The "Tennis Country" [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

The "Tennis Country"

August
09-16-2012, 06:26 PM
What country do you think is the "Tennis Country", the country you associate with tennis? Which country has the best combination of great players, traditions, and interest in tennis? Here are my options:

United Kingdom

UK was the country where modern tennis was invented, and they have the most prestigious tennis tournament, Wimbledon. On the other hand, they haven't produced as many top players as some other countries with equal populations and I have a feeling tennis isn't very big in UK outside the Wimbledon Championships.

France

Another traditional European tennis country. They have a slam and they have good players, yet it's almost 30 year's from the last time a French male player won a slam, and after Mauresmo, and her slams in 06, they haven't slam hopes in women.

United States

A country with very long traditions and host of a slam. Excluding recent years, they've almost always had a men's slam contender, yet you should almost compare USA to a continent.

Australia

Besides USA, another non-European tennis superpower, they have a slam and they've had great success. Still, the recent decades have been even more difficult for them than for USA. I have a feeling that tennis isn't the most import sport for any country but Australia is the country where it's more important than anywhere else.

Spain

Has become one of the best countries in men's tennis over the latest decades. Spaniards were traditionally great on clay but now they do well also on other surfaces, partly because traditional clay tennis suits well to modern tennis and modern surfaces. Still, despite doing well in men's tennis, they lack success in women's tennis.

Argentina

Argentina is probably the "Tennis Country" of South America. They have had great players and even slam winners and they have done well in DC, yet they must still wait for the title. But they seem to be most passionate country about DC.

Russia

Was one of the most successful countries in tennis in 90s and 00s. They do still well in women's tennis but they aren't anymore as good in men's tennis as some years ago.

Czech Republic

Are in both Davis and Fed Cup finals this year, maybe the best Eastern European country in tennis. Have produced singles' slam winners Kodes, Mandlikova, Lendl, Novotna, and Kvitova, as well as some doubles slam winners. Czechoslovakia was also the birthplace of legends Navratilova and Hingis. Has also produced some famous coaches also for foreign players.

Serbia

One of the best countries in tennis at the moment. They have one of the best male players, a few other decent players, and had recently two women's top players another of which won RG. Also, they produced one of the best female players of '90s. Won Davis Cup 2010 and reached this year's Fed Cup final.

I would've also liked to include Sweden, but I wanted to include the option "Other". I think Sweden has been more successful than e.g. Serbia or Czech Republic, but I wanted to give more weight for recent success that Sweden lacks.

I'd say it's Australia, they've done well, they have a slam, and they seem to one of of the most tennis-interested nations. But I read other posts before voting.

Edit: See post #39 (http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?p=12432637#post12432637) for my top 10 list.

TigerTim
09-16-2012, 06:28 PM
Australia.

Sanya
09-16-2012, 06:30 PM
You forgot Sweden.

EDIT: I see you didn`t forget. :) Still, you can`t exclude country where were born Borg, Wilander, Edberg, Norman, Soderling etc.

Nr 1 Fan
09-16-2012, 06:37 PM
Atm It's Spain. Of all time, that's a really tough call. Also, do You mean men and women combined?

rocketassist
09-16-2012, 06:42 PM
Sweden EASILY given their achievements in it with such a small population.

August
09-16-2012, 06:42 PM
Also, do You mean men and women combined?

I mean men and women combined.

hipolymer
09-16-2012, 06:46 PM
USA. American players brought tennis to the masses.

August
09-16-2012, 06:47 PM
Still, you can`t exclude country where were born Borg, Wilander, Edberg, Norman, Soderling etc.

I wanted this to be mainly about current situation, you can't get the old days back. But if any Swede reads this, I ask if he/she could tell if there seems any hope for Sweden to become again one of Europe's top countries in tennis.

GOATsol
09-16-2012, 06:51 PM
Argentina.

Sanya
09-16-2012, 06:54 PM
I wanted this to be mainly about current situation, you can't get the old days back. But if any Swede reads this, I ask if he/she could tell if there seems any hope for Sweden to become again one of Europe's top countries in tennis.

