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Article : Dustin Brown hopes to make Jamaica's loss UK's gan (Plays for Germany now)

Action Jackson
02-09-2010, 10:20 AM
Classic incompetence from the federation and Burke that Brown wants out won't get sacked because he is related to Gore.

He lived in Jamaica from the age of 12 and got absolutely no support at all in the important development years and struggling to get a clothing sponsor. It's good that he is having some success at the moment, but he is very raw and it needs to be harnessed.

Dustin helped Jamaica progress through the group stages of the Davis Cup, but never got paid for it.


http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20100208/sports/sports8.html

No end in sight for Dustin Brown fiasco

Published: Monday | February 8, 2010

Kwesi Mugisa, Staff Reporter

There seems to be no end in sight for the bitter dispute between Jamaica's top-ranked player Dustin Brown and the local governing body of the sport, Tennis Jamaica.

Additionally, despite a phenomenal surge in the ATP rankings this year, a feat that has seen the player climb to 144th in the world, there is very little hope of him representing the country in this year's Davis Cup competition, or perhaps ever again.

It all comes down to financing, or better yet a lack thereof, as Brown has accused consecutive administrations of neglect, as it relates to providing a backbone for players seeking to break through on the world stage.

"Tennis Jamaica only knows me when the Davis Cup comes around, all the other times during the years they don't care how I manage to train and play tournaments. I could have attained a higher ATP ranking much earlier with proper support," Brown told the Gleaner.

Brown's current ranking is a phenomenal achievement as it is no secret that the country has struggled to produce top-class players in the sport of tennis, the last being Richard Russell, who made it to the second round of the Australian Open in 1964.

Mighty struggle

However, the fact that the 25-year-old has had a mighty struggle to do so, without the help of the association, despite repetitive pleas for assistance, sees him in no hurry to don the national colours again anytime soon, without major changes taking place.

Brown last represented the country in 2003 when, along with Ryan Russell who was at the time another promising junior, the team secured first place and promotion from Group 3 to Group 2 with a win over Puerto Rico. However, controversy sparked the following year when Brown, after another year of battling to fend for himself on the tour, declined the invitation to appear for the country as they pushed for a spot in Group I.

Making sacrifices

According to the player, the only way he was able to maintain and eventually improve his ranking was due to the fact that his parents purchased a camper, which enabled the player to travel to various tournaments around Europe.

"To be able to continue my career, my parents bought me a camper in April 2004 in order to travel through Europe and play as many games as possible."

"I would eat and sleep in my camper and I was travelling all over Europe, up and down for seven years to make it in professional tennis, holding the Jamaican flag high week by week, while my parents struggled to pay for the camper.

"I made a name for myself in Europe with my camper, my only chance to make it in tennis. Finally in 2009, I reached 144th in the ATP world ranking as a Jamaican player. I made it."

However, from the point of view of general secretary of Tennis Jamaica, Christine Gore, the current situation which sees Brown receiving no support from the association is of his own choosing.

According to Gore, one of the first things the then new administration did after taking office was to reach out to the player in an attempt to bury the hatchet. Brown, however, demanded the sacking of long-standing technical director Douglas Burke, a condition the body was unwilling to consider.

"We told him that we would not be dictated to, administrations cannot allow players to dictate terms and we were not willing to compromise on that," Gore said. "Unfortunately, that was one of the conditionalities of him returning to play for the team, he wanted us to fire Burke."

"We would love to support Dustin and have him as a part of the team. I mean, think about it, everyone wants to back a winner, we would have no reason to be isolating him and, in fact, we wish him all the best," Gore said while pointing to the fact that several players have been and continue to receive support.

CooCooCachoo
02-09-2010, 11:00 AM
Nice article. Thanks.

n8
02-09-2010, 11:37 AM
He's the only Jamaican player in the rankings. It's incredible he's made it to world number 132 given his story. I hope he gets to play his first Grand Slam this year.

Team_Roddick
02-09-2010, 01:01 PM
Thanks for the article.

n3gative
02-09-2010, 01:03 PM
Hope to see him make the MD at the US Open, he'll be a fan fave.

Goldenoldie
02-09-2010, 01:41 PM
And I thought GBR tennis admin was a joke!

Poor Brown, classed as the villain.

abraxas21
02-09-2010, 01:54 PM
that mug should stop whining and concentrate on winning some matches for a change.


just kidding :) i'm not aware of the problems with his federation but i wouldn't be surprised if they're big. Pressing for the resignation of one of the big dogs might have been justified (I don't know what's the deal with that) but it's hard to have some real weight to do things like that. Not even Gonzo in my country was able to push for the resignation of Hinzpeter (a cheating SoB), even though he's pretty much loved by eveyone here.

Another thing that should be considered is that Jamaica is overall a poor nation and it's expected that their tennis Federation won't even have 1/10 (not even close to that actually) of what, say, the French or the American Federations have at their disposal. Different countries, different realities... Brown must (or if not he should) be aware of this.

JMG
02-09-2010, 02:54 PM
I hope they can find a solution one day, so that he can play Davis Cup. But if not, he can have a good week in Newport instead.

I think last year Burke's son was in the DC team. :o

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
02-09-2010, 03:59 PM
There should be a player fund for this kind of situation

here is a player who with proper funding could be a top 100 player, and he needs to live a camper van to survive

this is just wrong, and unfair

i wonder if the Nadals and Federers of this world would be able to dominate if they had to live in camper vans during tourneys

reality really hits home

i suppose you cant ask too much from a poor nation like jamaica, however, tickets and lodging isn't asking too much for such a rare jamaican talent

Getta
02-09-2010, 04:09 PM
thanks for the article.

I think last year Burke's son was in the DC team. :o

yup, Brandon is Douglas' son.

http://www.tennisjamaica.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=136&Itemid=2

Americas Zone Group II

Jamaica vs. Mexico
March 6- 8, 2009

We regret to inform that trials for the 2009 Davis Cup will not be held due to the current economic crisis being experienced, even though we are fully committed to the event.

