Who was the first pusher in ATP history? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Who was the first pusher in ATP history?

robinpirate
03-16-2010, 01:23 AM
Hi, guys. I know I don't post really often;) but I was sort of interested in some of your views

Nowadays, the term pusher is very common to describe many players' style of play. I don't know if it's the best way to describe it but many have acknowledged that certain top players have benefited from "pushing"
As I know some of u have watched tennis for much many years than I did, when do u think was the first time a player with a "pusher" style succeeded?
I remember now, after few years, watching Guillermo Coria. Don't get me wrong, I think he was a fantastic player, sort of an argentinian version of Murray (minus the serve...though he had Carla:cool:) with great hands and incredible movement that used to revert to "pushing" in some of his matches to solve them.
Do u think is it sth the spanish and southamerican (in general) developed and spread or is it dated to before even all the spanish boom??
Thanks for your answers, guys

Ibracadabra
03-16-2010, 01:28 AM
Any claycourt player ever.

robinpirate
03-16-2010, 01:39 AM
You mean Borg, Lendl, Kuerten etc?

McAlistar
03-16-2010, 01:42 AM
A huge amount of players push, of course they'll have matches when their more agressive but in general when i watch top players like Nadal,Djokovic and Roddick they spend alot of time pushing. Murray also although like Nole he'll throw in a few big shots here and there. Some guys simply dont have the capability to hit the ball that hard, like Santoro and some of the slightly lower ranked players like the Rochus brothers, Cipolla etc. If it works and it wins you matches then its the way to play.

marcRD
03-16-2010, 01:45 AM
A huge amount of players push, of course they'll have matches when their more agressive but in general when i watch top players like Nadal,Djokovic and Roddick they spend alot of time pushing. Murray also although like Nole he'll throw in a few big shots here and there. Some guys simply dont have the capability to hit the ball that hard, like Santoro and some of the slightly lower ranked players like the Rochus brothers, Cipolla etc. If it works and it wins you matches then its the way to play.

Santoro is not a pusher, that is crazy talk.

DJ Soup
03-16-2010, 01:50 AM
Santoro is undefinable

ssj100
03-16-2010, 02:01 AM
Sampras.

Sunset of Age
03-16-2010, 04:03 AM
A huge amount of players push, of course they'll have matches when their more agressive but in general when i watch top players like Nadal,Djokovic and Roddick they spend alot of time pushing. Murray also although like Nole he'll throw in a few big shots here and there. Some guys simply dont have the capability to hit the ball that hard, like Santoro and some of the slightly lower ranked players like the Rochus brothers, Cipolla etc. If it works and it wins you matches then its the way to play.

Mentioning Santoro and the word 'pusher' in once sentence is an anathema.

My guess? Nick Bollettieri, the founding father of "The Principles of Pushing Made Flesh". :worship:

leng jai
03-16-2010, 05:33 AM
My guess would be Rafito. Followed by the scottish dolt.

Start da Game
03-16-2010, 08:39 AM
My guess would be Rafito. Followed by the scottish dolt.

rafa a pusher? you are no nadal hater and it's surprising to hear that from you........can you briefly explain how nadal is a pusher?

Start da Game
03-16-2010, 08:40 AM
Sampras.

that holds as much weight as saying federer is a mug pusher.......

-Valhalla-
03-16-2010, 08:42 AM
What up SdG. [I think leng jai was being sarcastic.]

The Magician
03-16-2010, 08:45 AM
Probably Lendl and Borg. They were severly limited by technology of course, but by today's standards they would be considered pushers/moonballers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW4z0FnUz4o

So sloooooooooooow:zzz:

Start da Game
03-16-2010, 08:49 AM
What up SdG. [I think leng jai was being sarcastic.]

hello valhalla, don't know if that was just a sarcastic remark.......

am just waiting for the prestigious european clay court season to kick off.......i was never interested in the overhyped, pointless, irrelevant hardcourt events(just before the clay season) indian wells and miami.......

-Valhalla-
03-16-2010, 08:59 AM
am just waiting for the prestigious european clay court season to kick off.......i was never interested in the overhyped, pointless, irrelevant hardcourt events(just before the clay season) indian wells and miami.......