Ok, then another question - you have GB and haven`t Switzerland. Murray + Robson + Wimbledon > GOAT? Just wonder. :)

Ash86
09-16-2012, 06:54 PM
I wanted this to be mainly about current situation, you can't get the old days back. But if any Swede reads this, I ask if he/she could tell if there seems any hope for Sweden to become again one of Europe's top countries in tennis.

Well then it's clearly Spain. Most depth of current countries (France also does well there) with one all time great player.

If you're looking at both men and women then maybe Czech Republic - have made Davis Cup and Fed Cup final in same year - first time that's ever happened. Top ten players in mens and womens game - one of whom is a slam champion. Serbia a few years ago was good in the mens and womens combined but Ivanovic and Jankovic results wise have been terrible lately.

As it is don't think you can choose one country overall if we're looking at it historically. If I had to I'd still say the UK - invented the game and hosts the most prestigious tournament that is still synonymous with the game...

TigerTim
09-16-2012, 06:55 PM
Not Sweden. I reckon Per capita Aussie is Way more successful at slams

Hewitt - 2
Rafter - 2
Cash - 1
Emerson - 12
Laver (need I say more?)- 11 + pro slams + doubles
Hoad - 5 + 7 doubles
Newcombe (need I say more?) - 7 + pro slams + 17 doubles slams!!!!
Stolle - 2 + 5 doubles slams
Rosewall - 8 slams + 15,, yes 15!!! Pro slams

Suk it world :wavey:

Looner
09-16-2012, 07:06 PM
Aussies.

Johnny Groove
09-16-2012, 07:20 PM
Right now? Spain without a doubt.

The British had their time, the Aussies as well, and the Americans too. Now, all 3 previous powerhouses are struggling. The French have as many guys top 100 as Spain or close, but none seem to want to win slams.

Time Violation
09-16-2012, 07:34 PM
Usa

The Prince
09-16-2012, 07:35 PM
Australia for sure.

MIJB#19
09-16-2012, 07:52 PM
I'm actually glad there's no clearcut easy runaway answer, the international competition is part of what makes tennis such an interesting sport.

TigerTim
09-16-2012, 07:54 PM
*Enters Corey Feldman mode*
Right now? Spain without a doubt.

The British had their time, the Aussies as well, and the Americans too. Now, all 3 previous powerhouses are struggling. The French have as many guys top 100 as Spain or close, but none seem to want to win slams.

Yeah I know, look at who won the last slam

OH WAIT

http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/poster/2012/9/11/120911MurrayUSOpen_6649471.jpg

vamossssssssssssssssssssss Britannia

Johnny Groove
09-16-2012, 08:00 PM
*Enters Corey Feldman mode*


Yeah I know, look at who won the last slam

OH WAIT

http://cdn.theguardian.tv/brightcove/poster/2012/9/11/120911MurrayUSOpen_6649471.jpg

vamossssssssssssssssssssss Britannia

I know you trollin', but if Britain was so great, you wouldn't have to big up it yourself. Others would.

TigerTim
09-16-2012, 08:03 PM
I know you trollin', but if Britain was so great, you wouldn't have to big up it yourself. Others would.

dude, people ain't saying Britain cause its so obvious!

1 slam in 76 years


suk it haters :wavey:

Plus we had a guy called Bunny Austin. If that isn't GOAT worthy I don't know what is.

stanch
09-16-2012, 09:02 PM
Currently Serbia and Spain. Judging by tradition, USA and Australia.

hipolymer
09-16-2012, 09:19 PM
Oh this topic is about currently? Then Serbia. They would have won this year's Davis Cup if Djokovic didn't abandon them.

Chase Visa
09-16-2012, 09:24 PM
USA traditionally, Spain now.

Although if population was a factor then us and the Swedes would do well.

August
09-16-2012, 09:25 PM
Oh this topic is about currently? Then Serbia. They would have won this year's Davis Cup if Djokovic didn't abandon them.

I meant currently in the light of the combination of great players, traditions, and interest in tennis.

a_boy
09-16-2012, 10:23 PM
In the modern game, you have to go with Spain, because they've had so many top players. Maybe only Nadal winning majors, but the depth of talent is huge.