Seven of our top competitors are currently overseas. Accordingly, the selection committee has therefore selected the team based on availability and the NCAA and ITF Rankings. The team chosen for the first Tie being held in Mexico City, Mexico in March will be:

- Damar Johnson (Captain)
- Damion Johnson
- Christopher Lawson
- Brandon Burke

Due to the economic constraints being experienced there will be no Non-Playing Captain travelling with them. For the second Tie being held in July we hope to have more competitors available.

Of course thanks goes out to companies and individuals who made specific contributions. Special thanks to the Tennis Jamaica staff who worked tirelessly behind the scenes. THANK YOU!!!


"We regret to inform that trials for the 2009 Davis Cup will not be held due to the current economic crisis being experienced, even though we are fully committed to the event." and "Due to the economic constraints being experienced there will be no Non-Playing Captain travelling with them. For the second Tie being held in July we hope to have more competitors available.", i found these interesting.

Another thing that should be considered is that Jamaica is overall a poor nation and it's expected that their tennis Federation won't even have 1/10 (not even close to that actually) of what, say, the French or the American Federations have at their disposal. Different countries, different realities... Brown must (or if not he should) be aware of this.

granted you raise a valid point.

Action Jackson
02-09-2010, 10:49 PM
As for the federation being poor, well Brown knows this but they didn't want to know about him when he needed some support, whether this is financial or otherwise. This is a common thing in Argentina as well.

Hewitt =Legend
02-09-2010, 10:54 PM
Really, he played Davis Cup and never got paid for it :eek:

Good for Dustin that he's been able to climb up the rankings without the help of his adopted country and is now making a name for himself on the big stage. Hope he can continue his good form and maybe play a grand slam this year. Wimbledon would be awesome!

save ausdecline
02-09-2010, 10:55 PM
hope he can produce a fairytale story in the coming months.

Nagime
02-10-2010, 12:00 AM
In Brazil, Guga and all others major players did this around 2004 and worked, even if it lasted a couple of years. The team was represented by juniors and went downhill at the DC, and only last year had a real chance of coming back :(

dijus
02-10-2010, 12:25 AM
thanks for article, GWH

Action Jackson
02-10-2010, 11:53 AM
http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/sport/BROWN-RANKING_7401032

High-ranking Brown chides Tennis Jamaica

BY ANDREW HANCEL Observer writer

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

Dustin Brown became the highest ranked Jamaican ATP player ever after the latest rankings were released.

The 25-year-old Brown ascends nine places to be ranked number 132 in the world, eclipsing Richard Russell's 37-year-old mark of 140 achieved August 23, 1973.

Last week Brown got to the quarter-finals of the South Africa Open, an ATP World Tournament in Johannesburg, which equalled Douglas Burke's 1989 feat in Wellington, New Zealand. Burke's best ATP ranking was 175.

The Jamaican top seed, who is eying a top-100 spot with a view to gain automatic entry into the Wimbledon main draw this summer, told the Observer that he's aiming for continued improvement.

"No Jamaican player ever reached an ATP-tournament semi-final ... that is my next goal," an elated Brown said yesterday.

Brown continues to sharply criticise Tennis Jamaica, the local governing body for not supporting him during his rise and quest to become only the second Jamaican to play in a Grand Slam. Russell is the lone Jamaican, having played in the 1964 Australian Championship.

But the Caribbean island remains true to the heart of the 6'5" Brown, who was born in Germany.

"I gave interviews after my matches at the press conferences wearing my Jamaican T-shirt ... that went around the world. What an advertisement for Jamaica, and what do I get? nothing!" he said.

"It seems to me that Jamaicans never know who they have. Look back in Jamaican history for example (people like) Sam Sharpe and Marcus Garvey... nobody was interested while they were alive. Today, they are National Heroes. Even Bob Marley had a hard time... in the very beginning. Today Jamaica is proud of him," he added.

A longstanding tiff between Brown and Tennis Jamaica have seen the latter last representing his country in 2003. Tennis Jamaica, however, has expressed willingness to welcome Brown, who it claimed has demanded the sacking of its technical director Burke, but under its own terms and conditions only.

He has now accumulated 406 ATP points and requires a further 126 points before Wimbledon in order to break into the top-100 currently led by the great Roger Federer.

abraxas21
02-10-2010, 12:07 PM
"I gave interviews after my matches at the press conferences wearing my Jamaican T-shirt ... that went around the world. What an advertisement for Jamaica, and what do I get? nothing!" he said.

I understand his frustration and anger but he should be careful in trying to appear as the good guy in the story. if he wants to wear his national t-shirt, it's his deal and he shouldn't expect to be rewarded for it, imo.

That being said, it's just another sad story that finds its echo all around the third world. Anyone who has spend some considerable time in third world nations knows that jocks don't exactly get much funding, much less when the sport is not well known or appreciated by the population as it seems to be the case with tennis in Jamaica. lack of money but also incompetence by the sports federation are common factors that frustrate the future of potential players of all kinds of sports.

Usually the few good players who make it to the ATP coming from poor nations are people who belong to relatively wealthy families over there.

Action Jackson
02-10-2010, 12:34 PM
The federation are lining their own pockets and not helping player development.

abraxas21
02-10-2010, 12:37 PM
The federation are lining their own pockets and not helping player development.

although there doesn't seem to be any info to know that for sure, i wouldn't be surprised if it is the case. corruption (with the little money there is) in sports federations of poor nations seems to happen quite often, unfortunately.

Action Jackson
02-10-2010, 12:40 PM
although there doesn't seem to be any info to know that for sure, i wouldn't be surprised if it is the case. corruption (with the little money there is) in sports federations of poor nations seems to happen quite often, unfortunately.

Brown didn't get paid when he played Davis Cup, the cheque bounced, but these officials got their pay.

Yes, they have meagre resources but there is massive mismanagement and it's a common thing in the Caribbean sporting admin world.

abraxas21
02-10-2010, 12:45 PM
Brown didn't get paid when he played Davis Cup, the cheque bounced, but these officials got their pay.

