Is Grigor Dimitrov the real deal? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Is Grigor Dimitrov the real deal?

Nole fan
01-17-2011, 03:25 PM
A Grigor Dimitrov Moment
By Steve Tignor

The two girls smiled at each other. Then they looked backed at Court 10, at the player in the yellow shirt with the silky one-handed backhand and the very familiar service motion and the easy way with a forehand winner. Then the girls looked at each other again. They smiled again. They were having a Grigor Dimitrov moment.

The Grigor Dimitrov Moment: It sounds like a bad lounge-band name. I can see it now: A tall man with a receding hairline and a black goatee is hunched over a saxophone in a half-empty basement bar in Philly or Prague. But no, a Dimitrov Moment is what we got in Melbourne on Monday. In front of those two smitten girls, as well as a fair number of tennis cognescenti, the 19-year-old Bulgarian won his first match at a Grand Slam by routing Andrey Golubev, an otherwise perfectly respectable pro who is currently ranked No. 36 in the world. It wasn’t just that Dimitrov beat Golubev like a drum, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2; it’s that he outclassed him. He was the elegant tennis aristocrat slumming it for a few moments with the clumsy hoi polloi.

Players win their first matches at Grand Slams all the time, of course. But Dimitrov hasn’t been just another player since 2008. That year he won junior Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back to back, turned pro, and was promptly pushed into the pole position among the contenders for Next Big Tennis Thing.

And that’s as far as he got until today. The two years since Dimitrov’s junior triumphs have been hard ones. He was lost on the Challenger circuit, playing in Thailand one week and Geneva the next. He dropped out of the Top 200. The early talk of a touring entourage faded. When I spoke to him by phone from somewhere between Katmandu and Timbuktu last year, he sounded humbled. “I just have to keep going and hope it turns around,” he said.

It turned around in 2010. Dimitrov began working with former doubles standout Peter McNamara of Australia. He won six Challengers. He moved into the Top 200, then the Top 150, then up to 105, which is where he started this tournament. He’s not talking about hopes anymore; he’s talking about goals. Big goals.

“We’re aiming high," Dimitrov said today. "We want to be in the Top 40 by the end of the year." Maybe he’ll get the old entourage together again, too.

What changed? Nothing too specific or miraculous, it seems. “I’m more mature on court now,” Dimitrov said. “I have to accept it didn’t come as fast. I know I have to take it step by step.”

But the new confidence hasn’t vanquished the old frustration just yet. Dimitrov shoved an umpire at a Challenger in Helsinki last month, but was not suspended.

“It’s something that happened,” said Dimitrov, who described himself as “not an easy person” all the time. “It will never happen again.”

The talent, the temper, the early professional disappointment. Does this lineup remind you of someone else? Yes, Dimitrov appears to be taking a page or two from Roger Federer. Make that three or four or five pages. The Bulgarian says Federer is his hero, and he’s clearly spent a good deal of time watching him play.

The similarities in their games are uncanny. The relaxed start and sudden upward burst on the serve. The long extension on the backhand, and the extra, easy snap of topspin on the forehand. Dimitrov even sets up for his backhand the same way as Federer. Both of them, when they have the time, turn their bodies to the net and place their feet far apart for balance.

It’s one thing to copy the mechanics. It’s another to get the results—to catch the spirit rather than just the letter of the Federer law. Dimitrov does that too, and he did it today to devastating effect. Both Dimitrov and Federer seem to play farther from their torsos than their opponents, with a sweep to their strokes that lets them get more of their arms and bodies into their shots—they get out their own way. Golubev was handcuffed by Dimitrov’s inside-out forehand, as well as his down the line backhand. At 4-2 in the third set, Dimitrov hit three returns of serve that landed on the baseline, and which Golubev dumped into the net. After the last one, Golubev shrugged as if to say, “Forget it. Nothing I can do about that. Get me out of here.”

Dimitrov moves with something of the ease of Federer, and as I said, his way of playing has that loose, high-class Federer sheen (whether he's actually as fast is yet to be determined). This begs the question: Did Dimitrov borrow some of his talent from Federer? Or did his mimicry hold him back from developing what would have been his own genius? You can’t just move like Federer because you want to.

Would the younger man have been as good—or maybe better—if he had never seen the older man play? Would we all be better if we could make our games as close to Federer’s as possible? It’s one thing to copy a player’s general style. Bjorn Borg launched a million baseliners. It’s another to copy—or internalize; Dimitrov understandably doesn’t like the copycat label—the idiosyncrasies of one man’s genius. John McEnroe had no imitators.

