Favorite Extinct Bird [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Favorite Extinct Bird

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 05:16 AM
What else is there to make a poll about? ;)

J. Corwin
02-16-2005, 05:17 AM
The dodo. :sad:

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 05:25 AM
The Dodo Bird
http://www.50birds.com/images/ext%20Dodo%20Bird%20hsb.jpg


Passenger Pigeon
http://www.50birds.com/images/ext%20Last%20P%20Pigeon%20rm.jpg


Great Auk
http://www.50birds.com/images/ext%20Great%20Auk%20ne%20brehm.jpg


Ivory-Billed Woodpecker (probably extinct)
http://www.50birds.com/images/extivorybilledwoodpeckercarbb.jpg


Giant Moa
http://www.50birds.com/images/extbgiantmoa.jpg


Carolina Parakeet
http://www.50birds.com/images/extbCarolinaParakeetboenacar.jpg


Labrador Duck
http://www.50birds.com/images/ext%20Labrador%20Duck%20ec.jpg


Bachman's Warbler
http://www.50birds.com/images/extbachmanswarblerlafwna.jpg


Spectacled Cormorant
http://www.50birds.com/images/extbPallusCormorantovw.jpg

J. Corwin
02-16-2005, 05:25 AM
Just spreadin' the dodo love... :angel:


http://www.greenscreen.org/newsletter/articles/images/dodo.gif

http://www.folkmanis.com/imagefilesA/DodoBird.jpg

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Delphi/9910/ReadingRm/images/dodo-bird.jpg

http://www.alcheringa-gallery.com/images/gallery/alianga-91-4627.jpg

http://www.msnucleus.org/membership/html/jh/earth/stratigraphy/images/dodo.jpg

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 05:29 AM
Some of those look like bonafide Berkeley Dodos, jace. :smoke: ;)

J. Corwin
02-16-2005, 05:36 AM
:rolls:

Wednesday Addams
02-16-2005, 10:11 AM
Ermmm........ all of them...
Poor birdies...... :sad:

PennyThePenguin
02-16-2005, 11:58 AM
judging solely on the piccies...the great auk :p

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 12:00 PM
judging solely on the piccies...the great auk :p

your cousin :bigcry:

It was sort of a penguin of the Northern Hemisphere/Arctic.

Angle Queen
02-16-2005, 12:48 PM
As a fine Carolina girl (who went to NC State instead of that, um, place in Chapel Hill)...I must choose the lovely CarConuropsis carolinensis.

Auscon
02-16-2005, 12:53 PM
The Moa

my grandpa & great grandpa used to dig up their skeletons in NZ....one of the skeletons they dug up is now in the Auckland Museum.

TennisLurker
02-16-2005, 01:26 PM
This thread makes me sad, cant we bring them back to life ???? :sad:

Giant Moa looks like a badass big bird

PennyThePenguin
02-16-2005, 01:28 PM
your cousin :bigcry:

It was sort of a penguin of the Northern Hemisphere/Arctic.


ahh.thought so...
explains why there aren't any pennies in the north too...after the great aukkie died...they all moved south :p

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 02:56 PM
The Moa

my grandpa & great grandpa used to dig up their skeletons in NZ....one of the skeletons they dug up is now in the Auckland Museum.

That's so interesting! :cool: :yeah:

This thread makes me sad, cant we bring them back to life ????

Giant Moa looks like a badass big bird

:hug: we can think of it as a tribute to their memory :sad:

Yeah, the giant moa was over three meters tall! :scared: :bolt:

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 02:56 PM
No moa
No moa
In old Ao-tea-roa
Can’t get ‘em
They’ve eat ‘em
They’re gone and there ain’t no moa.
(Poem by W Chamberlain)

:lol: :sad:

lizzieh
02-16-2005, 03:00 PM
Yeah, the giant moa was over three meters tall! :scared: :bolt:

Three metres tall?!!!!

Holy smokes that's one big mutha!!!

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 03:03 PM
As a fine Carolina girl (who went to NC State instead of that, um, place in Chapel Hill)...I must choose the lovely CarConuropsis carolinensis.

the only parrot native to the continental U.S.

such a shame... :sad:

TennisLurker
02-16-2005, 03:04 PM
who killed them, bastards!!!

sigmagirl91
02-16-2005, 03:04 PM
The Moa looks like a bad MF, but I'm choosing the Carolina parakeet.

