When was last time Fed lost a match due to fatigue acumulated in a previous match ? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

When was last time Fed lost a match due to fatigue acumulated in a previous match ?

fsoica
01-20-2011, 04:43 PM
This is a serious, statistical, question.

Nadal seems to have this problem, often finding himself tired after a long, grueling match.
His fans often use this as an excuse, which I don't remember Rafa doing himself...

Other players, also ( just saw Nalby getting thrashed by a lesser player due to exhaustion).

I watch Federer since 2005.

I can't remember a match he lost/was on the verge of losing due to fatigue accumulated in the previous match.

Can anyone refresh my memory ?

Do u remember seeing him tired and not fit for a match due to running too much in the previous match ?

A_Skywalker
01-20-2011, 04:47 PM
I dont think Federer ever lost due to this, he is always fresh even after 5 setter and even at 29. His game is very easy on the legs, but he also recovers very quickly from tough matches.

abraxas21
01-20-2011, 04:47 PM
i think it has happened quite a few times that fatigue has been a factor for a defeat, perhaps not the deciding or crucial factor but certainly a factor that influenced his performance. the thing with federer is that it doesn't show -i.e. he could look totally fine but in reality he's tired and fatigued.

here's an interesting article about his training:

Training With Federer in Dubai
By GEOFF MACDONALD

Ever wonder how Roger Federer trains? I spoke with Jeremy Bayon, a Frenchman who played college tennis at Mississippi State and is now the assistant coach of the men’s team at the University of Florida, about his experience watching Federer train in Dubai with Jesse Levine, a young American player Bayon coaches. (In the second round of the Australian Open on Wednesday, Federer survived a five-set match against Gilles Simon of France, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 4-6, 6-3.)

Bayon and I talked during last spring’s N.C.A.A. tournament in Athens, Ga. Most coaches love to talk shop, to pick each other’s brains in an attempt to learn, and I was intensely curious to learn more about Federer’s practice routine.

“It was a training camp in the heat of July in Dubai,” Bayon said. “Very hot and only a little breeze. Aside from Jesse, Ricardis Berankis was also invited, and Yves Allegro, a Swiss player and friend of Federer, would sometimes come in the late afternoon for more set play. The practices were very focused, well-organized and simple.”

The players practiced for 12 days, with the Swiss Davis Cup captain Severin Luthi and Federer’s physical trainer, Pierre Paganini, on hand to help with the planning of each practice session.

As Bayon remembers, “Each day we would get picked up at our hotel, usually by Severin, but a few times by Federer and twice by his wife, Mirka, and driven to a hotel with tennis courts. It was extremely hot, so very few tourists were in Dubai. We would see Federer already on the court, running sprints as he finished a hard one hour conditioning session with Paganini. He would then rest for a few minutes while Jesse and Ricardis jogged and stretched. Then he would join them on court and warm up too.”

The players would begin with two-on-one drills, with Federer working alone against the two younger players. Levine, a lefty with a long, flowing topspin forehand, was invited as a stand in for Nadal. He and Berankis would play from the baseline for a while, and then, to increase the intensity and shorten the rest interval between shots, come to the net and volley to Federer.

Bayon was struck by how Federer began the drill in a playful, relaxed way, but then, almost imperceptibly, he would shift into deep concentration.

“One minute he was hitting easily,” Bayon recalled,”and then — Boom! — He became the Roger Federer you see in a Grand Slam final. He completely shuts out all distractions, and for 15 straight minutes he was in the zone. He ran for every ball, even out balls.” The trio would then take a drink break, during which Federer would sometimes ingest an energy gel. They would then resume doing two on one drills, going hard for close to an hour.

The second phase of practice was set play. Federer would play for 60 to 90 minutes, first with Levine, followed by Berankis. Allegro would sometimes come later, if Federer wanted more set play.”What impressed me the most was that he revealed nothing. I never saw fatigue. After practice, Federer would say,’I am completely exhausted’, but he looked the same. After set play he always hit two small baskets of serves –one to the deuce, and one to the ad- for a total of 100 serves.”

In the evenings, at dinner back at their hotel, Levine and Bayon would marvel at the simplicity of Federer’s approach.

