch actually hurt you. He can transition those points into offense."

Nothing in Nadal's meteoric rise to near the top of world tennis has had any effect on his amiable nature. He arrived at the Open, where he has twice gone out in the second round, ready for a succession of publicity stops, and it's uncle Toni who is most responsible for keeping him humble in the face of all the popularity.

"Never has he broken a racket," Toni Nadal said. "Never has he thrown a racket."

"When he was young, I would drive him a half-hour each way to his training and it was his responsibility to give back for what he has."

Benito Perez-Barbadillo, who is Spanish and one of the ATP communication directors, recalls walking down the Champs Elysees with Toni and Rafael during the French Open fortnight.

"Rafa was in the middle and suddenly Toni said, `You can't be in the middle. You're not the star here.'"

He hasn't let his nephew and pupil become full of himself and, judging from Rafael's simpatico nature, that's not likely to happen.

But there are no leashes on his intensity, his fist pumping and his celebratory screams on court.

"He can be intimidating," said Roddick's coach, Dean Goldfine of Aventura. "Not the biceps but his running. He's going left, right, center, up and back and after he gets the point he's jumping around, fresh as a daisy, while his opponent is taking his last gasp of air."

That's the starting point from which Nadal's game flows. The strength to run all day and the strength to do just about anything he wants with the ball when he gets there.

Castafiore
08-28-2005, 12:07 PM
Rafa was in the middle and suddenly Toni said, `You can't be in the middle. You're not the star here.'"

He hasn't let his nephew and pupil become full of himself and, judging from Rafael's simpatico nature, that's not likely to happen.
I've said it before and I'm saying it again but Toni Nadal is great! It's really very good for Rafa to have somebody like that around when half the world is kissing up to you.

Thanks, Veyonce. :)

GonzoFan
08-28-2005, 12:16 PM
"His biceps are bigger than my head," cracked fellow pro Andy Roddick a few days ago as he contemplated the rapid rise of the most photographed man in tennis.


:lol:

Sugar Kane
08-28-2005, 04:09 PM
Ducky quack you :p Your have failed to conceal your jealousy of this guy!

veyonce
08-29-2005, 07:45 AM
Nadal hard not to notice
Sunday, August 28, 2005

By ADAM ZAGORIA
HERALD NEWS

NEW YORK - As a slew of photographers snapped frenzied shots of Anna Kournikova on the Arthur Ashe Stadium Court on Saturday, Rafael Nadal stood off to the side, wearing his trademark culottes and shoulder-length brown hair.

Kournikova has never won a title and is retired from tennis, yet the paparazzi was much more interested in her than in Nadal, the 19-year-old Spaniard who looks like the next great thing in men's tennis. Eventually, the photographers invited Nadal to pose with the Russian bombshell. At first, he whispered to his translator that he was too "shy," but after some trepidation, he moved in and posed with her anyway.

Nadal had better get used to the attention, even if it pales in comparison to that lavished upon Kournikova. With the U.S. Open set to begin on Monday, many observers consider him a legitimate contender to knock off the steamroller that is Roger Federer and win his second Grand Slam of the year.

"I think this guy is incredible," John McEnroe, the veteran TV analyst and seven-time Grand Slam winner, said of Nadal, the reigning French Open champ. "This guy's been a huge injection into the men's game. The guy's only 19 and he plays with unbelievable intensity. He loves competing and he's not afraid to go lay it on the line. He has a totally different style than Federer, and his look is unusual, to put it mildly. But I think it adds some interest."

McEnroe likes Nadal's culottes, pants that hang well below his knees, so much that he has even worn them himself on the court, a compliment that Nadal said he thought was "funny."

Yet for all the attention paid to his pants and tight-fitting tennis shirts, Nadal is the real deal on the court. The left-hander is seeded No. 2 here and has proven that he is not the typical Spaniard who wins only on clay and not on hardcourts.

The French Open champ beat Andre Agassi earlier this month to win on a hard court in Montreal, his ninth title of the year, tying him with Federer, the world's No. 1 player, for most titles this year. His tour-leading 65 wins this year is second best ever by a teenager to Boris Becker's 69 in 1986. And Nadal has the most wins by a teenager since Agassi won 63 in 1988.

"Of course I have good confidence for this tournament," he said during Arthur Ashe Kids' Day. "This year I was playing very well in hardcourts. I was playing in Australia, in Miami, in Montreal, so that's important, too. So now when I go to the hardcourt, I feel good. I feel with good chances to win matches."

Born in Manacor on the Spanish island of Mallorca, Nadal began playing tennis at age 5 with his uncle, Toni, who is his coach. As a child he hit with Carlos Moya, the veteran who also comes from Mallorca.

By age 17, Nadal said he felt like a man. He said he barely lifts weights but has a routine to maintain strength in his left shoulder, which suffered the effects of wear and tear a few years ago.

"I need to stay 100 percent physically because I need to run a lot to return balls," he said. "Normally this year I feel every time good."

Nadal began the year ranked 51st by the ATP and has climbed to No. 2 with nine tournament wins..

"He has a difficult game," Agassi said after Nadal beat him in Montreal in three sets. "It's certainly easy to see why he's won so many matches. He does a lot of things really well. He's just a great mover on the court. He gets good power from very stretched positions, so you're never quite sure if you have complete control of the point."

Agassi said Nadal's serve was much more difficult to return than he thought it would be from watching him on TV.

"It is a lefty action with sort of a slice kick to it," Agassi said. "So the ball's moving around a bit. If you don't hit it square, (if) you leave anything hanging, that's where he's really dangerous."

Nadal and the 35-year-old Agassi could be headed for another showdown in the quarterfinals of the Open, a match that would surely be a late-night highlight in the second week, yet Nadal said he is not looking past his first-round matchup with Bobby Reynolds.

"I think (the fans) are going to go nuts for (Nadal)," said Mary Carillo, the CBS television analyst. "His personality is (like Jimmy) Connors. He's going to come on the court and be clammy and sweaty. I think they'll just eat it up."

While Federer comes in as the prohibitive favorite, Nadal owns a 2-1 career record against him, including a victory at this year's French Open. Unlike Andy Roddick, who is 1-10 against Federer, Nadal does not seem fazed by the brilliant play of the Swiss native.

"He is unbelievable, he is the best now, and I only think about improving so I can compete against him," Nadal said of Federer.

"At the moment, (Nadal) is the best bet, if he can keep up this level of play, to really challenge Federer on a somewhat regular basis, particularly on a slow court," McEnroe said. "I think Nadal is the best thing to happen to the men's game this year without question.