None of this means the Bulgarian is any kind of genius; Frank Dancevic's game is also reminiscent of Federer's, and he's never cracked the Top 20. What matters for tennis fans is this: If you like to watch Roger Federer play, you’re going to like to watch Grigor Dimitrov. If, like me, you love Federer’s game but have gotten tired of his Sire Jacket lordliness over the years, you’ll like him even more, because it’s going to be a while before Dimitrov lords it over anyone. I spent a set at Court 10 watching Dimitrov-Golubev today, long enough to see that it wasn’t going to be a competitive match. So I traipsed to the other side of Melbourne Park, which is not around the corner, to watch some of Victor Troicki, another guy I’m interested this season. Or at least I thought I was interested in him. Compared to Dimitrov, Troicki’s game seemed limited and earthbound. So I got up and made the trek back to Court 10, just for the pleasure of seeing the kid play.

The two girls were there, and they were still smiling. So was Dimitrov. When he won the last point, he pumped his fist and flashed a wide grin. Then he looked at his coaches and smiled some more. He couldn’t stop smiling. He’d won a Grand Slam match. It was a Grigor Dimitrov moment to savor.

FedererBulgaria
01-17-2011, 03:31 PM
:worship::worship::worship:

The two girls smiled at each other. Then they looked backed at Court 10, at the player in the yellow shirt with the silky one-handed backhand and the very familiar service motion and the easy way with a forehand winner. Then the girls looked at each other again. They smiled again. They were having a Grigor Dimitrov moment.

The Grigor Dimitrov Moment: It sounds like a bad lounge-band name. I can see it now: A tall man with a receding hairline and a black goatee is hunched over a saxophone in a half-empty basement bar in Philly or Prague. But no, a Dimitrov Moment is what we got in Melbourne on Monday. In front of those two smitten girls, as well as a fair number of tennis cognescenti, the 19-year-old Bulgarian won his first match at a Grand Slam by routing Andrey Golubev, an otherwise perfectly respectable pro who is currently ranked No. 36 in the world. It wasn’t just that Dimitrov beat Golubev like a drum, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2; it’s that he outclassed him. He was the elegant tennis aristocrat slumming it for a few moments with the clumsy hoi polloi.

Players win their first matches at Grand Slams all the time, of course. But Dimitrov hasn’t been just another player since 2008. That year he won junior Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back to back, turned pro, and was promptly pushed into the pole position among the contenders for Next Big Tennis Thing.

And that’s as far as he got until today. The two years since Dimitrov’s junior triumphs have been hard ones. He was lost on the Challenger circuit, playing in Thailand one week and Geneva the next. He dropped out of the Top 200. The early talk of a touring entourage faded. When I spoke to him by phone from somewhere between Katmandu and Timbuktu last year, he sounded humbled. “I just have to keep going and hope it turns around,” he said.

It turned around in 2010. Dimitrov began working with former doubles standout Peter McNamara of Australia. He won six Challengers. He moved into the Top 200, then the Top 150, then up to 105, which is where he started this tournament. He’s not talking about hopes anymore; he’s talking about goals. Big goals.

“We’re aiming high," Dimitrov said today. "We want to be in the Top 40 by the end of the year." Maybe he’ll get the old entourage together again, too.

What changed? Nothing too specific or miraculous, it seems. “I’m more mature on court now,” Dimitrov said. “I have to accept it didn’t come as fast. I know I have to take it step by step.”

But the new confidence hasn’t vanquished the old frustration just yet. Dimitrov shoved an umpire at a Challenger in Helsinki last month, but was not suspended.

“It’s something that happened,” said Dimitrov, who described himself as “not an easy person” all the time. “It will never happen again.”

The talent, the temper, the early professional disappointment. Does this lineup remind you of someone else? Yes, Dimitrov appears to be taking a page or two from Roger Federer. Make that three or four or five pages. The Bulgarian says Federer is his hero, and he’s clearly spent a good deal of time watching him play.

The similarities in their games are uncanny. The relaxed start and sudden upward burst on the serve. The long extension on the backhand, and the extra, easy snap of topspin on the forehand. Dimitrov even sets up for his backhand the same way as Federer. Both of them, when they have the time, turn their bodies to the net and place their feet far apart for balance.