MisterQ
02-16-2005, 03:25 PM
The most mind-boggling extinction is that of the Passenger Pigeon:

"
Gone Forever From the Face of the Earth
"Extinction is Forever"

Just a little over a century ago, the Passenger Pigeon was the most numerous species of bird on Earth. In the Eastern United States they numbered in the BILLIONS, more than all other species of North American birds combined! They flew in enormous flocks that filled the sky and sometimes extended for miles. Their nesting sites covered hundreds of square miles of forest, each tree holding dozens of birds.

Not only were the sheer numbers of the pigeons spectacular, the speed at which the pigeons flew was also remarkable. It is estimated that they could travel at almost 60 miles (96km) per hour!. The population of the Passenger Pigeon started declining with the European colonization of North America. As the forests were cleared and converted to farmland, their habitat began to disappear. But, by far the biggest reason for the decline, was hunting by man. Many passenger pigeons were shot for their excellent meat. However, untold thousands were shot for "sport." In one competition a participant had to kill 30,000 pigeons just to be considered for a prize. They were shot, netted, and blasted out of trees with an early prototype of the machine gun.

By 1896 their were only 250,000 passengers pigeons remaining in one single flock. But still they were not safe. The newly erected telegraph lines allowed a large group of hunters to communicate with each other. On a spring day in April they descended on the flock. At the end of the day the carnage was devastating: 200,000 carcasses, 40,000 mutilated, thousands of chicks destroyed or left to predators. Less than 5,000 birds survived.

The last legitimate record of a wild Passenger Pigeon was in 1900 in Ohio. This bird was shot and its remains are still in the Ohio State Museum. A few individuals lingered on into the early part of the century in captivity. In 1909 the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens had the three remaining birds, two males and a female. By 1910 only the female was left. This last bird to survive was affectionately called Martha , after the wife of George Washington, the first president and "father" of the United States.

On September 1, 1914, at 1:00 in the afternoon, Martha died at the age of 29.



This is possibly the only instance in history where we know the exact moment of a specie's extinction. It took only 50 years for man to exterminate the passenger pigeon.

"When an individual is seen gliding through the woods and close to the observer, it passes like a thought, and on trying to see it again, the eye searches in vain; the bird is gone." John J. Audubon, on the Passenger Pigeon."

http://www.ris.net/~tony/ppigeon.html

Denise
02-16-2005, 06:27 PM
Carolina... simply beautiful :sobbing:

CassL
02-16-2005, 09:27 PM
Since the Giant Moa looks so cool, I'm voting for that. But that story with the pigeons is sooooooo sad!

CooCooCachoo
02-17-2005, 09:30 AM
The woodpecker of course :p

CooCooCachoo
02-17-2005, 09:35 AM
That hunting story pisses me off :fiery:

SuperFurryAnimal
02-17-2005, 11:43 AM
I voted for the dodo

PennyThePenguin
02-17-2005, 02:21 PM
awww...only me for the great auk....:sad:

Kristen
02-18-2005, 08:46 AM
Humans are such assholes :rolleyes:

Over the last two days I learnt (IFAW) how to rehabilitate bird/wildlife affected by oil spills! :woohoo: Cormorants, Penguins, PELICANS even :eek: I have a greater respect for birds now...and MisterQ, boobies were covered in the course. :p

Purple Rainbow
02-18-2005, 08:59 PM
I decided to go with Jiat and vote for her extinct grandparents the Great Auks!
Though the Moa is great as well! Aboriginals found it a great source of food when they entered Australia. The problem was that the Moa's had never lived with humans before and thus hadn't developed a flight response when humans were in sight, making it very easy for the Aboriginals to hunt them. The Moa's were extinct in no time!

PennyThePenguin
02-19-2005, 12:48 AM
:D

poor moas....i'm not really a big fan of the winged ones (and i hate pigeons and crows)....but it's disgusting how humans treat the environment and the other inhabitants of earth...:fiery:

Deco
03-02-2005, 06:55 PM
I'll choose the Labrador Duck; ducks are :cool: , but in fact I feel sorry for them all :sad:

jackieglover
03-04-2005, 07:49 AM
The Ivory Billed Woodpecker looks dope.

MisterQ
04-16-2005, 06:21 AM
The Ivory Billed Woodpecker looks dope.