"I'm not quite sure he can go all the way yet, but he's proven to be a very legitimate contender, even on this court. I'm amazed at how quickly he's advanced. We've been talking about this guy for a few years but this guy, he's been an incredible boost for the game."

If Nadal were to win the Open, he could stake a claim to the No. 1 world ranking at the end of the year. For now, however, he's just taking it one match at a time.

"I don't know if I can win, but if I play a good tournament, I think have a chance if I play my best," Nadal said.

Mimi
08-29-2005, 09:00 AM
its strange, does not lift weight but got such big biceps :eek:

Sugar Kane
08-29-2005, 09:59 AM
Yeah, everyone lashes out at him for the biceps - other tennis players I mean - but who cares if he works out like mad or not? The biceps are there! :devil:

Ti-Anne
08-29-2005, 01:31 PM
"His biceps are bigger than my head," cracked fellow pro Andy Roddick

Bigger than Duckie's brains obviously ;)
:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

Sugar Kane
08-29-2005, 03:47 PM
Bigger than Duckie's brains obviously ;)
:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:
I never knew that existed, thanks! :devil: :p

Ti-Anne
08-30-2005, 01:01 PM
I never knew that existed, thanks! :devil: :p

:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

topspin_baby
08-30-2005, 01:53 PM
SORRY if this has been posted

Nadal puts on show

By JANE MCMANUS
jmcmanus@thejournalnews.com
THE JOURNAL NEWS


NEW YORK — In a flame-colored T-shirt that conformed to his muscles like a second skin, it was easy to imagine Rafael Nadal as one Spaniard who had hit upon the fountain of youth. The 19-year-old scampered over the court without regard to ankles and knees, his long hair damp with sweat in the swampy afternoon.

Nadal has been known to accumulate serious mileage, and at times has gone through a pair of sneakers every match. Recently, however, he has been able to lengthen that life span through judicious choices in footwear.

"Normally I am running a lot on the court," Nadal said with that guileless Majorcan smile bright enough to be used in travel brochures. "But with this shoes, is very good shoes."

Nadal may have beaten American Bobby Reynolds in straight sets yesterday, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4, but the second-seeded player wasn't happy with his performance in the first round of the U.S. Open at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadow.

It was not the commanding win the French Open champion has proven capable of this summer, and Nadal seemed at times to guess wrong on the forehands Reynolds would hammer at him.

"(Reynolds) was hitting, going for broke on every shot," a translator said on Nadal's behalf.

Moreover, Nadal wasn't happy with his outfit. The sleeveless red shirt and calf-length black pants will not return when he takes on Scoville Jenkins in the second round. Instead he will go with a blue shirt and white clamdiggers, which would blend in nicely with the backdrop of his island home.

He might not have been the first to go with a sleeveless shirt, but it is easy to see why he should. Nadal's arms are intimidatingly sculpted and bronzed, but he swears with all the earnestness of youth that he doesn't work out all that much. The build has been honed, he says, through nearly constant tournament play.

Now with two or three days off, Nadal said he does not plan to relax in New York.

"My best fun is improve, is improve my game in these two days," he said, again with that smile. "If I improve, I enjoy a lot New York."

It was a first look at Nadal for most New Yorkers — on Arthur Ashe Stadium court, no less, while defending women's champion Svetlana Kuznetsova was bumped to the smaller Louis Armstrong Stadium.

It was easy to like his passionate style of play. Growing up on clay courts, Nadal digs for balls even on the hardcourts. With that relentless energy, he has won nine titles and $3,305,551 this year alone, going 65-9 in the process.

He was the sixth youngest Grand Slam winner, and he has shot up in the rankings. It is an auspicious beginning, hearkening comparisons to other prodigies such as Andre Agassi and Boris Becker.

Most impressive, he has beaten the top players in the game right now. There was a win over a resurgent Agassi in the final at Montreal, in addition to beating Roger Federer in four sets at the French Open.

It hasn't all been easy, with awkward losses as well, most recently in Cincinnati to Tomas Berdych. In his first two U.S. Open appearances, Nadal lost in the second round.

There is no scrutiny like in New York, and after his first-round win, it was Nadal's turn in front of the U.S. Open press corps. He listened to questions with one formidable eyebrow raised, and seemed a little self-conscious with the rolled R's in his English.

His good nature was evident, however, and he will learn the language and routine much as past U.S. Open media darlings Marat Safin, Elena Dementieva and Gustavo Kuerten did.

He might, however, want to be wary of that last name. Kuerten, the two-time French Open winner, could never get the right feel for New York, and lost in the first round as the second seed in 2000.

Nadal has cleared the first-round hurdle. It remains to be seen if he can make the blue courts of New York seem a little more like the red clay at Roland Garros.

veyonce
09-07-2005, 04:49 PM
I like the way the writer described Rafa's physique : 'a baby bull's build'... ;)

From newsday.com

Spanish export is hot commodity

Nadal's blend of shotmaking and charismatic on-court personality have created a buzz for the 19-year-old phenom who has unlimited upside

BY JOHNETTE HOWARD
STAFF WRITER

September 4, 2005


Rafael Nadal is more than just 19 and already a haymaker-throwing French Open champion. He has a power-charged game, a baby bull's build, and a transfixing on-court personality. With Andy Roddick already gone from this year's U.S. Open, Nadal is celebrated because he's exactly what men's tennis has been keening for: An antidote to the predictions that Roger Federer's stay atop men's tennis is destined to be long and uninterrupted and aesthetically nice, thanks, but nothing that's likely to move the needle on the excitement register.

Enter Nadal. In the past five months, the Spanish teenager has risen from No. 46 to second in the world, and put himself in position to slingshot by Federer for No. 1 if he wins this tournament. Already, he's eclipsed the 23-year-old Roddick as Federer's greatest potential foil and tennis' favorite pin-up boy. He meets James Blake Saturday in a third-round match.

Nadal strides out for matches, racket already in hand, with a pirate's bandana around his shoulder-length black hair, a torso-hugging sleeveless shirt that shows off his deeply tanned arms and six-pack stomach, and matador pants that slyly hint that he comes from Spain.

His looks and effect on crowds are impossible to not comment upon. If tennis had a Cecil B. DeMille right now, Nadal would be cast opposite 18-year-old women's star Maria Sharapova as the sport's dream couple, the It Boy and It Girl whom the paparazzi snap dancing in some Ibiza disco or breezing into some Cannes movie premiere, or hanging out around the roulette wheel in Monte Carlo.

Except this is where Nadal, at least right now, flips the script.

He still lives at home on the Spanish island of Mallorca with his extended family - his parents, grandparents and uncle Toni, his coach since childhood - in a five-story apartment building they share in Manacor, a town of about 30,000 people.