It’s one thing to copy the mechanics. It’s another to get the results—to catch the spirit rather than just the letter of the Federer law. Dimitrov does that too, and he did it today to devastating effect. Both Dimitrov and Federer seem to play farther from their torsos than their opponents, with a sweep to their strokes that lets them get more of their arms and bodies into their shots—they get out their own way. Golubev was handcuffed by Dimitrov’s inside-out forehand, as well as his down the line backhand. At 4-2 in the third set, Dimitrov hit three returns of serve that landed on the baseline, and which Golubev dumped into the net. After the last one, Golubev shrugged as if to say, “Forget it. Nothing I can do about that. Get me out of here.”

Dimitrov moves with something of the ease of Federer, and as I said, his way of playing has that loose, high-class Federer sheen (whether he's actually as fast is yet to be determined). This begs the question: Did Dimitrov borrow some of his talent from Federer? Or did his mimicry hold him back from developing what would have been his own genius? You can’t just move like Federer because you want to.

Would the younger man have been as good—or maybe better—if he had never seen the older man play? Would we all be better if we could make our games as close to Federer’s as possible? It’s one thing to copy a player’s general style. Bjorn Borg launched a million baseliners. It’s another to copy—or internalize; Dimitrov understandably doesn’t like the copycat label—the idiosyncrasies of one man’s genius. John McEnroe had no imitators.

None of this means the Bulgarian is any kind of genius; Frank Dancevic's game is also reminiscent of Federer's, and he's never cracked the Top 20. What matters for tennis fans is this: If you like to watch Roger Federer play, you’re going to like to watch Grigor Dimitrov. If, like me, you love Federer’s game but have gotten tired of his Sire Jacket lordliness over the years, you’ll like him even more, because it’s going to be a while before Dimitrov lords it over anyone. I spent a set at Court 10 watching Dimitrov-Golubev today, long enough to see that it wasn’t going to be a competitive match. So I traipsed to the other side of Melbourne Park, which is not around the corner, to watch some of Victor Troicki, another guy I’m interested this season. Or at least I thought I was interested in him. Compared to Dimitrov, Troicki’s game seemed limited and earthbound. So I got up and made the trek back to Court 10, just for the pleasure of seeing the kid play.

The two girls were there, and they were still smiling. So was Dimitrov. When he won the last point, he pumped his fist and flashed a wide grin. Then he looked at his coaches and smiled some more. He couldn’t stop smiling. He’d won a Grand Slam match. It was a Grigor Dimitrov moment to savor.

Orka_n
01-17-2011, 03:33 PM
All aboard the GriBOAT. :rocker2: :music:

Seriously though, it would be interesting if he started producing results.

Nole fan
01-17-2011, 03:38 PM
All aboard the GriBOAT. :rocker2: :music:

Seriously though, it would be interesting if he started producing results.

He's getting there, be patient. But if he keeps focused he has enough game to be in the Top 40 at the end of the year.

myrt
01-17-2011, 03:39 PM
Hope some of this match will turn up on youtube. Have only seen him on livestream in challengers against lesser opponents. Judging from Hopman Cup play Golubev is definitely not in form. Good to see young players making it happen.

Chartreuse
01-17-2011, 03:40 PM
Next GOAT.

Johnny Groove
01-17-2011, 03:42 PM
As long as he keeps his head level, there is no limit.

FedererBulgaria
01-17-2011, 03:46 PM
amazing article....no words,im just....

Armless
01-17-2011, 03:47 PM
Dimitrov has massive amounts of potential , his bandwagon is gathering pace at an enormous level , why shouldn't he be the next big thing?

Lurking
01-17-2011, 03:48 PM
He's the next Nalbandwagon.

pla
01-17-2011, 03:51 PM
I don't care, he has beautiful game, he has personality, he is hot as hell and he's good for the tennis in the country- even if he never goes into top50, I don't care. :) The article is nice but we've heard already enough of this- he's not a clone of Federer.

allpro
01-17-2011, 03:58 PM
yes, time is running out for clowns other than federer or nadal to win grandslams. just ask forehander.

viruzzz
01-17-2011, 04:14 PM
The bulgarian Federer is rising.

