2005 Andy Articles! [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

2005 Andy Articles!

Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Deboogle!.
01-03-2005, 02:32 PM
I realized we could start a new thread. And what better topic than the Australian Press finally waking up and joining the party!
============

No favours for Hewitt
Leo Schlink
04jan05

LLEYTON Hewitt's quest for the Australian Open second seeding could already be over, unless Tennis Australia breaks with tradition and promotes him up the tournament order.

Trailing world No. 2 Andy Roddick by 65 points, Hewitt can equal the American's total with victory this week at the Next Generation Hardcourts in Adelaide.
But, according to unconfirmed ATP estimates, Roddick is likely to retain the No. 2 ranking, and second seeding, on a countback.

The complicated 52-week rolling computer entry system credits Roddick with 3655 points to Hewitt's 3590.

The ranking is determined on the results of the four grand slams and the nine Masters Series tournaments -- automatically calculated whether a player competes or not -- and the results from five other events.

If Hewitt wins Adelaide, he will receive 175 rankings points, but he will then lose his Tokyo haul of 110 points (the worst of his best 2004 results), leaving him equal with Roddick.

But the American's superior record in Masters Series events -- he won Miami, was runner-up in Toronto and reached the semi-finals in Cincinnati -- means he will almost certainly retain the No. 2 spot when the new rankings are issued next week.

Roddick accumulated 2815 points in the big 13 tournaments, Hewitt 2705.

Both players won four tournaments and reached a grand slam final.

Australian Open officials generally follow the rankings when formulating seedings.

Hewitt had hoped to overtake Roddick to earn the right to start the January 17-30 Australian Open at the bottom of the draw, raising the prospect of clashing with defending champion Roger Federer in the final.

But ATP officials yesterday warned Hewitt would not pass Roddick even if he triumphed this week.

The ATP rule book suggests Roddick's effort to reach the Wimbledon final -- matched by Hewitt's US Open showing -- allied to his slightly superior Masters Series results would be enough for him to cling to No. 2.

As much as Hewitt hoped to pass Roddick, and earn the second seeding, he will not be expecting much charity from Tennis Australia given the publicity generated from his comments about the pace of the Open's Rebound Ace courts.

Hewitt believes the courts are too slow, claiming TA officials have repeatedly ignored his request to speed up the rubberised surface.

Wimbledon is the only major to routinely recast seedings, to suit the peculiarities of grass.

The US Open weathered a player revolt in 1996 when aspiring world No. 1 Yevgeny Kafelnikov was dropped in the seedings.

All four majors reserve the right to alter the seedings against the rankings but the Australian Open has never done it.

Hewitt is yet to get past the fourth round at Melbourne Park.

He trails Federer 8-7 after losing six matches to the Swiss world No. 1 last season.

Hewitt will have to rely on the luck of the draw next week when he could land at the bottom of Federer's half or at the top of Roddick's.

Hewitt and his coach Roger Rasheed suffered a first-round doubles defeat at Memorial Drive yesterday.

They lost 7-6 (7-3) 6-7 (5-7) 6-2 to Australian Jordan Kerr and American Jim Thomas.

Tytta!.
01-03-2005, 03:02 PM
Better late than never :lol:

Havok
01-03-2005, 06:48 PM
IF Tennis Australia would have bumped Lleyton up to #2, that would have been extremely :retard:. Forget about Lleyton's words about the surface, his track record compared to Roddick's is abysmal :o and Lleyton has played the AO many more times than Andy has.

Leena
01-03-2005, 06:50 PM
After the debacle at 96 US Open, I don't believe the seedings will be played around with again.

Fumus
01-03-2005, 07:03 PM
Well is this an Andy article or a Hewitt one Deb? ;)

Deboogle!.
01-03-2005, 07:27 PM
I think it was relevant to Andy, don't you? ;) His ranking and seeding at AO is very important :p:p

Leena, I don't know as much as you - what happened in 96? The only thing about that USO is the Sampras-Corretja match :o

Black Adam
01-03-2005, 07:31 PM
After the debacle at 96 US Open, I don't believe the seedings will be played around with again.
What happened at the USO 1996? :confused:

tangerine_dream
01-03-2005, 08:54 PM
The only thing I remember at the 96 open was Petey puking his brains out on the court...and he still went on to win. Alex was beside himself. :lol:

I gotta get that match on DVD. :yeah:

Deboogle!.
01-03-2005, 09:08 PM
The only thing I remember at the 96 open was Petey puking his brains out on the court...and he still went on to win. Alex was beside himself. :lol:

I gotta get that match on DVD. :yeah:

LOL EXACTLY, that's all I remember :lol:

superpinkone37
01-04-2005, 01:38 AM
Well I am glad that there is finally an article confirming what you guys have been saying all along. :) Its sad that Lleyton didnt know about it lol.

J. Corwin
01-04-2005, 01:41 AM
Leena, do tell...I'm waiting for a response too, lol. I was still a tennis virgin back then. :angel:

heya
01-04-2005, 02:41 AM
:haha: I wonder why I like Andy even more.
He's actually AWARE of his own humanity. He knows when to shut his mouth.
Could it be that he's SEVERELY UNDERESTIMATED????? :yeah: :bounce:

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 02:42 AM
heya, have I told you lately that I love you?

And that's true, Andy usually does know when to shut his mouth. He's fairly tactful and will just say "no comment" - like when the Spanish fans got to him at DC, he just said "I don't wanna talk about it next question" or whatever.

heya
01-04-2005, 03:19 AM
Ha! I was thinking,
"He may not be the quickest guy on the court, but he's
still classy + elegant (and sweet) enough to tone down his evil, macho side."

Of course, I still love the wicked guy who can improve at anythng--not just tennis.
He's a natural actor even though he doesn't want to admit it.
At 1st, I didn't want him to do TV shows/commercials, but I saw how scary good he was.
He can beat you at ping-pong, basketball, baseball, etc. heehee

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 05:21 AM
AH! PROOF HE'S PRACTICING! :lol: :rolls:

I don't get the headline though, but it's late and maybe I'm slow :silly:

Does Andy look a bit trimmer or am I just wishfully thinking :p
============
I’ve Got a Big Serve, But Four at Once?
By Staff
2005-01-04
Andy’s new coach, Dean Goldfine, isn’t really asking Andy to do that, but ar.com observed Andy working hard at practice and frequently conversing with Dean who conducted a very spirited workout. From the sidelines, the new partnership appears to be gelling very nicely.

Reliable sources informed ar.com that Andy is grinding two-a-days and still finds time for some personal activities. Andy, Dean and his wife, and Doug Spreen (Andy’s trainer) all had floor seats at the Miami Heat game tonight. Very nice!

Go Andy! (and Dean and Doug and Grant)

http://www.andyroddick.com/images/news/1949image.jpg

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 05:25 AM
dude, there are four balls in the picture! d:

:o:o:o:o:o :smash: :smash:

I told you I was tired and slow. Thanks for being on MSN, you could've helped me avoid embarrassment by telling me that before I posted :haha:


I thought the camera was supposed to add 10 lbs. :p

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 05:28 AM
Well you're right, I'm going to bed rather soon. But still, we missed you :sad: I have buttloads of new smilies to share and had no one to share them with :(

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 05:33 AM
they're not scary, I promise *pinky swear* :p Some of them are really really cute :D

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 02:47 PM
Well you're not on MSN so I can't prove how cute they are to you :ras:

andyroxmysox12191
01-04-2005, 08:13 PM
I thought Andy looked a bit....slimmer, as manDa said, but it might just be us wanting him to be that way :p

Flushing_Ace
01-04-2005, 10:54 PM
The article Debstah posted said good luck to Andy, Doug, Dean and Grant, but I read supposably from Grant himself that he stopped working for Andy after the DC final. Has anyone else heard this?

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 11:07 PM
:scratch: I dunno... hadn't read that anywhere, but that doesn't mean it's not true :lol:. Where did you read something from Grant himself? I mean was it reputable? It would certainly seem odd for his site to be wishing him good luck if he were no longer working for Andy :confused: Just a few months ago they had the big thing on AR.com about how important Grant was to Andy and whatnot, so it'd be surprising if he left. I really don't have a clue :shrug:

Flushing_Ace
01-04-2005, 11:13 PM
Umm, well at the tennis warehouse message board someone plays Grant very convincingly haha. Anyway, you can go to http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=36243 and see how valid it really sounds...?

J. Corwin
01-04-2005, 11:16 PM
Ok let me get off the short bus here.

*gets off the short bus*


Who's Grant again? I know Dean's the new coach...but Grant is....? :retard:

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 11:19 PM
Jace, Grant is/was Andy's stringer/equipment manager

oh ok .... I just wasn't sure if it was like a newspaper or whatever. Why would Grant post on a big tennis message board? Or maybe, and very possibly, the people who write the articles on Andy's site don't know yet :bigcry:

But yes, that seems convincing, and he seems sad about it... seemed like Andy relied a lot on Grant to perfect his racquets and equipment for him every day, so I hope he can find someone as good. That's what's most important. Understandable that Grant would want to get on with his life. Traveling like that can be hellish.

Guess we'll find out soon enough. As long as Grant is happy and Andy has someone good to work on his stuff, that's all that matters.

Thanks for the heads up, Cole :)

Flushing_Ace
01-04-2005, 11:39 PM
Aww you actually remembered who I was :) But actually Cole is a nickname. Anyway, I always thought it was weird of Grant to post there too and at first I didn't even believe it was him either, but he seriously sounds like he knows what he's talking about. But hey, I didn't believe Andy and Brad spilt until a couple days later so what do I know? :) It does sound like, if that's truly Grant anyway, that they ended on much better terms then maybe Brad and Andy, so that's always good.

Deboogle!.
01-04-2005, 11:45 PM
Yea I remembered :) I can remember names and phone numbers but not birthdays :shrug: go figure. Well I can call you anything you want, if you don't like your nickname or don't want to be called it :)

I did a search for Grant's other posts there and they're always nice, and informative. So I agree with you, if it's not Grant, then it's someone who really likes Andy a lot, who knows inside stories, who has a lot of time on his/her hands.

*plays Twilight Zone music* And the plot thickens..... dundundun

Flushing_Ace
01-04-2005, 11:53 PM
I can't remember names at all. So if I ever get over this weird sickness and learn how to post and talk to new people, I'll have to go by everyone's usernames. If you ever see me again you can just call me Nikki though ;)

But yeah, that guy definitely knows what he's talking about. You would just think that ar.com of all places would know if Grant didn't work for Andy anymore... but lol at your little twilight zone comment haha :)

Deboogle!.
01-05-2005, 12:09 AM
ok then, Nikki it is :) You'll come out and post more, at some point you'll just stop being able to resist the urge. MUAHAHAHAHAAHAHHAAAAAAAA :devil:

You would think ar.com would know.. but.... :tape:


And yay, I aim to amuse :p

Flushing_Ace
01-05-2005, 12:17 AM
lol Well what do you think got me to post in the first place? You guys are certinly an intriging bunch :) and the smilies are great. But it's useless since I'm mently unable to talk on forums. I am almost at 20 though ;)

Deboogle!.
01-05-2005, 12:22 AM
come on MSN some more, we'll really get in your head ;);)

roisin
01-05-2005, 12:28 AM
i'll vouch for that. :p

Flushing_Ace
01-05-2005, 12:31 AM
lol :) Well I'm on msn now... I think I only have andyroxmysox(again with my name problem...) on my list though.

heya
01-05-2005, 01:13 AM
Grant: :lol:

I know everybody has there own opinion. That is what this country is all about. But how many of you know P mac. I have been with the davis Cup team for a year. Mac is a great guy. He is very smart,funny and knows a lot more about the game and the politics that go along with it than any of us. He has been a great Captan for the team. He works very hard for tennis as a sport. We compare him to John all the time. You say if it were not for John he would be nothing. Well take John away now look at what he has done. Who here has won an ATP tournament. Who here is on the road 20 weeks a yr promoting tennis. P Mac may not be the best ever. But he is damb good at what he does.

Havok
01-05-2005, 01:16 AM
Ok let me get off the short bus here.

*gets off the short bus*


Who's Grant again? I know Dean's the new coach...but Grant is....? :retard:
I was thinking the exact same thing.:haha:

superpinkone37
01-05-2005, 01:40 AM
Thats interesting about Grant, especially as he was only there for the summer pretty much. But I read thorugh a bunch of his posts and they seem valid :shrug: I believe him.

andyroxmysox12191
01-05-2005, 08:13 PM
NIKKI!!!!!!! FINALLY! :kiss: :hug: :banana: and it's Mani :p :kiss:

Flushing_Ace
01-05-2005, 10:35 PM
Hey Mani :) I should have just looked at your sig for your name haha. For some reason I was thinking it stared with an A.

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:35 AM
uh ohmygod, hell froze over!!!!!

http://www.andyroddick.com/av_summary.php?audvid_id=155

Pyramid hair..... NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!! :bolt:

Havok
01-06-2005, 04:39 AM
Link isn't working.:o

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:40 AM
:confused::scratch: works for me...

try this

http://www.andyroddick.com/av_detail.php?audvid_file_id=276&audvid_file_type=2

or
http://www.andyroddick.com/audio_video.php first one

My Quicktime is on pot and it's messing up the audio so I can't understand anything :retard:

Havok
01-06-2005, 04:44 AM
Yeah, I'm not getting anything whatsoever. All I get is "this information is only accessible by logging into his website."

It's because I am retard.:retard:

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:45 AM
Well you have to be a member of AR.com and you have to be logged in....

you are not a retard!

Havok
01-06-2005, 04:46 AM
Ack, missed a comma there. I am a member and I was logged in. That last sentence is me telling ar.com that i AM logged in.:rolls:

superpinkone37
01-06-2005, 04:46 AM
I am going to that link and it wont let me see it. It keeps saying..."This information is only accessible by logging into this website." But I am logged and it lets me see the other videos :confused: I even tried opening it from how I usually do in my Favorites and it keeps geiving me that message :(

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:47 AM
:retard: :retard: :retard: I have no clue :confused:

and I can't get audio in quicktime to work so I can't even tell you what he says :haha:

snaillyyy
01-06-2005, 04:51 AM
Thanks for the info deb :hug: but.......OMG Andy......NOOOOOO PYRAMID!!!

Said he was lazy on his few off days, was supposed to go to Maimi on New Years eve but had plane trouble and so stayed in Austin with friends, and the wristbands will be available very soon.

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:59 AM
Which is what? All I could make out was the end, that it probably wouldn't happen

Why is my QT on pot?????? :ras:

snaillyyy
01-06-2005, 05:02 AM
Well Deb since you are reading and pot might not help, it just couldnt go to waste so QT took it :devil: :p

superpinkone37
01-06-2005, 05:03 AM
ok wow it finally worked for me. About the new years resolution he said that he has been trying to stop biting his nails for seven years and he kinda gave up on that so it wasnt gonna happen. And his hair looks funny because it is indeed the pineapple hair, but it is too short on the sides so yeah.

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 05:04 AM
Yea Carole, I guess so :o:o and a big :smash: for Quicktime

ooooooohhhh biting his nails :haha: he can't stop, what else would he be able to EAT during his matches since he can't have PIZZA on court ;)

It's no the pineapple hair, Danielle, it's its uglier relative, Pyramid hair. I :hearts: pineapple hair. I :mad::fiery: Pyramid hair....teehee

superpinkone37
01-06-2005, 05:10 AM
LMAO I think I got some pot from the Quicktime, Deb, and I typed the wrong thing :smash: lol. Yeah I know, I love the Pineapple hair too. :hearts:

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 05:11 AM
My Quicktime is now not only on pot but it's dealing it too?! OY VEY!

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 05:18 AM
AH!! I just played with every damn QT setting imaginable and got it off pot!!!! Of course, I didn't test a file after I changed each setting so I don't know which one it was... But still. :woohoo:

heya
01-06-2005, 05:41 AM
Grow his hair 10 more inches, the way I want it. Who cares what Fish and other friends are thinking?
He's whining about being a lazy bum with bad habits again. What's new??
He moans during matches about playing awfully because he's lazy. :fiery:

Drink a little Caprisun. :drink: Maybe before serves, he can smoke weed. :smoke:
He will jack up his backhand and clean the floor with J. Johansson,
*dirk & fedex squeal with delight* Ostrich God, Nadal, Agassi and Hewee.

heya
01-06-2005, 06:40 AM
Celebrity sightings

Celebrities at the Orange Bowl included Oklahoma governor Brad Henry, Toby Keith, Brad Pitt, Magic Johnson, Pat Riley, Henry Winkler, Andy Roddick, Carson Palmer, Roy Williams, Will Ferrell, Marcus Allen, Nick Lachey and Ashley and Jessica Simpson.

O.J. Simpson, who won a Heisman Trophy at USC, was in attendance. Simpson caused a stir when he made an impromptu appearance at a USC practice before the 2003 Orange Bowl. He did not attend practice before this year's game.
sun-sentinel.com

superpinkone37
01-06-2005, 06:59 AM
heya, you are a riot :haha:

heya
01-06-2005, 07:31 AM
heehee Omg. I made so many typos. :o :smash:

J. Corwin
01-06-2005, 08:12 AM
Andy...return of the dunce cap. :retard:

J. Corwin
01-06-2005, 08:50 AM
Yes. They're all guilty! ;)

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 03:40 PM
um..... hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
==========
Celebrity NFL Football Pool
By Staff
2005-01-06
As recently reported on ESPN, tennis player, James Blake, finished seven points ahead of Wilma McNabb to capture the Page 3 crown and even earned bragging rights over ESPN’s NFL analysts.

Blake may have found himself a career after tennis. "It feels great to win the pool," said Blake. "Being off the tour for so long with injuries and illness, I could take plenty of time to check ESPN.com for all the pertinent information. So I feel like I may have had an unfair advantage. Although that doesn't excuse all the analysts for losing to me since it is their job.

"I'm also proud that I absolutely killed Andy Roddick, and will be sure to remind him of that consistently on tour. Everyone else did great and it was a fun excuse to care about every game in the NFL."

To that, Andy said, “Yeah, Yeah! The way I was coming back Blake was lucky there weren’t thirty weeks in the NFL season!”

Final standings:

1. James Blake 186
2. Wilma McNabb 179
3. Heather Mitts 173
4. Jermaine Dye 169
4. Luke Walton 169
6. Drew Lachey 168
7. Bow Wow 166
8. Steve Harris 158
9. Nick Lachey 156
10. Holly Robinson Peete 155
10. Pat McGee 155
12. Andy Roddick 153

On behalf of the winner, ESPN will make a charitable contribution to Shriner’s Children’s Hospital in Springfield, Mass. As a kid, Blake spent time there as a patient, when he suffered from severe scoliosis. If it wasn't for Shriner's, Blake says he would never be playing professional tennis. And since the Andy Roddick Foundation is dedicated to “helping children today for tomorrow” Andy could not be happier. In Andy’s words, “How good can it be when you can lose and still win?”

roisin
01-06-2005, 04:11 PM
haha, bless andy for coming last!

Deboogle!.
01-06-2005, 04:34 PM
Fumigator showed me this yesterday then I found it on the TennisOne site - by Joel Drucker
--------------

What can we expect from Andy Roddick's new coach
Having spent an arduous seven years in the Todd Martin camp drawing on every possible resource, expect Dean Goldfine to work very hard with Roddick on and off the court. But while Roddick's ex-coach, Brad Gilbert, is rarely known for crediting or bringing other experts into his classroom, and is at heart a specialist in tennis tactics, Dean Goldfine is far more inclusive. It wouldn't surprise me to learn of Goldine chatting occasionally with the likes of longstanding guru Jose Higueras and bringing those ideas to Roddick.

As for Roddick, do note that this guy has finished the last two years ranked one and two in the world. Let's see if he's able to add more wrinkles to his game such as intermittent net play and continue working out the kinks in his backhand.

tangerine_dream
01-06-2005, 09:33 PM
Damn, I missed seeing Brad Pitt and Andy Roddick in the same place? I've got to start watching Heat matches more often. :p

Too funny he came in dead last in the NFL picks thingy. :haha:

heya
01-07-2005, 12:27 AM
Presumably, Andy and Pitt were at the football game.

Why's he so desperate to watch lame football and basketball games?
It's urgent for him to get ready for the next day's tennis practice...

James Blake laughed at his ignorance.
IMO, Andy believes that he's a joke, and most people think that he won't have a great tennis future either.