Rafa, as he is affectionately called at home, doesn't even have a driver's license. Though he turned pro at 15, not long after defeating former Wimbledon champ Pat Cash in an exhibition match, Nadal's family insisted that he stay in regular high school during his breaks from the tour, and forego an offer to move to a Barcelona academy and have his training subsidized by the Spanish tennis federation.

Both choices - skipping junior tennis completely, and staying home at his modest five-court club to train on clay - were highly unorthodox. Yet Nadal has won like crazy anyway.

He seized 37 of the first 40 pro matches he played on the satellite tour, tennis' equivalent of baseball's Triple A circuit. The excitement about him here is astonishing considering he won his first main tour hardcourt title just three weeks ago, in Montreal. But it's not misplaced. His uncle believes had Rafael not been hurt for long stretches in 2003 and 2004, the tear he embarked on this year - roaring to the final of the NASDAQ tournament in Miami this February opposite Federer, then winning three straight claycourt tournaments before seizing the French Open - would have happened even sooner.

But it was the French Open win - and most especially, Nadal's victory over Federer in the semifinals there after falling just two points shy of beating him at NASDAQ - that has worked an alchemy on Nadal's career and made him an international conversation piece.

A steady stream of tennis pundits and stars have been asked to rate him or explain him since that win. And in the end, after remarking on the particulars of his game, most come to the same conclusion that Boris Becker, who knows something about being a teenage wunderkind, expressed this year at Wimbledon.

"He is by far the best player at 19 of his generation," Becker told The Independent of Britain. "If I look back, Stefan Edberg was very good. John McEnroe was good. Federer was good ... I was not bad. But Nadal is among that group. When you win a Grand Slam at 19 years old, it puts you there automatically. He's very good for tennis."

On an ESPN conference call, commentator McEnroe agreed. "Not since the days of Boris Becker have I seen such intimidation on a tennis court," McEnroe said. "His physicality can frighten opponents into submission almost without a stroke being played. It's the beauty of youth. He's fearless and he loves to compete."

The other thing about Nadal that's notable is when tennis pundits are asked whom he reminds them of, the answer is usually "Nobody." Like a lot of eventual greats, Nadal is an original. He has the relentlessness that all great players reared on clay courts have had.

But he combines it with the footspeed and the sort of power, especially on his forehand side, that will allow his game to translate to any surface, even grass, especially once his ongoing work to improve his serve takes hold. The fact that he's lefthanded presents an added challenge.

Already, Nadal can think the game, too.

Asked after the French Open how he was able to remain so poised given the pressure and the occasion, Nadal said, "The only way of finding a solution is to fight back, to move, to run, and to control that pressure."

In an era where sportspeople try so hard to have personality - "Sometimes too hard," U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe said - Nadal has substance as well as fizz. Before Wimbledon, the sloganeers at Nike trotted him out for a get-to-know Nadal media day in Madrid.

And a banner on the stage that day should prove to be prescient. It read: "Tennis has changed - get used to it."

Copyright 2005 Newsday Inc.

parissima
09-08-2005, 05:38 PM
Oh, that's such a good article about him... They described him so well :p
Unfortunately, Rafa did not beat Blake, as we all know. But hey, he's got plenty of time to win the USO right? ;)

veyonce
09-12-2005, 05:08 AM
Yes.. He'll...

David Ferrer to play in his first Davis Cup

David Ferrer will be the big newcomer to the Spanish Davis Cup team looking to maintain their place in the World Group against Italy on 23rd, 24th and 25th September in Torre el Greco. The player from Valencia will be accompanied by Rafael Nadal (2), Juan Carlos Ferrero (22) and Feliciano Lopez (21), all players in the top 30.

adelaide
09-13-2005, 01:25 PM
:banana: David :banana:

veyonce
10-04-2005, 05:42 AM
It's been a while since this thread was updated...

Credits to Yoly of VR.com, did some minor editing..

Should be on the 3.10.2005.
Well, tonight Rafa was on a Mallorca sport program called "Fora de Joc" on the mallorcan chanel 4. He was on at 22.30 for about 30 minutes. He was there with his uncle Toni.

He was wearing a white Nike shirt and he looked really serious all throughout the interview.

The interview wasn't as close up and personal as the one he did on the radio, but it was still good.

The interview was entirely in mallorquin/catalan, here's the transcript:

Presenter: Good Evening.

Rafa: Good evening.

Toni: Good evening.

Well, what a year Rafa, and don't be modest...

Rafa: Yes, it's been a good year so far, couldn't really ask for more. I started winning matches and gaining confidence and I played at a good level so it brought me to here.

Toni, would you of believed it if they told you a year ago that your nephew would be in this position?

Toni: No, one year ago we didn't think of this. Knowing how difficult it is to win a tournament, not only for Rafa, but for any good tennis player. This has been a success for him.

So Rafa, you come from playing a lot, and you went to a hospital aftwerwards, are you not tired?

Rafa: Yes, obviously. That's why I haven't done anything this week, just relaxed for a bit. The only thing I had to do is go to Barcelona for one day, but that's it. I needed to stop for a little bit, to get my strength back and charge my batteries up again. I've only started training again today.

Rafa, you are number 2 now (4,475 points), but previously Moya and Ferrero have been number one with less points than what you have got now. Moya was number one with 3,484 points and Ferrero with 4,250 points. But as Federer is there, isn't that a bit fustrating for you? Will you never be number 1 while Federer is around? Is he so good?

Rafa: Yes, he is very good. He never loses. He's only lost 3 matches this year, he just never fails. It's a bit of bad luck for me, because maybe if he wasn't there or if it was a different year I would be number one. But I'm satisfied with what I'm doing. I have ambition, I want to get it and I'll fight until I achieve what I want, and that's to be number 1.

So Rafa, which match would you choose as your favorite, as your best match of the year, as the match you did great and think you were at 100%?

Rafa: well, there's not really a specific match I would choose... maybe the final with Agassi, or the final agaisnt Federer in Miami, although I lost I thought I played very good. Roland garros wasn't my best week I'd say... The season is very long and sometimes you play good and sometimes bad. But I've been more or less regular and I'm happy about that.

So Toni, what's the things you liked the best and the things you disliked?

Toni: The things I like are the results, his matches in Rome, Miami and Montreal were good. What I didn't like was Flushing Meadows. I was really disappointed there, he should have done so much better. He played bad. He was mentally very bad... and physically very bad too.. Hahaha... And Wimbledon wasn't too good either, but I expected that more or less because he came from winning the Roland Garros and that affected him a bit because he had a lot of pressure on him, everyone expected him to play good, to be one of the favorites and that distracted him a bit I think.

