Why is the English GS always called Wimbledon while the FO isn't always called RG? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why is the English GS always called Wimbledon while the FO isn't always called RG?

abraxas21
03-11-2010, 12:51 AM
This question is very important.

Kolya
03-11-2010, 01:01 AM
Ignorance.

HKz
03-11-2010, 01:07 AM
This question is very important.

"Roland Garros" is in the official name of the tournament in the French language. However to English speakers it just more known as the French Open. It is just a choice thing because I'm quite sure in French, they also refer to it as either "Roland Garros" or "French Open".

I know I heard "French Open" before I've heard "Roland Garros" when I was growing up playing the game. Wimbledon is just Wimbledon because that is what it is. I mean it is officially "The Champships, Wimbledon" of course, but since the suburb is also named Wimbledon and it is a lot easier to just call it Wimbledon by all languages, that is probably how it came out in the end.

abraxas21
03-11-2010, 01:23 AM
I have always find it somewhat strange, tbh. I always prefer to use the name Roland Garros over French Open but many other people don't. I don't know why... Maybe Roland Garros isn't so easy to pronouce for English speaking people.

On the other hand, if I were to say "English Open" instead of "Wimbledon", people would probably look me in a strange way...

HKz
03-11-2010, 01:26 AM
I have always find it somewhat strange, tbh. I always prefer to use the name Roland Garros over French Open but many other people don't. I don't know why... Maybe Roland Garros isn't so easy to pronouce for English speaking people.

On the other hand, if I were to say "English Open" instead of "Wimbledon", people would probably look me in a strange way...

Well of course they would look at you silly because no one calls it that, nor is it anything official. French Open, on the other hand, is the English variant officially I believe.

helen10
03-11-2010, 01:26 AM
Don't know why it's always known as Wimbledon, but there's no such thing as the 'English GS' - it's the British GS...
Just my cents' worth :)

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
03-11-2010, 02:38 AM
England>france

grass>clay

strawberries&cream>garlic breath

networthy
03-11-2010, 03:02 AM
This question is very important.

Just as important, why in French is it sometimes spelled "Roland-Garros" and sometimes "Roland Garros" (without the hyphen): http://www.rolandgarros.com/fr_FR/index.html

oematoema
03-11-2010, 08:19 AM
England>france

grass>clay

strawberries&cream>garlic breath

British Davis Cup Team < Lithuanian Davis Cup Team

propi
03-11-2010, 09:03 AM
Ignorance.
This.

I have never heard French Open.

elessar
03-11-2010, 10:19 AM
"Roland Garros" is in the official name of the tournament in the French language. However to English speakers it just more known as the French Open. It is just a choice thing because I'm quite sure in French, they also refer to it as either "Roland Garros" or "French Open".

No we don't. No French people would ever say the French Open, everyone would say "Roland Garros" or just "Roland".
England>france

grass>clay

strawberries&cream>garlic breath
I wonder where this garlic thing comes from when British people are obsessed with Garlic Bread.

Also in the spirit of international friendship I feel compelled to point out that :
Everything in the world >>>>>> Pimm's

Jelena
03-11-2010, 10:30 AM
According to the English wiki-article, the French tennis "authorities" was presented the area to build a tennis stadium there under the condition that the stadium/area was named after the WW1 aviator Roland Garros. If you want to know more about this aviator - do more researches yourself. ;)

Truc
03-11-2010, 10:33 AM
Just as important, why in French is it sometimes spelled "Roland-Garros" and sometimes "Roland Garros" (without the hyphen): http://www.rolandgarros.com/fr_FR/index.htmlRoland-Garros is the correct way to write it in France according to all the typography reference books, but loads of people don't know about that rule, you will probably see it written without the hyphen more often. It's too bad since there is, for once, a simple, logical rule. Aéroport Charles-de-Gaulle, avenue Victor-Hugo, lycée Jules-Verne, stade Jean-Bouin, etc. – it always works. It is the rule in use in the publishing business, but be ready to get "corrected" by a lot of people if you write it that way.

Truc
03-11-2010, 10:40 AM
No we don't. No French people would ever say the French Open, everyone would say "Roland Garros" or just "Roland".They also sometimes say "Internationaux de France", on TV for example.

We used to call the US Open "Flushing Meadows" in France when I was young. Roland-Garros, Wimbledon and Flushing Meadows were the common appellations (nobody talked about the AO at the time). Now we say "US Open" in French too.

elessar
03-11-2010, 10:53 AM
They also sometimes say "Internationaux de France", on TV for example.
Usually when they want to sound extra pedantic :lol:

federersforehand
03-11-2010, 11:06 AM
because i touch myself at night

Goldenoldie
03-11-2010, 11:15 AM
Could it be that Wimbledon has always been played at Wimbledon, but the French was played at other venues before Roland Garros?

elessar
03-11-2010, 12:19 PM
I think it's more to do with the fact that Wimbledon is played in an English speaking country so if the Brits are calling it Wimbledon then so will the rest of the Tennis world (mainly English speaking countries too). RG being french the diffusion of he name may not have been as easy :shrug:

Corey Feldman
03-11-2010, 12:21 PM
i have always called it French Open (blame british media) before i came to know it as its name now .. Roger Garros.