Does he want to humiliate himself at Kooyong & Australian Open?
I don't want to waste my time watching him if he won't do what it takes to win every title, with no fear.
I don't want to see him self-destruct again in 4-hour marathons.
Many Andy fans just don't care if he loses early, but I hate watching him
waste chance after chance and then giving up. I was very angry when he injured himself by diving on the ground/twisting his ankle.

He should know that he's the 1 who's responsible for fitness and preparation.
So, it's ridiculous for him to pretend that his unforced errors happen for no reason.

Deboogle!.
01-08-2005, 08:26 PM
Argh.... everyone else is either already in Australia and practicing or playing various tournaments. Only Andy is still at home it seems. Oh well:o
------------------
Andy Off Down Under
By Lucy Flory
2005-01-08
G’day andyroddick.com! Andy will soon be heading to the Land of Oz in the sizzling heat of the Australian summer, destination Melbourne, to begin preparations for the first Grand Slam of the year: The Australian Open.

Andy’s first event of 2005, will be the Kooyong Classic, at the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club from January 12-15. Joining Andy there will be a real ripper of a field comprising of Federer, Henman, Agassi, Nalbandian, Gaudio, Massu and Srichaphan. "This is probably our best field ever" said Tournament Director, Colin Stubs. "I will be delighted and privileged to welcome the above eight players to Kooyong.”

With play starting next Wednesday, there will be four matches on the opening day, three on Thursday and Friday, and then the two finals will be played on Saturday. In recent years the format has been that the players move left or right in the draw depending on whether they win or lose their opening matches.

This is an alternative approach in terms of preparation for the Australian Open. Instead of playing in one of the ATP tournaments preceding the Australian Open, Andy has decided to train hard in Texas and Florida before flying to Australia. With the round robin format of the Kooyong Classic, Andy will be guaranteed some hard fought matches to fine tune his game and competitive edge.

This will be Andy’s first tournament with his new coach, Dean Goldfine, and both player and coach expect to do well in Kooyong and enter the Australian Open razor sharp.

Golfnduck
01-08-2005, 08:30 PM
Thanks for the article Deb!!! I can't wait until Wednesday!!!!

aceit
01-08-2005, 08:38 PM
Thanks for the article. :) I hope Andy starts off the year very well.

Tytta!.
01-08-2005, 09:12 PM
Argh.... everyone else is either already in Australia and practicing or playing various tournaments. Only Andy is still at home it seems. Oh well:o

:mad: :o He better be arriving in Australia otherwise :smash: :fiery:

heya
01-08-2005, 11:41 PM
He waits til the last day to fly overseas again. :fiery: :retard:
Be that way and lose 6-4 6-0 again, Andy!!!! :mad:
I'll smack him if he's like this in the clay & indoor events again!!!!
Tennis is about being serious ALL YEAR, NOT about being complacent on HARDCOURTS!

He won't even go to friends' tourneys to work hard with Dent, Andre, Fish, etc.
If he cares so much about Davis Cup, World Team Cup, etc., he should improve his game as well as his DC teammates'.

Does he want to be stuck between #2-10 all the time?? Players love to bring him down, but he's SO DAMN NICE to them. Blast them off the court, ANDY!!!
Goldfine, WHIP HIM!!!! :devil:

Deboogle!.
01-09-2005, 12:09 AM
He waits til the last day to fly overseas again. :fiery: :retard:


Yea, this is something, IMO, that Andy really needs to think about. Marat, Tim, Andre, and more - they're all already in Melbourne. Look at Roger, he was in Doha several days before the tourney.. Andre went to Australia to acclimatise over a week before Kooyong... There's a reason these people do well - they are the best prepared for an event that they can possibly be. Andy needs to be in Australia, NOW. I think it was a good decision to sit out the ATP tournaments and go for Kooyong instead, I give that a :yeah: but still, be prepared for it, be as prepared as humanly possible. You and Dean can hit in Australia too. But gahhhhh.

heya
01-09-2005, 01:24 AM
I hated people who jeered at him in Spain and the nonfans yelled all the time when he lost in Thailand & Houston. :mad:
....Ljubicic and Anti-fans enjoy that stupidity, don't they????
I'm sure Davis Cup vs. Croatia will be joyful. :fiery: :shout:
HE HAS TO WIN A LOT. BE SELFISH, ANDY!! :bigclap:
Last year, Andy DIDN'T TRY HIS BEST & he knows this. He better stop that!!!
3-MATCH LOSING STREAK. Hello Andy?
He played smartly in 2003, but he was encouraged to SERVE 155 mph!!!!
When you made him practice dropshots on clay, he ignored you.
If he doesn't care, he should NOT be shocked when he loses a lot.

He loves to make tennis popular (exhibitions, TV shows, ads),
but does it hurt him that he WON NO TOURNEY in 5 months
& that he could BARELY BREATHE in matches? No Fitness = No Wins
I knew he'd injure himself last year (Toronto, Thailand, Memphis, Spain).


GET YOUR CONFIDENCE BACK, ANDY! :bounce:

Golfnduck
01-09-2005, 02:07 AM
I hated people who jeered at him in Spain and the nonfans yelled all the time when he lost in Thailand & Houston. :mad:
....Ljubicic and Anti-fans enjoy that stupidity, don't they????
I'm sure Davis Cup vs. Croatia will be joyful. :fiery: :shout:
HE HAS TO WIN A LOT. BE SELFISH, ANDY!! :bigclap:
Last year, Andy DIDN'T TRY HIS BEST & he knows this. He better stop that!!!
3-MATCH LOSING STREAK. Hello Andy?
He played smartly in 2003, but he was encouraged to SERVE 155 mph!!!!
When you made him practice dropshots on clay, he ignored you.
If he doesn't care, he should NOT be shocked when he loses a lot.

He loves to make tennis popular (exhibitions, TV shows, ads),
but does it hurt him that he WON NO TOURNEY in 5 months
& that he could BARELY BREATHE in matches? No Fitness = No Wins
I knew he'd injure himself last year (Toronto, Thailand, Memphis, Spain).


GET YOUR CONFIDENCE BACK, ANDY! :bounce:
Have to agree with Heya on this one. I finally understood a whole post.

Deboogle!.
01-09-2005, 02:09 AM
I'm sure Davis Cup vs. Croatia will be joyful. :fiery: :shout:


Don't worry, heya, some of US will be there this time :devil::devil:

heya
01-09-2005, 02:41 AM
*F A I N T
I spewed out more venom (with restraint). :lol:
Sadly, :sad: the humorless banshees at GM are gettin' paranoid and desperate for Duck Entertainment. They break the forum rules and they hold grudges! How hypocritical!!!!! :spit: Didn't Fed's win explode their EGOS???? OMG :o :eek:
Ljubicic is PROUD!!! OY
:rocker2: Duck Entertainment. *wipes away tear :tears: :haha:
Let them try hard to make you argue with them :sobbing:
but they want us fans to argue with them!!! :haha: :spit:

aceit
01-09-2005, 02:46 AM
*F A I N T
I spewed out more venom (with restraint). :lol:
Sadly, :sad: the humorless banshees at GM are gettin' paranoid and desperate for Duck Entertainment. They break the forum rules and they hold grudges! How hypocritical!!!!! :spit: Didn't Fed's win explode their EGOS???? OMG :o :eek:
Ljubicic is PROUD!!! OY
:rocker2: Duck Entertainment. *wipes away tear :tears: :haha:
Let them try hard to make you argue with them :sobbing:
but they want us fans to argue with them!!! :haha: :spit:

Your posts are so entertaining to read with the smilies and fragments. :)

snaillyyy
01-09-2005, 02:51 PM
No I havnt gone nuts and started posting Maria news :rolleyes: but THANK YOU ANDY! finally he gets there.....

Maria's sneak preview
Bruce Matthews
10jan05

ROLL back the roof, remove the shirts . . . it's time to party at the Australian Open.

Not all the tennis big names are heading to Kooyong, Sydney and Canberra for warm-up tournaments.
Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova and world No. 2 Andy Roddick were among the superstars to hit Melbourne Park shortly after arriving yesterday.

Sharapova chose an outside court far away from prying eyes to engage in a series of reflex-sharpening exercises with balls of all sizes under the instructions of her fitness coach.

The Russian blonde demonstrated the nimble footwork that she hopes will carry her through two weeks of heat and seven opponents to a first Australian title.

Roddick was also quick to re-familiarise himself with Rod Laver Arena, where the retractable roof is opened only for the next three weeks.

The American ace is joining tour colleagues such as world No. 1 Roger Federer and Andre Agassi 6km away for the eight-man Kooyong Classic, starting on Wednesday.

While Kooyong has Rebound Ace courts in the main stadium, the players still prefer to practise at the Open venue after completing their matches in the round-robin competition.

Qualifying rounds will occupy most of Melbourne Park's outside courts later in the week.

But centre court will have a procession of the main fancies such as Serena and Venus Williams and Marat Safin waiting for their turn to have a hit.

Deboogle!.
01-09-2005, 03:47 PM
Just saw this, Carole! And all I can say is.... THANK GOD.

heya
01-10-2005, 02:45 AM
:worship:

smucav
01-10-2005, 04:47 PM
Roddick has spent two days hitting in the main arena at Melbourne Park. He doesn't share Lleyton Hewitt's concern over the court speed.

"I think they are fine. I'm not sure when he (Hewitt) would've had the chance to hit on them," Roddick said. ;)
A-Rod: Federer the one to beat (http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,11904837%255E3162,00.html)

Iza
01-10-2005, 06:01 PM
heya is completely right. :worship:

BTW, which of u r u going?

blosson
01-10-2005, 06:37 PM
Hi,
Not sure where to post this but there is a nice interview clip with Andy in Australia in this site:
http://seven.com.au/todaytonight

MissFairy
01-10-2005, 06:49 PM
aww thanks blosson :hug:
some great footage, andys looking in great shape :) :)
THREE WEEKS hard training, thats an improvement on last years 4 days :eek:
things are looking good for aussie then :)
ohhh hes sweet with that charity thing, and him and his half ass serving to that toddler, awwww too cute !!!

Golfnduck
01-10-2005, 07:38 PM
He does look good in that video. Thanks for posting the link. :)

Havok
01-10-2005, 08:02 PM
Thanks a bunch for the link to the clip.:yeah:

snaillyyy
01-10-2005, 10:24 PM
:wavey: Thanks for the link blossom, he looked good, glad to hear about the training :p

Jennay
01-10-2005, 10:32 PM
The clip wouldn't load for me :(

heya
01-11-2005, 02:01 AM
"There's no shame right at the moment in losing to Roger," said Hewitt, who recognises that Federer, the defending champion at next week's Grand Slam, is the leading player of his generation. He's going to go down as one of the greatest. There's no doubt that, right at the moment, he's the best player in the world."
So, in Queen's Club, Andy only needed "confidence????"
Gee, I forgot the losses to El Aynaoui, Clavet, Robredo, Karlovic, Mirnyi, Dent, Novak, Santoro, Pavel, Chela and Malisse? :scratch:

Federer took two of the three sets 6-0. "He was the only one stopping me last year. Otherwise, I'd be number one in the world," Hewitt said.

Although Hewitt would not go so far as to say that the world No 1 has a psychological hold over him, he had been desperate to secure for himself the No 2 ranking to ensure that he was not in the same side of the draw at Melbourne Park. Unfortunately for him, the mathematics did not allow him to overtake Andy Roddick.

:sobbing: Yeah, that no-talent Roddick had nothing to do with that math.
Awwwww

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2005/01/11/sthodg11.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/01/11/ixtenn.html

Carito_90
01-11-2005, 02:05 AM
The more Lleyton opens his big mouth, the less I like him :o

Deboogle!.
01-11-2005, 02:09 AM
me too, Caro :(

Golfnduck
01-11-2005, 02:12 AM
Shut up Lleyton!! No one cares about your crying.

aceit
01-11-2005, 02:17 AM
Federer took two of the three sets 6-0. "He was the only one stopping me last year. Otherwise, I'd be number one in the world," Hewitt said.
He was just but a few bagels away...

superpinkone37
01-11-2005, 02:23 AM
Thanks for the link to that video :kiss: I dont know I missed it earlier lol.

And yeah, the more I hear about Lleyton lately, the more I seem to dislike him so yeah

Golfnduck
01-11-2005, 02:24 AM
He was just but a few bagels away...
LOL!!! It was a really close match :rolleyes:

aceit
01-11-2005, 02:32 AM
LOL!!! It was a really close match :rolleyes:
It annoys me because I really like Hewitt. He's so energetic and plays with such passion which is really fun to watch and I can respect that. Yet sometimes he should just shut his big loud mouth and let his results speak for himself. :shrug:

Deboogle!.
01-11-2005, 02:37 AM
It annoys me because I really like Hewitt. He's so energetic and plays with such passion which is really fun to watch and I can respect that. Yet sometimes he should just shut his big loud mouth and let his results speak for himself. :shrug:

Yea, exactly. He used to be one of my top faves.. but the fist pumping and shouting at your opponent's errors (Even double faults!! That's the one that really gets me) then all the recent whining.. um ew. Like, it's not like it's even true!!! The way Andy played at Wimby, I believe he would've beaten Lleyton in the final. The way Andre was playing last summer, if Roger weren't around I believe Andre would've made it and Andre would've beaten him in the USO final. Thus, Lleyton would still have been #3. He just needs to shut his trap.

heya
01-11-2005, 02:38 AM
Come on!!!! The media calls Andy a brash, in-your-face person???? HAHA!!!
Andy is very smart, funny and down-to-earth.
Too bad for the idiots who've NO IDEA that Andy had big problems with coaching, fitness & anger. Andy hasn't started to work HARD YET!!! I can see the TV commentators crying later when Andy gets better and better, for a lot of years!

aceit
01-11-2005, 02:43 AM
Come on!!!! The media calls Andy a brash, in-your-face person???? HAHA!!!
Andy is very smart, funny and down-to-earth.
Too bad for the idiots who've NO IDEA that Andy had big problems with coaching, fitness & anger. Andy hasn't started to work HARD YET!!! I can see the TV commentators crying later when Andy gets better and better, for a lot of years!

The media just picks up on what they think they can write good stories on that will sell. :o

Havok
01-11-2005, 03:34 AM
Erm, not for anything but the Ao someone was bound to beat him. It's the Ao for crying out loud. RG he has no excuse. Wimbledon Roddick or Grosjean could have easily taken him out. USO, Agassi would have cruised to a win. Not for anything, but the only time that statement from Lleyton can be correct is if he kept on facing Fed in the finals of slams, and he only faced him in one final. Lleyton, please learn to shut your trap.

Deboogle!.
01-11-2005, 06:03 AM
Yeah Naldo, you're right :)

This is an excerpt from the Kooyong press conference, but it's not particularly Kooyong-related so I'll put it here :)
==========

Roddick is working with U.S. Davis Cup assistant coach Dean Goldfine.

"I felt like it had run its course," Roddick said of his decision last month to part with Gilbert.

"I've had a great training period with Dean, felt better than I have in a long time," he added. "I'm happy with the team around me now. I feel very optimistic for 2005 - I'm excited." :yeah:

heya
01-11-2005, 06:29 AM
:devil: Run Brad Run :mad:

Havok
01-11-2005, 06:17 PM
Federer took two of the three sets 6-0. "He was the only one stopping me last year. Otherwise, I'd be number one in the world," Hewitt said.


Hilarious that tennis-x share the same feelings as Hewitt:
2. Lleyton Hewitt "Former two-time World No. 1 got his game back in 2004, and arguably only Federer kept him from another top finish."

Yes, CLEARLY Fed was the only one stopping him for that #1 spot. Nah it wasn't Safin, Roddick, Agassi and other scrubs who beat him along the way in 04 that stopped him from getting to #2, let alone #1:retard:. Tenniz-x needs a serious wake-up call because their bias, both positive and negative, is disgusting for a website that wants to be taken seriously.:o

blosson
01-11-2005, 06:20 PM
It's a pitty some of you can not get the video clip to loadas it's quite funny. I think you need Windows media player.

Oh well.

http://seven.com.au/todaytonight

MissFairy
01-11-2005, 06:22 PM
yeah i agree naldo, tennis-x is a pile of...grrr...i only had the unpleasance of being there one or two times, but when i did, all i read was blatant biasm and bad tennis journalism. i couldnt believe it was a serious attempt at reviewing the tour, they must be having a laugh :(

Dinkie
01-11-2005, 06:30 PM
"I felt like it had run its course," Roddick said of his decision last month to part with Gilbert.

"I've had a great training period with Dean, felt better than I have in a long time," he added. "I'm happy with the team around me now. I feel very optimistic for 2005 - I'm excited." :yeah:


After TWO training weeks with Dean he felt better than he has in a long time? :confused: Oh my, he must have had a really miserable year!!! He's quite a baby isn't he?

Havok
01-11-2005, 06:31 PM
Viva.

smucav
01-11-2005, 07:38 PM
Lleyton's tailor-made claims leave his opponents bemused
Chip Le Grand and Patrick Miles
January 12, 2005

LLEYTON HEWITT's free-speaking start to the year was greeted with bemusement by two of his rivals yesterday.

Andy Roddick and Roger Federer placed little stock in Hewitt's public comments in the lead-up to next week's Australian Open.

Roddick was unwittingly drawn into Hewitt's spat with Open organisers over the speed of this year's courts.

Arguing that the courts should have been tailored to his playing strengths, Hewitt claimed Roddick would expect similar preferential treatment when playing in New York.

Asked yesterday whether he had been consulted about court preparation for the US Open, Roddick's response was as direct as one of his thunderbolt serves.

"I've never been asked about the court surface at the US Open in my life," world No.2 Roddick said.

Hewitt yesterday refused to be drawn further on the speed of the Rebound Ace courts.

Speaking after his first-round match at the Sydney International, which is also played on Rebound Ace, Hewitt said the surface at Sydney Olympic Park was "probably slower again than Adelaide".

"I've only had one hit on centre court, though," Hewitt said. "But from what I've heard from a lot of the players, they're saying it's a lot slower."

Asked for his reponse to Tennis Australia's claim that the surface at Melbourne Park had been made quicker this year, Hewitt said: "I'm not going to coment on that anymore.

"I think everyone knows how I feel about it."

Federer was polite, if perplexed, to hear that Hewitt had mused about the pressure the Swiss would have backing up from his extraordinary 2004 season and how this would make life difficult this year.

"It might be, but I prefer to be playing well and coming into the Australian Open with a great season of 2004 and a good start to 2005," Federer said.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,11915614%255E2722,00.html

Black Adam
01-11-2005, 08:03 PM
It's a pitty some of you can not get the video clip to loadas it's quite funny. I think you need Windows media player.

Oh well.

http://seven.com.au/todaytonight
Loved that clip :hearts: i kinda noticed that he was more relaxed and his slice was better than when i last saw it. Great donation :yeah: thnx Blosson :hug:

Black Adam
01-11-2005, 08:05 PM
"I've never been asked about the court surface at the US Open in my life," world No.2 Roddick said. Well does that mean lleyton, the boxer ( for he does the talk before the action :lol: ) was saying things he imagined to be the truth..........well i loved the way andy handled the whole thing ;) :angel:

Golfnduck
01-11-2005, 08:24 PM
:devil: Run Brad Run :mad:
Andy might be able to catch him now that he has cut down on the pizzas :devil:

Tytta!.
01-11-2005, 08:52 PM
Andy might be able to catch him now that he has cut down on the pizzas :devil:

:haha: :haha: :worship:

snaillyyy
01-11-2005, 09:31 PM
LMAO!!! so good Jen :haha: :rocker2:

andyroxmysox12191
01-11-2005, 10:21 PM
:rolls:
Thanks for the link Blossom! :hug:

heya
01-12-2005, 01:42 AM
Mary Carillo + Patrick Mc + Cliff Drysdale + Mal Washington + Courier + journalists + Gilbert + Hewitt = :inlove:

...even little Caesar can chase down Bradboy. Everyone's in love with each other...

heya
01-12-2005, 05:37 AM
Legend Courier backs Henman Down Under
The Mail

Former champion Jim Courier has tipped Tim Henman to finally break his Grand Slam duck in the Australian Open beginning next Monday.
Courier claimed the title in 1992 and 1993 and knows what it takes to triumph in the famously tricky first major of the season.