Do you agree, Rafa?

Rafa: Yes, whatever he says...

Does your uncle get angry and tells you off?

Rafa: No, he doesn't hit me or anything.. Hahaha..

No, I meant that if after bad matches do you get wrong?

Rafa: I know, I was joking... Well, he tells me... What he has to tell me.

So why is it different to play the Davis Cup?

Rafa: Well, I feel a bit nervous playing the Davis Cup, because you're not only playing for yourself, but for a team, for your country, it's a lot more responsibility... It's different, the people, the environment... The public isn't on someone's side or on another's, it's kind of divided...

And when you play it's very important for the team, I mean the one that plays the most has a lot of importance in the team, but still isn't nothing without the others. Everyone in the team has a role and everyone is the same.

So now that they are changing the captains what do you think, first you were not happy about it, then you were, then you didn't care, so what do you really think?

Rafa: This is going back to a subject I've already said and given my opinion about... I still have the same opinion, I haven't changed my mind. He promised them 2 years, and he hasn't kept his word. There's nothing more to say.

It's not easy to be a captain fo any team, and they were doing a great job. I like having 2 captains, they always make decisions better because 2 heads are better than one, and they can talk about decisions. They had hard decisions, they took me off in Slovakia but I was back on in Italy, and I was happy with their decision because I knew it was for the best.

So you don't want a new captain?

Rafa: I'm not saying that. I don't like talking about things I don't have to do or have a say. It's the president who has to choose a new captain, and I'll accept that. Whoever comes, I'll give everything I have for the team because I love the Davis Cup and I love playing for my country, for Spain.
But yes, I wanted them to stay for 2 more years.

Do you, our number 1, number 2 in the world have any say in any of this, do you have a bit of power or influence in the decisions that or taken?

Rafa: If they ask for your opinion, you give it, but that's it. I don't have any sort of influence. I only found about all this because I saw it on the press. Before they did used to have that in mind and take notice of what players said, but not anymore. But it's silly to talk about this, because it's not going to change anything...

What do you think of Emilio Sanchez Vicarioas a captain?

Rafa: I have nothing against him. You hear about names, but it's the president who has to decide. Me, I'll take anything the president says, there's nothing else I can do.

Toni, you go to the Davis Cup, what is your role there? And what do you think about what's going on?

Toni: Well, players always go to tournaments with their trainers, so that's why I go. It's for the players to feel more comfortable and secure. And I try to help here and there.

And about the captains, well I've spoken to Arrese and Avedaño, and they wanted their 2 years or nothing. They were going to get 2 years but they didn't, that's what they are complaining about. I think they should go on because they are really good and have done a great job, they have their rights to complain.

And Rafa has a lot of gratitude to them, but he has to show his gratitude to them personally, not publicly.

Rafa, people have always talked about your serve, that it wasn't very good, is it any better?

Rafa: Well, if you are asking me this then it obviously isn't any better then..(laughs)

Well, I had one of the worst serves in the circuit. Now it's a lot better, well, it's not one of the best, but it isn't the worst one any more. I'll have to keep practising.

Toni: He was the 3rd worst serve of the top 50 before!!!( laughs)

He is better now though, but has to get even better, his serve is not as soft as it used to be, but still has to work a lot on it if he wants to be on the top..

But he is on the top...!!

Toni: That's this year, we'll see next year...

Well, I think he's great, I mean, I don't know Rafa, but when I do see him play I always think he is going to win, because he is a winner, when he plays, he does it to win... I mean if in other sports the players did the same things iit would be different, and that goes for the Mallorca players!!! (he says that because Mallorca soccer team are at the bottom, last in the champioship)

Well, when I saw you playing in Italy and doing all these gestures and that... Do you get angry when you are losing?

Rafa: No, don't think I do... I take it in a clam way, there's no use in getting angry. In Italy it was a bit of a difficult situation, we needed the help and cheers from our public, and the italians were booing at us a lot... So I tried to encourage our public a bit for help and I think it worked although we lost the doubles at the end...

So What is this sock thing you always do? Do you have problems with your socks?

Rafa: When I wear my pirate pants yes...

Are those pants comfortable?

Rafa: Yes, otherwise I wouldn't play with them, believe me...

But why are the socks a problem when you wear the pirate pants?

Rafa: because I need to pull my socks up all the time, and my socks pulled up and the long pirates pants well don't look too good, I'll look like a clown (laughs)

But why do you have pull your socks up? Is it to concentrate or to get your rival nervous?

Rafa: No, nothing of that, it's simple, it will sound so stupid but I'll tell you... When I play, the socks, with the sweat and that, will keep falling down, so the little hairs from my lower leg/ankle stick out over the top of them and it's very uncomfortable!! It pesters me so I keep pulling them up so those hairs don't stick out!!

So does Nike choose the clothes for you?

Rafa: Well, they give me ideas, propositions and if I like them I say yes, if not they look for something else.

Toni: But he always says yes to everything!! (laughs)

So are you wearing anything special for Shanghai?

Rafa: No, I don't think so...

How about in Madrid?

Rafa: Nothing special, all I can say is that I'm going to wear the short pants again for the rest of the season.

So you are back to the shorts again! So in Madrid we will see you in shorts again...

Rafa: Yes, well, that is if Nike don't change their mind, sometimes they change, so I can't confirm anything...

So how is this all this advertisment stuff, I love the Kia car one, with tennis balls raining over you...

Rafa: It's nice to watch once it's finished, but not fun to make, I tell you...

Was there really a lot of tennis balls falling on top of you?

Rafa: Hahaha... Well, new technologies do great things these days... There is a part of fiction and a part of reality... I did have a machine and 15 people throwing balls at me though..

Hahaha well that was good then...

Rafa: What was good was that none of the balls hit me on the head while filming, that was a miracle... (laughs)

So you've done Nike, Kia, colacao advertisments...

Rafa: And Rosdor biscuits..

Oh yes, forgot about them, that's good, a mallorcan product... So any more advertisment now?

Rafa: No, well, just another Cola Cao one.

So, another 5 tournaments left...

(Rafa counts): Yes.

Are you going to Vienna?

Rafa: If I knew I would tell you... At this moment it's more a no than a yes... But who knows, I'm not sure yet. I mean I want to go but... I need a little more rest and training so I don't know. Maybe the day comes and I say, hey I wanna go, but maybe I say, well I want to train more for Madrid because I want to do really good there this year, and Madrid is my number 1 priority...

If you go to Vienna you could practise a bit before Madrid there...