Came across this website about a 2002 search in Louisiana, which was held after an alleged sighting in 1999. There are experts who believe there may still be some Ivory-Billed WPs in remote forests in the south.

http://www.zeiss.de/C1256BCF0020BE5F/Contents-Frame/BCF8F0B8837639FB85256CC60078F4EE

Neely
04-16-2005, 05:12 PM
after watching the pics, I would say: Bachman's Warbler...

but without pics I would have been lost because the only wordw I understood were duck, bird and pigeon :lol:

Deboogle!.
04-17-2005, 12:31 AM
Dodo!!!!!!

Sorry to the duck :sad: :p

Leonandy
04-18-2005, 03:20 AM
At lease from the pictures,I want to see Giant Moa the most...
Poor birds...Pity!!!

MisterQ
04-29-2005, 08:05 AM
INCREDIBLE NEWS!!!!

Ivory-billed woodpecker not extinct

Scientists report sightings of bird in Arkansas, release video

Thursday, April 28, 2005 Posted: 10:55 PM EDT (0255 GMT)

http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/science/04/28/woodpecker/story.illo.usda.jpg

This illustration shows the endangered woodpecker. Its wingspan is about 3 feet wide.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- An ivory-billed woodpecker -- widely believed to be extinct and whose last confirmed sighting was 60 years ago -- is alive in Arkansas, according to a research paper released Thursday.

And there are plans to use federal money to preserve the bird's habitat.

Evidence the woodpecker still exists includes eight independent sightings between 2004 and 2005 and a videotape.

"The bird captured on video is clearly an ivory-billed woodpecker. Amazingly, America may have another chance to protect the future of this spectacular bird and the awesome forests in which it lives," said a statement from John Fitzpatrick, director of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, The Associated Press reported.

Fitzpatrick co-wrote a paper about the discovery that was released Thursday in the online version of Science magazine.

Interior Secretary Gale Norton called the find an "exciting opportunity," the AP reported.

"Second chances to save wildlife once thought to be extinct are rare .. we will take advantage of this opportunity," she said at a news conference.

The AP reported that Norton and Agriculture Secretary Mikle Johanns promised federal assistance to protect the ivory-bill.

The paper's authors said that observers heard drumming sounds that are consistent with those made by the bird.

Searchers have been unable to spot the bird outside a three-kilometer area of the Big Woods region of Arkansas, but the paper's authors note the area is prime to support a few breeding pairs.

As a result of the sightings, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the Nature Conservancy and other groups have joined to form the Big Woods Conservation Partnership to conserve 200,000 acres of forest habitat and rivers in the area during the next 10 years.

The last confirmed U.S. sighting of the the bird was in a Louisiana hardwood forest in the 1940s. The bird is second in size to the endangered imperial woodpecker of Mexico, once the largest woodpecker on Earth.

Ivory-billed woodpeckers have a nearly 3-foot wingspan and are almost 20 inches long -- about the size of an American black crow.

They once spread across bottomland hardwoods and mountain pine forests of the southeastern United States and Cuba.

The birds, which require a large area for feeding, maintained a small, healthy community until the late 1800s.

Logging and hunting caused the birds' severe decline to near-extinction, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

The birds lived primarily in mature deciduous forest swamps in the southeastern United States, Cornell Lab's Web site states. It takes about three square miles of mature forest to sustain a breeding pair of ivory-bills.

By 1938, about 22 birds remained.

But reported sightings -- in Florida, Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana -- spawned searches. Many of those sightings turned out to be of the more common, slightly smaller and more widespread pileated woodpecker.

The ivory-bill differs from the pileated in size, bill color, the female's all-black crest and large patches of white on the lower back of the perched bird. When perched, the pileated appears solid black on the back.

In 1999, a Louisiana State University student David Kullivan said he saw a pair of ivory-billed woodpeckers in a remote bayou.

"That morning, I was sitting at the base of a tree," Kullivan told Audubon magazine. "Suddenly, these two birds were in the trees. I watched them for 15 minutes.

"The male -- the bird with a red crest -- seemed to be doing all the calling. I was awfully excited when they flew away. I tried to follow them, but they were gone."

Cornell and Zeiss Optics sponsored a search of the area beginning in 2002, but they did not find any clear evidence of the bird.

Mary Scott, avid birder and operator of the Web site BirdingAmerica.com, says she saw the ivory-bill in Arkansas in 2003, but did not announce it until April 27, 2005. Scott said she saw the bird while taking a break and without her camera.

Gene Sparling reported seeing the bird while he was kayaking in early 2004 in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge in Monroe County, Arkansas.