Henman's career took on a new lease of life last season as he swept to the semi-finals of both the French and US Opens as well as making his customary fighting challenge for the Wimbledon crown.

And far from fading away in his 31st year, Courier believes the British number one can continue his revival starting in Melbourne, where he is yet to make a big breakthrough.

Courier said: "This must be the most confident Tim has ever felt coming into an Australian Open.

"In the last three major events he was right in it. He went to the semis, quarters and semis so he has got to be thinking this is his best look so far at going deep into the Australian Open draw.

"Is Australia somewhere he can push it another level past the semi-finals? It certainly is."

Courier added: "Like everyone else, Tim has got to hope he is not in Federer's side of the draw.

"I think everyone is wondering, how do you beat him? He's not only beating guys, he's crushing them.

"And I'm talking about guys in the top 10 - he's not even being pushed by a guy like Lleyton Hewitt, who was playing the second best tennis in the world at the end of last year.

heya
01-13-2005, 11:24 PM
Andy needs to shut his mouth too and just be aggressive in ALL matches.
No more giving up and losing 6-2, 6-0 ----:fiery: :mad:.
1- get his body working and moving faster
2- stop playing exhibitions a week before a big tourney
3- stop injuring himself by twisting his body too much (Look what happened to Mark Poo)
4- He has to stop telling everyone that he has so much trouble.
That's really cowardly.

"There is no doubt that Andy Roddick is a world-class player but if he wants to win more Grand Slams and reclaim the number one spot, there are areas he needs to develop.


Andy Roddick cannot rely on his serve to get him back to the top
"Federer will make Roddick a better player because as long as he is chasing Federer, there is absolutely no risk of complacency on the American's part.

"Brad Gilbert made some major progress with Roddick in terms of learning to combine shots.

"In the early rounds at Wimbledon, Roddick was hitting single shots very well but as the tournament wore on, he started hitting combinations - the big serve or the big forehand and then looking to follow it up with something else.

"That is what sets Federer apart from everyone else: his strengths are not necessarily better than anyone else's, but what he does is combines those strengths to give himself a sustainable, competitive advantage."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4100859.stm

heya
01-14-2005, 01:07 PM
ESPN2 Announces Australian Open Schedule
By Tennis Week
01/13/2005

ESPN2 will be a major player at the year's first major. The network will commence its 76 hours of Australian Open coverage on Sunday at 7 p.m. Eastern time with live opening round action from Melbourne.

All Australian Open will air on ESPN2 with the network's coverage generally consisting of two shows each — live coverage in the evening and same-day programming in the afternoon. To commemorate the 100th Anniversary Australian Open, the coverage will include historical vignettes, short video packages and "best of" lists reviewing the great moments and players from the Grand Slam event's history. But if you want to see the men's semifinals or final live you better book a flight to Melbourne now.

Tennis Australia's decision to shift the Australian Open men's semifinals and final to evening starts has prompted a delayed reaction from ESPN2. The network plans to telecast the 2005 Australian Open men's final on tape-delay starting at noon Eastern time on the final Sunday, January 30th. In recent years, ESPN had telecast both the men's and women's finals live.

In celebration of the Australian Open centenary and as a contractual concession to host broadcaster Channel 7, the Australian Open men's semifinals and final will be staged at night under the lights at Melbourne Park. The men's final is scheduled to start at 7:30 p.m. Melbourne time on the tournament's final Sunday. The 16-hour time difference between Melbourne and the East Coast of the United States means the men's final will begin at 3:30 a.m. East Coast time, 12:30 a.m. on the West Coast.

"The men's semis is not a change," an ESPN spokesman told Tennis Week. "The final is, and may be a positive move for those in Melbourne, but we will televise the match Sunday at noon Eastern, which is less favorable than the Saturday prime time slot of recent years."

Asked why the network would not consider televising the men's final live as it occurs followed by an encore presentation of the final Sunday afternoon to attract both the hard-core and casual tennis fan, an ESPN spokesman suggested such an approach could cause reduced ratings as fans would have the opportunity to see highlights of the match before an afternoon airing.

"Although the core audience would wake early to watch, we would lose too many other viewers who would not watch because they see the highlights in the intervening hours on any other network," an ESPN spokesman told Tennis Week.

ESPN plans to telecast more than 600 hours of tennis this year.

Cliff Drysdale and Tim Ryan will return to call matches throughout the year, with Dick Enberg adding his legendary voice to the three Grand Slam events. Enberg will arrive in Australia on Thursday, January 20th after his NFL duties conclude. Enberg joined ESPN last year before the French Open, and the upcoming Australian Open will be his first, completing a "career Grand Slam."

Analysts Mary Carillo, Mary Joe Fernandez, Patrick McEnroe and Pam Shriver also will return for events all year. On Grand Slams, Brad Gilbert returns as an analyst and Chris Fowler as on-site host and calling select matches. When not working a match, Gilbert and Shriver will also serve as roving reporter at the three Grand Slams. :hearts:Suzy Kolber will again share the host duties at the French Open and at Wimbledon.

http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=12268&bannerregion=

Deboogle!.
01-14-2005, 09:17 PM
Here's a pretty good article from the British Financial Times, some nice quotes from Dean, etc.
=====================

Roddick haunted by second best
By Mike Steinberger
Published: January 14 2005 20:55 | Last updated: January 14 2005 20:55

The former world number one has been usurped by Roger Federer, writes Mike Steinberger, but is still among the greats.


Andy Roddick arrived at last year's Australian Open ranked number one in the world and with every expectation that 2004 would cement his status as the brightest star in the tennis firmament.

Twelve months on, Roddick will take the court in Melbourne ranked a very distant second and faced with the sobering possibility that, right now, second best may be as much as he can realistically hope for.

When Roddick mapped out his goals for 2004, he surely never imagined that Roger Federer would win three of the year's four grand slam titles. He surely never imagined that he would reach the Wimbledon final, play an impeccable match yet still lose to Federer in four sets. And he surely never imagined that by the end of the season, John McEnroe and many other knowledgeable observers would be hailing the 23-year-old Swiss as possibly the most gifted player the game has seen.

While Federer sizzled in 2004, Roddick mostly fizzled, losing in the second round at the French and in the quarter-finals at the Australian and US Open, where he was the defending champion. To see Federer cart off so much silverware, and to see his own game more or less stagnate, undoubtedly left the 22-year-old Roddick feeling just a shade blue.

It was surely, then, out of frustration that he dumped coach Brad Gilbert last month and replaced him with Dean Goldfine, the now-retired Todd Martin's longtime cornerman. Given that Gilbert had guided him to nine titles in 18 months, including his one and only grand slam crown, Roddick's decision to part company with the voluble, slightly eccentric Californian took many by surprise, not least Gilbert himself. "I believe there is still a great deal of work to be done," Gilbert said on learning of his sacking. On that point, at least, he and Goldfine are in complete accord.

Goldfine said his new client had put 2004 and its disappointments behind him and was focused "simply on improving". Asked to identify the major shortcoming in Roddick's game, Goldfine said it was his lack of aggressiveness. To the layman's eye, of course, aggressiveness would seem to be the least of the hard-hitting Roddick's problems. But Goldfine explained that while Roddick's groundstrokes are punishing, their effectiveness is undermined by his tendency to hang behind the baseline. "He gives his opponents a little too much time to play, too much time to recover," said Goldfine. "You're not going to beat Roger Federer by giving him a lot of time." Goldfine's objective is to get Roddick to shrink the court on his opponents.

Mary Carillo, a former pro and one of the more insightful tennis commentators on US television, agrees that Roddick's positioning is a problem and believes it is a by-product of his big wind-up. "Andy's strokes are drawn on just such a generous scale; he creates these huge swings," says Carillo. "You look at Federer, he generates amazing racquet speed and he does it without using his whole arm. His swing is so compact. Andy needs to learn how to abbreviate his swing, get his butt to the net and put pressure on Federer."

Carillo believes that Roddick's game is too one-dimensional. "Andy wants to win with power, to hit 150mph serves and huge monster shots," she says. "But when Plan A isn't working, his only Plan B seems to be a modified Plan A - muscle the ball even harder."

Goldfine insists that Roddick is not consumed with trying to reel in Federer. It is not as if the world number one is the only competition he faces, and, besides, Roddick is hardly the brooding, obsessive type. He is not about to play Ahab to Federer's Moby Dick, nor is the good-natured Nebraska native likely to snarl, as Jimmy Connors once did of Bjorn Borg, "I'll chase the son of a bitch to the ends of the earth." Moreover, as Roddick himself acknowledged during an on-court interview after losing to Federer at Wimbledon, a rivalry is not much of a rivalry if one guy does all the winning and, simply put, Federer owns Roddick, having defeated him eight times in nine career meetings. They meet again today in the final of the Kooyong invitational in Melbourne.

For Carillo, the question now is not whether Roddick can catch Federer - that is probably not on the cards - but whether he can make himself the kind of indispensable adversary that Andre Agassi was to Pete Sampras. Agassi pushed Sampras to heights he might otherwise not have reached, and although Agassi will forever be in Sampras's shadow, his own place in tennis history is going to be a prominent one. For all Roddick has achieved, it is far from clear that he is blessed with the stuff of legends. As Carillo puts it: "How good is Roddick? I'm not saying he's an overachiever, but what are we putting on this guy?"

When Roddick blew into Melbourne for last year's Australian, these were surely not the kind of questions he expected to hear one year hence.

Tytta!.
01-14-2005, 09:23 PM
Great article! Andy has to play from the baseline and hopefully he'll do that tonight :o

tangerine_dream
01-14-2005, 09:39 PM
Thanks for the good stuff, heya and Deb :kiss:

... still laughing at heya's ostrich av.... :haha:

Deboogle!.
01-15-2005, 01:18 AM
Here's an even BETTER article, this from the London Times
----------------
Roddick determined to close the gap after year of Swiss domination
By Neil Harman

Our correspondent finds the American working hard to emerge from rival’s slipstream

THE No 1 and No 2 players in the world were scheduled to face off here last night in a match labelled an exhibition but which was nothing of the sort. Andy Roddick does not like being No 2 at anything and each of the tournaments that Roger Federer won last year was akin to a slap across the American’s face.

The two are as different as Switzerland and the United States, yet so much about them smacks of similarity. They have hearts of gold and virtuous personalities, allied to a frenzied determination; Federer keeps his locked beneath that impenetrable bandana, while Roddick does his utmost to contain his under his cap.

Yet both have demonstrated the mean streak required to keep them ahead in this relentless sport. Federer finished 2003 the Wimbledon and Masters champion. He promptly dismissed his coach. Roddick lost out in all the grand-slam tournaments of 2004, was badly bruised in Houston, sacrificing the last 20 points of his Masters semi-final to Lleyton Hewitt, and lost both singles rubbers to Rafael Nadal and Carlos Moyà in the Davis Cup final against Spain. He promptly dismissed his coach.

Yet Roddick’s seemed the more bizarre choice, given that Brad Gilbert and he shot the breeze, enjoyed the edge to a partnership more like elder and younger brother. What we did not know was that Roddick was running out of time and patience. Tarik Benhabiles, who coached him from restless youth to a man capable of being something in tennis, had been moved aside for Gilbert’s ring craft 18 months earlier and, thanks to that, Roddick had won his first grand-slam title, the US Open, after a devastating spell of success on the 2003 hard-court circuit.

A phone call two days after Spain’s victory in Seville last month had crushed Roddick informed his coach that their alliance was finished. “Brad and I had a conversation, we got out what we thought and decided to move on,” Roddick said. “That is as simple as it’s going to get.

“The situation with Tarik was different because I would not have been a professional tennis player had it not been for him. I became a man, on the court as well, and that (dismissing him) was a lot more difficult than Brad.” (interesting. This is about the most Andy has said about it. Makes sense.)

Dean Goldfine, most closely associated with bringing the best out of Todd Martin over seven years, had been at the Davis Cup as an assistant coach and there he felt the first vibes of a possible link, although he did not initially realise how powerful they were. After a call that any coach would give their right arm for, they first trained at Roddick’s home in Austin, Texas, just after Christmas. “We were on court for three or four hours a day, Andy did his gym work and he just wanted more and more and more,” Goldfine said. “That is magical for a coach.” :yeah::yeah::yeah: But it kinda dents the whole argument that Andy wouldn't work hard enough for Brad :scratch:

Roddick said that he felt he needed to work himself harder. “Roger (Federer) has set the bar at a higher standard and has given us all something to chase,” he said. “I have never been one to sit back. If at the end of my career I have two grand-slam titles, Roger has 26 and I felt I had done everything to try to throw him off course, I’ll be OK. If I haven’t put everything in, I shall be pissed off for the rest of my life.” :D:D:D:D:D:D

As we speak, Roddick fidgets constantly with a magenta wristband on his left arm. The phrase “No Compromise” is etched on it, the proceeds from the sales of which will go to the Andy Roddick Foundation, which gives hope to underprivileged children in the US.

Roddick’s heart is definitely in the right place. His recent week-long bus ride through the American heartland with Mardy Fish and the Bryan brothers, Mike and Bob, raised tennis to new levels of interest. “We were spreading the word,” Roddick said. It is something only he of contemporary tennis players could do, would want to do and would love doing. No compromise indeed.

superpinkone37
01-15-2005, 01:23 AM
Roddick said that he felt he needed to work himself harder. “Roger (Federer) has set the bar at a higher standard and has given us all something to chase,” he said. “I have never been one to sit back. If at the end of my career I have two grand-slam titles, Roger has 26 and I felt I had done everything to try to throw him off course, I’ll be OK. If I haven’t put everything in, I shall be pissed off for the rest of my life.”

:D :yeah:

Thanks for the article Deb :kiss:
magenta wristband...isnt that like pink? lmao, did they get their colors mixed up or am I? :lol:

Deboogle!.
01-15-2005, 01:25 AM
Yeah I saw that too. It's definitely a blue wristband LMAO!

superpinkone37
01-15-2005, 01:27 AM
I dunno if you guys still check Brad's updates, or if you care anymore, or if this is the appropriete place to post it or whatever, but I happened to check and he has written, surprisingly.... so yeah
====================

1.14.2005 -

What’s with the water down under? So far the AO has been a shredder for the top players. Taylor Dent came down with a mystery illness in his quarterfinal match with Mirnyi and retired after winning the final 8 points with a 4-3 lead. Andre is questionable at this point. Some guys will play if they are only 80% but not AA, at this stage in his career he has to be more cautious and will only compete if he’s 100% fit. If Andre does pull out the rest of the young American players will really feel the pressure.

Philippoussis is out. Haas, a two time semi-finalist is questionable with a groin injury and Joachim Johansson has a hamstring injury, and he was not the most mobile guy to begin with. Hopefully the injury bugaboo will not continue.

Let’s give a shout out for Alicia Molik and Sam Stosur. For the first time in 13 years, two Australian women will meet in a final. It’s been a long time since the Aussies fans have had a woman player to get behind at the AO.

The early weather prognosis for the first few days of the tournament call for temps in the high 60’s and low 70’s, like last year. I’m a big fan of hot and humid conditions and I also like to see the elements play a factor. Dealing with the grueling heat is part of passing the test.


1.11.2005 -

Unlike Connors in '74 and Wilander in '88, Roger Federer will follow up his amazing year and win at least one slam in '05. The "Artful Dodger" is a combo of Lendl and Sampras; the perfect prototype for a tennis player. What makes him most dangerous is that he can break and hold serve better than anyone on the planet. For a big guy his range of moment is incredible. He’s like a ghost the way he covers the court. What’s even scarier is the confidence that this guy has every time he steps out on the court. Don’t be surprised if he becomes the first player to lead the tour in breaking and holding serve. Now with Roche, he’s got it all going.

There’s only one guy who doesn’t fear him and that’s Andre. AA was the only guy in the top ten who was close to beating him last year. His best shot at knocking off Federer will be if they play on a day above 40 degrees Celsius. Andre has been down under since Jan 1st. He’s done his homework and is now ready for the test.

What a difference a year can make. Now the women’s tour has become like the men’s tour was before the dominance of Federer. There are 8 or 9 women would could win the Australian Open. I look for Serena, Davenport or Mauresmo; not a last name ending in A to win it. I think Serena wants to reinvent herself and will be the player to beat. If Davenport can stay healthy she has a good shot. Mauresmo has made this her top priority.

As always I’m looking forward to working with ESPN. Now that I’m not coaching I’ll try to be a little more open in the booth. Stay tuned for more of my Australian Open picks…

Deboogle!.
01-15-2005, 01:27 AM
Brad's updates are :yawn: now.. well they were :yawn: before but now there's no Andy to talk about :haha:

Havok
01-15-2005, 01:43 AM
Yes, let's give a shout out to Stosur, making it to the finals of Sydney by only playing 2 matches.:retard: Mind you, Sam has been amazing these past 2 weeks, and I'm sure it's because she's playing in Australia. Would be interesting so see what the heck she does off her home turf.

J. Corwin
01-15-2005, 01:55 AM
Interesting, Brad stays away from talking about Andy in both of his entries. ;) But he'll forever talk about Andre. :lol: :banana:

Jennay
01-15-2005, 01:57 AM
"If at the end of my career I have two grand-slam titles, Roger has 26 and I felt I had done everything to try to throw him off course, I’ll be OK. If I haven’t put everything in, I shall be pissed off for the rest of my life.”
:)

heya
01-15-2005, 02:51 AM
Andy realizes that he made mistakes personally and professionally.
http://www.jockbio.com/Bios/Roddick

Talk about having it all. At the age when most kids are figuring out creative lies for their resume, Andy Roddick is the world’s hottest pizza-loving, break-dancing, black-sock-wearing tennis player. A self-professed “goofball,” he’s handsome and charismatic, and has the entire sport eating out of his hand—and an MTV girlfriend to boot! Can Andy go anywhere but down from here? Not if he keeps consuming fame faster than it consumes him. This is his story…

GROWING UP

Andrew Stephen Roddick was born on August 30, 1982, in Omaha, Nebraska to Blanche and Jerry Roddick. Blanche was a schoolteacher and Jerry was a businessman who struck it rich accumulating Jiffy Lube franchises. Rambunctious even as a newborn, Andy earned the nickname “Tiger” from the nurse who helped deliver him. To his mother’s amazement, Andy was lifting his head after just two hours.

Older brothers Lawrence and John showed early promise in tennis, and their parents did what they could to foster their ambitions. Naturally, Andy wanted to do whatever his siblings were doing, and mimicked their strokes whenever he found an extra racket lying around. By his fourth birthday, he was banging the ball against the garage door, playing imaginary matches against Ivan Lendl and Boris Becker.

No one gave Andy much thought as a potential tennis star. His brothers were convinced their hammy younger sibling would become an actor. Or a baseball player. Andy had the skills and the bravado to back up just about any career aspiration. After he turned five, his mother found a legal pad with the words, “I can run faster, I can hit a ball far, I can catch every ball.”

That was the same year the Roddicks left Omaha for Boca Raton, Florida. There John and Lawrence were able to hone their tennis skills year-round on a backyard court. John stuck with the sport after the move (though he eventually was forced to quit because of a back injury), while Lawrence became more interested in competitive diving. That left an opening on the other side of the net for Andy, who by the age of eight could hold his own against his brother and other kids much older.




In 1991, Andy’s parents gave him a fantastic birthday present: a trip to the U.S. Open in New York. That was the tournament that featured 39-year-old Jimmy Connors’s incredible run to the semifinals. Andy was captivated by Connors. He marveled at the veteran’s ability to stir up the crowd and then feed off its energy. That was the same kind of passion the youngster felt for the game.

After Connors retired, Andy latched on to Andre Agassi as his favorite player. Agassi too had the fire in his belly that Andy so admired. Also, like his new hero, Andy was not a big kid. In fact, he was quite short for his age. But older brother John was tall and talented, which gave him confidence that he would achieve the same stature sooner or later. Andy’s brashness was in full flower by the age of 10, when, during a tournament in which John was competing, he spotted a Reebok exec and offered him the deal of a lifetime to sign a “great tennis player.”

Incredibly, that is exactly what happened. Reebok inked Andy to play in its junior program. The relationship worked out nicely for both parties, as Andy moved through the juniors at steady pace.