YouKnowWho
01-17-2011, 05:10 PM
Dimitrov definitely has the tools to be a great (note, not simply good, but great!) player, I have no doubt about it. However, he still needs to get his head straight and I am sort of afraid that the humongous amount of publicity and following that he gets will not help him do that. If he doesn't get his head straight, I wouldn't be surprised if he never even cracks top-30. If he does get his head straight though.. Top10 seems guaranteed, and who knows from there :)

shiaben
01-17-2011, 05:24 PM
I think he will be a bust :)

smitty8
01-17-2011, 05:33 PM
I saw him play in a Challenger over a year ago and I think he has the potential and the desire to be great, but time will tell. He's still young, still maturing. Good win for him.

Sham Kay
01-17-2011, 05:38 PM
Good luck to the kid, the world's his oyster if he keeps his head. I just wanted to say kid so it sounds funny if this gets bumped 5 years down the road.

Arakasi
01-17-2011, 06:19 PM
He has a very nice game. I really hope he does well this year.

Lopez
01-17-2011, 06:19 PM
I've always liked his game. The junior Wimbledon final 2008 was great with Dimitrov vs. Kontinen: 2 aggressive, talented players with one-handed backhands :). I'm still a fan, even though I was put off by his behavior at Helsinki a few months ago. Hope he sorts out his temperament and does well.

Henry Chinaski
01-17-2011, 06:31 PM
Does Tignor not know the difference between challengers and futures?

Dimitrov won 3 challengers last year, not 6.

Intro is seriously corny too.

abraxas21
01-17-2011, 06:40 PM
dimi will break the top 40... and if not, a lot of umpires will get their faces smashed

fast_clay
01-17-2011, 09:38 PM
Does Tignor not know the difference between challengers and futures?

Dimitrov won 3 challengers last year, not 6.

Intro is seriously corny too.

yeah man... as soon as i read it i felt patronised... it's not massive bullsh!t, it's just f**king lazy reporting...

and didnt spend any time on the fact that grigor is a potential bar room brawler... kid had a short fuse... a loose cannon... he's ready to trade knuckle... there was a nice angle there that he didnt exploit for a paragraph or two... any other sport, you beat up on an official and you get holidays without pay... but, with dimitrov i'm increasingly getting the feeling that he could buggar three umpires on arthur ashe without lubricant and still appear the fresh, clean cut new kid on the block...

Forehander
01-17-2011, 09:39 PM
I'm in tears

Soliloque
01-17-2011, 09:52 PM
I think that he'll be the new Federer (with less success), but Berankis will be his Nadal. He has already lost several times to him.

tumbak
01-17-2011, 10:01 PM
I think that he'll be the new Federer (with less success), but Berankis will be his Nadal. He has already lost several times to him.

Lool .. he lost just once.

l_mac
01-17-2011, 10:01 PM
Does Tignor not know the difference between challengers and futures?

Dimitrov won 3 challengers last year, not 6.

Intro is seriously corny too.

Who cares about piffling details like that, when the article contains this:

If, like me, you love Federer’s game but have gotten tired of his Sire Jacket lordliness over the years, you’ll like him even more, because it’s going to be a while before Dimitrov lords it over anyone.

??

:rolls:

Li Ching Yuen
01-17-2011, 10:07 PM
It's fucking impressive how these people get paid for writing this shit.

fast_clay
01-17-2011, 10:11 PM
??

:rolls:

quote worthy, yes... it was a highlight indeed...

perhaps tenfold for nadal fans by the looks...

l_mac
01-17-2011, 10:21 PM
perhaps tenfold for nadal fans by the looks...

For people who think Fed is an ass, not necessarily Rafa fans. Nole fans too :D

madmax
01-17-2011, 10:23 PM
Lool .. he lost just once.

actually he lost twice, first time being in juniors....anyway, going back to the topic I feel like this bulgarian kid has an aesthetically pleasing game, but his attitude leaves a lot to be desired for. I understand all the hype about a young charismatic player, but results have to justify all the flash too. He's still unproven and a raw material in a big boys game.

Nole fan
01-17-2011, 10:25 PM
It's fucking impressive how these people get paid for writing this shit.

Steve Tignor is a well-respected tennis observer and expert and he's probably the best tennis blogger out there. Read more of him before making such uninformed comments. :rolleyes:

rocketassist
01-17-2011, 10:26 PM
His game doesn't suit today's surfaces and conditions. It's a fun, really enjoyable game to watch, but he won't be winning any GS titles.

l_mac
01-17-2011, 10:32 PM
Steve Tignor is a well-respected tennis observer and expert and he's probably the best tennis blogger out there. Read more of him before making such uninformed comments. :rolleyes:

In your opinion he's the best blogger out there.