Yes, they have meagre resources but there is massive mismanagement and it's a common thing in the Caribbean sporting admin world.

the fact that he didn't get paid doesn't indicate for sure that the ATP officials are lining up their own pockets in an "extra-official" way, so to speak. as far as the article says, they just got their corresponding salaries while the profits might have actually been invested in productive areas of tennis development. but again, i won't be surprised if corruption happens to be the case.

I agree that there's certainly mismanagment, though. the fact that brown didn't get paid for playing the DC is a testament to this.

Action Jackson
02-10-2010, 01:01 PM
The ATP aren't relevant here at all and have nothing to do with Davis Cup or this particular problem.

Proves that players usually need to be from a middle to upper class backgrounds to get on the tour and prosper.

Brown wants to play Davis Cup, but not under this particular corrupt regime and they aren't going to progress through the ranks without him. There are talented athletes there in Jamaica, but they don't have the access to the basics to help them develop, that is down to the pigs eating all the bacon.

Johnny Groove
02-10-2010, 01:05 PM
Tennis Jamaica needs to understand that Brown could make tons of $$$$$$$$ for the country if he gets bigger.

Imagine how the sport of tennis will explode in Jamaica if Dustin makes even the top 50.

Pigs eating all the bacon is a solid analogy, GWH.

rocketassist
02-10-2010, 01:45 PM
Be great for tennis and Jamaica if Dreddy makes top 50- a true character :worship:

Jamaican federation needs to get off its arse, no one saw 20 years ago Jamaica dominating athletics like they do, so that should be enough of an inspiration.

abraxas21
02-10-2010, 02:06 PM
The ATP aren't relevant here at all and have nothing to do with Davis Cup or this particular problem.

yes. i meant to say the Jamaican Tennis Federation officials instead of "ATP officials". my bad.

Nidhogg
02-10-2010, 03:42 PM
The more I read and find out about Dustin, the more I like him.

Thanks for the articles.

Action Jackson
02-11-2010, 09:29 AM
Be great for tennis and Jamaica if Dreddy makes top 50- a true character :worship:

Jamaican federation needs to get off its arse, no one saw 20 years ago Jamaica dominating athletics like they do, so that should be enough of an inspiration.

Bit different with the athletics. I mean they don't need the cash to run, so what happens is once they get good then at least they can get some spikes for them to run in.

Agreed it would be great if he can make Wimbledon directly.

Action Jackson
02-15-2010, 09:33 PM
He is going to play Indian Wells and Miami qualies.

Action Jackson
03-09-2010, 10:58 AM
Dreddy has a good draw at Indian Wells.

(10) BROWN, Dustin JAM v SMYCZEK, Tim USA
(WC) KRAJINOVIC, Filip SRB v (20) GAUDIO, Gaston ARG

Ibracadabra
03-09-2010, 11:02 AM
Fingers crossed for dustin, real hero.

Hewitt =Legend
03-10-2010, 02:58 AM
All went wrong for Dustin today losing 6-1 6-1 in 43 minutes. Your typical setback after a big couple of months.

Action Jackson
04-17-2010, 01:04 PM
Dustin thrives in Jo'burg and won the challenger there today. He should be in the top 100 after this week or just outside.

The fighting is still going on with the Jamaican federation, he might end up playing for Germany.

out_here_grindin
04-17-2010, 02:34 PM
Dustin!! Great challenger title. Now he can get into slams without qualifying and get the big bucks. :D:worship:

JMG
04-17-2010, 07:22 PM
http://satablog.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/final1.jpg

Smoke944
04-17-2010, 07:34 PM
Awesome pic JMG.

GustavoM_Fan
04-17-2010, 07:34 PM
:worship: Dustin
already putted this image as the wallpaper on my desktop :yeah:

mN5yKGm4q_k
WaEYH2P2mYE

Nidhogg
04-17-2010, 10:24 PM
Booyakh, Dustin.

malisha
04-17-2010, 10:28 PM
congrats Dustin

keep up the hard work

Action Jackson
04-17-2010, 11:03 PM
The Sowetans love the Brown.

LeChuck
04-18-2010, 12:30 AM
Thanks for the articles, photos and videos everyone. Great stuff by Dreddy.

JustJames
05-18-2010, 11:44 AM
The end IS now in sight.. Dustin has made the Top 100!! :yeah: :aparty:

This week he debuts in the top100 at #99 [ ATP Profile (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Br/D/Dustin-Brown.aspx) ]. Must be a proud moment for Dustin & his family.

Action Jackson
05-18-2010, 11:46 AM
Dustin has made Wimbledon directly.

Action Jackson
06-14-2010, 09:44 AM
Hope he gets a good draw at Wimbledon.

Turquoise
06-14-2010, 11:25 AM
Thanks for the articles GWH. It's heartwarming to see Dustin Brown making significant breakthrough. Hope he takes it a step further at Wimbledon.

ShotmaKer
06-14-2010, 12:55 PM
good read, thanks for the articles and pics. hate it when politics get in the way of talent.

martine2
06-14-2010, 05:19 PM
Thanks for this thread and good luck to Dreddy!! :yeah:

asl
06-15-2010, 05:58 AM
hate it when politics get in the way of talent.

As did Henri Kontinen yesterday.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 04:44 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2010/jun/20/dustin-brown-wimbledon-interview

Dustin Brown hopes to make Jamaica's loss Britain's gain

Dustin Brown is the best player to emerge from Jamaica in decades but, spurned in his homeland, he plans to represent Britain at the Davis Cup

Dustin Brown is the most exciting and controversial tennis player to emerge from the Caribbean in a long time, a distinction in a restricted category, perhaps – but interest is heightened somewhat when he says he wants to play in the Davis Cup for Britain. The first West Indian since Richard Russell 42 years ago to play at Wimbledon, the 25-year-old Brown has roared up the ATP rankings over the past year and turned a few Pimms-happy heads in Buckinghamshire ealier this week when he beat the world No 9 Fernando Verdasco in three sets in the Boodles Challenge at Stoke Park, losing in the final to Gaël Monfils yesterday. He has drawn the 16th seed, the Austrian Jürgen Melzer, in the first round at Wimbledon.