Toni: But if he goes, he goes there to win, not to train... But he would get a good training there, that's the problem we have now about the decision, I mean if he goes he'll get a bit into the game again, I think it would be good for him, but if he goes and is still a bit tired it might be worse... Depends on what he want's to do..

(Toni looks at Rafa and Rafa shyly looks down)

Rafa: I want to go... But...

Toni: He doesn't know yet. Madrid is what he really wants to do good at.

Rafa: Yes.

Toni: Moya always says he plays a lot during the year and that when Masters Madrid comes, he's always too tired and plays badly there, and Rafa doesn't want that to happen to him.

So are you training now?

Toni: Yes, he started today. It's going to be difficult to find someone to train with him because Moya is going to Vienna and the guys at the tennis club are all on tournaments as well, so it's going to be hard to find someone with a good level to play against him while here.

Well, what I hope is that you bring back a cup from Shanghai when you go...

Rafa: pfffff... With the surface they've prepared I doubt it...

Why?

Toni: Because it's a very fast court. A lot of players are against it, apart from Rafa, like Federer and Hewitt. That surface is good for Roddick and Safin. They should have taken into account the players' and the public's opinion, but anyway, he'll try his best...

And Rafa, no one can get you out of Mallorca eh! Other players have left to train and live in Barcelona, Madrid..., but you have stayed here.

Rafa:Yes, I love Mallorca, I wouldn't change it for anything. My family, and my friends are here. I like being here, it relaxes me.

So are there other places you like, you've visited other places in the world, do you tour a lot or just stay in the hotel?

Rafa: pfff ask him that, (pointing to his uncle Toni), he's the one that goes all over to shop, not me...

So you go all over but you order your nephew to stay in the hotel and rest then...

Toni: (laughs) He can come if he wants..

Anyway, I want to thank you for coming, it's been a pleasure, and I hope to see you back here soon, and Rafa, don't change, because you are so kind-hearted. Everytime you arrive in Mallorca, we are waiting and pestering you in the airport, but you always have a few minutes for us, that means a lot to us...

Rafa: No problem...

Thank you, and have a nice rest.

Rafa and Toni: Thank you.

amierin
10-04-2005, 02:06 PM
Great interview. Thanks for the transcript.

parissima
10-04-2005, 03:06 PM
Thanks so much for the transcript Veyonce :) (hehe i love your avatar ;) )
It's a long interview, hmm.. And an interesting one! I love it when they have a lot to say ^^

Rafa, people have always talked about your serve, that it wasn't very good, is it any better?

Rafa: Well, if you are asking me this then it obviously isn't any better then..(laughs)
:lol: Poor Rafa...

veyonce
10-05-2005, 03:59 AM
Didn't know Rafa has such a bad serve as I became a fan of his after Roland Garros.... Hope Rafa can have better serves as the years goes by especially in serving aces cos that's an advantage...

I like the part when Toni mentioned it's up to Rafa whether he wants to go Vienna and Rafa shyly looks down and was in a dilemma..

rue
10-05-2005, 06:24 AM
Parts of that interview were very funny. I liked it.

veyonce
10-06-2005, 02:16 AM
Just got my hands on Deuce Fall issue with Lleyton Hewitt on the cover on my way to work... Will scan the articles if nobody scanned it...

There's a small article on Rafa, Food of Champions and a 6 page article, Rafa Unmasked, respected coach and former Top 10 player Jose Higueras does what very few players can do. He breaks down Rafael Nadal's game. This article's so funny...

FOOD OF CHAMPIONS

What is it with Rafael Nadal and trophies? Have you noticed that he sinks his pearly whites into every piece of silverware he wins? Given the rate at which he wins, the odds are high that he's going to chip a tooth before too long. And then there's the problem of indigestion.

There he is at the Rogers Masters in Montreal, taking a bite out of the trophy. At Roland Garros the world's photographers snapped him croquant the Coupe des Mousquetaires. He munched away on his first ATP Masters Series trophy in Monte Carlo.

So what gives? Is he checking that the trophy is a genuine Waterford Crystal? "No, this is something that I have always done since I won my first ATP title," he says. "I was so happy I just wanted to eat the trophy. I guess it has become one of my trademarks. The truth is that it shows how happy I am with the trophy." Buen apetito!

Carlita
10-07-2005, 12:50 PM
:woohoo: Richard Krajicek signed Rafael to play in Rotterdam 2006 :woohoo:


http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/thumbs/cheering.gif:bounce:http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/thumbs/cheering.gif:bounce:http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/thumbs/cheering.gif:bounce:http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/thumbs/cheering.gif:bounce:http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/thumbs/cheering.gif

eddie_hyden
10-08-2005, 01:40 AM
Are you going to Vienna?

Rafa: If I knew I would tell you... At this moment it's more a no than a yes... But who knows, I'm not sure yet. I mean I want to go but... I need a little more rest and training so I don't know. Maybe the day comes and I say, hey I wanna go, but maybe I say, well I want to train more for Madrid because I want to do really good there this year, and Madrid is my number 1 priority...

If you go to Vienna you could practise a bit before Madrid there...
[color=RoyalBlue]
Toni: But if he goes, he goes there to win, not to train... But he would get a good training there, that's the problem we have now about the decision, I mean if he goes he'll get a bit into the game again, I think it would be good for him, but if he goes and is still a bit tired it might be worse... Depends on what he want's to do..

(Toni looks at Rafa and Rafa shyly looks down)

Rafa: I want to go... But...

Toni: He doesn't know yet. Madrid is what he really wants to do good at.

Rafa: Yes.



well, apparently toni won, and the answer is NO. rafa just pulled out of vienna citing knee injury, needs rest.

well, i miss rafa in the circuit, but i'd rather he return healthy and full of energy like before ;p

cheers all!

...ed

Castafiore
10-12-2005, 09:17 AM
An article (translated by salsa on vamosrafa.com) about his training schedule:


THE SECRETS OF THE TRAINING OF THE ‘BEAST NADAL’
by Kim Forteza

SportLife, October 2005

Joan Forcadas takes care of the physical preparation of Rafa Nadal, a physical trainer with a lot of experience in the world of tennis, since he was the the one that took care also of the training of Carlos Moyà when he was in the tennis school in Palma de Mallorca. We have had the chance to talk to Joan so he could explain to us some of the secrets of the physical preparation of Rafa and here you have them.

Rafa’s preparation is based on “work of elasticity, stretching and muscular boosting, using weights that are very small, of one or two kg. maximum, to condition the muscular groups that are supposed to protect those areas or joints”.

For the back:He does stretching, specially of the ‘isquiotibials’ and of the ‘psoas’ and of the pelvic waist. And abdominal boosting to protect the lumbar column. “Rafa doesn’t work the lumbar muscles because in tennis, these muscles are already well developed due to the positions of attention that you adopt to start the point”.