By 1996, Andy finally began to grow, inching over five feet by December. When he sprouted another foot over the next few years, the resulting changes in his body played havoc with his game. Much of what Andy mastered at 15 he had to relearn at 16. His serve, in particular, was a mess. Used to firing spin serves as an undersized “tween,” he was now tall enough to cream the ball, but couldn’t find his groove. That happened during a practice one day, when Andy walked to the baseline and, out of frustration, threw the ball up and swung as hard as he could. The ball hissed into the service box. He reproduced this serve several more times and, certain he had stumbled upon something, began to build on the basic mechanics. He increased his speed up to 100 mph, then 110 mph and eventually 120 mph. His old first serve, meanwhile, became his second serve (and would one day be a lethal weapon, too).

Andy attained his full height of 6-2 the summer he turned 17. He had grown some nine inches since his 15th birthday. His shoulders broadened, enabling him to pack on muscle in all the right places, and his timing came together. His strong wrists boosted his serving speed further and added pace to his booming forehand. This was the same time Andy started working full-time with Frenchman Tarik Benhabiles, a former Top-25 player who had made a name for himself molding the games of countrymen Cedric Pioline and Thierry Champion.

Andy tinkered with his ground strokes and serve during the 1999 season. With opponents back on their heels, he took the opportunity to experiment with the occasional slice and spin, and developed great feel for altering the pace and placement of his shots. Benhabiles, who had promised Andy he could win points without killing the ball, was pleased to see his protege discover this for himself at such a tender age.

Andy heated up at the end of 1999, spurred on by a snub when it came to pick the U.S. team for the Sunshine Cup (the rough equivalent of the Davis Cup in junior tennis). He won the Eddie Herr Championship in Bradenton—an important international under-18 competition—then took the prestigious Orange Bowl title.

As Andy’s game matured, so too did his on-court demeanor. His amazing drive to win had often led to outbursts—made all the more stunning because he was such a gentleman at all other times. He was learning to channel that anger back into his game, an important step for developing players.

ON THE RISE

Andy began 2000 in style, becoming the first American since Butch Buchholz in 1959 to win the Australian Open Junior Championship. The victory convinced the teenager to turn pro, and earned him his first major endorsement deal, with SFX Sports Group, one of the world’s most influential sporting event promoters.

Andy made the leap in February, recording his official debut at the Citrix Championships in Delray Beach, Florida. For many 17-year-olds, the decision to go pro is a difficult one. In Andy’s case it was a no-brainer. Without an arsenal of weapons, young guns usually get picked apart by ATP veteran, but he already had one of the hardest serves in tennis, and the rest of his game flowed from there, including a top-notch forehand and volleying skills. To have a real chance at winning, however, he would have to steady his backhand and locate his second serve deeper in the box.



Jimmy Connors, 1986 Fax Pax



Andy’s first big event as a a pro was the Ericsson Open (formerly the Lipton) in Key Biscayne. He survived his first-round match against Fernando Vicente before encountering the tournament’s top seed: Agassi. The Saturday night match drew more than 12,000 fans, including many of Andy’s tennis friends and family members. Despite their support of the underdog, Agassi won easily 6-2, 6-3. Though Andy gave his idol all he could handle with his serve and forehand, his backhand still lacked consistency, which ultimately cost him the match. Agassi, who ran Andy mercilessly from side to side, had nothing but good things to say afterward, predicting the teenager would soon join him at the top of the ATP rankings. Andy responded in kind, telling his hero what an honor it was to play him.

Andy played in seven more ATP events in '00 (nine in all) and finished the year ranked #160 on the men’s tour. He posted wins over Karol Kucera, Fernando Vicente and Fabrice Santoro—not exactly household names, but guys who typically eat teenagers for lunch. At the Legg-Mason in Washington D.C., Andy upset Adrian Voinea, Santoro and Kucera to reach the quarterfinals. There he met Agassi again. In a rain-interrupted match, he fell 6-4, 6-4.

Andy also competed in Junior tournaments right until his 18th birthday in August, winning the U.S. Open Juniors and the Sugar Bowl Classic. He injured his knee at the French Open Juniors, causing him to miss the Wimbledon Juniors, but he did well enough at this level—37-5—to finish as the world’s top-ranked Junior for 2000.

Andy also entered the main draw of the U.S. Open, where he lost to Albert Costa in the first round. He finished off the year by playing in the Sunshine Cup for the U.S. No snub this time around., he led the team to a rare victory.

With his SPX bankroll, the odd check from Reebok and an additional $79,000 in tour winnings, Andy had money in his pocket for the first time. Yet except for picking up the occasional dinner tab, he played it cool his first year as a pro. In fact, he continued to sleep in his room at his parents house.



Andre Agassi, 2000 Tennis
The highlight of Andy’s year actually came in April, when Davis Cup captain John McEnroe invited him to be the team’s official practice partner prior to first-round matches with the Czech Republic. Andy got to hit with Agassi and Pete Sampras, and learned a lot from each. He was astounded how hard Agassi worked in practice—harder in many respects than he played in tournaments. As for Sampras, he came to appreciate how sublime the champion’s skills were when he faced him from across the net. Pistol Pete could indeed make any shot at any time.

Andy prepared for the 2001 season, his first full year on the pro tour, under the weight of high expectations. His big serve led to comparisons to Sampras. And with no other American teenagers with games as evolved as his, Andy was cast as the “future of U.S. men’s tennis.”

The pressure intensified in January when he won a USTA Challenger event in Hawaii—his third title in five Challenger appearances—then soared in February after new captain Patrick McEnroe named him to the U.S. Davis Cup squad. Andy was the fresh blood on the team, joining Todd Martin, Jan-Michael Gambill and Justin Gimelstob.

Unfortunately, the U.S. went down in flames for the sixth straight year, falling to Switzerland in Basle. Andy played in the fifth and final match, which was mathematically meaningless, as the Roger Federer-led Swiss team had already beaten America three times. But Andy’s clock-cleaning of George Bastl, a talented Top-100 players, provided a glimmer of hope for American tennis fans.



John McEnroe, 2000 Tennis Week
Six weeks later, Andy took a huge step. After six sparkling weeks of practice, he qualified for the draw of the Ericsson Open as a Wild Card entry, which earned him a slot across from Sampras. Early in the match, with 16,000-plus watching, Andy unleashed a serve clocked at 136 mph—right at Sampras. The ball closed on him so quickly that he ended up taking it right in the chest. This tied the match 2-2, and turned the tide of Andy’s career.

Sampras never recovered from this blow, and Andy—playing with a surge of confidence—committed only five errors during the match. Every time Sampras charged the net, Andy hit a low, blistering return. He took the first set tiebreaker, then dusted off Sampras in the second set, 6-3. Serving consistently in the 130s, he landed a remarkable 72 percent of his first attempts.

It was Andy’s first victory against a Top-10 player, and Sampras’s first loss to an 18 -year-old in a decade. The champion had nothing but great things to say about his conqueror after the match.

Two days later, after getting a pep talk from Agassi, Andy became the youngest player to reach the Ericsson quarterfinals, defeating Andrei Pavel, 7-6, 6-2 on serves that approached 140 mph. He survived three set points to force the tiebreaker, which he won 12-10. Despite a loss in his next match to Lleyton Hewitt, the two victories moved Andy into the ATP’s Top 100 and guaranteed him a berth in the tour’s next major, the French Open.

Prior to Roland Garros, in April, Andy went to Atlanta and won the Verizon Tennis Challenge, defeating Xavier Malisse in the final. It marked the first time in a decade that an American teenager captured a men’s tour event. Andy proved this win was no fluke when he took the U.S. Men’s Clay Court title in Houston a week later, blowing Lee Hyung-Taik off the court. In less than two months, his ranking had soared more than 100 places to #21.

In Paris, Andy faced former French Open champ Michael Chang in the opening round. The wily veteran ran him ragged, and by the fifth set of their grueling marathon, Andy was fighting through cramps. In a scene reminiscent of Chang’s performance against Ivan Lendl on his way to winning the 1989 tournament, Benhabiles motioned from the stands for Andy to retire, but he waved off his coach and took the fifth set 7-5 to advance.

Andy showed a flair for working the crowd during this match, and tore off his shirt after the final point. But when he recovered quickly enough from his cramps to appear at a dance club that evening, some doubted how much pain he had really been in.

Two rounds later, Andy tweaked his hamstring against Hewitt. This time he could not overcome the discomfort and had to pull out of the match. It was beginning to dawn on Andy that the physical demands of his sport were a bit greater than he had realized. He also had to work harder on the last weakness in his game, his backhand. It was shaky in Paris, and Chang and Hewitt had gone to town on him because of it.



Pete Sampras, 2001 Tennis
One thing Andy did not have to worry about anymore was his second serve. Now a valuable weapon, it was coming in deep, with good pace and a devilish spin that caused it to explode upward, sometimes above the receiver‘s head. Andy was also developing a swagger that suggested to some that he was getting close to becoming a consistent championship contender. Andy’s growing legion of believers also noted that he put his overabundance of energy to excellent use, logging time on the running track and often booking two practice sessions a day. A significant portion of these fans—screaming, giggling, jiggling teenage girls—did not care how much he trained. They just liked the final results.

After losing to eventual champion Goran Ivanisevic in the third round at Wimbledon, Andy won his third pro event, the Legg-Mason Classic. He did so with astonishing ease, disposing of Marcelo Rios, Dominik Hrbaty and, in the final, Sjeng Schalken—who had upended Agassi in the semis the day before. As some observed, Andy seemed to put more effort into his extra-curriculars, taking in a Janet Jackson concert and hanging with former Maryland basketball star Steve Francis.

MAKING HIS MARK

In a little over a year, Andy had risen from 338th in the rankings to #18. The victory in D.C.—during which he broke the 140 mph barrier with his serve—made him the first American teenager to crack the Top 20 since Chang in the early 1990s. The last one to win three tournaments before age 20 was Sampras, 11 years earlier. The Palm Beach Post, Andy’s “home” paper, celebrated his Sampras-like skills and un-Sampras-like personality, calling him “Sampras unplugged.”

In his next major event of ‘01, Andy reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open, losing a five-set thriller to Hewitt (who like Ivanisevic also went on to win the tournament), and finished the year ranked #14.

Andy continued to lengthen his resume with impressive performances in 2002. He won at Memphis, defeating fellow American James Blake in the final, then defended his '01 win in Houston. This time he faced Sampras in the final, and beat him soundly. Sampras later returned the favor at the U.S. Open on his way to the championship. Andy also reached the quarters at Wimbledon and helped the U.S. advance to the semifinals of the Davis Cup, though he then dropped his two singles matches against France. At season’s end, Andy was the proud owner of the #10 ranking.

Andy started the 2003 season with an encouraging performance at the Australian Open. Down two sets to Mikhail Youzhny, he rallied to win and earn a quarterfinal berth. He eventually made it to the semis, where he lost to Rainer Schuettler. Andy was getting so close to a Grand Slam title he could almost taste it.



Andy Roddick, 2001 Tennis
Though he played well as winter turned to spring, Andy felt his game was lagging behind where it should be. In June, after an embarrassing loss to Sargis Sargisian in the first round of the French Open, he made a coaching switch and began to work with Brad Gilbert, Agassi’s one-time guru.

Gilbert, who mastered the art of “winning ugly” during his playing days, instilled in Andy an appreciation for finding imaginative ways to turn matches around when things were not going well. This quality, which kept players like Agassi and Sampras atop the rankings for so long, was the final piece of the puzzle. Andy’s first outing under Gilbert’s tutelage, the grasscourt event at Queen’s Club, resulted in a championship.

Andy was constructing points better, and keeping his cool when things did not go his way. Instead of bulling his way through tough times, he began using his head. After advancing to the semis at Wimbledon, he won hardcourt titles in Indianapolis, Toronto, and Cincinnati.

Andy’s love life was looking good, too. He had struck up a relationship with recording artist Mandy Moore, and things were going well. All that remained was that elusive first Grand Slam victory.

The field heading into the 2003 U.S. Open featured many contenders but no clear-cut favorite. Agassi, now 33, was the sentimental choice. He would have to overcome Wimbledon winner Roger Federer and the '01 champion Hewitt, who seemed due for a major win. The dark horse was Thai star Paradorn Srichaphan, who had opened a lot of eyes at the All England Club two months earlier. Then there was Andy.

Dodging the raindrops, he beat Tim Henman, Ivan Ljubicic, Flavio Saretta, Xavier Malisse and Sjeng Schalken without losing a set. Andy also showed he could handle the New York press after Ljubicic ripped him for playing to the crowd. The Croat star claimed the other players were tiring of his antics. The old Andy might have popped off, but he did and said all the right things.



Brad Gilbert, 1991 Netpro
Meanwhile, as the tournament neared its conclusion, that most American of tennis events was looking decidedly un-American. The Williams sisters had pulled out beforehand, Jennifer Capriati and Lindsay Davenport were gone, and Agassi was out of the running. After celebrating his 21st birthday, Andy was the only player left representing the stars and stripes.

In his semifinal match with David Nalbandian, Andy dropped the first two sets. For a while, it looked like the finals would be without an American for the first time since the 1980s. With the crowd still reeling from the departures of Davenport, Capriati and Agassi in the other semis, Andy had none of the usual energy at Flushing Meadow to pump him up. Facing match point in the third set tiebreaker, he fired a pair of aces past a stunned Nalbandian, then took the set three points later. For there, he roared to a five-set victory, taking 12 of the next 16 games.

After the match, Andy returned to his hotel and started to cry. It hit him how close he had come to letting his dream slip through his fingers.

In the final, Andy played French Open winner Juan Carlos Ferrero. Sticking with his strengths, he squashed the man known as the “Mosquito.” Only once, late in the match, did Andy sit back and trade ground strokes with Ferrero. When that experiment flopped he got back to the business of winning his first Grand Slam. The final score was 6-3, 7-6, 6-3. Andy rocketed 24 aces in the match to make it 123 for the tournament. Three came in the final game, putting an exclamation point on an already impressive performance.

Andy appeared stunned when Ferrero failed to return serve on match point. He celebrated briefly on the court, then leaped over the camera well into the stands. He hugged Gilbert, kissed Moore and embraced his parents and two brothers in the stands. “I won the U.S. Open, I won the U.S. Open,” he kept repeating. On his way back down to the court, he exchanged high fives with the fans.



Andre Agassi, 2001 SI for Kids
What Andy’s showdown with Ferrero lacked in drama, it more than made up for with symbolism. The tournament had opened with a farewell to Sampras, and prior to the men’s final, Connors was saluted on center court. (It was the first time the former champ had set foot there since Andy had witnessed his wonderful run at the 1991 U.S. Open.) Andy’s match against Ferrero featured the kind of dominant performance in which Sampras had long specialized, but with the fire and passion that Connors brought to the game.

Just a week after Andy took over the #1 ranking, he fell to Henman in the Paris Masters. The semifinal loss did not jeopardize his standing, but it did illustrate that Andy still had room to improve—and grow up. He cursed and slammed his racket several times during the match, then pulled himself together and almost roared back from a 1-5 deficit in the final set.

Andy entered the 2004 Australian Open as the top seed, and was a heavy favorite to win his second Grand Slam. His quarterfinal match against Marat Safin, however, dumped him from the draw, as the lanky Russian played unusually poised tennis to win a three-hour marathon.

Andy rebounded in San Jose to win his first tournament of the season, defeating Mardy Fish in the finals. He lost in the quarters to Henman at Indian Wells, but captured his second tournament at the Miami Masters, beating Carlos Moya, Vincent Spadea and Guillermo Coria in the process.

The French Open was a disaster for the U.S. men, all of whom were ousted by the second round—including Andy. After building a two sets to one lead over Olivier Mutis, he dropped the final two sets. The slow clay of Roland Garros enabled Mutis to deal with Andy’s blistering serve, and as he grew impatient he began to make mistakes. Mutis simply outlasted him.

Andy bounced back on the grass at Queen’s Club and played masterful tennis. He trounced Lleyton Hewitt and Sebastian Grosjean to take the Wimbledon tune-up, then kept the momentum going at the All England Club.
Andy cruised through the Wimbledon draw to a showdown in the final against red-hot Roger Federer. He looked good in winning the first set 6-4, but in a match that saw two rain delays, Federer took the next two sets. Andy responded by hanging in the fourth set and gaining six break points against his Swiss opponent. Unfortunately, he failed to capitalize, and Federer emerged the victor. Andy put on an awesome display of raw power that had Federer back on his heels at times. His first serve consistently reached the 130s, while his second serve was often as fast as Federer’s first. The champ survived the onslaught, however, and in the end, Andy could not match him shot for shot.

Between Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, Andy won in Indianapolis at the RCA Championships for the second straight year. To do so he needed to save three match points in his semifinal against Ivan Ljubicic, then overcome German star Nicolas Kiefer in the final. Andy reached the finals of his next event, the Canadian Masters, only to lose to Federer again.

Andy’s next big tournament came as a member of the U.S. Olympic team in Athens. A second-round loss by Federer seemed to guarantee gold for Andy, but he lost his focus and was ousted by Fernando Gonzalez of Chile in the third round—a player he had wiped out in the first round of the 2004 Australian Open. Their Olympic match was close, but a poor call by the umpire broke Andy’s concentration and he never regained his edge.

The next stop for Andy was New York, where he sought to defend his U.S. Open crown. This quest ended in the quarterfinals, when Joachim Johannsen defeated him in a five-set marathon. Federer went on to claim the championship, cementing his #1 ranking.

Though Andy had no major wins to show for his 2004 campaign, he had played well enough and won enough events to earn the #2 world ranking, with Hewitt right behind him. Neither man had a chance to catch Federer, however. before the year was ou3.

If, as most everyone suggests, Andy is the future of American tennis, it would seem to be in capable hands. Not only does he have the game to be a dominant player, but he enjoys the spotlight, and there's no doubt the spotlight is drawn to him.

ANDY THE PLAYER



Andy has the total package for tennis stardom. He is big and strong, moves around the court well, and uses his head to stay calm when the pressure is on. Andy’s serve is the most feared in tennis. When it tops out in the low 140s it is almost unreturnable. His second serve is no picnic either.

Andy’s forehand is above average, while his backhand is superb when it’s working and less than superb when it’s not. The difference between Andy before he hooked up with Brad Gilbert and after is that when some part of his game is flat, he can manage points to minimize the damage.

The X-factor for Andy is his enormous crowd appeal. Clearly, he feeds off the energy his presence creates. And although many opponents resent him for the connection he makes with fans, it is hard to imagine they need a special incentive to beat him. When you are going up against the guy who’s sitting atop the mountain, you’d better bring your A-game, and then some.

andyroxmysox12191
01-15-2005, 05:21 AM
He might not talk about Andy til late :shrug: who knows

heya
01-16-2005, 05:46 AM
Federer this week revealed the moment he started to take control of Hewitt's game actually came earlier in Shanghai, at the year-ending Masters Cup in 2002.

"I could feel it coming in a way that I was getting closer to him," Federer said.

In three of last year's four Grand Slams, it was Federer who put an end to Hewitt's campaign: beneath Australia Day fireworks in the fourth round at Melbourne Park, in the quarter-finals at Wimbledon and the final at the US Open. Hewitt also lost to Federer twice at the Masters Cup in Houston, including the final.

But if a winning record against Hewitt is rare enough, it is the manner in which Federer has dismantled Hewitt's game that has the former world No1 at a loss.

Five times since the Davis Cup, Federer has kept Hewitt scoreless in a set, including two humiliating 'bagels' in last year's US Open final.

Federer believes that night in New York was the closest thing he had played to a perfect match.

"It was just fantastic from beginning to end," Federer said. "I walked off the court and couldn't believe how well I played."

Neither could Hewitt, who, like most players, has done nothing to hide his admiration for Federer's game. So far, there is little evidence the Swiss champion will prove any easier to beat this year.

"At the beginning he was the better player and he beat me on several occasions. I thought the change started to come in Shanghai in 2002, when I was very close to beating him.

"I lost to him in the Davis Cup here in Melbourne when I was up two sets to love and two points from the match. I think then I also felt I was playing really well those first two sets and could really feel I was dominating him. Then I really started to get a grip on his game and I haven't lost since." theaustralian.news.com.au



Roddick turned to comedy. "Forty bucks if you hit another serve and forehand winner," he called out towards the end of the 70-minute match. Facing Federer for the first time under the guidance of new coach Dean Goldfine, the American was broken in the fifth and 11th games and later complained of a slight ankle injury. telegraph.co.uk

tangerine_dream
01-21-2005, 08:51 PM
Sexy stars are worth courting
Shaun Phillips
Herald Sun
22jan05

BOFFINS can argue about economic benefit and job spikes but it is hard to go past the Australian Open as Melbourne's sexiest major event.