Whether the 6ft 5in, rocket-serving Brown, ranked 105 in the world and not long ago at No99, can realise his long-shot plan to play for a country he hardly knows rests on his ability to establish the existence of an English grandmother, and he also needs a UK passport and two years' continuous residency. But he hopes his rising form will persuade the Lawn Tennis Association and the Great Britain Davis Cup captain Leon Smith he is at least worth talking to.

"We have had no contact with him yet," an LTA spokesman said. "But, if he satisfies the International Tennis Federation regulations, we will be happy to do so."

Brown says: "I looked into what criteria applies. I have been told last week at Queen's that I might be able to play. Definitely I would be interested. The British connection is on my father's side of the family; it's my grandmother – although I'm not that sure where she was from. We're still checking into it. But it's a real possibility. If it turns out to be a positive situation then I definitely will look more into it. I haven't had any contact with Leon Smith yet but I'm going to be in Wimbledon so I'm pretty sure when I get there I am going to be in contact with those people sooner or later."

On the evidence of his ranking (55 places ahead of Great Britain's No2, Alex Bogdanovic) and his vibrant game, Brown would be a catch for Smith, who has been deprived of Andy Murray's services, at least for the tie against Turkey in July, as well as the reluctant Bogdanovic.

John Lloyd, the previous captain, became aware of Brown and his desire to play for Britain but he had never seen him play and dismissed the notion – although it is known he was tempted. If he were to qualify, Brown would have to wait six months before he could play.

What Brown brings is a ready-made fairytale: a handsome, dreadlocked rebel with a booming serve (his first serve percentage for the year stood at one point at a remarkable 87%) and a curious slice on a viciously whipped forehand, weapons that were too much for Verdasco and seriously inconvenienced Denis Istomin at Queen's Club.

He is the son of a Jamaican father and German mother who bought him a camper van to slog around the backblocks of the lower-level European circuit for four years. At times his journey was so grim he survived on complimentary sandwiches at obscure tournaments, on all continents. He played everywhere and anywhere, from Chennai to Johannesburg. Brown struggled in anonymity, just another battling pro. Except he kept going.

"I was born in Germany in 1984," he says. "Lived there until 1986. Then I moved back to Jamaica. I went to school there and started playing junior tournaments there. I also played Davis Cup for Jamaica. In 2004, I moved back to Europe, and that's when my parents got me the camper van, so I started playing tournaments here.

"At the beginning it certainly was not very easy, but that was my last option to keep going with tennis. It took me a while to get used to it. But, after all, it got me to where I am, so I am very thankful to be given that opportunity by my parents.

"Money was pretty tight most of the time. I was playing Futures, on the road all over Europe, and making $170 to lose in the first-round match is not exactly a good amount of money. But with the camper, it was possible, it [enabled] me, if I lost in the first round, to have enough money to play the next tournament. That pretty much saved my career.

"It was a pretty big camper, actually, with three beds and a kitchen. So I could save quite a bit of money, cooking for myself. I adjusted to it very well. Yes, I was by myself at the beginning quite a lot, but you get used to it. Then there were my friends at the tournaments, who I'd hang around with, and often I'd have a companion travelling with me in the camper. It was a bit of an adventure."

That is the happy bit. The downside to the Brown fairytale is how he was forced to abandon the country of his father's birth because, he says, the tennis establishment there refused to fund him. He accused them of favouritism and felt the full brunt of their disgust.

After his first major breakthrough, winning the Soweto Open in April last year, he complained: "I am the No1 [tennis player] in my country, probably the best player Jamaica ever had, but I have no support from the tennis federation in my country, which is kind of sad. Also, people in Jamaica basically don't know how I am doing. I actually called my dad, who is in Jamaica, and told him that I won today, because it's not going to be printed there in the newspapers."

It is as much a shame for Jamaica as for Brown that he and the tennis big shots there could not resolve their differences. Jamaican tennis has had few heroes down the years. You have to go back to the Sixties, when Richard Russell and Lance Lumsden were taking on and beating the American doubles greats Charlie Pasarell and Arthur Ashe, to identify a really buoyant period in Jamaican tennis. Lumsden, a calypso singer, once wrote in a song not wholly complimentary about Wimbledon: "I'd rather fight in Vietnam, than have to play at Roehampton."

Dougie Burke – with whom Brown has been in heavy dispute in his role as national director – followed those pioneers. And it is a wonder he does not empathise with Brown: he travelled widely too, winning junior tournaments in Belgium and Italy, then moving to Canada, where he was ranked eighth in 1981.

If Britain is to be the beneficiary of Brown's spat with Tennis Jamaica, the pragmatists at the LTA will probably be more grateful than shamefaced that they could not find their own talent from the streets. "I'm so looking forward to Wimbledon," he says. "This is a dream come true. The last year has been really good. I'm just looking forward to keeping it going like this."

For now, for Brown, the sun is shining, and the weather is sweet. He is ready to come to the rescue.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 04:46 PM
What a clown.

oranges
06-20-2010, 04:50 PM
What a clown.

Why exactly is he a clown?

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 05:12 PM
Representing another nation just to get money is a very practical decision but utterly despicable in my book. I understand that the Jamaican Federation might have fucked him up but that's no reason to leave your whole country behind, imo.

I have abosolutely no sympathy or love for this bloke.

dombrfc
06-20-2010, 05:13 PM
No thankyou.

Thats not going to help the development of British Tennis.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 05:18 PM
Representing another nation just to get money is a very practical decision but utterly despicable in my book. I understand that the Jamaican Federation might have fucked him up but that's no reason to leave your whole country behind, imo.

I have abosolutely no sympathy or love for this bloke.