I rather enjoy IW and Miami, but yes, I'm looking forward to the clay season and RG as well :drink:

Puschkin
03-16-2010, 09:14 AM
Some guys simply dont have the capability to hit the ball that hard, like Santoro
This doesn't make him a pusher.

ssj100
03-16-2010, 09:59 AM
that holds as much weight as saying federer is a mug pusher.......

But of course Federer is a mug pusher. He just gets lucky man, can't you see? He's fluked his way through to some random records, and mainly because he's playing crap players all the time. The only half decent player around leads him 13-7 in H2H.

orangehat
03-16-2010, 11:25 AM
People who can't hit the ball hard enough are more of grinders than pushers :rolleyes:

But again, that doesn't apply to Santoro either.

VolandriFan
03-16-2010, 11:43 AM
Ridiculous question. There have always been 'pushers' in tennis.

Just like there have always been players who rely on power and aggression to dictate points, and there have always been players whose calling cards are consistency and defense.

robinpirate
03-16-2010, 01:19 PM
Ridiculous question. There have always been 'pushers' in tennis.

Just like there have always been players who rely on power and aggression to dictate points, and there have always been players whose calling cards are consistency and defense.
so, who's the first "pusher" that u saw?

Btw, Lendl and Borg compared to tennis standard nowadays would be considered pushers but u have to compare them with their peers. Were they considered defensive players in general?

Goldenoldie
03-16-2010, 02:44 PM
Obvious answer - Ken Rosewall
5 ft 7 in tall and a weak serve, what else could he do but "push"?
He had a pretty ok career though :D

paseo
03-16-2010, 02:58 PM
The founders of tennis. I doubt they were blasting shots when they invented the damn game.

VolandriFan
03-16-2010, 03:16 PM
Obvious answer - Ken Rosewall
5 ft 7 in tall and a weak serve, what else could he do but "push"?
He had a pretty ok career though :D

The ATP didn't exist when he was playing though. :p

TennisLurker
03-16-2010, 03:32 PM
Lendl was not a pusher, he had a big serve and forehand.
In the 80's Lendl (and Wilander) would play a very different game depending on the surface, on clay you would see many 50+ stroke rallies with high looping shots, that was the way people played on clay then, they were still pretty much playing wood racket tennis but with modern rackets.
But on hardcourts the way Lendl played was not much different from modern hardcourt tennis.

This is a very past his prime 34 years old Lendl losing to Pat Rafter in 1994 on hardcourts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWNJntV3NDE

If that borg clip is the one I think it was, then, you have to consider that it was clay, with wood rackets, and a fifth set.

Har-Tru
03-16-2010, 05:14 PM
Obvious answer - Ken Rosewall
5 ft 7 in tall and a weak serve, what else could he do but "push"?
He had a pretty ok career though :D

Rosewall was the pusher of his time indeed, which shows you how much tennis has changed seeing as he came in behind virtually all serves on fast courts until the 70's.

The ATP didn't exist when he was playing though. :p

He made the final of Wimbledon and the US Open two years after the ATP was formed. ;)

Persimmon
03-16-2010, 06:09 PM
Obvious answer - Ken Rosewall
5 ft 7 in tall and a weak serve, what else could he do but "push"?
He had a pretty ok career though :D

Wow, he overachieved for a pusher.

marcRD
03-16-2010, 06:18 PM
People really have no idea what a pusher is, that is the only thing I learned reading this thread.

JediFed
03-16-2010, 06:39 PM
Muezza's pic is in the definition of 'pusher'.

I remember once needing to sleep. So I turned on a Murray/Nadal match. Was out like a light.

JediFed
03-16-2010, 06:42 PM
Couple points.

1. Does this player have more UEs than points in most if not all of his wins?

2. Does this player demonstrate a lack of creativity in his shots?

If both are true, you have the definition of a pusher.

Santoro fails on both counts. He doesn't play a power game, but he ain't el mago for nothing.

duong
03-16-2010, 06:49 PM
I was horrified by the first answers :eek:

"Pushing" is as old as tennis.

Wasn't Segura a kind of that by the way ?

Or starting with the ATP creation, I thought you would mention the "crocodiles" like Vilas or Higueras, or a Solomon.

Santoro was definitely a pusher in the first part of his carreer.

But Lendl a pusher :eek:

robinpirate
03-17-2010, 01:23 AM
Who was Segura?
I've never seen Vilas play, but didn't he win the US Open?