For the shoulders: He does very selected exercises of internal and external rotation. All tennis players have excess external rotation and a deficit of internal rotation, so you have to work this one a lot”.

It’s also very important the stretching plan of all the muscle groups of the body, because the elasticity is what produces that greater flexibility and enables the joints to work appropriately.

Preventing injuries (with morning exercises of joint mobility, compensatories, etc.) and the improvement of the coordination capabilities are the other key parts of his work. Equilibrium in the supports, capacity of reaction, changes in rhythm and direction, foot play, to feel the right and to listen to the ball are concepts tied to coordination. We work these aspects on a integrated way on court with his trainer and in the sessions of physical preparation (of one and a half hours), where you build work based on the real game on court.
Rafa also works with giant balls (fitball), deformable tables/sheets, skateboards, and with mechanical vibration platforms, developed by the investigator Julio Tous. These vibratory machines (also used to fight osteoporosis), were used by Tous for the Barça team members in the 2003-2004 season to reduce injuries, and with them you develop also the explosive strength and the equilibrium.

Another curious work is the one that he does with pulleys. “Rafa Nadal using pulleys is like a beast, it looks like he’s fighting with them. He has an amazing strength”. Some facts and comparisons: The Manacorian is capable of applying a strength equal to 117 kilos (1.176 Newtons) (257 pounds) in exercises of traction with any of his two arms, while the average of the national Hockey team, to set an example, is of 70 kilos (154 pounds). The key is found in the great acceleration that he applies. Strong weightlifters would win him in strength when lifting weights, but not in strength when hitting the ball

Anne-Claire
10-12-2005, 01:38 PM
hello
what is the official hotel for qualie's players in tms madrid???????? thanks

ataptc
10-12-2005, 05:23 PM
Another curious work is the one that he does with pulleys. “Rafa Nadal using pulleys is like a beast, it looks like he’s fighting with them. He has an amazing strength”. Some facts and comparisons: The Manacorian is capable of applying a strength equal to 117 kilos (1.176 Newtons) (257 pounds) in exercises of traction with any of his two arms, while the average of the national Hockey team, to set an example, is of 70 kilos (154 pounds). The key is found in the great acceleration that he applies. Strong weightlifters would win him in strength when lifting weights, but not in strength when hitting the ball

:eek: WOW.

veyonce
10-19-2005, 05:04 AM
Nadal Signs Cologne Deal

Barcelona company Antonio Puig has signed a deal with Rafael Nadal to create a new cologne with him which is expected to go on sale at the beginning of 2006.

RogiFan88
10-20-2005, 02:09 AM
I wonder what his fragrance will be called? "Huracan"!! ;)

Castafiore
10-20-2005, 10:34 AM
Spanish pirate out to make Federer walk the plank
By Neil Harman
Our correspondent on Rafael Nadal’s plan to be master in Madrid


ALTHOUGH Andy Murray may contend differently, there is only one man in tennis who gives Roger Federer the quivers. Rafael Nadal won a match yesterday on one good leg, which rather gets to the heart of the 19-year-old and the impact he is having on a sport that used to be known for its genteel, garden-party environment.
Ask Nadal to a garden party and he will greet the hosts graciously, for he is polite to the point of bashfulness, but do not ask him to play a tennis match because the grass would be torn to shreds, the neighbours would wonder what his curdling cry of “vamos” meant and, if they were enticed to peer over the fence, they would be confronted by a piratical leviathan who is actually not half as chilling as he looks.


Chilled would be more appropriate, for Nadal has one simple desire in life. He is about winning tennis matches and the chances are that he is going to be doing a lot more of that as the years pass. While he is about it, Nadal is attracting to his chosen sport youngsters who want to be like him. In deepest Berkshire, at my own club, when the junior co-ordinator asks youngsters with rackets that are often bigger than them who they are going to be today, it is a toss-up between Nadal and Murray.

Tennis cannot buy that. What it has to do is make sure that it does not run him into the ground, that tournament directors who lose him to legitimate injuries do not promulgate absurd untruths about his withdrawal, that he develops (look at his physique and it looks as if he has developed already) at a pace that suits with a minimum of intrusion and a maximum of support. That is easier said than done, given that there are 34 weeks on the ATP Tour, 54 tournaments to squeeze into that timeframe and everyone wants Nadal.

He actually felt compelled to hold a press conference here in Madrid a few days ago, just to reassure the local public and a sceptical press that he was playing. Seeing was believing. All of Spain is in raptures, which brings a different kind of problem because there are those — Juan Carlos Ferrero to the fore — who have become a bit miffed that the youngster receives so much acclaim.

But Ferrero, nice man that he is, is not a Nadal and never will be. He was never a crowd-rouser, he does not have the mannerisms, exhibit the sheer joy of playing or show off the prominent muscles which just add to the allure of the teenager. Ferrero is a muck-and-nettles player who, although a grand-slam champion, cannot disguise the fact that an autograph session for him would speedily disband when Nadal came into view.

That is the way it goes. If Nadal can overcome his niggling knee problem and reach the final here, not only would Spain rejoice, but he would then have overcome Federer, the world No 1 from Switzerland, in one significant detail — 78 wins this year to 77.

“But you mean that Federer has still won more matches than me this year — how does he do that?” Nadal asks. He knows, though, that he is the one player living who can get under Federer’s skin, as the French Open semi-final this year showed with a famous victory for Nadal. Of the seven Masters events this year, Federer has won four, Nadal three.

“For me, what I have done already this year is unbelieveable,” Nadal said. “I never expected this to happen for me so fast, but I am ready for what comes next. I know I have a lot of expectations on me but that is the way tennis is. Coming back to the tour after three weeks off and to play in front of a Spanish crowd, it is a little bit crazy.

“When I am at home in Majorca, I can do the usual things and still no one takes much notice of me, I can be normal. Here it is a little bit different (as he found when he took his seat at the Bernabéu for Real Madrid versus Rosenborg last night), but so many people want to come and watch me practise, to be near to me. It is unbelieveable support and it is a reason to improve, which is what I need to do.”

For the final three tournaments of the year, here, in Paris and at the Masters Cup in Shanghai, the “pirata” three-quarter length trousers have been left in the cupboard. In discussions with Nike, his clothing sponsor, Nadal proposed that he tried more normal shorts for a while. “I just wanted to see how the shorts felt again, I like them,” he said. “Just a change, nothing permanent. The piratas will be back in Australia (for the Australian Open in January).”