Nothing has happened as of yet, and yes why should he play Davis Cup for Jamaica? They didn't want to know him then and don't really care now.

Did you hate Rusedski as well?

Sofonda Cox
06-20-2010, 05:21 PM
He is more British than Murray

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 05:34 PM
Nothing has happened as of yet, and yes why should he play Davis Cup for Jamaica? They didn't want to know him then and don't really care now.

I'm not saying he should play the DC for Jamaica. If the issues he has with the governing body of the Tennis Associaction of his country are important enough (as they seem to be according to him), then I might even support his idea of not playing the DC as long as the guys in charge are sacked. However, choosing to play for a foreign rich nation just to get money is a very different thing.


Did you hate Rusedski as well?

Never knew much about the guy's personal life except that he was a Canadian who, for some reason decided to play for Britain. I don't know if money was involved in the decision but yeah, I never liked him much and almost always wanted him to lose. It was funny to see him get booed when playing in Canada :)

oranges
06-20-2010, 05:47 PM
Representing another nation just to get money is a very practical decision but utterly despicable in my book. I understand that the Jamaican Federation might have fucked him up but that's no reason to leave your whole country behind, imo.

I have abosolutely no sympathy or love for this bloke.

Right, he should show utmost devotion to the country whose corrupt tennis federation basically told him to fuck off and no one bothered to remove those responsible and install someone who'd actually help tennis in the country. Martyr philosophies might work for religious zealots or something similar, not tennis players.

:secret: BTW, you should despise your favorite big mouth too then, he also "sold himself", only to Aussies

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 05:52 PM
I'm not saying he should play the DC for Jamaica. If the issues he has with the governing body of the Tennis Associaction of his country are important enough (as they seem to be according to him), then I might even support his idea of not playing the DC as long as the guys in charge are sacked. However, choosing to play for a foreign rich nation just to get money is a very different thing.

You answered it in the last part of this paragraph. It's not solely and yes I use the term solely about the cash, of course money is a part of it. They aren't going to sack these guys as the inherent corruption is so entrenched. At the same this story will get back to Jamaica and perhaps something might come out of it.


Never knew much about the guy's personal life except that he was a Canadian who, for some reason decided to play for Britain. I don't know if money was involved in the decision but yeah, I never liked him much and almost always wanted him to lose. It was funny to see him get booed when playing in Canada :)

Money was clearly involved as he could get more playing DC for the UK and his mother is English.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 06:02 PM
Right, he should show utmost devotion to the country whose corrupt tennis federation basically told him to fuck off and no one bothered to remove those responsible and install someone who'd actually help tennis in the country. Martyr philosophies might work for religious zealots or something similar, not tennis players.

He's ranked around, what? the 100th nowadays? That's relatively good and most players at that point -while they certainly can't afford to live a luxorious life- manage to make ends meet without the help from their Federations. It's not like Dustin Brown is still traveling across Europe in his camper trying to get and save as much money as he can.

:secret: BTW, you should despise your favorite big mouth too then, he also "sold himself", only to Aussies

uh?

You answered it in the last part of this paragraph. It's not solely and yes I use the term solely about the cash, of course money is a part of it. They aren't going to sack these guys as the inherent corruption is so entrenched. At the same this story will get back to Jamaica and perhaps something might come out of it.

Hopefully it will but that won't change my opinion on Dustin Brown if he truly wants to play for Britain, as he apparently wishes to do according to the article posted on this thread.

barbadosan
06-20-2010, 06:02 PM
Right, he should show utmost devotion to the country whose corrupt tennis federation basically told him to fuck off and no one bothered to remove those responsible and install someone who'd actually help tennis in the country. Martyr philosophies might work for religious zealots or something similar, not tennis players.

:secret: BTW, you should despise your favorite big mouth too then, he also "sold himself", only to Aussies

As a Barbadian from the same neck of woods, I second this 1000 times. Love of nationals goes along with love of country: it's not a one-way street. If he hadn't kept battling on his own, he would just have been another lost talent nobody, including Andy Neyer, would have remembered.

Edit: And btw, Andy N, people DO migrate to other countries to better their situations. Not much different really. This "play-for-your-country, DC aura, does have its limitations, like everything else under the sun

Johnny Groove
06-20-2010, 06:04 PM
Caribbean corruption? What a surprise.

Dustin should play for whoever will accept him.

KaiserT
06-20-2010, 06:06 PM
Business wise this would be an immensely good move for Dustin.

Can really see him becoming a star in the UK.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 06:11 PM
He's ranked around, what? the 100th nowadays? That's relatively good and most players at that point -while they certainly can't afford to live a luxorious life- manage to make ends meet without the help from their Federations. It's not like Dustin Brown is still traveling across Europe in his camper trying to get and save as much money as he can.

He still uses the camper when in Germany. Need to be inside the top 100 for a couple of years to be able to get back most of his expenses.

Hopefully it will but that won't change my opinion on Dustin Brown if he truly wants to play for Britain, as he apparently wishes to do according to the article posted on this thread

Not exactly a lot of opportunities there in the Caribbean, just lucky Bolt didn't leave like many Caribbean athletes have. It's a fact of life. Not like the UK hasn't recruited from outside its borders before.

Tommy_Vercetti
06-20-2010, 06:12 PM
I've already grown tired of listening to this tennis player's "struggle." Got James Blake tones to his incessant whining. Play for whomever and stop bitching.

How many players at his level have any sponsors or options at all really? STFU.

oranges
06-20-2010, 06:14 PM
He's ranked around, what? the 100th nowadays? That's relatively good and most players at that point -while they certainly can't afford to live a luxorious life- manage to make ends meet without the help from their Federations. It's not like Dustin Brown is still traveling across Europe in his camper trying to get and save as much money as he can.


Yeah, he's so swimming in money now, he should not bother to find a country that would actually help his career in return for representing it. You're acting like he's in top 10 for years and just greedy for money. In reality, it would help his career in more ways then one. He doesn't need to be struggling to pay for his basic expenses to be allowed to look out for his best interests given the situation.

uh?