Bobby Harrison of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, and Tim Gallagher of Cornell, who was writing a book about the bird, asked Sparling to lead them to the site where he saw it.

Two weeks after Sparling's sighting, Gallagher and Harrison saw the bird, too.

Five more sightings -- all by experienced observers -- came between April 5, 2004, and February 15, 2005.

But the key evidence is an April 25, 2004, video that David Luneau shot. It shows a large woodpecker perched on a tree and flying away as his canoe approaches.

"Its images are blurred and pixilated owing to rapid motion, slow shutter speed, video interlacing artifacts, and the bird's distance beyond the video camera's focal plane," the paper says of the video.

"Despite these imperfections, crucial fieldmarks are evident both on the original and on deinterlaced and magnified video fields."

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/science/04/28/woodpecker/index.html

J. Corwin
04-29-2005, 08:38 AM
INCREDIBLE NEWS!!!!

Ivory-billed woodpecker not extinct

Scientists report sightings of bird in Arkansas, release video

Thursday, April 28, 2005 Posted: 10:55 PM EDT (0255 GMT)

http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/science/04/28/woodpecker/story.illo.usda.jpg

This illustration shows the endangered woodpecker. Its wingspan is about 3 feet wide.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- An ivory-billed woodpecker -- widely believed to be extinct and whose last confirmed sighting was 60 years ago -- is alive in Arkansas, according to a research paper released Thursday.

And there are plans to use federal money to preserve the bird's habitat.

Evidence the woodpecker still exists includes eight independent sightings between 2004 and 2005 and a videotape.

"The bird captured on video is clearly an ivory-billed woodpecker. Amazingly, America may have another chance to protect the future of this spectacular bird and the awesome forests in which it lives," said a statement from John Fitzpatrick, director of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, The Associated Press reported.

Fitzpatrick co-wrote a paper about the discovery that was released Thursday in the online version of Science magazine.

Interior Secretary Gale Norton called the find an "exciting opportunity," the AP reported.

"Second chances to save wildlife once thought to be extinct are rare .. we will take advantage of this opportunity," she said at a news conference.

The AP reported that Norton and Agriculture Secretary Mikle Johanns promised federal assistance to protect the ivory-bill.

The paper's authors said that observers heard drumming sounds that are consistent with those made by the bird.

Searchers have been unable to spot the bird outside a three-kilometer area of the Big Woods region of Arkansas, but the paper's authors note the area is prime to support a few breeding pairs.

As a result of the sightings, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the Nature Conservancy and other groups have joined to form the Big Woods Conservation Partnership to conserve 200,000 acres of forest habitat and rivers in the area during the next 10 years.

The last confirmed U.S. sighting of the the bird was in a Louisiana hardwood forest in the 1940s. The bird is second in size to the endangered imperial woodpecker of Mexico, once the largest woodpecker on Earth.

Ivory-billed woodpeckers have a nearly 3-foot wingspan and are almost 20 inches long -- about the size of an American black crow.

They once spread across bottomland hardwoods and mountain pine forests of the southeastern United States and Cuba.

The birds, which require a large area for feeding, maintained a small, healthy community until the late 1800s.

Logging and hunting caused the birds' severe decline to near-extinction, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

The birds lived primarily in mature deciduous forest swamps in the southeastern United States, Cornell Lab's Web site states. It takes about three square miles of mature forest to sustain a breeding pair of ivory-bills.

By 1938, about 22 birds remained.

But reported sightings -- in Florida, Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana -- spawned searches. Many of those sightings turned out to be of the more common, slightly smaller and more widespread pileated woodpecker.

The ivory-bill differs from the pileated in size, bill color, the female's all-black crest and large patches of white on the lower back of the perched bird. When perched, the pileated appears solid black on the back.

In 1999, a Louisiana State University student David Kullivan said he saw a pair of ivory-billed woodpeckers in a remote bayou.

"That morning, I was sitting at the base of a tree," Kullivan told Audubon magazine. "Suddenly, these two birds were in the trees. I watched them for 15 minutes.

"The male -- the bird with a red crest -- seemed to be doing all the calling. I was awfully excited when they flew away. I tried to follow them, but they were gone."

Cornell and Zeiss Optics sponsored a search of the area beginning in 2002, but they did not find any clear evidence of the bird.

Mary Scott, avid birder and operator of the Web site BirdingAmerica.com, says she saw the ivory-bill in Arkansas in 2003, but did not announce it until April 27, 2005. Scott said she saw the bird while taking a break and without her camera.