For all time, obviously Australia. Laver, Emerson, Rosewall, Newcombe... Australia absolutely dominated tennis. And then you have old Madge Court with as many majors as all the Aussie men combined (only a slight exaggeration, lol)

And you can probably count Clijsters too. She had some Aussie in her, if you know what I'm saying.

Sanya
09-16-2012, 10:29 PM
In the modern game, you have to go with Spain, because they've had so many top players. Maybe only Nadal winning majors, but the depth of talent is huge.

For all time, obviously Australia. Laver, Emerson, Rosewall, Newcombe... Australia absolutely dominated tennis. And then you have old Madge Court with as many majors as all the Aussie men combined (only a slight exaggeration, lol)

And you can probably count Clijsters too. She had some Aussie in her, if you know what I'm saying.

I think USA "beats" Australia here. Pete, Andre, Connors, Mcenroe, sisters Williams and so on and so forth.

Orka_n
09-16-2012, 10:58 PM
It used to be Sweden :bigcry:
I wanted this to be mainly about current situation, you can't get the old days back. But if any Swede reads this, I ask if he/she could tell if there seems any hope for Sweden to become again one of Europe's top countries in tennis.As of now there are no strong up-and-coming youngsters on the men's side.

However, there is some hope. When Soderling beat Nadal in 09 and then rose through the rankings he got a lot of kids in Sweden interested in playing tennis again. Maybe in 5 years or so we'll see the fruit of that. At least that's what I'm hoping.

Thirty All
09-16-2012, 11:03 PM
France or England, just because of their history. I still don't consider Spain a "tennis" country, its still more soccer. In the 80's and 90's, it would have been either Sweden or the US.

atennisfan
09-16-2012, 11:37 PM
Australia.

They have Stosur. and They will have Tomic.
They have a Slam, a GOAT, small population, etc etc.

Spain does not have a slam, and lack womens tennis

Petronius
09-16-2012, 11:45 PM
What country do you think is the "Tennis Country"? Which country has the best combination of great players, traditions, and interest in tennis? Here are my options:

Czech Republic

Are in both Davis and Fed Cup finals this year, maybe the best Eastern European country in tennis. Have produced slam winners Kodes, Lendl, and Kvitova.


Nice thread, but have you ever heard of these other Czech or Czech-born players?:

Martina Navratilova, 59 slams in total (18 in singles), world#1, one of the best female players of all time
Martina Hingis, A daughter of two top Czechoslovak players, the youngest world #1, 5 single slams, youngest slam-champion of all time
Hana Mandlikova, 4 single slams, loads of FedCups, world#3
Petr Korda, 1998 Aussie Open champ, world #2
Jana Novotna, 1998 Wimbledon champion, world #2
Helena Sukova, 14 slams in doubles, loads of Fed Cups, just nominated for Hall of Fame

Or maybe you have heard about these coaches, former Czechoslovak players?
Pavel Složil - 10 slams with Steffi Graf (including the Golden Slam in 1988)
Marian Vajda - 5 slams with Novak Djokovic
Ivan Lendl - Olympic Gold and US Open with Andy Murray

Or maybe you have noticed that in 2011:
Petra Kvitova was voted the world's best female singles player
Kveta Peschke was voted the world's best female doubles player
Jiri Vesely was voted the world's best male junior player?

Just a few examples.

To answer your question, there are obviously several strong tennis countries:

USA - huge country, which will always have several top players, but they have had no single slams champions recently. As for WTA, it will be interesting what will happen when Serena retires
Australia - much weaker now than in the past, one of the reasons may be that tennis is no longer a compulsory subject at schools
Spain - amazing recently especially in ATP, while no top WTA player
Czech Rep./Czechoslovakia - strong past, strong present, probably the most successful small country of the Open Era (41 single slams by Czech or Czech-born players), has a top 10 player both in ATP and WTA, just reached both Fed Cup and Davis Cup finals
Serbia - great results over the past 5-10 years plus Monica Seles in the past
Russia - another huge country, which will always have a top player, 12 players in WTA 100
Germany - big past with Graf, Becker, Stich etc., still waiting for a new big champion
Sweden - amazing past with Borg, Edberg and Wilander, but these times are long gone and the country has never produced a top WTA player

Honorable mentions: France, UK, Belgium, Argentina

Mountaindewslave
09-17-2012, 12:27 AM
I mean Wimbledon has the most prestige as far as history with WImbledon in a way BUT United States overall has had the most history, whether it be organizations, players, especially players, they've had by far the most greats.

people are putting spain which is very odd, the last decade certainly SPain has been the strongest tennis force and the last few decades they have done a great job with their academies and the overall development of players BUT in the last century it's United States all the way.