Future No1, it's-just-a-matter-of-time Tomic

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 06:25 PM
He still uses the camper when in Germany. Need to be inside the top 100 for a couple of years to be able to get back most of his expenses.

I'm not sure about that (I've constantly heard that most players in the top 200 manage to make a living) but even if it's true is still something that can be made. It's not at all like the option is between being a martyr and playing for a foreign nation as oranges made it seem.


Not exactly a lot of opportunities there in the Caribbean, just lucky Bolt didn't leave like many Caribbean athletes have. It's a fact of life. Not like the UK hasn't recruited from outside its borders before.

Very True and I've never liked those decisions. Happens with all rich countries and even the not-so-rich ones like Kazajhstan (or whatever it's spelled). Call me old-fashioned but it's the way I feel. I don't like it when players choose to adopt a new nationality purely out of self-interest. I just don't.

JMG
06-20-2010, 06:26 PM
If he has an English grandmother on his father's side, it means he is more German than anything else. He would have every reason to represent Germany, German even seems to be his first language. I have the feeling he enjoys being the best or one of the best players of his country, that's why he plays for Jamaica. But there is no way that he can feel British, so of course they shouldn't let him play Davis Cup and I also doubt that he seriously wants this.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 06:30 PM
Yeah, he's so swimming in money now, he should not bother to find a country that would actually help his career in return for representing it. You're acting like he's in top 10 for years and just greedy for money. In reality, it would help his career in more ways then one. He doesn't need to be struggling to pay for his basic expenses to be allowed to look out for his best interests given the situation.


You're reading what you want to read. I said that most players around the top 100 -even though can lead a luxurious life- manage to make ends meet. That's all. I've noticed you have a tendency to exaggerate things...


Future No1, it's-just-a-matter-of-time Tomic

I don't even like Tomic...

marquez
06-20-2010, 06:30 PM
If he has an English grandmother on his father's side, it means he is more German than anything else. He would have every reason to represent Germany, German even seems to be his first language. I have the feeling he enjoys being the best or one of the best players of his country, that's why he plays for Jamaica. But there is no way that he can feel British, so of course they shouldn't let him play Davis Cup and I also doubt that he seriously wants this.

yeah, thats what I've been thinking too, if anything, play for germany

Ariel
06-20-2010, 06:35 PM
That's quite a compelling story he has. I think he should go to the country that can reward him financially for his DC efforts and provide additional support. This is the business end of tennis. You do what you have to do to claw your way up the rankings and if that includes spurning your country's DC team because that country has never supported you, than so be it. He obviously feels that this Burke guy was a key obstacle in getting that support so I cannot blame him for letting his anger dictate his actions.

He has shown that he has weapons that can throw off top players. I can't get all excited over what he did at the Boodles MM challenge but I do look forward to seeing him capitalize on his talent in the near future.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 06:39 PM
I'm not sure about that (I've constantly heard that most players in the top 200 manage to make a living) but even if it's true is still something that can be made. It's not at all like the option is between being a martyr and playing for a foreign nation as oranges made it seem.

Shouldn't you able to learn as decent living as possible? The top 100 is the promised land pure and simple, can play a mix of ATP events and challengers, with some league money on the side. There is a thread on here ladder to success read it and then you it's explained clearly.

Depends on what country players are from outside top 100 it's harder to plan, some weeks league tennis so to get an income, other times challengers and then qualies of the odd ATP event. Expenses build up over time, good thing about tennis play well and then the income comes in as it should.

Considering at the advanced age Brown has had a breakthrough, this is why the top 100 and to stay there is the goal for many players battling it out on the lower levels of the tour.

Kazakhstan is quite rich due to mineral wealth.

oranges
06-20-2010, 07:04 PM
You're reading what you want to read. I said that most players around the top 100 -even though can lead a luxurious life- manage to make ends meet. That's all. I've noticed you have a tendency to exaggerate things...

No, I'm reading what you're saying - unless he's struggling to make ends meet, there's no excuse. If anyone's exaggerating here and blowing things way out of proportions, it's you.

I don't even like Tomic...

Does it matter? You should consider him a clown as well according to the criteria you set.

Sapeod
06-20-2010, 07:15 PM
:woohoo: Great decision Dustin. The crowd here will love you :yeah:

scoobs
06-20-2010, 07:25 PM
Will he be available for the Turkey tie then?

Sapeod
06-20-2010, 07:28 PM
Will he be available for the Turkey tie then?
He might be.

scoobs
06-20-2010, 07:29 PM
*cackles*

what a joke.

ah well whatever, money talks

Sapeod
06-20-2010, 07:31 PM
he's going to meet the dc captain at wimbledon. if he can get a british passport and citizenship soon, he might be able to play the turkey tie.

decrepitude
06-20-2010, 07:53 PM
The article says he would need 2 years residency. :shrug:

I'm a bit ambivalent about the whole idea, I would have thought Germany would be a better choice if he wants to change. But as for GB accepting him - well, I suppose, if you can't grow your own you go and buy them :lol:

PiggyGotRoasted
06-20-2010, 07:55 PM
The article says he would need 2 years residency. :shrug:

I'm a bit ambivalent about the whole idea, I would have thought Germany would be a better choice if he wants to change. But as for GB accepting him - well, I suppose, if you can't grow your own you go and buy them :lol:
Its doubtful he would get into the Germany team

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 08:15 PM
I don't see what the big deal is. People leave their country for a new one with perceived better opportunities all the time. The majorities of the populations of North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand are where they are precisely because of this concept. Ditto for a substantial portion of people in Western Europe. It's called immigration. If Dustin Brown thinks he's going to have a better opportunity to advance his career and build a more comfortable life for himself by switching nationalities then go for it. That's called being smart.

And since when was providing better opportunities for people called "buying" them? If I could advance my station in life by moving to Kazakhstan I probably would too. I guess every immigrant to the US ever was just "bought" (aside from slaves of course, who were in fact purchased)?