DrJules
03-11-2010, 01:09 PM
"Roland Garros" is in the official name of the tournament in the French language. However to English speakers it just more known as the French Open. It is just a choice thing because I'm quite sure in French, they also refer to it as either "Roland Garros" or "French Open".

I know I heard "French Open" before I've heard "Roland Garros" when I was growing up playing the game. Wimbledon is just Wimbledon because that is what it is. I mean it is officially "The Champships, Wimbledon" of course, but since the suburb is also named Wimbledon and it is a lot easier to just call it Wimbledon by all languages, that is probably how it came out in the end.

Roland Garros comes from the name of a French aviator for those who wondered:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Open

Kraxths
03-11-2010, 01:17 PM
simple..imagine what is easier for a Brit to pronounce: Roland Garros or Wimbledon ?

Ububub
03-11-2010, 04:40 PM
How about changing Roland-Garros to Tournament of Never-Ending Rallies?

Orysbestos
03-11-2010, 04:44 PM
French Open sounds better.

bjurra
03-11-2010, 06:12 PM
Wimbledon (Championships) and French Open are the official names.

Tutu
03-11-2010, 06:12 PM
because Wimbledon is the best. :bigwave::kiss:

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
03-11-2010, 07:31 PM
IF it wasn't for "tradition" Roland garros would have lost its 'slam' status a long time ago

its the most boring slam quite frankly

e.g 1981 pusher final between bjorn pushorg and ivan the pusher

Roland garros is a slam only because the powers that be have determined there must be a slow slidey slam for all the spanish/south american players

slow clay needs to die

slow clay nullifies the serve
takes away from the power game
gives an advantage to pushing
hugely benefits top spin which in turn benefits pushing
makes S&V a nightmare to try

clay is boring
clay is boring
soooooooooooooooo boring

there are no tactical battles on clay, it is a war of attrition- tennis is not about endurance pushing- i dont want to a watch a marathon i want to watch shot making and magic

Arkulari
03-11-2010, 07:38 PM
IF it wasn't for "tradition" Roland garros would have lost its 'slam' status a long time ago

its the most boring slam quite frankly

e.g 1981 pusher final between bjorn pushorg and ivan the pusher

Roland garros is a slam only because the powers that be have determined there must be a slow slidey slam for all the spanish/south american players

slow clay needs to die

slow clay nullifies the serve
takes away from the power game
gives an advantage to pushing
hugely benefits top spin which in turn benefits pushing
makes S&V a nightmare to try

clay is boring
clay is boring
soooooooooooooooo boring

there are no tactical battles on clay, it is a war of attrition- tennis is not about endurance pushing- i dont want to a watch a marathon i want to watch shot making and magic

http://www.fayerwayer.com/up/2008/07/vader-fail.jpg

Getta
03-11-2010, 07:55 PM
i've always called it Roland Garros. 'French Open' sounds hollow and distant. :shrug:

Acer
03-11-2010, 08:07 PM
British Davis Cup Team < Lithuanian Davis Cup Team

KO!

Cloudygirl
03-11-2010, 08:34 PM
Also in the spirit of international friendship I feel compelled to point out that :
Everything in the world >>>>>> Pimm's

this is very true

LucyFromLondon
03-11-2010, 08:42 PM
This question is very important.

British not English.

Jelena
03-11-2010, 10:33 PM
http://www.fayerwayer.com/up/2008/07/vader-fail.jpg
Agree.

Federerhingis
03-12-2010, 01:47 AM
Well of course they would look at you silly because no one calls it that, nor is it anything official. French Open, on the other hand, is the English variant officially I believe.

Technically no, and it is no English variant of nothing officially named that in French. Roland Garros is a proper name and that does not translate into French Open. ;)

Sophocles
03-12-2010, 10:42 AM
You couldn't call Wimbledon "The British Open" as that would make it sound like an impossibly minor tournament (such as "Lithuanian Open").

Corswandt
03-12-2010, 12:48 PM
Why is the English GS always called Wimbledon while the FO isn't always called RG

I'm equally annoyed by the practice, prevalent in some Anglo countries, of calling RG "French Open".

To retaliate, I often call The Championships "The English Open".

Vida
03-12-2010, 02:30 PM
because of the stiff upper lip and a shoved-up broom.

Ouragan
03-12-2010, 04:30 PM
British Davis Cup Team < Lithuanian Davis Cup Team

So tennis-hero (sic), where's your repartee here? :devil:

Corey Feldman
03-12-2010, 04:50 PM
So tennis-hero (sic), where's your repartee here? :devil:no Murray playing

Ouragan
03-12-2010, 08:15 PM
no Murray playing

Maybe Murray doesn't want to play in, what is it, the Europe-Africa sub-division x against players ranked 1000 at best? And last time he played I do recall England lost anyhow

Persimmon
03-12-2010, 08:23 PM
because of the stiff upper lip and a shoved-up broom.

:lol:

-Valhalla-
03-12-2010, 11:56 PM
there are no tactical battles on clay, it is a war of attrition- tennis is not about endurance pushing- i dont want to a watch a marathon i want to watch shot making and magic

http://www.rogueburners.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/Dark/facepalm.gif

octatennis
03-13-2010, 02:54 AM
the earthquake really screw your head up.