US and not close

a_boy
09-17-2012, 01:04 AM
I think USA "beats" Australia here. Pete, Andre, Connors, Mcenroe, sisters Williams and so on and so forth.

Yes, that's true :) If you go back a long time to include everyone like Mallory, Tilden, Budge, Gonzales... I guess the number of all-time greats from the USA would vastly outnumber everyone else.

I just find it more impressive how a country with a much smaller population could produce so many male and female champions, over a 20 year period.

Sri
09-17-2012, 01:39 AM
At the moment, its between Spain and Serbia.

Overall, has to be the United States.

156mphserve
09-17-2012, 02:47 AM
Canada

or Australia, couldn't decide

Edda
09-17-2012, 02:50 AM
Spain and the United States

August
09-17-2012, 04:35 AM
Nice thread, but have you ever heard of these other Czech or Czech-born players?:

Thanks for mentioning, edited the OP.

Avi14
09-17-2012, 08:07 AM
In the past decade Spain without a doubt.

USA of all time.

Dmitry Verdasco
09-17-2012, 10:20 AM
Australia for January atleast.

August
09-18-2012, 09:16 PM
Well, now I publish me own list. I somewhat repeat my OP.

10. Germany

Most difficult selection to the list. Germany did very well in the '80s and '90s with Grand Slam champions Boris Becker, Michael Stich, and Steffi Graf, and they won Davis Cup in 1988, 1989, and 1993 as well as Fed Cup in 1987 and 1992. Still, they haven't got any slam title after 1999, but currently they have some promising female players. But what brought Germany to the list is that they had success already in the early 20th century, for example Hans Nüsslein was one of the best professional players in the 1930s.

9. United Kingdom

United Kingdom is the country where modern tennis was invented, yet tennis isn't as popular there as in other countries. But they have the most prestigious tennis tournament in the World, Wimbledon. Also, Brits did well in tennis until 1930s, their 9th and last Davis Cup title came in 1936, and they have still third most Davis Cup titles. In women's tennis, Brits were still competitive even after WWII, they had multiple slam winners and they reached Fed Cup final four times between 1967 and 1981, yet won none of those finals. But after those years Brits had long wait for their next singles slam title which came this year when Andy Murray won the US Open, just weeks after he won the singles' Olymic Gold in Wimbledon.

8. Czech Republic

Czech Republic/Czechoslovakia has produced multiple slam winners, most notably Ivan Lendl and Martina Navratilova, even though Navratilova won all her slam titles for the USA. And Czechoslovakia won Davis Cup in 1980. Besides, they have great players also nowadays, most notable of them being Tomas Berdych and Petra Kvitova. And they will play in both Davis Cup and Fed Cup finals this autumn. But Czechs have had success also quite early, Karel Koželuh won four professional majors in late 1920s and 1930s.

7. Sweden

Between 1974 and 1992 Swedish players Björn Borg, Mats Wilander, and Stefan Edberg won 24 titles for Sweden, and during those 19 years, there were only two years when a Swede didn't win a slam. Sweden has also won Davis Cup seven times, in 1975, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1994, 1997, and 1998. Still, the latest years haven't been anymore as good for Sweden. Thomas Johansson won the Australian Open in 2002 and Robin Söderling reached the French Open final twice, in 2009 and 2010. But as Söderling isn't playing now, Sweden doesn't even have a decent player on tour. But Sweden has been one of the most successful countries in the open era. And that's even more impressive when you consider Sweden has a population of less than 10 million. On the other hand, Sweden hasn't had notable success in women's tennis.