England will be seeing more of Nadal close up, which cannot be a bad thing for those marketing men who should use his decision to play at Queen’s Club, West London, in the Stella Artois Championships for the next two years (“it is the perfect preparation for Wimbledon, I hear it is a lovely tournament”) as reason to utilise the freshness and vitality that he brings to the game. He is what tennis needs and what tennis wants. We can only cherish him.

Source: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1834100,00.html

veyonce
10-21-2005, 04:42 AM
From stellaartoistennis.com

Nadal Shows Grass-Court Intent; Commits to Stella Artois

French Open champion Rafael Nadal has signalled his intention to master the art of grass court tennis by committing to play at the Stella Artois Championships for the next two years.

Nadal, the winner of 10 titles already this year, eight of which were won on clay, has never previously entered the Stella Artois Championships, which will be played next year at the Queen's Club between the 12 and 18th of June.

Despite the enormous success enjoyed by the 19-year-old Mallorcan in 2005, he lost at the second round stage at Wimbledon, and now plans to use the Stella Artois to test himself against many of the world's best grass-court exponents.

Tournament Director Ian Wight was delighted to secure Nadal's participation.

"I'm thrilled that Rafael has committed himself to The Stella Artois for the next two years," said Wight.

"His desire to be a winner on every surface makes him one of the most exciting players of this and future generations."

Jim Courier, a two-time French Open champion who also reached the Wimbledon final, believes Nadal has got what it takes to be successful on the surface.

"His game may not be obviously adaptable to grass, but his attitude is," said Courier.

"He is firmly committed to it, and as the grass courts have firmed up it's given the groundstrokers an ability to compete."

Nadal, currently No.2 in the rankings, burst onto the world tennis scene as a 15-year-old in 2002 by reaching the second round at his home event in Mallorca.

A year later he registered wins over former French Open champions Albert Costa and Carlos Moya, and showed glimpses of grass court pedigree by reaching the Wimbledon third round and beating former semi-finalist Mario Ancic en-route.

Injury saw him miss three months of the 2004 season, including the French Open and Wimbledon, but he won his first career-title in Sopot, Poland in August of that year.

He came-of-age in 2005, snaring the French Open title and other big tournament-wins in Hamburg, Rome and Monte Carlo, as well as hard-court victories in Montreal and Beijing.

federated
10-24-2005, 01:15 AM
lovely article about the win in madrid:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1840531,00.html

eddie_hyden
10-24-2005, 01:42 AM
I wonder what his fragrance will be called? "Huracan"!! ;)

lol, what about Rafael Nadal's 'Piratas' by Antonio Puig :angel:

rue
10-24-2005, 02:50 AM
lovely article about the win in madrid:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1840531,00.html

That was a really nice article.

veyonce
10-24-2005, 04:10 AM
Here's an interesting article from The Independent... Especially the part where Roger teased Rafa...

Nadal draws level with Federer after marathon final win

By John Roberts in Madrid
Published: 24 October 2005

It takes time for rivalries to develop and can take even longer for friendship to grow between players whose job is to plot each other's downfall. Sometimes they choose to keep their distance throughout their careers.

The 19-year-old Spaniard Rafael Nadal may have wrecked Roger Federer's hopes of completing his collection of the four Grand Slam singles titles by edging the 24-year-old Swiss world No 1 out of the French Open semi-finals in June, but the pair already seem to hit it off.

En route to winning yesterday's final of the Madrid Masters, Nadal, the world No 2, spared a thought for the injured master of the game, who is back home in Basle nursing three damaged ankle ligaments.

By defeating Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia, 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 after three hours 51 minutes, Nadal equalled Federer's four Masters series titles for the year - a record - and also drew alongside him with 11 titles for the season.

"I spoke to Federer on the phone the other day and asked him how his ankle was," Nadal said. "He was still on crutches but hopes to be in Shanghai [for the Masters Cup]. I have spoken with him a few times, to congratulate him on winning Wimbledon, for instance, and on winning the US Open.

"We have a good relationship. Federer is not only No 1 and a great person, he's a man that's calm and quiet, a good person. He's nice. That's the most important thing."

After defeating Federer at the French Open, Nadal wanted to practise with Federer at Wimbledon, but was too shy to ask. He approached Vittorio Selmi, the ATP's head of player liaison to make the request on his behalf. Selimi told Nadal to go ahead and ask, but then explained the situation to Federer.

One day, when Nadal was in the players' lounge, Federer walked in and said to Selmi in a loud voice: "Do you know why this guy doesn't want to practise with me?" Nadal blushed.

The pair did not get to hit together, because Nadal lost in the second round, but a bond was established.

Nadal's opponent yesterday, the 26-year-old Ljubicic, who has inspired his country to the Davis Cup final, also had a lot at stake. Competing in his third ATP tour final in three weeks - and his first in a Masters Series event - Ljubicic was a contender to take one of the final places in the eight-man Masters Cup.

By defeating David Nalbandian, of Argentina, in the semi-finals, Ljubicic extended his winning run of matches to 16. Long admired for his powerful serve, canny ground-strokes and refreshingly realistic attitude to the sport, Ljubicic has emerged as a force.

A year ago, he beat Tim Henman in three sets in the third round here in a match that was scheduled too early to draw enough spectators to create an atmosphere. Asked if that bothered him, Ljubicic said, "No, I'm the type of player who's used to being sent out to play early in tournaments."

Those days appear to be behind Ljubicic, who in the last few days has made a major contribution to a tournament denied leading players such as Federer, Lleyton Hewitt, Andre Agassi and Marat Safin because of injuries.

He even courted minor controversy. One of the model ball girls, Emma, was involved in a minor incident during Ljubicic's match against Nalbandian. Ljubicic, break point down, told Emma that she was too close to him and threw the ball too hard. Emma took offence, and complained to the umpire.

"It was a misunderstanding," Ljubicic said. "I tried to show her how to throw the ball. The people started to whistle."

eddie_hyden
10-24-2005, 04:57 AM
thanks veyonce.

hehe indeed that was very cute, the part roger teased rafa. i like to hear about their friendship, very sweet...

moya should be jealous now :devil: , hahaha ok joking joking.


p/s getting some popcorn for tonight's final rematch ;)

eddie_hyden
10-24-2005, 05:00 AM
He even courted minor controversy. One of the model ball girls, Emma, was involved in a minor incident during Ljubicic's match against Nalbandian. Ljubicic, break point down, told Emma that she was too close to him and threw the ball too hard. Emma took offence, and complained to the umpire.