While spring racing has glamour covered it comes second to summer tennis in terms of exposure.

It is short and skimpy on court and off at Melbourne Park.

Most punters are happy for Damien Oliver and Darren Gauci to keep their silks buttoned.

The Grand Prix has its share of bikinis and muscle shirts, but they are more often than not on models pushing product. On the bleachers at the tennis it is like Beaumaris beach. The sexiest of the sexy stand out like sexy beacons.

Most young men cannot see past leggy Russsian Maria Sharapova.

A poll around the outer courts puts the Siberian six-footer way out in front. "She tickles my fancy," said 16-year-old Dave Stree.

Gerard Reeves appreciates the Wimbledon champion's single-minded focus. "And she's got a good body," the 15-year-old said.

Other women to rate a mention included Daniela Hantuchova, American star Venus Williams, Anastasia Myskina and Australian pair Alicia Molik and Sophie Ferguson.

Young Argentine Gisela Dulko, bundled out in the second round, is an emerging crowd favourite. On the other side of the net Andy Roddick outpolls his nearest rivals two to one.

"Lleyton Hewitt has got good arms and back, but Roddick is sexy everywhere," Bonnie McHarg, 17, said.

"He seems like he has a good personality . . . and he's hot," Olivia Friedman, 13, said.

James Blake and Roger Federer share the second rung, with Hewitt's possible future brother-in-law Joachim Johansson, Marat Safin, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Tommy Haas and Carlos Moya also snaring a few votes.

But really, it is the eligible A-Rod by a street.

Often practice sessions featuring big names will be better attended than matches going on nearby.

"The players are so hot, but when they take their tops off, it's even better," Sheree James, 21, said.

"Some of the six packs are unbelievable."

----------------

Oh no! More proof that Roddick is so hated and unpopular outside of the US. :tears:

Carito_90
01-21-2005, 09:25 PM
"Some of the six packs are unbelievable."

Fuck, are you blind?! I know he's fitter now but I still can't see any six packs. Geez.. :retarded:

Deboogle!.
01-21-2005, 09:40 PM
Fuck, are you blind?! I know he's fitter now but I still can't see any six packs. Geez.. :retarded:

LMAO I don't think the quote was really just about Andy, I think it was a statement about all players in general.

MissFairy
01-21-2005, 09:44 PM
debbb, am i late? but i lurrrrve that avatar, :rolls: i even have to extend the 'love' its so funny. good one :hug:

Carito_90
01-21-2005, 10:07 PM
LMAO I don't think the quote was really just about Andy, I think it was a statement about all players in general.

Uh good :retard:

Deboogle!.
01-26-2005, 01:27 AM
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I hope it's not true I hope it's not true I hope it's not true I hope it's not true I hope it's not true

"Roddick has also been reported in the trade press as sniffing around for a Nike clothing deal after his Reebok contract expires at the end of March."

Havok
01-26-2005, 01:48 AM
:retard: Nike will be the end of him. I'm sure he'll get his own line, but just look at Serena. She WAS Puma, and it's been all downhill since she switched to Nike. I hope Andy swalows his pride and accepts whatever Reebok can muster up to pay him and stick with him. He is so loyal to that shit Houston tournament, he better be loyal to this clothing company who has been sponsoring him since he was a toddler.:(

superpinkone37
01-26-2005, 01:58 AM
just say no to nike :retard: :(

snaillyyy
01-26-2005, 02:12 AM
:eek: NOOOOOO he better not, :mad:

Deboogle!.
01-26-2005, 02:16 AM
I'll cry. I really will cry.

Golfnduck
01-26-2005, 02:49 AM
I think I will die of shock. I love Andy in Reebok, practically everyone wears Nike or Adidas. How boring :zzz:

aceit
01-26-2005, 02:54 AM
Maybe Serena & Andy could join forces working on a new line. :rolleyes:

heya
01-26-2005, 03:23 AM
Andy's shoe split, and was thrown up to trainer Doug Spreen to be glued back together

AR.com

Carito_90
01-26-2005, 01:26 PM
Uh... WHAT ARE YOU DOING RODDICK YOU TARD?!
Change your Reebok NY subway map shirt for a... PLAIN SHIRT?! What are you insane?! (okay that didn't sound too convinsig (sp))

Anyway, he bettah not switch to Nike. Or I'll sue/kill him

tangerine_dream
01-29-2005, 04:35 AM
:banana: :banana: :banana:

Sportsview: Tennis Popularity Growing

STEVE WILSTEIN
Associated Press

Insomniacs and tennis junkies aren't the only ones staying up in the middle of the night to watch the Australian Open.

All across the country, the doings Down Under are gaining new fans. They're raving about it on sports talk radio stations, dashing off e-mails to ESPN2.

The cable network planned to show 71 1/2 hours of this once-sleepy Grand Slam tournament. With all the buzz about the big matches and stars - Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova, Roger Federer vs. Marat Safin, Andy Roddick vs. Lleyton Hewitt - the network added more and more coverage. By the time the tournament ends this weekend, ESPN2 will have shown some 110 hours of tennis.

Popularity goes it cycles. What's hot suddenly is not. What's out of fashion can come back in.

Tennis has a chance to become hotter than ever, now that it has a deep base of international stars and stellar rivalries in both the men's and women's games.

Not since its peak years in the 1970s, when the Billy Jean King-Bobby Riggs match stirred the world and the rivalries among Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe drew millions of fans has tennis been in a better position to grow.

There's a broader balance of power in the men's game with charismatic stars from all corners of the globe - Federer from Switzerland, Safin from Russia, the Australian Hewitt and the American Roddick.

Close in age - Safin is the oldest having just turned 25 - they could be firing shots at each other for the next eight years, while still younger players look for their places in the pecking order.

Andre Agassi, meanwhile, is still around and still dangerous enough to beat any of them.

"This is, to me, the real start of the new era in men's tennis," said Patrick McEnroe, the U.S. Davis Cup captain and an ESPN2 commentator at the Australian. "You've got these four great players, all of whom have won a Grand Slam. They are all young personalities and enjoyable to watch in different ways.

"Whenever tennis has been at its best, you have great players on the great stages. People want to see players they are familiar with in the semis and finals. This bodes well for what is coming in men's tennis. The fact that Federer is such an extraordinary talent has raised the bar."

That has translated into packed crowds at events almost everywhere. Worldwide ATP attendance, not including Grand Slams, rose to 4 million in 2004, up from 3.8 million the year before and 3.6 million in 2002.

The women's game, boosted in recent years by the rise of Venus and Serena Williams as champions and Anna Kournikova as cover girl, has blossomed into a deep mix of players with talent and personality.

The three Russian women who won majors last year brought a new dimension to the game. Sharapova, the 17-year-old Wimbledon champion, showed she's far more than just a pretty face, even if that face is all over magazines and on late-night talk shows.

Serena Williams had to survive three match points to beat Sharapova in a semifinal that was every bit as thrilling as the Federer-Safin match. Sports fans, even if they never were particularly tennis fans, were drawn into the quality and tension of those matches - so much so that ESPN2 is showing them again this weekend as "instant classics."

Lindsay Davenport, who reached the finals with Williams, is a compelling story in her own right. She planned to retire at the end of 2004, but after regaining the No. 1 ranking, albeit without winning a Grand Slam, she plugged on and has no reason to regret it so far. One of the genuinely nice people in sports, Davenport is as good a role model as exists in the game.

At a time when other pro sports have been beset by problems with steroids, the arrests of stars and confrontations with fans, tennis stands to gain as a civil alternative - like golf, but with far more sweat and athleticism. No pro sport has a tougher anti-doping program than tennis.

"Let's face it, we don't have the same problems that baseball, football, basketball have with people breaking the law. You're not reading negative headlines like that," said Kurt Kamperman, the U.S. Tennis Association's chief executive for community tennis.

A recent study by the USTA and the Tennis Industry Association showed that the sport has been growing in popularity on courts throughout the country. With 24 million players - 4.75 million of them frequent - the sport is not quite where it was at its height in the 1970s, when it had as many as 32 million players. But it's close to golf and growing despite many more athletic and recreational options for people these days.

"We're trying to piggyback on the general awareness of the game created by this new generation of stars," Kamperman said. "Tennis has been an international sport for many years and it's at a maturity level with the American fan base that they can just as easily root for a non-American."

As much as ESPN2 might have hoped for a men's final with Roddick, the duel between the fiery Safin and Hewitt promises to be filled with plenty of excitement to keep new tennis fans, along with insomniacs, happy.

----

ADDENDUM

----

An oldie but a goodie, from last year:

An Interview With Andy Roddick
2004 Wimbledon
Date: 2004-06-24
Roddick def. Wang 6-3, 7-5, 6-4


Question So was Wayne the weakest link?
Answer It was probably me again (laughter).


Question Have you got your livestock straightened out this year?
Answer I had no idea, man. But you know what, I knew going in that my ignorance was going to shine through. I was just happy it happened later rather than sooner.


Question Was it fun? Were you nervous?
Answer Oh, I was nervous. I was very nervous. You know, you would be shocked at the stuff I don't know (laughter). But it was interesting.


Question But "forehand"?
Answer I couldn't understand her accent half the time. She talks fast, and I'm thinking -- I'm thinking she's going to like make fun of me or something. But you're right, there's not much excuse.


Question When did they film it?
Answer We did it last Friday.

Question Who has a sharper wit, Anne Robinson, Brad Gilbert or the Saturday Night Live writers?
Answer No, the Saturday Night Live writers, for sure. The stuff that went on behind the scenes in the rooms, they stuff they came up with kind of off the top of their head, I was pretty amazed.


Question Really cutting-edge stuff?
Answer Just hilarious. I basically just sat in a room and laughed for an entire week. It was pretty fun.


Question Was it more nerve-wracking to be on that show than it is on a tennis court?
Answer No, probably not, because worst-case scenario on that show is, you know, I miss questions and I leave, which really won't affect me the next day too much. Whereas, this might.


Question Happy with your play?
Answer I felt -- it was tough out there. The conditions, you know, the wind was swirling in there. I was not feeling comfortable out there. I got through it. You know, I feel like there's a lot of room for improvement from today. But, you know, I had a lot of, you know, built-up, you know, kind of energy. You know, I mean, I had to play on it, too. I got through. That's the thing I was looking for.


Question How late were you here yesterday?
Answer I got here about 10 and left at about 7:30.

Question Going on those sort of shows, is that part of kind of building up a new image for yourself?
Answer New image? What was my old image?


Question I'm not sure.
Answer No, it was for fun. The winner had a chance to get a lot of money for charity. You know, I'm always willing to do it. I have a foundation, so that was probably the goal. I probably should have known that I didn't have much chance, but...


Question Harassment in the locker room yesterday? Were people talking about it to you?
Answer You guys think you're clever with your livestock questions. I've heard it six times already (laughter). Anything you guys are coming up with, yeah.


Question After the second set, was that a fist pump and a "come on"?
Answer Maybe.


Question I thought Lleyton had that sort of trademarked.
Answer He's the only person that ever says "come on" on a tennis court?

Question With a fist pump and the "come on."
Answer Trademarking? That would be like trying to trademark taking a sip of Coke in the tennis world. I didn't realize you weren't allowed to fist pump and say "come on." I don't know if I kind of got the thing right, but I kind of tried to do it my way. I didn't really realize I did it.


Question Is it a strange feeling, it's Thursday and you've only played one match?
Answer That doesn't happen often, no. But, you know, it's Wimbledon. I think you kind of have to expect it sometimes, and just do your best to roll with the punches.


Question What did you do yesterday all day waiting it out?
Answer I struggle. I mean, I'm not good for sitting around with nothing to do. My boredom was killing me. But got through it, I guess.


Question In addition to starring in the TV series, you became a star in the Beano.
Answer That's the cartoon?


Question Can you tell us how that came about?
Answer I really didn't know much about it, obviously being from the States. But my PR people came and said they wanted to do a cartoon. I really didn't have much to do with it, to be honest. You know, it sounded like a cool thing. It was for kids. You know, so, it sounded like a good idea.

Question Dennis the Menace is a huge star in this country.
Answer That's what I was called when I was younger. It's fitting.


Question Roger Federer was very impressive on Monday. What do you think he'd have made of your performance today?
Answer Don't know. It really doesn't matter, to be honest. You know, it's early on. You know, there's a lot of tennis to be played before, you know, that becomes relevant.


Question What memories do you have of watching Martina Navratilova play when you were a kid?
Answer I remember I think the one year she beat Garrison in the final. I think that was one of the first times I had watched her play and sat through a whole match. But she's amazing. You know, I mean, there's not much more you can say. It's pretty incredible what she did. And she's probably the only one who thought it was a good idea, and she kind of proved a lot of people wrong.


Question Are you rooting for her now as she plays her second-round match and perhaps goes even more distant into the draw?
Answer Oh, sure. It will create interest. You know, anything that brings interest to this game and gives people something to talk about is healthy. I'm cheering for her.

Question What does age 47, this kind of performance, say to you?
Answer She's a -- not every 47-year-old can do that, huh? I mean, she's a pretty special woman.


Question Who do you think has it harder, you during the US Open, or Tim here?
Answer Oh, hands down Tim.


Question Can you talk about, since you know a bit about what it's like to be in that kind of spotlight, when you observe just how people react to him.
Answer I mean, I think I can relate to it but on a much, much smaller stage. I was kind of the favorite going into the US Open last year, so it was at an all-time high for me. But at the same time they're talking about me a little bit, and other sports a lot. Whereas I think this year's a little bit different with the Euro2004 going on. It's not as bad as I've seen the other years. I mean, it's pretty intense. You know, I don't think I've ever been through something, you know, quite as large as that.


Question You were out on the practice courts with Sjeng Schalken the other day. Can you talk about what that fire in Italy, how it's affected you, if there's kind of a unique bond that you and Sjeng have developed?
Answer Yeah, I think there is. I mean, anytime you share an experience that's pretty traumatic, with someone, there's always something there. I've been asked that question this week. I don't know what that bond is, but there's something a little different there. That's kind of neat.


Question How did that affect you, that experience?
Answer It rattled me for about a week. Rome was probably the first time in my life, I was out on the court and could care less if I won or lost. I wanted to go home and I wanted to see my family. After about a week of that, you know, my boredom set in and I was ready to go again.

Question Looking back psychologically on that US Open, how important was it for you to actually win a Slam?
Answer It was huge. Now I bought myself some time so you guys can't get on me for another, what, Slam or two at least.


Question But beyond that, beyond us, to you personally, being able to actually achieve that goal?
Answer It was amazing. It was my ultimate dream in tennis. You know, I wanted to win the US Open. To be able to achieve that, you know, I really proved something to myself. Going in as a favorite, then backing it up, you know, it was a big confidence builder for me.


Question Any sense among the American men here to sort of show that Paris was a fluke?
Answer Fluke would imply that we had been doing well on the clay leading up to it and then bombed out there. I don't think so. We don't have this kind of thing going against Paris. We just didn't play well this year. You know, it's as simple as that. I haven't talked about it with any of the other young guys or Andre or anybody. I mean, it's not brought up. You know, there's no reason to dwell on it for us. It's new tournament. Wimbledon has nothing to do with a month ago.


Question You've had an interesting year, a public romance, your Q rating is rising. Have you learned anything about being a celebrity outside of being a tennis player this year that you would maybe do differently in the future or just things you're going to have to deal with?
Answer There were a lot of questions in there.


Question Have you learned anything about being a celebrity that you're going to have to deal with from here on out?
Answer I mean, people try to make a big deal of it, I sit here and cry, talk about how hard it is, but it's not. You know, it's all right. It's just something you deal with. Whether it means stopping, taking a couple more pictures, that's about it. That's the way I see it. When I am home, I kind of live a -- I try to live a quiet life. You know, I don't try to bait the media into a, you know, frenzy or anything like that. You know, that's just the way it is. Obviously, it's a learning experience. But for me it hasn't been a really difficult one.

Question It's not just the English at Wimbledon, it's the Australians in Melbourne and the French in Paris. I mean, it's been a long time since any of the home countries have won, except for the Americans. Why do you think it is that Americans don't have a problem winning their own Slam, and everybody else seems to have a problem?
Answer I don't know. I mean, I think it has something to do with the fact that we've had a couple of guys named Agassi and Sampras come along. You know, in any country, they were a couple of the best players in the world. You know, I think it has a lot more to do with players, you know, the depth of players. I mean, we've had -- we've been lucky enough to have tons of guys who have been No. 1 in the world or are contending consistently. I think it's just a battle of odds. I mean, if you have eight guys throughout a span of 20 years who are contending every year, some are going to win.


Question Because they're there, does that take pressure off the next generation? It's happened so often, there's not that pressure?
Answer I don't think so. I think, just judging from my experience, I think there's pressure to uphold the tradition of it.


Question You seem to understand that personality is a big part of tennis, that allowing the public and the media in is an important part of this sport. Is that fair to say? Do you think you maybe understand that, whereas some of the others don't?
Answer I'm not going to speak for anybody else. I think as players and as, you know, the stars of the sport, personally I live this amazing life because of what tennis has given to me. You know, it's as simple as that. I feel like it is one of my responsibilities to give back and help where I can. You know, I'm still learning what that is and how to go about it. But, you know, if I can do anything to kind of help promote the game and make it bigger, then I will.


Question Is tennis like boxing in that people need to feel like they know the person a little bit before they can get behind them?
Answer Maybe. I don't know. I'm not sure. It's tough from the inside looking out. So I guess you guys would know better than me.


Question Back to Tuesday, or maybe even Monday, this was a match that you were supposed to win. As you know, last year at this tournament Lleyton Hewitt had a match he was supposed to win.
Answer My guy was only 5'9" today.

Question Asking Roger Federer a couple of days ago what sort of mental preparation he goes through before that key first-round match at a Grand Slam, he was talking about how much he thinks about the match, gets him out of the sense of "I'm going to win this because I'm favoured." What is your mental preparation knowing that first-round match is difficult?
Answer First rounds at Slams, they're always a bit jittery. I don't ever feel totally comfortable. There's a lot of buildup. There's a lot of hype around obviously the Grand Slams. You can't wait to get out there. You're anxious. So there's a lot that goes into it. You know, if someone comes out and they have no pressure and they're just trying to knock off a big name, you know, it can create for some interesting things sometimes.

tangerine_dream
01-30-2005, 06:12 AM
Just for posterity reasons.... :angel:

Why Ivan Ljubicic is a giant Asshole and will always be Andy's Bitch http://www.terranuts.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin3.gif
tennisreporters.com

Ljubicic: Players don't like Roddick's celebrations and told him to 'kick Andy's ass'
Roddick: I respect everyone and needed the crowd

How hot under the collar was Ivan Ljubicic after his 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 7-6 (8) loss in raucous Ashe Stadium to Andy Roddick on Friday night? About as fired up as Goran Ivanisevic was during one of his vintage meltdowns in NY. He was upset with the crowd, with the linespeople, who he felt were influenced by Roddick, and with Roddick himself, who he says is way to demonstrative on court.

"I think that anywhere in the world, except in the United States, if we played this match, I won it," Ljubicic said. "He's acting on the court and stuff like that. … It affected the linesmen; it affected the crowd. It affected everyone else except me. In a match like this, that's what makes the change. … Generally, I don't like him. Nobody in the locker room like his acting on the court. He's a good player. He's gonna win a lot of matches, but not because he's like that. It's just that we don't like it. Because nobody acts like that. He's the only one. Every single player said to me, 'Good luck. Kick his ass.'"

Roddick wasn't pleased with Ljubicic's accusations and tried to take the high road. Only twice did the match did he try pump up the crowd by waving his arms.

"I think that's pretty much sour grapes. I think the linesmen did their job," he said. That really doesn't deserve a response. I don't think that's very respectful. I definitely don't have anything bad to say about him. So, it's disappointing."

Roddick – who is friends with other American young players – says he's never heard that other competitors don't like his celebratory ways.

"No. I don't really care either," he said. "I try to treat everybody with a lot of respect. I'm not mean to people. I'm very courteous to people. I'm not worried. I'd be worried if I was doing things that I thought were causing that. I try to treat everybody with respect. If they're talking, they're not talking to me about it, which would be the mature thing to do. I think it's easy to come and talk to journalists about it."