6. Russia

Russia has been one of the best countries in tennis in the latest decades. Yevgeny Kaflenikov won two slams in '90s and Marat Safin won two in '00s. Also, they've had other good players like Nikolay Davydenko and Mikhail Youzhny. And in women's side, Russia has won seven slam titles by three players since 2004. Since then no other country has had three different slam singles champions, even if you include both genders. Russia has also had other good female players, for example they won all medals in women's singles in 2008 Beijing Olympics, and none of those players was a slam champion. Russia has also been one of the best countries in team competitions in the '00s, they've won Davis Cup twice and Fed Cup four times.

5. Argentina

Argentina is the South American country with most tennis traditions. Guillermo Vilas won four slam titles in late 1970s. In women's side, Gabriela Sabatini won the US Open in 1990, yet in recent years Argentina haven't had notable success in women's side, excluding doubles. In '00s, Argentina got two more slam titles, in 2004 Gastón Gaudio won an all-Argentine final at the French Open and in 2009 Juan Martin del Potro won the US Open. In 2005 David Nalbandian won the Masters Cup where four of the tournament's eight players were Argentinians. Argentina has also been one of the most best countries in Davis Cup in recent years, they have reached the final four times, 1981, 2006, 2008, and 2011, and Argentinians have been said to be the country that cares most about Davis Cup.

Argentina is maybe not 5th most successful country in tennis, but compared to many other big tennis countries, I think it's better known from tennis than some more successful tennis countries that have even bigger sports.

4. Spain

Spain has been the most successful country in the '00s. They have won Davis Cup three times, for the first time in 2000. And currently they have three players in top 12. On the other hand, Spaniards Grand Slam success has usually came from the clay of Roland Garros. Nadal's 2008 Wimbledon title was the first men's slam title for a Spaniard outside Roland Garros since 1975, when Manuel Orantes won US Open. And in 1975, US Open was played on clay. The previous time when a Spaniard won a slam not played on clay was 1966 Wimbledon when Manuel Santana won his last slam title.

The recent years have been worse for Spanish women's tennis, even though Virginia Ruano Pascual and Anabel Medina Garrigues won doubles slam titles in '00s. But that hasn't always been the case. Spain has won five Fed Cups, all in the 1990s. Spain also got five women's slam titles in late '80s and '90s, won by Arantxa Sánchez Vicario and Conchita Martínez.

Anyway, despite recent success in men's tennis, I don't rank Spain higher than 4th. That's because of their recent lack of success in women's tennis and also because their success has come mainly only from slower surfaces.

3. France

France is one of the countries with longest tennis traditions. The Four Musketeers dominated the game in late 1920s and early 1930s. On the other hand, French male players have won only one slam title in the open era, 1983 French Open by Yannick Noah. On the other hand, Franch has won Davis Cup nine times, in open era three times (1991, 1996, 2001). Also they reached the Davis Cup final as recently as 2010. And even if they haven't had success in slams, they pruduce good players, they have currently three top 20, only Spain has as many.

In the open era, France has had more slam success in women's side, Mary Pierce and Amelie Mauresmo both won two slam titles. But at the moment, Bartoli, their only hope is ranked at 10, next French female player is ranked at 49.

Anyway, I rate France above Spain. That's bacause even if Spain has currently more success than France, France has longer traditions, and they have a Grand Slam tournament. Also, French players have been able to succeed on different surfaces more than Spaniards.

2. United States

United States is definitely the most successful country in tennis as well as host of a slam. USA is maybe not as much known from tennis as some other countries in this list, but they've been just so successful. It almost needs more explaining why USA isn't No. 1 than why it's No. 2. But I'll reveal my No. 1 before explaining.

1. Australia

For me Australia is the "Tennis Country". They are one of the countries with most tennis traditions and they have a Grand Slam tournament. They're the 2nd most successful country in tennis, and the only one close to USA. But as USA is more successful, why did I rank Australia above USA?

When I think about which sport I'd associate USA with, it would be American football, basketball, or baseball. Or IndyCar or NASCAR from motorsports. I associate Australia much more with tennis. And I think Australia's tennis achievents are more impressive because they have much smaller population, yet have achieved almost as much. Of course, Australia doesn't currently do as well as earlier, with Samantha Stosur as their only slam hope. If USA were now having a tennis bood, I might have ranked them above Australia, but neither they have more than one slam hope, Serena Williams.