Gene Sparling reported seeing the bird while he was kayaking in early 2004 in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge in Monroe County, Arkansas.

Bobby Harrison of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, and Tim Gallagher of Cornell, who was writing a book about the bird, asked Sparling to lead them to the site where he saw it.

Two weeks after Sparling's sighting, Gallagher and Harrison saw the bird, too.

Five more sightings -- all by experienced observers -- came between April 5, 2004, and February 15, 2005.

But the key evidence is an April 25, 2004, video that David Luneau shot. It shows a large woodpecker perched on a tree and flying away as his canoe approaches.

"Its images are blurred and pixilated owing to rapid motion, slow shutter speed, video interlacing artifacts, and the bird's distance beyond the video camera's focal plane," the paper says of the video.

"Despite these imperfections, crucial fieldmarks are evident both on the original and on deinterlaced and magnified video fields."

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/science/04/28/woodpecker/index.html

:woohoo:

MisterQ
04-29-2005, 05:20 PM
ANOTHER ARTICLE:

'Extinct' woodpecker found alive

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41086000/jpg/_41086929_woodpecker250.jpg

The bird was declared extinct in 1920

The spectacular ivory-billed woodpecker, which was declared extinct in 1920, has been found alive in North America, Science magazine reports.

The news has stunned ornithologists worldwide, with some comparing the discovery to finding the dodo.

Researchers began an intense year-long search after a tip-off before finally capturing the bird on video.

The find has ignited hope that other "extinct" birds may be clinging on to survival in isolated places.

'Finding Elvis'

"This find is so significant that it is really difficult to describe," Alistair Gammell, of the UK's Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), told BBC News. "We sadly won't rediscover the dodo, but it is almost on that level."

Frank Gill, of the US National Audubon Society, added: "This is huge, just huge. It is kind of like finding Elvis."

The "stunning" red, white and black woodpecker was formerly distributed across the south-eastern United States and Cuba.


It's like a funeral shroud has been pulled back



Tim Gallagher, editor of Living Bird magazine

The bird carves out a narrow niche for itself by drilling in mature trees, and logging and forest clearance for agriculture began to impinge on its environment.

By 1920, it was assumed extinct, although, in 1944, there was one more confirmed sighting in North America of a lonely unpaired female, above the remnants of an over-cut forest.

Since then, decades of searches yielded nothing and hope gradually faded away.

Now, finally, the bird has been seen again in the Big Woods of eastern Arkansas.

The discovery was first made on 11 February 2004, by Gene Sparling, of Hot Springs, Arkansas, who was kayaking in a reserve in Big Woods. He saw an unusually large red-crested woodpecker fly towards him and land on a nearby tree.

He said the creature did not look quite like anything he had seen before, so he contacted Cornell University's Living Bird magazine.

After a team of experts interviewed him, they felt they might be onto something special.

A second chance

John Fitzpatrick, of Cornell University, headed the search party, which included Tim Gallagher, editor of Living Bird.

Within a month, Dr Gallagher had seen the ivory-billed woodpecker for himself.

Describing the moment he first set eyes on it, he said: "Just to think this bird made it into the 21st Century gives me chills.

"It's like a funeral shroud has been pulled back, giving us a glimpse of a living bird, rising Lazarus-like from the grave."

The team finally went on to capture the bird on video, which allowed them to confirm its identity.

Among the world's largest woodpeckers, the ivory-bill is one of six North American bird species suspected or known to have gone extinct since 1880.

"This provides hope for [other] species classified as potentially extinct," said Stuart Butchart, of BirdLife International.

It also offers an extra incentive to protect the habitat of the ivory-bill, as well as other birds.

"Amazingly America may have another chance to protect the future of this spectacular bird and the awesome forests in which it lives," Mr Fitzpatrick said.

"It is the most beautiful bird we could imagine rediscovering. It is a magical bird.

"For those of us who tenaciously cling to the idea that man can live alongside fellow species, this is the most incredible ray of hope."



http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4493825.stm

MisterQ
04-29-2005, 05:24 PM
there's a link to some video footage on that bbc page... :dance:

joeb_uk
04-29-2005, 05:27 PM
Carolina Parakeet

MisterQ
04-30-2005, 03:27 AM
Here's a great site about this amazing discovery! :dance:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/index.html

MisterQ
04-30-2005, 04:25 AM
Great radio stories on the Ivory-Bill can be found here:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4622633