Ljubicic said that Roddick deliberately employed the crowd to get on his foe and insinuated that the 21-year-old American would be a lesser player if he didn't have the home crowd pulling him through.

"He doesn't respect the others," Ljubicic said. "It's in your face or it's not in your face, doesn't matter. Some other player's going in your face and you understand that they just want to win a match. But what he's doing is just pumping up the crowd, which is, in the United States he can do it. Fortunately for him, there is like 70 percent of the big tournaments are played in the States. He's No. 4 in the world for that."

RODDICK SAYS CROAT CROWDS CHEERED LJUBICIC
Roddick countered that when Ljubicic led Croatia to a 3-2 win over the US back in February, it wasn't as if he was playing in a temple of silence.

"I watched the Davis Cup from home when the Croatian fans were behind Ivan. I saw a lot of excitement, too," Roddick said. "I'll never do it to my opponent. If anything, it's to my box or to the fans. I don't think I've ever tried to disrespect anybody. I'd like to think if he had 20,000 some-odd Croats behind him, too, he'd probably get a little juiced. I feel bad if that got on his nerves or something. I wish he would have come to me and said, 'This got on my nerves.' I probably would have taken it a lot better and respected his opinion a lot more. Tonight I definitely needed [the crowd]. They were there for me. It's not like I'm up 6-2, 6-1, 5-0 and I'm going nuts. That was an intense match. But I feel bad that he was bothered by it. But sometimes that's the way it goes sometimes. You can't please everybody."

Whether Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt's serial fist pumping is good for game is a hot topic. But a similar topic raged in the 1970s and 1980s as to whether Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe's nuclear explosions were good for the game and now at least a couple million fans and commentators have noted that it's those type of personalities that are missed in today's game.

"In the past I'm sure there were lot worst players than him," Ljubicic "It's part of the game. It's just that we don't like it. There's nothing to do about it. It's not like we don't like it so we have to change it. No, it's him. We don't like him, but who cares. … Maybe it's good for the game. I'm not saying that it's bad. For sure, we need some something different in a game. Because we need some interesting guys out there. But you can be interesting also in the positive way."

Roddick said that he might try to make peace with Ljubicic.

"I might apologize for making him upset even though I don't agree with the whole thing," Roddick said. "We're gonna be on tour together for many years, so I don't want any hard feelings."

The oddest moment of the evening came when after trashing Roddick, Ljubicic wished him a happy birthday while walking down the hall just now after his press conference. "I was thinking, 'That's pretty classy,' " Roddick said.

tangerine_dream
01-31-2005, 01:33 AM
Some more old goodies I found :)

http://www.rickmacci.com/news/roddick2.jpg

Something on Andy's brother, John.

http://www.rickmacci.com/news/roddick1.jpg

superpinkone37
01-31-2005, 04:12 AM
thanks Tangy :D

blosson
01-31-2005, 06:46 PM
Thanks for the articles Tangy. The one about John Roddick is interesting.
The paper predicted John to be the next American tennis superstar. How ironic Andy is the star now.

John used to be very slim in the pic.

smucav
01-31-2005, 08:13 PM
13. We get the question all the time: "How can Andy Roddick be a top player when his game is so limited -- a monster serve and a monster forehand and not much else?" Our stock response: He is a lot stronger mentally than his Von Dutch personality would have you believe. That said, if he doesn't compete better than he did against Hewitt, it's hard to see him finishing at No. 2 again.

25. Fiona McKenna of Melbourne was the first of many to inquire about the blue wristbands favored by Roddick and several other Americans. Turns out the bands are Roddick's answer to Lance Armstrong's "LiveStrong" bracelets. Embossed with the words, "No Compromise," they benefit children in need and are available at andyroddick.com. Price is $2 (minimum order of five) plus shipping and handling.

33. Note to Brad Gilbert: If Federer is USC and Roddick is Oklahoma, as you uncharitably put it, doesn't that make you Bob Stoops?

39. Speaking of Jackson, he joined Roddick for dinner -- regaling him with Dennis Rodman stories -- and joined him at the blackjack table, where Roddick claims to have won more than $5,000.

45. John McEnroe and Courier will join Roddick in an exhibition event at Houston's Toyota Center called "Serving for Tsunami Relief" on Monday. Joining the past and present ATP stars will be Chris Evert, Kournikova and TV talk-show host Dr. Phil. The event will raise money for the Bush-Clinton Tsunami Relief Fund, an effort by the two former presidents to fund relief, reconstruction and rehabilitation for the victims of the disaster in Southeast Asia. Courier's InsideOut Sports & Entertainment is producing the event along with Jim McIngvale, the Houston Chair of the Bush-Clinton Fund. Tickets to the event are available at toyotacentertix.com.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/01/31/wertheim.aussiemail/index.html

tangerine_dream
02-01-2005, 04:27 AM
smucav, thanks for the SI.com update. :haha: the snide remark they made about BG.

Blosson, John Roddick probably would've been a tennis star but he developed a career-ending injury (his back, I think?) and had to hang it up. Very sad. But he coaches for WTT and has his own tennis academy in Houston so he's still in the game as much as he can be. :)

Someone did a profile on some ballplayer and he mentions Andy :yeah:
Batting Around with Ryan Dempster
By*Scoop Malinowski*/*MLB.com
01/31/2005

Ryan Dempster went 1-1 with a 3.92 ERA for the Cubs in 2004.

Favorite athletes to watch: *"Torri Hunter -- always seems like he's having a good time. Plays hard, plays the right way, but it looks like he's having fun. (Other sports?) Michael Jordan. Brett Favre. Peter Forsberg. And, believe it or not, Matthew Barnaby. He gets all over the visiting crowd. And he has a good time when he's out there. Andy Roddick -- fun, energetic out there. It seems to work for him. McEnroe -- god, man, fun to watch. Played his [butt] off. He looked like he was actually going to commit suicide if he lost. He made you believe that. It was like the most important thing in the world to him. (Golf?) Mike Weir -- he's Canadian."
-----

It's good to see so many professional athletes admiring Andy a lot these days. :D

thelma
02-01-2005, 12:51 PM
TENNIS Video

Andy Roddick overrated? (http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/3367102)

Tennis stars help raise more than $500,000

Associated Press
Posted: 6 hours ago


HOUSTON (AP) - Andy Roddick, Tommy Haas, John McEnroe, Chris Evert and Jim Courier played a little fun tennis for a big cause Monday night, helping to raise more than $518,000 for tsunami relief.

Roddick, who lost to Lleyton Hewitt in the semifinals of the Australian Open, defeated Haas 7-6 (6) in the feature match of the event for the Bush-Clinton Fund for Tsunami Relief.
Courier, whose production company put on the event, lost 6-4 to McEnroe in the opening match.

"Everything's going very smoothly except for the fact that I just lost to a guy who has more gray hair than my father," Courier said about the loss to 45-year-old McEnroe, 12 years his senior.

The Houston Chronicle reported in its Tuesday editions that one person who insisted on anonymity paid $250,000 for 50 seats at the benefit at the Toyota Center and the United States Tennis Association contributed $25,000. Former President Bush accepted a giant check for $518,952.

Evert praised the current players who participated in the event.

"They flew all the way in from Australia for this," she said. "In my day, we never played charity events (during the season). To see Andy fly over after a very disappointing loss - I'm sure he's not very happy right now - that's really impressive."

McEnroe said it's about players understanding their roles.

"Andy Roddick gets it, and Jim Courier gets it," he said. "Tennis needs events like this, innovations, new ways to reach out to the fans. It's for a great cause, obviously, and it's also very good for the game. Jim has credibility because he has won (three Grand Slams).

"He's still young enough that the current players know him, but he's been around long enough for the older guys like myself to remember him beating up on me at the end of my career. It's a good combination, making it easy for him to reach a lot of people."

The event was to help relief efforts in south Asia where the tsunami, triggered by a massive earthquake on Dec. 26, killed more than 178,000 people in 11 countries

Tytta!.
02-01-2005, 01:49 PM
Thanks for the article :)

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 12:14 AM
Roddick ready to bounce back after Australian Open

JANIE McCAULEY

Associated Press


After falling short in the Australian Open a year ago, Andy Roddick's tournament title in San Jose helped him get headed back in the right direction.

He's counting on that being the case this time, too.

Roddick believes he beat himself in his frustrating four-set semifinal loss to Lleyton Hewitt last week in Melbourne, and the No. 3-ranked American is anxious to return to California to try to defend his title in San Jose.

"Obviously, the opportunity was there," Roddick said Tuesday of his 3-6, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 6-1 defeat to eventual Australian runner-up Hewitt. "I don't know how much I let it slip away. I wish things had gone differently. I didn't step up and take my chances the way I should have. I'm still disappointed. It's been running through my mind the last couple days. ... Losing isn't fun, it never is. It never gets any easier."

He will be making his fourth career appearance in San Jose, where the tournament name has switched from the Siebel Open to the SAP Open. The top-seeded Roddick, who plays his first match next Wednesday night, beat countryman and close friend Mardy Fish in straight sets to win the tournament last year.

That victory came on the heels of a quarterfinal loss to Marat Safin - this year's Australian Open champion - in Melbourne that caused Roddick to lose his top ranking. It was also Roddick's first title after he captured his first Grand Slam tournament in September 2003 at the U.S. Open.

"Once I get to San Jose I'll start focusing more on that tournament," Roddick said during a teleconference. "Last year I came in and had lost a tough match at the Aussie Open as well. When I got to San Jose, I may not have been playing my best tennis, but I felt like I played really well to get a win there last year. It definitely was a great kind of springboard into the year."

Now, Roddick has a new coach in Dean Goldfine after parting ways in December with Brad Gilbert, his coach for 1 1/2 years.

Roddick is focused on improving his backhand and developing his serve-and-volley game. He is excited about how things are going with Goldfine. Roddick's training is well organized, he said.

"Everything's positive right now. I think it's an overall package," he said of the coach. "He's worked with a couple top-10 guys. Obviously, we developed a relationship. I just like his whole groove."

After arriving home from Australia, Roddick immediately was busy again.

On Monday night, he, Tommy Haas, John McEnroe, Chris Evert and Jim Courier played in a fund-raiser in Houston that raised more than $518,000 for tsunami relief. Roddick then drove back to his home in Austin that night.

He now enters into an important stretch of the schedule in which winning matches can separate the top players in the points totals.

"I don't think about it as defending or not defending," he said. "If you win matches you're going to put points on the board."

What's the best way to get back on track after losing in a Grand Slam?

"If you start winning again," he said. "You know, I think actually getting back into it is almost like therapy."

Deboogle!.
02-02-2005, 12:15 AM
Oops I just posted that in the tourney thread... my bad :o :smash: by now, I should've learned to read everything first :lol:

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 12:18 AM
:lol: Sorry... That may have been my fault :smash:

Deboogle!.
02-02-2005, 12:20 AM
No, it wasn't lmao

actually I see we posted it at the same minute - just in 2 different threads :haha:

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 12:21 AM
:haha:

Great minds think alike, never forget that ;)

Becarina
02-02-2005, 12:22 AM
good article. GO ANDY! Good luck

djb272727
02-02-2005, 01:23 AM
Great article.... makes me feel a whole lot better! :D

Deboogle!.
02-02-2005, 03:45 PM
here's from TR.net that has some more of what Andy said in the teleconference yesterday, etc.
===================

Roddick assesses the Hewitt loss
Andy Roddick didn't let his major disappointment at the Aussie Open spill over and went to Houston and helped Jim Courier and others raise more than $500,000 for the Bush-Clinton Tsunami Relief Fund in a special exhibition in Houston on Tuesday.

Courier and his InsideOut Sports & Entertainment Group teamed up with two-time Tennis Masters Cup Houston tournament promoter Jim McIngvale to assemble a cast of greats, current players and celebrities that included Tommy Haas, John McEnroe, Chris Evert, Anna Kournikova, TV celebrity Dr. Phil, NBA legend Clyde Drexler and former U.S. President George Bush.

Roddick did say that he's still smarting from his four-set semifinal loss to Lleyton Hewitt, when his level dropped precipitously in the second- and third-set tiebreak.

"The opportunity was there," said Roddick, the defending champ at next week's SAP Open in San Jose. "I don't know how much I let it slip away. Obviously, it was totally under my control if things would have gone differently. Unfortunately, I was playing a guy in form. I didn't step up and take my chances the way I should have. I'm still disappointed. It's been running through my mind the last couple days. As Andre said, 'The later in the tournament, the more a loss hurts.' I think that definitely rings true."

What's fascinating to watch with Roddick these days is how much he's improved the once weak parts in his game but how those components of his arsenal (backhand, return of serve and volley) still frequently fail at crunch time.

"It's only going to get better through more hard work," he said "I am improving in those aspects. The bottom line is I let myself down. My backhand didn't let me down in that match; I let myself down."

Partial credit has to be given to Hewitt, who upped his play in both breakers. But without question, Roddick has his chances in the contest and mentally let down.

"It's a little bit of both," he said. "Lleyton's going to make you step up and beat him. He doesn't give matches away. That's just the nature of his game. The bottom line is I didn't step up in those tiebreakers and I didn't beat him. I beat myself. Lleyton makes you feel a little bit weird because you feel like you beat yourself, but he puts you in a position to do that. You know, unfortunately I didn't come up with the goods. A lot of it's just mental, just bearing down mentally. I know I can hit forehands and backhands and do a lot of things. Like Dean [Goldfine, his coach] said after the Aussie Open, I think I looked for the quick fix a little bit too much instead of actually working through the process of a point. That's stuff you learn along the way."

Here's Roddick's friend and Xs and O's guru Andre Agassi's take on Andy's Aussie Open performance:
"I just didn't sense the whole tournament like he found his comfort zone. It happens. You play a lot of events. It was a long year for him last year. If it wasn't for [Roger] Federer having an outrageous year, Andy would have finished the year No. 1 again, probably winning Wimbledon. So you're talking about a guy that has incredible potential. Expectations are always high. With his commitment to Davis Cup and all the other stuff he's doing, he was playing so hard through the year, so who knows if he's feeling a little tired or fatigued, mentally or physically. So I just sort of was waiting for his game to come around the whole tournament.

"But nobody ever really pushed him to get a sense for that. And Lleyton was the first one that did it. There's no question he could have won that match in straight sets. But then again, I've watched a lot of matches with people playing Lleyton that Lleyton found a way. That's a tribute to him."

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 03:48 PM
Interesting article... Thanks for posting :)

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 04:38 PM
It's not an article or anything, just found it and if it interests anyone... :rolleyes:

--

ESPN2 is in the mood for love.

The network will air ESPN Original Entertainment special Who’s #1? Sports’ Hottest Couples Presented by Us Weekly Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. (EST), with a Valentine’s Day encore Feb. 14 at 10 p.m.

The special will count down the 25 all-time hottest couples past and present, with looks at Anna Kournikova’s suitors, Derek Jeter’s “cavalcade of starlets” and couples like Tom Brady and Bridget Moynahan; Chris Webber and Tyra Banks; and Andy Roddick and Mandv Moore.

Among those providing commentary: Roshumba Williams (Sports Illustrated swimsuit model); Jesse Palmer (the National Football League’s New York Giants and ABC’s The Bachelor); Tiki Barber and Michael Strahan (Giants); Diana Taurasi (the Women’s National Basketball Association’s Phoenix Mercury); Carol Alt (former supermodel); Major League Baseball’s New York Mets’ Kris Benson and his wife, Anna; Caroline Schaefer (Us Weekly); Carol Grow (host of E! Entertainment Television’s Wild on E!); and Donnell Rawlings (Chappelle’s Show).

snaillyyy
02-02-2005, 08:52 PM
Hmmmmm they still want to talk about Andy & Mandy ;) :p

Saw ESPN Sportscenter this morning and #8 on the Top 10 of the week was the charity event in Texas, they showed Andy dancing and singing, I burst out laughing again unfortunately I was at work at the time, got quite a few strange looks :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Tytta!.
02-02-2005, 08:59 PM
:sobbing:

Today I woke up and the first thing I hear is: "What was that?" from my dad... I was like: "What was that what?" :lol: And he told me he saw Andy on TV dancing and singing and etc and he found that so weird :sobbing: Then I explained all the situation :haha:

aceit
02-02-2005, 09:04 PM
I was eating my bagel minding my own business watching SportsCenter like every morning and BOOM Andy and his "moves" are featured on the top ten. :p

andyroxmysox12191
02-02-2005, 09:16 PM
:sobbing: Should I watch Sportscenter to see it? ;)

aceit
02-02-2005, 10:07 PM
If you only want to watch it just for the clip of Andy shaking his thang, it's on during the last five minutes or so. :)

superpinkone37
02-03-2005, 12:55 AM
haha cool...they rerun sportscenter at 8 right? (pacific)

Deboogle!.
02-03-2005, 01:14 AM
Yes at 8 and 10 but I think now it's technically a new day's episode so it might have changed :(

superpinkone37
02-03-2005, 01:30 AM
oh that sucks. At least I have it saved on my computer though, thanks Deb :kiss:
But when they showed Andy on that hotseat thing I watched the rerun at like 8 I think and they showed it... I dunno I dont watch Sportscenter enough to know all that stuff :p

Deboogle!.
02-03-2005, 01:39 AM
I don't watch it either, but I'll try to remember to tonight, I guess :p

smucav
02-03-2005, 08:10 PM
TR.NET TOP 10 MEN: THURSday, FEBRUARY 3 (http://www.tennisreporters.net/top_men_020305.html)4. Andy Roddick: Now the clear No. 4 amongst the Fab Four, Roddick must keep his chin up and continue to make small improvements in his all-around game. His loss to Hewitt in the AO semis was very disappointing, but he'll have numerous other chances to avenge himself.

Jennay
02-03-2005, 10:13 PM
If you only want to watch it just for the clip of Andy shaking his thang, it's on during the last five minutes or so. :)
You did not just say thang.

thelma
02-03-2005, 10:56 PM
Roddick aims to rebound after Aussie loss

http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2005/02/01/roddick_aims_to_rebound_after_aussie_loss/

By Janie McCauley, AP Sports Writer | February 1, 2005

After falling short in the Australian Open a year ago, Andy Roddick's tournament title in San Jose helped him get headed back in the right direction.

He's counting on that being the case this time, too.

Roddick believes he beat himself in his frustrating four-set semifinal loss to Lleyton Hewitt last week in Melbourne, and the No. 3-ranked American is eager to return to California to try to defend his title in San Jose.

"Obviously, the opportunity was there," Roddick said Tuesday of his 3-6, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 6-1 defeat to eventual Australian runner-up Hewitt. "I don't know how much I let it slip away. I wish things had gone differently. I didn't step up and take my chances the way I should have. I'm still disappointed. It's been running through my mind the last couple days. ... Losing isn't fun, it never is. It never gets any easier."

Roddick will be making his fourth career appearance in San Jose, where the tournament name has switched from the Siebel Open to the SAP Open. The top-seeded Roddick, who plays his first match next Wednesday night, beat countryman and close friend Mardy Fish in straight sets to win the tournament last year.

That victory came on the heels of a quarterfinal loss to Marat Safin -- this year's Australian Open champion -- in Melbourne that caused Roddick to lose his top ranking. It was also Roddick's first title after he captured his first Grand Slam tournament in September 2003 at the U.S. Open.

"Once I get to San Jose I'll start focusing more on that tournament," Roddick said during a teleconference. "Last year I came in and had lost a tough match at the Aussie Open as well. When I got to San Jose, I may not have been playing my best tennis, but I felt like I played really well to get a win there last year. It definitely was a great kind of springboard into the year."

Now, Roddick has a new coach in Dean Goldfine after parting ways in December with Brad Gilbert, his coach for 1 1/2 years.

Roddick is focused on improving his backhand and developing his serve-and-volley game. He is excited about how things are going with Goldfine. Roddick's training is well organized, he said.

"Everything's positive right now. I think it's an overall package," he said of the coach. "He's worked with a couple top-10 guys. Obviously, we developed a relationship. I just like his whole groove."

After arriving home from Australia, Roddick immediately was busy again.

On Monday night, he, Tommy Haas, John McEnroe, Chris Evert and Jim Courier played in a fund-raiser in Houston that raised more than $518,000 for tsunami relief. Roddick then drove back to his home in Austin, Texas, that night.