And honorable mentions go to:

Switzerland, produced one great Grand Slam champion in both men and women
Belgium, produced two great female Grand Slam champions
Chile, produced first Latin American slam winner, women's 1937 US Champion, Anita Lizana, slam finalists Marcelo Ríos and Fernando Gonzalez, and Olympic Gold Medalist Nicolas Massu
Serbia, has produced many good players, even slam winners
Croatia, small country that won Davis Cup and has produced slam champion and multiple top 10 players

Backhand_Maestro
09-18-2012, 09:21 PM
As much I dislike it, Serbia for pure talent.

Spain is where its bred.

Black Adam
09-18-2012, 10:28 PM
Aussie Aussie Aussie!!

cloudeleven
09-18-2012, 10:32 PM
Spain. Of all time, Australia.

r2473
09-18-2012, 10:49 PM
What country do you think is the "Tennis Country"? Which country has the best combination of great players, traditions, and interest in tennis?

I'd say its between Australia and France.

The USA has had many great players, but fall a "a little" short with traditions and interest.

EDIT: I guess the OP summed it up pretty well in post #39. Though in my nearly 40 years in USA, I haven't seem much if any interest in tennis, making it hard to call this a "tennis nation" IMO. Guess it depends on how you weight things. In terms of pure talent and champions, USA is clearly #1. But we aren't even top 10 in the other categories. Unless "tradition" simply means "doing well for a lot of years". But I see tradition as something more like what Great Britain has.

uxyzapenje
09-18-2012, 11:04 PM
To me USA. So many great players on both mens, womens, singles and doubles side.... I rly don't see the point of pointing all of them in this post.

And with Serbia we had a no1 in mens singles, 2 in mens doubles and 3 in womens singles... Rly great for a small country. But pls don't forget to add Monika Seles to the list in your first post (if you're counting both mens and womens. You guess you just ment Ivanovic and Jankovic...)

Today, "The Tennis Country" is Spain, they have 2 (at the start of the year they had 3) players in TOP10 (1 of them being 1 of the best in the world and the no1 contender), many in the TOP100...

August
09-18-2012, 11:15 PM
And with Serbia we had a no1 in mens singles, 2 in mens doubles and 3 in womens singles... Rly great for a small country. But pls don't forget to add Monika Seles to the list in your first post (if you're counting both mens and womens. You guess you just ment Ivanovic and Jankovic...)

Thanks for mentioning, I just knew she was from Yugoslavia, didn't remember she was from current Serbia.

TigerTim
09-18-2012, 11:17 PM
To whoever said "Aussie Aussie Aussie"

I say "Oi Oi Oi" :D

Good picks August :D

Australia, considering it's population, has a remarkable success :)

Corey Feldman
09-19-2012, 12:37 AM
Davis Cup titles

GBR 9
ESP 5


last British GS Winner - 2 weeks ago
last Spanish GS Winner - 4 months ago

Travod
09-19-2012, 01:03 AM
When was the British and Spanish GS winner before those two?

bokehlicious
09-19-2012, 08:14 AM
Switzerland. Brought the most beautiful players on the men and women sides (Fed and Hingis). :D

TigerTim
09-19-2012, 08:53 AM
Margret Court, 24 singles, 62 total slam titles

Black Adam
09-19-2012, 09:38 AM
To whoever said "Aussie Aussie Aussie"

I say "Oi Oi Oi" :D

Good picks August :D

Australia, considering it's population, has a remarkable success :)
Finally someone caught the drift. One more time: "Aussie Aussie!"

TigerTim
09-19-2012, 09:44 AM
Finally someone caught the drift. One more time: "Aussie Aussie!"

"Oi Oi!"

Wolbo
09-19-2012, 09:47 AM
United States

People always point to Wimbledon as the tournament with the most heritage and history but the U.S. National Championships is just 4 years younger and has had more editions (132) than Wimbledon (126).

And the U.S. has almost always had world class players, except in the very beginning (when British players were better), the 60s (when the Aussies ruled) and the last decade.

Honorable mention goes to Australia for having had so many greats compared to the size of its population.

duong
09-19-2012, 10:06 AM
The country I mostly associate with tennis is Australia.