“There weren’t any fancy drills or games, just lots of two-on-ones and set play. Federer played on average five sets a day, this after a conditioning session with Paganini and an hour of drilling,” Bayon said. ”His work ethic just blew us away.”

http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/training-with-federer-in-dubai/

iriraz
01-20-2011, 04:50 PM
He certainly wasn`t that fresh in his loss against Murray in Toronto.He played 2 long 3 setters back to back against Berdych and Djokovic in the night session and had to play the final at noon.

fsoica
01-20-2011, 04:59 PM
http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/training-with-federer-in-dubai/

tks. for sharing the article...

Sophocles
01-20-2011, 05:20 PM
Rome 2006. Arguably.

Just like heaven
01-20-2011, 05:25 PM
Rome 2006. Arguably.

No.

samanosuke
01-20-2011, 05:26 PM
Monfils in Bercy last year . Not maybe because of fatigue from previous match at the tournament but the fatigue from last 2 or 3 weeks before Bercy

Elbarto
01-20-2011, 05:27 PM
I watch Federer since 2005.

I can't remember a match he lost/was on the verge of losing due to fatigue accumulated in the previous match.


USO 2009 final, fifth set against Del Potro --> Federer told to the press that he felt a little tired, bad footwork, I watched this match and it seemed clearly that Federer was not fit at the end of the match,

but I don't know if this fatigue was due to his previous matches

Horatio Caine
01-20-2011, 05:29 PM
A very interesting question.

I find that Federer doesn't travel as far in many of his 5-setters than other players, and therefore doesn't expend as much energy. Against Simon, yesterday, there were some long rallies but in the parts that I watched it wasn't often that Federer was getting truly dominated in them. He either had Simon running all over the place to retrieve balls, or they were involved in lengthly, tense exchanges (with Simon trying to soft ball Federer to death) that didn't involve too much movement out of position.

Federer also knows when to 'give up' on certain balls, whereas Nadal or Murray, for example, can virtually always be seen to chase down even the most unlikely ones. That in itself probably explains why those guys are more fatigued over long matches, especially as by the nature of their playing styles they will have been defending everything their opponents will have been throwing at them.

As far as overall fitness goes, I'm not convinced that Federer is one of the best specimens for endurance. It's just that by the nature of his playing style and by making sensible decisions during the match he is able to avoid this possible weakness being overly exploited.

Jimnik
01-20-2011, 05:39 PM
Flushing Meadows 2009

bokehlicious
01-20-2011, 05:41 PM
Masters 2005. Injured and tired.

Dr.Slice
01-20-2011, 06:22 PM
Masters 2005. Injured and tired.

Yes. He had not trained for a while before that tournament if I recall correctly.

Roamed
01-20-2011, 06:30 PM
He certainly wasn`t that fresh in his loss against Murray in Toronto.He played 2 long 3 setters back to back against Berdych and Djokovic in the night session and had to play the final at noon.

That one came to mind for me too among his more recent matches, although of course Muzza played well.

Sophocles
01-20-2011, 06:54 PM
No.

Why not? If Nadal had played that kind of semi against Nalbandian & lost in a 5th-set tie-breaker his tards would have flooded MTF with the tiredness excuse for weeks.

Kiedis
01-20-2011, 07:06 PM
At least in the last years Federer has taken more easy, and this help him a lot


Matches played

Year Roger Nadal
2007 77 85
2008 81 93
2009 73 83
2010 78 83

barbadosan
01-20-2011, 07:59 PM
Why not? If Nadal had played that kind of semi against Nalbandian & lost in a 5th-set tie-breaker his tards would have flooded MTF with the tiredness excuse for weeks.

I'm too lazy to look it up, but didn't he also play a pretty long match the day preceding the Nalbandian match?

Corey Feldman
01-20-2011, 09:05 PM
never

he is a superhuman athlete

never been tired, never retired in a match, called trainer about 3 or 4 times in his life (some players have called trainer more times in 1 day than that)

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
01-20-2011, 10:07 PM
style of play

reminds me of agassi. agassi wasnt known for having insane stamina but because he dictated play, and therfore used less legwork, he could play into his mid 30s. probably his 40s if his back didnt go on him

MalwareDie
01-20-2011, 10:16 PM
I'm too lazy to look it up, but didn't he also play a pretty long match the day preceding the Nalbandian match?

2 and a half hour match against Almagro.