He now enters into an important stretch of the schedule in which winning matches can separate the top players in the points totals.

"I don't think about it as defending or not defending," he said. "If you win matches you're going to put points on the board."

What's the best way to get back on track after losing in a Grand Slam?

"If you start winning again," he said. "You know, I think actually getting back into it is almost like therapy."

© Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

thelma
02-03-2005, 11:03 PM
Roddick recovering from Australian Open

the same here

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6896643/

aceit
02-03-2005, 11:11 PM
You did not just say thang.
I did indeed.

But it's not a word I'd say in public. Or maybe I would. But I'd be joking around. ;)

Deboogle!.
02-03-2005, 11:51 PM
this is from an article about Donald Young... doesn't sound like hitting with Andy is much fun :lol:
=======
He practised in Australia with Andy Roddick, the world No 3, who is also scheduled to be in the San Jose field. “We were hitting,” Young said. “He hit a short ball. I didn’t attack it or hit it hard, I just hit it to the open court. He got upset. He wants people when they hit with him to actually jump on it and not just hit it soft.”

BiancaUL
02-04-2005, 02:05 PM
How does that little blurb connect with him wanting all of the attention or being a bully?

It just seems like if someone's going to hit with him that he wants them to, well, actually hit it.

edited because of too many 'withs' and a lack of coffee

Tytta!.
02-04-2005, 02:09 PM
Just ignore it, Bianca ;)

smucav
02-04-2005, 03:57 PM
ADWATCH: Game for a double fault
Simon Canning

ADVERTISING with sports stars carries a special set of risks. They can misbehave, dragging your corporate reputation through the mud with them. They can get injured, sidelining not just themselves but the money a marketer has invested in them.

But the worst possible thing a sports star can do is lose. Losing in itself might not be considered a bad thing. It can give your chosen athlete an air of humility and magnanimity if they choose to lose with grace. It can allow them to show their softer side, perhaps shedding a few tears as they are bundled from a tournament. In each case the brand that backs the loser can ultimately be the winner.

But losing carries with it another risk. If your star features in a campaign where winning is the central theme, losing can make the whole project look unwieldy.

American Express and its agency Ogilvy & Mather faced just a such a problem when they decided to ride on the coat-tails of tennis star Andy Roddick. The premise for the ad is simple. The immensely talented Roddick stumbles through a series of airline scenes where he struggles to find space to stash his assorted trophies. They tumble from overhead lockers, block doorways and cause slapstick mayhem.

Finally, as Roddick buys his next ticket, he says he wants one seat going there and two coming back. The camera then cuts to him on his return journey, a large trophy nestled happily in its own business-class seat.

The ad ends with Amex's global tagline, "My life. My card."

For nigh on two weeks the ad played to great effect during the Australian Open tennis tournament. Then the unthinkable happened as Roddick was bundled out by Lleyton Hewitt.

Come the final, with Roddick nowhere to be seen, the ad suddenly threatened to look stupid and presumptuous. Unless, of course, someone had the foresight to shoot two endings.

As the ad played during the final, viewers might well have been thinking how ridiculous it was until a new ending appeared with a sullen-faced Roddick sitting next to a pricey but empty business-class seat. "Is this seat taken?" a girl asks, and Roddick brightens up as he offers it to her.

By shooting a new ending, Amex managed to refresh a campaign, reinforcing the message of the original and offering viewers a reason to smile.

Our rating... * * * *Copyright 2005 Nationwide News Pty Limited
The Australian
February 3, 2005 Thursday All-round Country Edition
MarketingMedia; Pg. 18

It's that time of year again - time for the annual gridiron spectacle. No, not the Super Bowl, but the 16th annual Scripps Howard Celebrity Super Bowl Poll. The rich and famous from movies, TV, sports, politics and pop culture predict the winner of Sunday's Super Bowl.

ANDY RODDICK, tennis star: New England, 27-17. Brady is the man!Scripps Howard's Celebrity Super Bowl Poll
Copyright 2005 Scripps Howard, Inc.
Scripps Howard News Service
February 03, 2005, Thursday

Flushing_Ace
02-04-2005, 11:37 PM
This has basiclly been quoted in all the articles everyone else has posted, but interesting topics none the less on Agassi, Davis Cup, and Young.
______
Q&A With Andy Roddick

The following interview with Andy Roddick was conducted by the ATP's Director of Communications, Greg Sharko, on Tuesday, February 1.

GREG SHARKO. Looking at Davis Cup, it seems that one of the only givens is that yourself and the Bryans are going to be on the team. That other slot is kind of on a try-out basis. Is that a healthy environment for Davis Cup or would you rather see kind of a set team coming in every tie?

ANDY RODDICK: Well, considering three out of the four players are set, you know, I think that's pretty good. You know, I try to look at it optimistically. Most countries have their two singles players and not a whole lot of depth besides that. The fact that we have three or four guys who can play the second singles, it's a concern, but it's a nice problem to have at the same time.

You know, I think we're a lot better off than we were two years ago before the Bryans got into the fold where it was just me playing, and that was the only given. I choose to look at it that we're making progress and, you know, I'm excited to start the year there in California.

Q. How much can you get involved in the process of trying to convince Andre that it would be a good thing to play? Is there only so much you can push him?

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, you know, the last thing I'm going to do, as a fellow player, is grill Andre all the time about it. But, you know, I have talked to him. We have discussed it. I've let him know that I'm a hundred percent supportive, if he wants to join us.

You know, I definitely want him on the team. I think he gives us a great chance. You know, obviously selfishly I'd love to be around him and learn, be in that close contact with him for a week.

But beyond that, I don't know how much I can do. I mean, I've made it known that I respect him, he's a good friend, and I'd love to have him around. But at the same time I don't want him to feel like I'm pressuring him into anything. That's not my place. I think those conversations are between captain and Andre.

Q. Regarding Davis Cup, if Andre Agassi were to join the team, what would he add to the mix, your mix of young guys that's included right now?

ANDY RODDICK: Well, Andre's great. I mean, he would come in and fit in no problem. You know, he's a people person, so it wouldn't be anything bad. We could only learn from Andre. I mean, if you have a Davis Cup team and you add one of the greatest players of all time to it, I mean, it can only benefit all of us.

Q. Your comments about Agassi, do you have a gut feeling either way if he'll play either this tie or any tie in the future?

ANDY RODDICK: I don't know. I mean, I'm not going to speculate because I honestly don't know. Like I said, I'm not going to harass Andre into telling us. He's a grown man. He's going to make decisions. Either way, I'm sure he'll have very valid reasons for choosing either way. That's something I do know.

Q. Your enthusiasm for Davis Cup, how much do you think that has affected, being the top American, the feeling of Davis Cup now, bringing back that camaraderie, team playing feeling?

ANDY RODDICK: I don't know. I'd be hard-pressed to say that's all me. I mean, like I said, I think it's a team effort. You know, there's a whole group of us young guys who are committed to the cause. I'm just one of those people.

I've kind of been there the longest now and I just am as committed now as I was five years ago.

Q. What is it about it that you're so enthusiastic about it?

ANDY RODDICK: I think it's great. I mean, it's not often you get to compete on behalf of your country in our sport, and especially with a bunch of your best friends. It really doesn't get much better than that.

Q. Do you know anything about Donald Young? You obviously were the last US Junior to be No. 1 in the world.

ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. I think very highly of Donald. I (inaudible) with him a couple times. He seems like a really sweet kid. You know, obviously being No. 1 in the world at such a young age, winning a Slam at such a young age, is a very impressive accomplishment.

My biggest I guess fear for Donald is that people put pressure on him too early. We have to realize how young he is and he's going to grow. You know, he still may be a couple years away physically, you know, as far as playing with the top-level guys. I really just hope people give him room to grow and give him some leeway. Like Bill said, he's got a conference call tomorrow. You know, he's No. 1. I just hope that people kind of realize it's going to be a learning process for him, even though he is so good at a young age.

I've been there under kind of the spotlight in the transition from juniors to pros before, and it's a tough one. I just hope people will give him his space and let him grow and mature naturally.

But, you know, he's a smart kid and I think he has good people around him, so hopefully that won't be too much of a problem.

Q. Regarding Donald Young, you won US Open Juniors when you were 17, correct?

ANDY RODDICK: Yes.

Q. How good is he to win the Australian Open Juniors at 15?

ANDY RODDICK: Oh, it's unprecedented, you know, like people have said. The thing being, at 17, I was fortunate because I was ready to play pro ball right away after the US Open. We do have to realize how young he is and how much he has left to learn.

I think his potential, it's unbelievable. The way he plays points, the way he already constructs points, he's just one of those guys who has a natural feel for the game. My biggest concern is letting him grow and people knowing that this is a process. If he does come in and win, start winning some, then it should be looked upon as a bonus; it shouldn't be expected right away.

I just wish nothing but the best for him. I hope everybody kind of realizes that this is going to be a process over the next couple of years.

Q. Would you say it was a risk for his parents to have him turn pro at age 15? Mentally it's hard to grow up and get used to the rigors of the tour at that age.

ANDY RODDICK: Hopefully he's not going to travel full-time right away. But at the same time, you have to kick butt when it's there to be kicked. He's obviously not a normal 15-year-old with the ability that he has. I hope they still let him do some normal stuff. I don't want it to start feeling like a job to him this early. It's a very sensitive situation because you have someone who is so talented and who wants to play the game, so you have to let him do his own thing, but at the same time there I think the sense of normalcy has to remain, as well.

Q. What is your coaching situation now? Was a change a good thing for you, as it turned out?

ANDY RODDICK: I am working with Dean Goldfine still. Yeah, I think so. I mean, only time will tell. I'm very happy with my team around me right now.

Q. What has been the major change that you feel like has benefited you since you left Brad Gilbert?

ANDY RODDICK: I mean, it's tough to say. It hasn't been long. I mean, people are asking me that question two weeks into working with Dean. I love Dean as a person. I think his work ethic is contagious, with how hard he works at his job. When we train together, it's very organized. We work really hard. We've been getting along great on a personal basis. Everything's positive right now.

Q. With Dean Goldfine, is it just his personality that drew you to him? Were you looking for kind of an expertise in one specific area?

ANDY RODDICK: No. I mean, I think it's an overall package. I think he's been a great coach. He's worked with a couple Top 10 guys. Obviously, we developed a relationship. He was an Olympic assistant coach and a Davis Cup assistant coach. We got to know each other. We got to spend some time together. I just like his whole groove.

Q. From the outside it looked like you and Brad had meshed together. What went wrong there?

ANDY RODDICK: You know, it had run its course. The results had plateaued a little bit. It was just time to move on.

Q. One obligatory question. Who is going to win the Super Bowl?

ANDY RODDICK: Patriots.

Q. Any score?

ANDY RODDICK: I'll go out on a limb and say Patriots. It is going to be -- the score is going to be 27-17.

andyroxmysox12191
02-05-2005, 12:24 AM
Nikkkkkkkiiii!!!!!! :kiss:

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 12:40 AM
Maannniiii! Look at me! 37 posts and an avatar. All I need now is a signature and I'll be heading to GM in no time! ;)

Deboogle!.
02-05-2005, 12:42 AM
Maannniiii! Look at me! 37 posts and an avatar. All I need now is a signature and I'll be heading to GM in no time! ;)

:lol:

How appropriate that you picked a pic from last year's San Jose, as that tourney is about to start again ;)

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 12:59 AM
It was actually pure coincidence (sp?). I was looking for a picture of him serving at Houston on RO and this one came up in that random picture area. Since it was fitting with the tourny I thought why not. Plus I love that outfit anyhow hehe :)

Deboogle!.
02-05-2005, 01:01 AM
It was actually pure coincidence (sp?). I was looking for a picture of him serving at Houston on RO and this one came up in that random picture area. Since it was fitting with the tourny I thought why not. Plus I love that outfit anyhow hehe :)

Cool :)

(oh and you spelled it right;))

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 01:05 AM
(I'm a genius ;))

Actually...I'm trying to get my post count up. Does that make me a teeny-bopper? or just pathetic?

Deboogle!.
02-05-2005, 01:07 AM
No it makes you cooooooooool!

So glad you're chatting with us! :banana:

fangirl
02-05-2005, 01:15 AM
You are not a teenybopper unless you talk like the 12 year old translator without actually using it :)

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 01:26 AM
No it makes you cooooooooool!

So glad you're chatting with us! :banana:
Thanks :) But the posting momentum will be gone by tomorrow, and you won't hear from me again in another month.

Ah yes, Kell. I wanted to mention how sexy Andy's nose hairs are, but I simply cannot read over half of what you guys have said, and I didn't want to repeat anything. And that translator, unfortunately, only translates to, and not from.

fangirl
02-05-2005, 01:31 AM
If the translator worked the other way as well, then I might actually be able to understand the offical board. And I don't think anyone has mentioned the nosehairs yet, I personally am all about the eyelashes at the moment.

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 01:39 AM
I've tried to decipher the unknown language of that board... I've deemed it impossible. But you know what I like better then eyelashes? and nose hair? Finger hair.

andyroxmysox12191
02-05-2005, 02:18 AM
:lol: Vamos Nikki!!! 44!! make it 100 :banana: so I win :p

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 02:30 AM
Oh I'll make it to 100 all right...in July.

andyroxmysox12191
02-05-2005, 02:38 AM
*gasp* You got a sig! You must get addicted to GM now and then start hating it! That's when you're a true MTF user :p

Deboogle!.
02-05-2005, 02:44 AM
*gasp* You got a sig! You must get addicted to GM now and then start hating it! That's when you're a true MTF user :p

I haven't been to GM in well over a week! :banana: :dance:

;) :p

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 02:46 AM
Yeah I spent 9 hours (8 and a half looking for quotes) on it only for it to be 600 characters too long. So I cut the quote and some of my players.

Honestly, I don't see myself ever getting outside the Team USA forums. GM is to hostile, and if I can barely make it in here, where it's nice and calm, I'd die out there.

andyroxmysox12191
02-05-2005, 03:09 AM
I haven't been to GM since um........last year or something :)

zoltan83
02-05-2005, 06:57 PM
(I'm a genius ;))

Actually...I'm trying to get my post count up. Does that make me a teeny-bopper? or just pathetic?
You forgot the homosexual :rolleyes:

*M*
02-05-2005, 07:36 PM
If the translator worked the other way as well, then I might actually be able to understand the offical board. And I don't think anyone has mentioned the nosehairs yet, I personally am all about the eyelashes at the moment.Then you should like this one:
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=410884&postcount=17

tangerine_dream
02-05-2005, 07:51 PM
All I need now is a signature and I'll be heading to GM in no time! ;)

Don't forget your head gear and armor. ;)

Golfnduck
02-05-2005, 08:06 PM
Don't forget your head gear and armor. ;)LMFAO!!!! And you must have a thick skin. The boneheads in there like to rage on duckies.

aceit
02-05-2005, 08:24 PM
LMFAO!!!! And you must have a thick skin. The boneheads in there like to rage on duckies.
My skin has grown way thick since Novemeber when I joined. :p

Flushing_Ace
02-05-2005, 09:00 PM
You guys could arm me with tanks and cannons and I'd still die out there in 5 minutes. I get far more enjoyment reading the crap in there anyhow, then actually contrubting it, so I don't think I'm missing much by not posting in there.

tangerine_dream
02-05-2005, 09:01 PM
I haven't been to GM in well over a week! :banana: :dance:

;) :p

:banana: :aparty: :dance: :cool:
The longest I've gone without GM is a little over a month when I took a brief hiatus at the end of last year. I should do that more often. Every time I go into GM my IQ drops ten points. :retard:

:secret: psst Deb, check your mailbox in a few days. :D

aceit
02-05-2005, 09:01 PM
I enjoy posting there. Not EVERYONE is obnoxious. ;)

Deboogle!.
02-05-2005, 09:12 PM
:banana: :aparty: :dance: :cool:
The longest I've gone without GM is a little over a month when I took a brief hiatus at the end of last year. I should do that more often. Every time I go into GM my IQ drops ten points. :retard:

LOL

It's fun without GM huh!? I'd be better off spending that time in some of the other forums of players I like. Right now I stick to Andy and the Team USA forum but I should visit the rest of my faves' forums :)

:secret: psst Deb, check your mailbox in a few days. :D

*claps* oh, yay! My LA mailbox?? :kiss: :kiss: :kiss:

Golfnduck
02-05-2005, 09:24 PM
:banana: :aparty: :dance: :cool:
The longest I've gone without GM is a little over a month when I took a brief hiatus at the end of last year. I should do that more often. Every time I go into GM my IQ drops ten points. :retard:

I still go in there to see what the idiots are saying.

Iheartandy&roger
02-05-2005, 10:08 PM
True enough GM is bullshit it's all a bunch of mindless clones that don't know what they're talking about sometimes.....

Becarina
02-05-2005, 10:25 PM
it is all " who hates andy" threads....boring./

blosson
02-05-2005, 10:34 PM
Yeah, most people at GM seem not to like Andy.
Why do you think GM people don't like Andy?

a) his looks, one of the cutest guys in the tour
b) think his game is boring due to his powerful serve, there aren't that many rallies
c) he is American, although I noticed a lot of Americans hate Andy too
d) he keeps beating their favourite players
e) his 'colorful' behaviour on court

Do you think they would change their minds once Andy is able to constantly beat Federer / Hewitt ? [wishful thinking!]

fangirl
02-05-2005, 10:35 PM
I think I have been there about twice - some strange threads scared me away. And besides, everyone has been really nice to me in this fourm.

superpinkone37
02-05-2005, 10:51 PM
From Tennis-X.........

..Since the only U.S. tennis you're getting from ESPN this month is the U.S. Davis Cup weekend, here's a sneak peek at The Tennis Channel's line-up for February: The Davis Cup story (premiers on 2/4), this week's semifinals and finals from ATP Delray Beach and Vina del Mar, the Andy Roddick Charity Jam (premiers on 2/7), Thurs.-Sun. coverage next week at ATP San Jose, semifinal and final coverage next week at Buenos Aires on the dirt, the WTA Paris final, ATP Memphis coverage Wed.-Sun., ATP Costa de Sauipe (Brazil) semifinals and final, the WTA Antwerp final, the Andy Roddick-led Serving Tsunami Relief exhibition from Houston, WTA Doha and ATP Scottsdale Thurs.-Sun. coverage, and ATP Acapulco semifinals and final. Unless like us you're without The Tennis Channel on Comcast, you're a happy puppy. Sign the contract Comcast!..

I hate everyone who has the tennis channel :(

snaillyyy
02-05-2005, 10:53 PM
:mad: :mad: I hate The Tennis Channel!!!

blosson
02-05-2005, 10:57 PM
Considering that quite a few of you don't go to GM, I'm posting an article I think it's funny. It's not about Andy but we all heard the word 'metrosexual' during one of his interviews at AO, so i thought some of you might enjoy it [it does mention Mardy and Agassi though], the thread title is 'metrosexual?'


(Douglas Robinson for Tennis Magazine)

Clean Cut: The men of the ATP are shedding their leg-acy

Maria Sharapova isn't the only player whose silky-smooth legs have drawn oohs and ahhs lately. Juan Carlos Ferrerro, Guillermo Coria, and Carlos Moya, among others, have turned their share of heads for shaving their legs, which is fast becoming a trend on the men's tour.

"It does seem like a lot of guys are doing it," says Mardy Fish, who wants in on the record that he does not clip, trim, or shave his leg hair.

What's behind the metrosexual trend? Most players say it's more convenient for post-match rubdowns, because hairy legs can make a massage uncomfortable and follicles are more easily infected. "It's for massage," Ferrerro says, "not for looking good." ATP trainer Per Bastholt, who treats dozens of players in the locker room during every tournament, agrees. "It makes it easier to do massage therapy and other treatments."

Vittorio Selmi, an ATP tour manager, says shaving may give some players the illusion of better aerodynamics, like swimmers who shave their bodies before competition. He adds, "you feel, not lighter, but more clean when you sweat."

The Armenian Sargis Sargsian admits he has taken a razor to his thick, dark hair simply for entertainment. "I've done a couple of times when I was bored in a hotel," he says.

While it's impossible to calculate how many men are exchewing the hirsute – ATP officials estimate that upwards of 50 percent of players perform some sort of hair removal – the trend is on the upswing. Its origin can be traced to Andre Agassi, who traded in his flowing locks for a shiny pate and streamlined body years ago. He still clips his legs, chest, and it appears, even his arms.