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 08:25 PM
Shouldn't you able to learn as decent living as possible? The top 100 is the promised land pure and simple, can play a mix of ATP events and challengers, with some league money on the side. There is a thread on here ladder to success read it and then you it's explained clearly.

It clearly depends on a player's priorities. To some honouring their country is more important than money. To some it isn't.

Considering at the advanced age Brown has had a breakthrough, this is why the top 100 and to stay there is the goal for many players battling it out on the lower levels of the tour.

Of course that any player will strive to get as high in the rankings as possible...

Kazakhstan is quite rich due to mineral wealth.

No it isn't. The country might be rich in natural resources but that doesn't mean it's rich or wealthy or anything. In point of fact, it's miles away from being rich.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 08:34 PM
It clearly depends on a player's priorities. To some honouring their country is more important than money. To some it isn't.


Like all cases are the same, one situation doesn't suit all. It's not the amateurs anymore.

Of course that any player will strive to get as high in the rankings as possible...

Once they do that, then the financial situation increases.

No it isn't. The country might be rich in natural resources but that doesn't mean it's rich or wealthy or anything. In point of fact, it's miles away from being rich.

There is enough money for them to be able to buy tennis players on both tours, so they can't exactly poor. They aren't paying people in vodka are they? It's developing quite well economically and having some big infrastructure projects, far from the backwater you are painting it out to be.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 08:34 PM
No, I'm reading what you're saying

Hardly.


unless he's struggling to make ends meet, there's no excuse. If anyone's exaggerating here and blowing things way out of proportions, it's you.

Let's see, shall we?

I said: "while they [most of the players ranked around the top 100] certainly can't afford to live a luxorious life- they manage to make ends meet without the help from their Federations."

However, for who knows what reason, you took that as if I meant this: "Yeah, he's so swimming in money now (...) You're acting like he's in top 10 for years and just greedy for money."

I'd explain the differences between the two but that would be just to embarass you.


Does it matter? You should consider him a clown as well according to the criteria you set.

I don't know the family story of Tomic and I don't even care. For some reason you also said he was my "favourite" loud mouth even though I have said to you before that I don't like him. I have no idea why you keep bringing him up here.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 08:41 PM
Like all cases are the same, one situation doesn't suit all. It's not the amateurs anymore.

Exactly, and I'll partly make my opinion of a player based on his decisions on and off the court. This decision of Dustin is something I feel very strongly about. That's all.


Once they do that, then the financial situation increases.

Of course.

There is enough money for them to be able to buy tennis players on both tours, so they can't exactly poor.

True but I never said it was poor either.

They aren't paying people in vodka are they? It's developing quite well economically and having some big infrastructure projects, far from the backwater you are painting it out to be.

You're reading what you want to read here. All I've said was that it wasn't a rich country (which is very true). I've never painted it as a backwater as you suggest.

oranges
06-20-2010, 08:45 PM
I said: "while they [players ranked around the top 100] certainly can't afford to live a luxorious life- they manage to make ends meet without the help from their Federations."

However, for who knows what reason, you took that as if I meant this: "Yeah, he's so swimming in money now (...) You're acting like he's in top 10 for years and just greedy for money."

I'd explain the differences between the two but that would be just to embarass you.

:lol: Oh please don't embarrass me, plenty of other ways to read you sentiments other than if you're can scrape by, you don't betray your country. :lol: I don't mind embarrassing you so I'll explain, even though it shouldn't be needed, I was ridiculing the position that he should be happy where he is now, suck it up and play for the country that did nothing to help him get where he is now, which you admitted is by no means a luxurious life.


I don't know the family story of Tomic and I don't even care. For some reason you also said he was my "favourite" loud mouth even though I have said to you before that I don't like him. I have no idea why you keep bringing him up here.

So, should we take it you despise him as well because you're a man of principles and he went to another country, judging it's the best thing to do for himself and his career? Or is there a reason why Brown is a traitor and he's not? Perhaps if your family decides, you're excused :hug:

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 08:53 PM
Exactly, and I'll partly make my opinion of a player based on his decisions on and off the court. This decision of Dustin is something I feel very strongly about. That's all.

So you feel strongly that someone should represent a country or federation that did nothing at all for his tennis development. Why should he? Unless there can be some reconciliation.

Where is your criticism of Lisnard for leaving France to play for Monaco.

You're reading what you want to read here. All I've said was that it wasn't a rich country (which is very true). I've never painted it as a backwater as you suggest

Countries have to have a certain amount of financial clout to do that don't they and they are rich enough to do it.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:01 PM
:lol: Oh please don't embarrass me, plenty of other ways to read you sentiments other than if you're can scrape by, you don't betray your country. :lol: I don't mind embarrassing you so I'll explain, even though it shouldn't be needed.

Your exaggerated words are there for all to see. I don't need to embarrass you, that's whay you do, sir.

I was ridiculing the position that he should be happy where he is now, suck it up and play for the country that did nothing to help him get where he is now, which you admitted is by no means a luxurious life

Is it something to be ridicule? Choosing to stay in your nation and instead of playing for another country just because they're willing to pay more.

So, should we take it you despise him as well because you're a man of principles and he went to another country, judging it's the best thing to do for himself and his career? Or is there a reason why Brown is a traitor and he's not? Perhaps if your family decides, you're excused :hug:

Like I said, I don't know Tomic's story and I don't even care. If you would improve your reading comprehension a little bit, you'd know that I have said to you in the past that I don't like him (and yet you tagged him as a favourite of mine) or you wouldn't resort to exaggerations to express yourself and you'd certainly know that I've never used words like "treason" or "traitor" which are also your exaggerated inventions that keep embarrassing you even more.

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 09:07 PM
Is it something to be ridicule? Choosing to stay in your nation and instead of playing for another country just because they're willing to pay more.

It's not just about being paid more. What about having a better opportunity to achieve your dream? He's going to have access to better coaching and training facilities. He'll likely receive assistance traveling to tournaments that he wouldn't otherwise get. He obviously wants to reach the top of the game. Representing another country will likely make that easier. It's not like he's straight-up accepting a bribe. He's accepting assistance to improve his game and to achieve his dream.