"It was a misunderstanding," Ljubicic said. "I tried to show her how to throw the ball. The people started to whistle."

i saw the part when ljubicic (god it's hard to spell this guy's name) accidentally sent the ball hitting the ball-girl at the net when returning david's serve. that poor girl ;p not sure whether this is that emma girl...

veyonce
10-24-2005, 05:34 AM
thanks veyonce.

hehe indeed that was very cute, the part roger teased rafa. i like to hear about their friendship, very sweet...

moya should be jealous now :devil: , hahaha ok joking joking.


p/s getting some popcorn for tonight's final rematch ;)

Now Star Sports is broadcasting the 1st telecast if I'm not mistaken... Another sleepless night for me...

Maybe Rafa should find out if Roger plays playstation.. lol...

RogiFan88
10-24-2005, 05:08 PM
Rogi definitely plays Playstation! ;)

casillas_girl
10-24-2005, 07:05 PM
i saw the part when ljubicic (god it's hard to spell this guy's name) accidentally sent the ball hitting the ball-girl at the net when returning david's serve. that poor girl ;p not sure whether this is that emma girl...

He hit a ball-girl?? :eek:
That's so sad! Was the girl in a lot of pain?

eddie_hyden
10-24-2005, 07:11 PM
He hit a ball-girl?? :eek:
That's so sad! Was the girl in a lot of pain?

the ball hit her head till her cap flew over. she didn't show any pain expression though, smiling gracefully when the camera focused on her. she took it well i must say ;)

veyonce
10-24-2005, 07:17 PM
Injured Nadal withdraws from Swiss Indoors
Oct. 24, 2005

BASEL, Switzerland (AP) - French Open champion Rafael Nadal pulled out of the Swiss Indoors because of knee problems Monday, a day after he won the Madrid Masters in a five-set final.

Nadal had been promoted to the top seeding after No. 1-ranked Roger Federer withdrew from his home tournament his month with a torn ligament in his right foot. Guillermo Coria of Argentina is now seeded first.

On Sunday, Nadal rallied from two sets down to beat Ivan Ljubicic in a match lasting nearly four hours for his 11th title this year. The 19-year-old Spaniard entered the Madrid tournament after a three-week layoff because of a knee injury.

Nadal has won an ATP-best 79 matches this year, two more than Federer and the most by a teenager since Mats Wilander won 82 in 1983.

Nadal will be replaced by Britain's Alan Mackin, who will play Cypriot qualifier Marcos Baghdatis in the opening round.

AP NEWS
The Associated Press News Service

eddie_hyden
10-24-2005, 07:21 PM
well i'm relieved ;)

Saumon
10-24-2005, 07:38 PM
Rogi definitely plays Playstation! ;)
yep, i remember him saying that he and peter lundgren (who was still his coach at that time) were travelling with their playstation :lol:

and he had a gameboy too :p

casillas_girl
10-24-2005, 07:41 PM
lol, Gameboy these days is more for sissies! :p
But it's an older pic, so Roger definitally isn't a sissie! :D

Jennay
10-24-2005, 09:43 PM
I'm so glad that Rafa has pulled from Basel, good choice. :yeah: Rest up! :hug:

rue
10-24-2005, 11:34 PM
good choice made there by pulling out.

veyonce
10-25-2005, 02:15 AM
Hmmm... I wonder if Roger will be as agitated as Rafa (as seen in TenisPro) whenever he plays playstation.. ;) Kind of hard to imagine Roger shouting etc when he's so cool and calm on court...

ataptc
10-25-2005, 03:41 AM
Have a good rest Rafa! :)

ataptc
10-25-2005, 03:41 AM
Hmmm... I wonder if Roger will be as agitated as Rafa (as seen in TenisPro) whenever he plays playstation.. ;) Kind of hard to imagine Roger shouting etc when he's so cool and calm on court...
:lol: I agree!

veyonce
10-25-2005, 03:49 AM
From antena3.com

53 seconds video: mms://a953.v59721.c5972.g.vm.akamaistream.net/7/953/5974/3c99fd9f/wms.antena3tv.com:81/a3noticias/1/7/omnic511669.wmv

http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/5695/omnic511600077675su.jpg

http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/1193/omnic51160032452oa.jpg

http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/9148/omnic5116005294989rc.jpg

Nadal no jugará en Basilea por la tendinitis que sufre desde hace semanas

2005/10/24. Joaquín Albareda García-Jiménez , Madrid

Rafael Nadal esta en Suiza, pero no para jugar. El tenista mallorquín tiene su rodilla izquierda inflamada por la tendinitis, lo que aconseja guardar reposo. La larga final disputada en el Masters de Madrid ante Ljubicic ha provocado que las molestias se le reproduzcan.

Para el viaje a Basilea a Nadal no le hacían falta tantas alforjas en forma de maletas. En Suiza un médico del torneo le dirá que sí, que su rodilla esta maltrecha de tanto correr en Madrid, como ha confirmado a Antena 3 TV este lunes por la mañana en el aeropuerto de Barajas "dos sets abajo era la primera vez que lo remontaba y sí fue un partido dificilísimo".

En Suiza Nadal pasará un control médico obligatorio y rápido de vuelta a Mallorca para descansar. Si todo va bien jugará en Paris después, y a mediados de Noviembre, el colofón "me queda Shangai, que es la final del Masters con los ocho mejores jugadores del mundo, y ese es mi primer objetivo".

Pero será difícil olvidar un triunfo que iguala en numero a los once que también lleva Federer "ha sido una de las mejores semanas de mi vida. Desde que llegué a Madrid el público me demostró todo su cariño. Yo venia para hacer simplemente un buen torneo, llegar a cuartos o las semifinales, pero al final jugué un torneo increíble".

Rough Translation:-

Nadal will not play in Basel due to the tendinitis that he has been suffering for weeks

2005/10/24. Joaquin Albareda Garci'a-Jime'nez, Madrid

Rafael Nadal this in Switzerland, but does not stop to play. The Majorcan tennis player has his left knee inflamed by the tendinitis, which he was advised to rest. The long match in the Masters of Madrid against Ljubicic has caused him much annoyances.

For the trip to Basel Nadal did not need much suitcases.

Nadal said he will pass a obligatory medical checkup in Switzerland and return to Majorca fast to rest. If everything goes well, he will play later in Paris, and in the middle of November, "I have Shanghai left, that is the end of the Masters with the top eight players of the world, and that is my ultimate goal".

But it will also be difficult to forget a triumph that I equals to Federer in number, it "has been one of the best weeks of my life. Ever since I arrived at Madrid the public demonstrated all their affection to me. I simply wants to play a good match, to reach the quarters or the semifinals, but in the end I played an incredible match ".

adelaide
10-25-2005, 04:21 AM
he looks stoned in the second pic :p

rest up Rafa :)