The USA have a very long tradition as well, but being a country of 15 times more population than Australia, it's not at all as amazing as for Australia. And it seems that tennis is quite a second-tier sport in the USA, not in Australia.

Besides, Australia is well-positioned in young players's categories. The USA kind of get better as well actually.

duong
09-19-2012, 10:12 AM
I meant currently in the light of the combination of great players, traditions, and interest in tennis.

saying judging "currently" and "traditions" in the same sentence clearly makes people wonder about the real topic : people understood it differently.

It's impossible to be objective when "combining" different criteria, I think "which country do you mostly associate with tennis ?" would have been less ambitious but clearer because it can only be subjective in the end when criteria are so numerous and different.

duong
09-19-2012, 10:22 AM
10. Germany

Most difficult selection to the list. Germany did very well in the '80s and '90s with Grand Slam champions Boris Becker, Michael Stich, and Steffi Graf, and they won Davis Cup in 1988, 1989, and 1993 as well as Fed Cup in 1987 and 1992. Still, they haven't got any slam title after 1999, but currently they have some promising female players. But what brought Germany to the list is that they had success already in the early 20th century, for example Hans Nüsslein was one of the best professional players in the 1930s.

I didn't know about the 30s but in the Open era before Becker, German tennis was a mess, I think.

August
09-19-2012, 10:36 AM
I didn't know about the 30s but in the Open era before Becker, German tennis was a mess, I think.

Yeah, Germany wasn't very successful before Becker. But Hans Nüsslein, who was banned from amateur tennis when he was just 15, was successful in pro competitions. And in 1930s, Gottfried von Cramm won French Championship twice and Henner Henkel once. In women's side, Cilly Aussem won French and Wimbledon championships in 1930, and Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling won the French Championship three times in a row between 1935 and 1937. Besides, German Open, the Hamburg ATP event is one of the oldest existing tournaments starting from 1892. So, Germany really has long traditions in tennis, even if most of their success is from '90s and '90s.

duong
09-19-2012, 10:40 AM
Yeah, Germany wasn't very successful before Becker. But Hans Nüsslein, who was banned from amateur tennis when he was just 15, was successful in pro competitions. And in 1930s, Gottfried von Cramm won French Championship twice and Henner Henkel once. In women's side, Cilly Aussem won French and Wimbledon championships in 1930, and Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling won the French Championship three times in a row between 1935 and 1937. Besides, German Open, the Hamburg ATP event is one of the oldest existing tournaments starting from 1892. So, Germany really has long traditions in tennis, even if most of their success is from '90s and '90s.

Thanks for the infos and for your post 39, but from what you said earlier, Nüsslein was in the 30s ? do you have infos about German tennis in the 40s to 70s ?

Johnp
09-19-2012, 01:59 PM
Players from Britain have won Grandslams since 1936, just not male players

August
09-22-2012, 04:08 PM
Players from Britain have won Grandslams since 1936, just not male players

I edited post #39 to include more about women's tennis e.g. in UK.

Thanks for the infos and for your post 39, but from what you said earlier, Nüsslein was in the 30s ? do you have infos about German tennis in the 40s to 70s ?

The most notable achievement for German men's tennis after WWII before Becker and Stich's era was maybe reaching the 1970 Davis Cup final. Wilhelm Bungert, member of that Davis Cup team, was 1967 Wimbledon runner-up, and he also reached the 1962 French Championship final with Christian Kuhnke, another member in that 1970 West German Davis Cup team.

In women's side, Helga Niessen Masthoff reached the 1970 French Open final as well as 1972 and '74 semifinals. She also reached the 1973 US Open semifinal. Sylvia Hanika was another German open era female finalist before Graf. She reached the 1981 French Open final and besides won the 1982 WTA Tour championship. West Germany reached 1966 and '70 Fed Cup finals, with Hanika in team in both occasions.

Also, West Germany had success in 1968 Olympics' demonstration and exhibition tournaments (whatever the difference between those tournaments was). So, Germany wasn't very successful after WWII before Becker, Graf, and Stich era, yet tennis obviously wasn't dead at least in West Germany during those years with poorer success.