That article was quite lazy and annoying. Not Bodo level, but closer than Tignor usually gets. Pretty crap for him, actually. I'm not sure what more the poster criticising has to do other than read the article quoted? That's what he/she is responding to.

I like him, but he has his fair share of lazy/over indulgent/needlessly flowery I-took-creative-writing-in-college articles.

Nole fan
01-17-2011, 10:36 PM
In your opinion he's the best blogger out there.

That article was quite lazy and annoying. Not Bodo level, but closer than Tignor usually gets. Pretty crap for him, actually. I'm not sure what more the poster criticising has to do other than read the article quoted? That's what he/she is responding to.

I like him, but he has his fair share of lazy/over indulgent/needlessly flowery I-took-creative-writing-in-college articles.

Try to write something newsworthy every day. Have you ever tried to write professionally? It's not easy, specially writing under pressure. That coming from a journo. People like to criticize journos's work too easily. :rolleyes:

This is an opinion anyway, his opinion. As valid as yours. But he's the blogger.

green25814
01-17-2011, 10:36 PM
His game is similar to Federer's, but importantly he lacks power, as well as Federer's level of topspin. Without that, he wont break into the top level.

fast_clay
01-17-2011, 10:42 PM
For people who think Fed is an ass, not necessarily Rafa fans. Nole fans too :D

you'd have to say fed could have kept many of his fans if he'd dropped the bells, whistles and other various tributes to wacko jacko...

the reasonable fans walked when he became a grotesque personality... and sadly, he only kept the fans that actually resemble him...

i think dimitrov could find a supporter in me... i like this eastern european, hanescu street pimp approach... sweet game, but we know he's as dirty as... i mean, come on... not even koellerer enjoys beating up on umpries...

this dimitrov may not win as many slams as fed, but... he doesnt mind bruising his knuckles to get his point across... a man's tennis player who won't mind exchanging saliva at 30 paces when required...

l_mac
01-17-2011, 10:42 PM
Try to write something newsworthy every day. Have you ever tried to write professionally? It's not easy, specially writing under pressure. That coming from a journo. People like to criticize journos's work too easily. :rolleyes:

This is an opinion anyway, his opinion. As valid as yours. But he's the blogger.

Lots of people's jobs aren't easy :confused: Not really sure what you're suggesting, maybe that we should only make positive responses? Ridiculous :lol: Tignor published an article on his blog with inaccuracies :shrug: If I made mistakes in my job, I'd expect to get called on it. You wouldn't?

No-one said his opinion wasn't valid, but you were the one suggesting that the poster who said he/she couldn't believe someone was paid for writing "that shit" didn't have a valid opinion.

l_mac
01-17-2011, 10:43 PM
you'd have to say fed could have kept many of his fans if he'd dropped the bells, whistles and other various tributes to wacko jacko...

the reasonable fans walked when he became a grotesque personality... and sadly, he only kept the fans that actually resemble him...

i think dimitrov has found a supporter in me... i like this eastern european, hanescu street pimp approach... sweet game, but we know he's as dirty as... i mean, come on... not even koellerer enjoys beating up on umpries...

this dimitrov may not win as many slams as fed, but... he doesnt mind bruising his knuckles to get his point across... a man's tennis player who won't mind exchanging saliva at 30 paces when required...
:lol:

He's the Cronaldo of tennis.

Except I love Cron.

Modetopia
01-17-2011, 10:55 PM
Patrick Mouratoglou:
I think Grigor Dimitrov, the 19-year-old Bulgarian player who trained in my academy, deserves to be talked about because he’s a symbol of the next generation. along with Berankis, Harrison, Tomic, Raonic, Kuznetsov and Krajinovic.

Grigor, started working with Peter McNamara in July and has improved a lot in his game and his ranking. After qualifying for the main draw, he won his first round match against Golubev - 38th in the world - in straight sets. This victory shows all the work done and how much he has improved in eight months.

He’s so fast, fluid and with a cat like game but he also showed maturity. He could have been carried away, could have tried to go too much for it and then being caught by the pressure of what was at stake. Winning his first match in this kind of event means a lot for a young player. Grigor remained focused and calm from beginning to the end. I’m really proud of him.