"Agassi was one of the first," Selmi says. "Things get trendy and everyone copies it."

Well, not everyone. "You look like a girl without any hair," says Belgium's Olivier Rochus. "I don't like it."[/QUOTE]

fangirl
02-05-2005, 11:00 PM
Yeah, most people at GM seem not to like Andy.
Why do you think GM people don't like Andy?

a) his looks, one of the cutest guys in the tour
b) think his game is boring due to his powerful serve, there aren't that many rallies
c) he is American, although I noticed a lot of Americans hate Andy too
d) he keeps beating their favourite players
e) his 'colorful' behaviour on court

Do you think they would change their minds once Andy is able to constantly beat Federer / Hewitt ? [wishful thinking!]

Please don't lynch me for this, but I can kind of see why a lot of people may not like Andy even though I like him. It is very easy to take a big personality and confidence the wrong way and assume it is arrogence. Also, everyone has their moments where they come across as a spoilt little diva brat, but unlike me where I just have my dad telling me to stop my attitude because I am being a complete brat, Andy has a lot of people just waiting for him to do something silly so they can pounce on it. My theory is that a lot of people simply take him the wrong way.

Oh, and as an Australian, I can hoenstly say I don't hate Americans. I just hate their president, but that is another story for another time.

BiancaUL
02-05-2005, 11:13 PM
The Charity Jam is his event in FL, right? My TiVo isn't giving me a description for it.

ATP officials estimate that upwards of 50 percent of players perform some sort of hair removal

Nice to know folks spend their time calculating and estimating the really important stuff in life and tennis.

tangerine_dream
02-06-2005, 12:03 AM
It is very easy to take a big personality and confidence the wrong way and assume it is arrogence.

I agree. Andy *does* come off a tad arrogant oncourt but that's his peacock mode; his intimidation factor. Hewitt is the same way. In fact, many players incorporate some kind of "act" when they take to the court and they use whatever works best for them to get that edge. It happens in all professional sports.

Personally, I'd have more of a problem with him he were truly like that off the court.

andyroxmysox12191
02-06-2005, 12:27 AM
:fiery: Stupid Tennis Channel *flips them off*

Tytta!.
02-06-2005, 12:29 AM
Get 'em, Mani!!!!! :banana: :haha:

Deboogle!.
02-06-2005, 03:48 AM
Not totally about Andy, but kinda cool anyway :)
-----------
Tennis anyone?
New Delray Public Library will have large collection of books and videos about the popular sport played at nearby stadium

Published Sunday, February 6, 2005 at 1:00 am
by By Dale M. King


Excitement about the imminent arrival of a new public library in Delray Beach is beginning to mount.

Much the way the crowd at the tennis stadium across the street feels when stars of the game prepare to take to the courts.

To honor the connection between Delray Beach and the world of tennis greats, the new library being built on West Atlantic Avenue will have a large collection of books, videos and DVDs about the popular racquet sport.

“This is something that’s uniquely Delray, with the stadium right across the street,” said board member John Burke.

Steve Leveen, another board member and founder of Levenger’s, spun the idea – and library officials have picked up on it.

“We are getting a lot of information from the Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I.,” said Burke. Some local players are also participating. Library Director John Callahan III said tennis great Chris Evert, who sponsors an annual celebrity event at the local net venue, plans to get on board. “We will be talking to Andy Roddick and the Williams sister,” he added.

“We expect this collection to be as formidable as any,” Burke said. Helping to make it the best the city can get is “a network of tennis insiders.”

snaillyyy
02-06-2005, 03:51 AM
Cool, thanks Deb :D
:secret: oh and you found out why all the posts ;)

Deboogle!.
02-06-2005, 03:52 AM
:haha: Yes, I uncovered the secret :rolls:

Tytta!.
02-06-2005, 11:53 AM
:rolleyes:
Thanks for the article
:secret: Deb you know I love you ;)

smucav
02-07-2005, 07:52 PM
Here are two recent articles about Donald Young where Andy is quoted extensively. It's only inevitable that Young will be compared to Andy just like Andy was compared to Agassi/Sampras:

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/10825120.htm
Posted on Sat, Feb. 05, 2005
The world is in his court
By Darren Sabedra
Mercury News

Five years ago, when he was only 10, Donald Young hit tennis balls with John McEnroe at a senior event in Chicago. Afterward, the tennis icon marveled, ``He's the first person I've ever seen that has hands like me, and the sky's the limit.''

Young has not let McEnroe down. The 15-year-old used those soft and quick hands last week to win the Australian Open junior title, becoming the youngest to do so at a Grand Slam event. This week, he became the youngest No. 1 in the history of the world junior rankings.

Now, 11 years after Venus Williams made her tour debut in the Bay Area, the latest African-American phenom will do likewise. Young plays his first ATP Tour match Monday night at HP Pavilion. The wild-card entry will face Robby Ginepri, 22 and ranked 73rd.

``This is a great opportunity for Donald,'' Gary Swain, Young's manager, said Friday. ``I'm not sure he really knows how good he is.''

Swain discovered Young when the kid was 10 and No. 1 in the under-12s. But just to be sure Young was as good as he seemed, Swain asked McEnroe, whom he managed for years, to rally with him at a senior event in Young's hometown of Chicago.

``I asked John to push him,'' Swain recalled. McEnroe pushed, and he left with the same reaction that many people have to Young: The kid is special.

So special that he has drawn comparisons to Williams, who was 14 when she defeated Shaun Stafford in her debut in Oakland in 1994, and her sister Serena. But whether Young will have similar mass appeal remains to be seen.

``That's asking a lot,'' said Luke Jensen, a former doubles star who works as an analyst for ESPN.

Young's roots hardly parallel those of the Williams sisters. Venus and Serena grew up in Compton and were taught by a father who learned the game from books. Young was taught by parents who played in college and run a tennis club in Atlanta.

``Donald's dad is a tennis pro. That helps a lot when you're learning on the courts,'' Jensen said. ``It's similar in the sense where he has talent. Is he going to play top-10 ball? I think he can. I think he can win some Slams. He'll play for the U.S. Davis Cup team one day.

``But can he be the dominating force in the game? I mean, Roger Federer has a pretty good flag standing up, and he's got some other guys who are still very young.''

Young isn't selling himself short. Though he comes across as modest and soft-spoken, he aims to win multiple Grand Slams and be No. 1 in the world.

This year, he plans to play in the three remaining junior Grand Slam events, as well as a couple of pro tournaments. He said he couldn't say when he will hit the tour full-time. Asked how he feels about playing in a tournament next week that includes Andy Roddick and Andre Agassi, Young said: ``I'm a little nervous. I hope I don't play one of them.''

Young's invitation to the SAP Open was in the works before his run at the Australian Open. Bill Rapp, the tournament director, caught wind of Young a few years ago and charted his progress, including McEnroe's comments.

``McEnroe does not pop off,'' Rapp said. ``He's very thoughtful about what he says.''

So Rapp called Swain to ask if Young would be interested in playing in San Jose. ``I thought his agent was going to drop the phone,'' Rapp said.

Young, who is 5-foot-10 and 150 pounds, said he accepted for several reasons.

``Experience, see how I am, see how I match up to a lot better players,'' he said.

Young has been preparing for matches such as these for much of his life. An only child, the left-hander said he learned the mental part of the game from his mother and the physical part from his dad.

Though the Youngs have said they did not push their son toward tennis, they have taken heat for his turning pro so early. Donald Sr. told Newsweek that the decision was necessary to pay for training and travel costs, adding: ``All we're trying to do is what it takes to make Donald the best player ever.''

Roddick, the No. 3 player in the world and the SAP Open's top seed, heeded caution.

``My biggest fear is that people put pressure on him too early,'' said Roddick, 22. ``We have to realize how young he is and how he's going to grow. He still may be a couple of years away physically. I've been there, under the spotlight in the transition from juniors to pros, and it's a tough one.''

Young considers himself a normal kid. Though he is schooled on the road, learning from his mother, he says he makes time to play XBox games and pingpong and watch movies. He also fiddles with his iPod.

``I still do normal things,'' he said. ``I'm just playing a sport.''

Contact Darren Sabedra at dsabedra@mercurynews.com or (408) 920-5815.

© 2005 MercuryNews.com and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.mercurynews.com http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?id=1986201
Updated: Feb. 7, 2005, 2:07 PM ET
Don't put too much pressure on debut
By Matthew Cronin
Special to ESPN.com

When Andy Roddick won the U.S. Open junior championship at age 17, it was pretty obvious he had the outright power and competitive zeal to become a great player.

Lefty Donald Young has terrific touch and solid strokes, but at age 15, he's only 5-feet-10, 150 pounds.

When Donald Young became the youngest male to win the Australian Open junior championship two weeks ago -- at 15 years, six months becoming the youngest to reach No. 1 in the ITF junior rankings -- long-term projections are not as obvious. It's clear that if Young keeps improving at the level he has during the past year, he's a surefire top-50 pro.

Young will make his pro debut as a wild card against fellow American Robby Ginepri tonight at the SAP Open in San Jose, Calif. The crafty lefty has terrific touch and solid strokes, but at 5-feet-10, 150 pounds, he's not about to knock out giants like Marat Safin in his rookie year. While he has proved himself in the juniors, more than a few kids have impressed against their peers and then never developed the mental and physical tools to deal with week-in, week-out grind of the tour (remember Tommy Ho?). Plus, Young faces the expectations that come with being a promising African-American male player.

With Roddick, now 22, being the only elite American male outside of 34-year-old Andre Agassi, fans are looking for another kid to bring back the glory years of U.S. tennis when Agassi, Pete Sampras, Jim Courier and Michael Chang dominated the tour.

"I was fortunate because I was ready to play pro ball right away after I won U.S. Open [juniors]," Roddick said. "We have to realize how young Donald is and how much he has left to learn. I think his potential is unbelievable. The way he already constructs points, he's just one of those guys who has a natural feel for the game.

"My biggest concern is letting him grow and people knowing that this is a process. If he does come in and start winning some, then it should be looked upon as a bonus. It shouldn't be expected right away."

Much is expected of Young, who has been called the next great one by numerous renowned coaches since he won the 2003 Orange Bowl 16 and unders as a 14-year-old. In December 2004, Young lost in the final of the Orange Bowl 18s to another promising African-American male, Timothy Neilly. But USTA High Performance chief Eliot Teltscher was still singing Young's praises.

"He has a winning way about him," Teltscher said. "It would be hard to believe that he won't make it as a pro. He moves very well and has beautiful strokes. He really knows his way around the court."

Young turned pro early not only because he's showed ability but also because he comes from modest means. His parents, Donald Sr. and Ilona, are both tennis teaching pros who competed at the collegiate level. Donald Jr. was brought up in Chicago, but last year his family moved to Atlanta, where his parents set up a tennis academy.

His dad focuses on his son's technical aspects, while his mom fine-tunes his mental game. His father says his son is the best lefty he's ever seen. By the time Donald Jr. was 9 years old, his father says he knew college was out of the question for his promising son. Ilona Young says they let their son take big career steps so he won't get bored.

"We've let him lead us," Ilona Young said. "As soon as he masters something, we move to the next level."

That's sounds like a solid parenting philosophy, but neither can be sure how Donald will respond to the rigors of the pro tour at age 15. Some phenoms have done fine, like Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who turned pro at 15. Nadal became a Davis Cup hero at age 18 and is currently ranked No. 17. Others have seriously struggled. France's 18-year-old Richard Gasquet, another pro who made waves by winning matches at 15, suffered with health and confidence problems in 2004 and is now ranked No. 111.

Roddick knows what it's like to hold the hopes of a nation. After winning his first major title as a pro at the '03 U.S. Open, Roddick's first words to the media were "No more, 'What's it feel like to be the future of American tennis?'"

"Hopefully, Donald is not going to travel full-time right away," Roddick said. "But at the same time, you have to kick butt when it's there to be kicked. He's obviously not a normal 15-year-old with the ability that he has. I hope they still let him do some normal stuff. I don't want it to start feeling like a job to him this early.

"It's a very sensitive situation because you have someone who is so talented and who wants to play the game, so you have to let him do his own thing, but at the same time, I think the sense of normalcy has to remain, as well."

Young might eventually master the pros, but it is doubtful he'll be doing that soon. It's extremely rare for male tennis players to do major damage before they are 18, mostly because they haven't physically matured. Moreover, the mental strength it takes to keep progressing when the world's eyes are fastened on your progress is phenomenal. Young might have "Next" in the potential department, but only hard work and a cool head will keep him climbing the ladder in the reality department.

"You see some kids who keep hearing how great they are, get it into their heads and forget what got them there," fellow African-American player James Blake said. "Donald has to remember that until he starts having results, that it's all potential. No one remembers potential. You have to back it up."

Matthew Cronin, the managing editor of Inside Tennis Magazine, is a regular contributor to ESPN.com.

Golfnduck
02-07-2005, 07:55 PM
Thanks for the article :hug:

Tytta!.
02-07-2005, 08:05 PM
Interesting articles, thank you! :)

blosson
02-07-2005, 09:34 PM
Huge expectations at 15. Does anyone have a picture of Donald Young?

smucav
02-07-2005, 09:43 PM
Huge expectations at 15. Does anyone have a picture of Donald Young?http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/playerprofiles/default2.asp?playernumber=Y124

djb272727
02-07-2005, 11:44 PM
Nice Article, Thanks!

blosson
02-07-2005, 11:49 PM
http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/playerprofiles/default2.asp?playernumber=Y124

oh thanks. i didn't realise there was a profile of him at the atp players section. i though it was only for pros.
thanx again! :D

Deboogle!.
02-08-2005, 12:02 AM
blosson, technically he's a pro now :)

smucav
02-08-2005, 11:00 PM
Warning! Rated R

Dan Savage mentions Andy in his latest column. Previously Savage was obsessed with Ashton Kutcher, then Trent Ford, now it seems he has moved on to Andy.

You've been warned!
http://www.villagevoice.com/people/0506,savage,60819,24.html (first response)

lizzieh
02-08-2005, 11:05 PM
:haha: well funny!!!!!

lizzieh
02-08-2005, 11:06 PM
Actually I should check that and say the bit about Andy was funny, not the bit about the woman having cancer as that is decidedly unfunny.

blosson
02-08-2005, 11:09 PM
good for Andy, the gay icon.

smucav
02-08-2005, 11:11 PM
good for Andy, the gay icon.Sometimes Savage is over-the-top with his advice, but is generally funny. He managed to work his previous obesssions (Kutcher & Ford) into his column nearly every week, so I'll keep tabs to see if he continues to mention Andy.

blosson
02-08-2005, 11:19 PM
Thanks for the article, it's funny.
You got to be really hot to be liked by the gay community so it's all good. Who said that only teenyboppers like Andy pandy.

ellehutton
02-09-2005, 06:43 AM
id love to read that article but for some reason the link isnt working does anyone know exactly where it is on the village voice website?
thanx :worship:

ellehutton
02-09-2005, 10:49 AM
nevermind i found it!- thank you anyway

DoolpH_
02-09-2005, 12:12 PM
Thanks for all these articles guys :worship:

tangerine_dream
02-09-2005, 03:59 PM
I read Dan Savage and he's definitely Rated XYXYXY in terms of his advice. ;) Not that I care. I survived his infatuation with Ashton Kutcher, I'm sure I'll survive his latest obsession----Andy.

Andy as a gay icon. You can't get any more famous than that. :lol:

Golfnduck
02-09-2005, 04:15 PM
WAY TO GO ANDY!!! See all this charity work is exposing him to other populations. :devil:

smucav
02-09-2005, 04:24 PM
WAY TO GO ANDY!!! See all this charity work is exposing him to other populations. :devil:It might be the AMEX commercials.

Savage is syndicated in over a 100 U.S. newspapers so I expect to see some of these new fans at Andy's matches.

tangerine_dream
02-09-2005, 04:27 PM
Well, if my experience at DC in Connecticut was any indication, Andy really doesn't need to recruit more gay fans through Savage. ;) :lol:

Golfnduck
02-09-2005, 04:29 PM
Well, if my experience at DC in Connecticut was any indication, Andy really doesn't need to recruit more gay fans through Savage. ;) :lol:
LOL!!! I'm sure Mardy is getting jealous with all these guys fawning over Andy :lol:

smucav
02-09-2005, 06:46 PM
This is old, but the bearded guy has obviously never seen or played tennis by him comments; however the other guy makes some good points (about The Fed and Agassi) for a general sports guy:

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis
Andy Roddick overrated?
Is Andy Roddick tennis' savior or just another overrated guy?

tangerine_dream
02-09-2005, 07:33 PM
Was this posted already? After AO, the media sure is coming down hard on Andy. (I see this public criticism as a good thing; Andy must realize what a big mistake he made and somebody's gotta pull a Foghorn Leghorn on him and wake that boy up, wake up and PLAY I say, this ain't no Sunday school you gettin' this son? I say SON! Pay attention boy, you got the attention span of a goldfish on a hook ... )

Bad Boy, Bad Boy
Roddick guilty of unacceptable behavior at Australian Open.
SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE
February 8, 2005

Andy Roddick brought to tennis one big serve and one big dollop of wholesome. He wasn't one of those "aw shucks" kind of guys – he was too flip for that – but he had those good looks and enough humility to make him appealing.

Perhaps somebody ought to call a let concerning what sort of a person we have here. Roddick put his image down love-40 with his petulant conduct during the recent Australian Open.

The international tennis community is still abuzz about this. What to do to get across to Roddick that his behavior at Melbourne was unacceptable? Try nothing, which is what I expect.

Tennis is as much an alphabetical mishmash as boxing, with male players coming under the umbrella of three groups, the ITF (International Tennis Federation), USTA (U.S. Tennis Association) and ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals). Before Roddick could be sanctioned, it first would be necessary to determine what body would do the sanctioning, and that would be ticklish business when it is considered that the LTAA (Lawn Tennis Association of Australia) also is involved here.

Any actions taken against Roddick will be done, one can be sure, very quietly. Tennis is not being received so grandly at the moment that it can welcome adverse publicity.

Let's cut to the chase. At Melbourne, Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt split the first two sets of a semifinal encounter. In the third set, the American took a 3-0 advantage, but he blew it, Hewitt rallying to take the set. Roddick then excused himself, his right under the rules, and repaired to the locker room.

This is where matters became strained. The rules as they were detailed to me by Ted Schroeder, the La Jolla squire who was in Melbourne, hold that a player can absent himself from the court after a third set for only 10 minutes. In Roddick's 11th minute away from it, he was visited by Peter Bellinger, the tournament referee.

Bellinger is a no-nonsense chap. It can be remembered that it was Bellinger who once defaulted John McEnroe from the Australian Open for conduct he deemed inappropriate. Bellinger further once penalized Venus Williams three points when the beads she was affecting as part of her headdress broke and were distributed about the court.

As the dialogue between Bellinger and Roddick has been spelled out, Bellinger advised the player to return to the court forthwith. Roddick, in the process of changing clothes, suggested to Bellinger that for him to tie one of the American's shoes would speed up matters.

My feelings here are divided. Roddick, after all, was tardy by only one minute. I further can understand how opposing Hewitt would put one in a pique. All that fist-pumping. It demeans an opponent. One day, somebody is going to cross over the net during a match and knock that Australian flat on his backside.

Where I fault Roddick is for speaking to Bellinger as he did. Roddick was being rude, which should be a no-no in any environment.

"I was changing my clothes and the referee came in and started getting on my case, so that was fun," Roddick would say in his postmatch news conference.

When Roddick did resume play, by Schroeder's accounting, 15 minutes had lapsed. He proceeded to drop the fourth set in 31 minutes.

The day after his dismissal, Roddick, to his credit, was chastened. "I wasn't too fond of it," he said of his confrontation with Bellinger. "But if I can't handle something like this, I have to do it better."

Some other things Roddick also can do better, such as volleying. His intention, he said in Melbourne, is to address this. He also might brush up on his etiquette.

Roddick's behavior aside, the Australian Open, I thought, heralded a season of interest for tennis. Marat Safin and Serena Williams, the singles winners, make the game exciting. The women's side will become further intriguing when the two Belgians, Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne, gather up their rackets after long absences because of injuries.

Roger Federer has to accept that he has a challenger for supremacy in the men's game in the gifted Safin, who can do everything Federer can and serves better. Play on. But do it with more class than Roddick just exhibited.