Henry Chinaski
01-17-2011, 11:09 PM
yeah man... as soon as i read it i felt patronised... it's not massive bullsh!t, it's just f**king lazy reporting...

and didnt spend any time on the fact that grigor is a potential bar room brawler... kid had a short fuse... a loose cannon... he's ready to trade knuckle... there was a nice angle there that he didnt exploit for a paragraph or two... any other sport, you beat up on an official and you get holidays without pay... but, with dimitrov i'm increasingly getting the feeling that he could buggar three umpires on arthur ashe without lubricant and still appear the fresh, clean cut new kid on the block...


Yeah, I can't get over him not eating a ban for that.

Fee semi-joked in the original thread on the subject that he'd be punished unless he's signed to IMG in which case the ATP would apologise, revoke the fine and pay him for his troubles.

There's definitely an element of truth in that. Not sure if he's with IMG or not but he obviously has some very good connections that the ATP didn't have the balls to tackle.

Bulgaria seems to be going nuts for him anyway. Dimitrov getting a mention in the western press seems to be considered news-worthy.

Some one on twitter even sent me a link to a Bulgarian website that had my first title piece translated into Bulgarian under the some grandiose headline about what a great prospect he is It's pretty funny.

Great description of Fed's eccentricities as tributes to Jacko. Better than Tignor's anyway. I don't think it has anything to do with "lordiness" though or whatever Tignor said. I think Fed the human being is basically an immature doofus whose naive interpretation of what constitutes "class" led to him making some horrible decisions at Wimbledon in particular.(Under awful advice no doubt).

Tignor is pretty good in general. Can't get over that cheesey intro though. "A Dimitrov moment" JESUS.

tumbak
01-17-2011, 11:17 PM
Shut up Dimitrov is the new goat that's it.

fast_clay
01-17-2011, 11:21 PM
Shut up Dimitrov is the new goat that's it.

wel... i hope so... cos then we'll have a GOAT that can say: 'yeah, of course i'm favourite for this slam... and anyone who disagrees, i'll see you in the f***ing car park...'

should be refreshing i think..

tumbak
01-17-2011, 11:23 PM
Yea.

Allez
01-17-2011, 11:36 PM
If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, looks like a duck, then hell yeah it must be a bloody duck!!!

abraxas21
01-18-2011, 02:46 AM
A Grigor Dimitrov Moment
By Steve Tignor

The two girls smiled at each other. Then they looked backed at Court 10, at the player in the yellow shirt with the silky one-handed backhand and the very familiar service motion and the easy way with a forehand winner. Then the girls looked at each other again. They smiled again. They were having a Grigor Dimitrov moment.


i dunno what he's on but whatever drugs he took before writing this, i want them.

ShotmaKer
01-18-2011, 03:04 AM
Does Tignor not know the difference between challengers and futures?

Dimitrov won 3 challengers last year, not 6.

Intro is seriously corny too.

This. Although I agree Trignor is usually an ok blogger.

Tipster13
01-18-2011, 09:03 PM
Lool .. he lost just once.

Dimitrov was trashed 2 times.

Action Jackson
01-18-2011, 09:08 PM
Dimitrovtards are going to be so huge over time.

Has a lot of talent and has the right coach with him at the moment, we'll see how it goes.

Nole fan
01-18-2011, 09:20 PM
Dimitrovtards are going to be so huge over time.

Yeah, and it's showing already. Bulgarians will come in full force. Watch for a repeat of the Serbian Invasion circa 2007-08. :lol:

Of course there will also be the second coming of the Serbs once Djokovic ones wins his second slam. :cool:

MalwareDie
01-18-2011, 09:22 PM
Yeah, and it's showing already. Bulgarians will come in full force. Watch for a repeat of the Serbian Invasion circa 2007-08. :lol:



And how do you know this?

jrm
01-18-2011, 10:24 PM
We need to wait and see ... so far he hasn't beat anyone worth mentioning

Everko
01-18-2011, 10:37 PM
He has improved but he will not be that great in the future.

oranges
01-19-2011, 12:49 AM
Everko has spoken, Dimi set for GOAT status after this proclamation

FlameOn
01-19-2011, 12:51 AM
Is he the one that pushed an umpire?

moon language
01-19-2011, 12:57 AM
His movement isn't that great, and that is a big part of what makes Federer Federer.

Halba
01-19-2011, 03:22 AM
has a lot of work to do to catch up with the field first. federer? no, there won't be another. theres a lot of aspects that make fed good, also between his ears he can think very quickly