On another note, does he even identify that much with Jamaica? It sounds like he hasn't spent a lot of time there in recent years.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:07 PM
So you feel strongly that someone should represent a country or federation that did nothing at all for his tennis development. Why should he? Unless there can be some reconciliation.

Just the country can be truly represented in the sports sense, imo. I would accept if someone would choose not to play for his country on the grounds that the Federation is corrupt. However, to choose another nation to get funding because you can't get it back home is a different story.

Where is your criticism of Lisnard for leaving France to play for Monaco.

I don't know his story but then again, why am I supposed to do it here? This is the thread to talk about Dustin Brown after all. But if it satisfies you, I can say with a lot of confidence that as a general rule I tend to dislike any player (not just in tennis but in general) who chooses to represent a foreign nation just because of money.

barbadosan
06-20-2010, 09:08 PM
[QUOTE=andy neyer;10063757]Your exaggerated words are there for all to see. I don't need to embarrass you, that's whay you do, sir.



Is it something to be ridicule? Choosing to stay in your nation and instead of playing for another country just because they're willing to pay more.


You're getting on as if the nexus of the argument is about which country pays more, and totally ignoring the circumstances that brought him to this decision. If Jamaica had given him some reasonable, even say token support, I could understand, but to reduce it to just one country paying more than the other, is willfully ignoring the entire circumstances.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:12 PM
It's not just about being paid more. What about having a better opportunity to achieve your dream? He's going to have access to better coaching and training facilities. He'll likely receive assistance traveling to tournaments that he wouldn't otherwise get. He obviously wants to reach the top of the game. Representing another country will likely make that easier. It's not like he's straight-up accepting a bribe. He's accepting assistance to improve his game and to achieve his dream.

I agree completely. However, I think some things are more important and I place a pretty high value on the concept of a nation. This is purely how I feel about things and I understand that others don't feel the same. Many people couldn't give a fuck about nationality. I'm not one of them, though.


On another note, does he even identify that much with Jamaica? It sounds like he hasn't spent a lot of time there in recent years.

That's a very valid point. German mother, Jamaican father and hasn't not spent his whole life in Jamaica at all. I don't know he can relate to Jamaica...That's a question only he can answer.

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 09:13 PM
I don't know his story but then again, why am I supposed to do it here? This is the thread to talk about Dustin Brown after all. But if it satisfies you, I can say with a lot of confidence that as a general rule I tend to dislike any player (not just in tennis but in general) who chooses to represent a foreign nation just because of money.

Do you feel this way about normal everyday people who immigrate to a different country? Is it really that offensive to you for people to relocate because another country may have more or better opportunities for them to advance themselves? We're talking about most people in North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand, and a host of people in Europe.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:16 PM
You're getting on as if the nexus of the argument is about which country pays more, and totally ignoring the circumstances that brought him to this decision. If Jamaica had given him some reasonable, even say token support, I could understand, but to reduce it to just one country paying more than the other, is willfully ignoring the entire circumstances.

Well, one thing is the Federation and one thing is the country. If the Federation is corrupt and totally unsupportive, then I'd understand his will not to play for the the country in order to press for the resignation of the guys in charge of the Federation. That would be understandable for a guy who's angry with his Federation and I'd support such decision.

However, to play for another country is a decision that's purely based on self-interest. He's not trying to change things at home, just to get money and the support for a better career.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 09:20 PM
Just the country can be truly represented in the sports sense, imo. I would accept if someone would choose not to play for his country on the grounds that the Federation is corrupt. However, to choose another nation to get funding because you can't get it back home is a different story.

No, you still don't get it. The Jamaican Fed is corrupt, there was always money for officials and others to go on junkets but nothing was put forward to any player development. This is commonplace in the Caribbean and why people and not just them move for better economic opportunities. If you can't get that Jamaican tennis federation doesn't care and the press hardly ever report his wins, why wouldn't he want to try his luck elsewhere if possible. Actually he does want stuff to change at home, but they aren't going to sack the corrupt idiots, so how is there going to be any progression, plus it will take a while before any limited cash can filter through.

Basically what it comes down to is you hate immigration in any form. Each individual case is different, don't judge it on the one size suits all.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:20 PM
Do you feel this way about normal everyday people who immigrate to a different country? Is it really that offensive to you for people to relocate because another country may have more or better opportunities for them to advance themselves? We're talking about most people in North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand, and a host of people in Western and Northern Europe.

No, not really. I hold different standards for sportspeople because they're visible faces that represent a nation. I know you migh not agree with that but it's how I feel...

But for the record, most people in the USA, South America, Australia and New Zealand aren't immigrants. There's a difference between being a immigrant and being a descendant of immigrants.

Winnipeg
06-20-2010, 09:21 PM
andy_neyer...u know nothing about this situation...i have talked to dustin personally about this so you really have no f'ing clue u tool

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 09:24 PM
No, not really. I hold different standards for sportspeople because they're visible faces that represent a nation. I know you migh not agree with that but it's how I feel...

But for the record, most people in the USA, South America, Australia and New Zealand aren't immigrants. There's a difference between being a immigrant and being a descendant of immigrants.

Kevin Pietersen, Strauss, Bogdanovic do you hate them as well.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:27 PM
No, you still don't get it. The Jamaican Fed is corrupt, there was always money for officials and others to go on junkets but nothing was put forward to any player development. This is commonplace in the Caribbean and why people and not just them move for better economic opportunities. If you can't get that Jamaican tennis federation doesn't care and the press hardly ever report his wins, why wouldn't he want to try his luck elsewhere.

I actually understand all that very well but I disagree with the idea of going elsewhere to get better opportunites. Esp. on the case of someone like Brown who being ranked around the 100th shouldn't be a person in desperate need of economic support.

Also, think about the implications of what you suggest. Should all people in third world countries who don't get proper chances at home should just accept the offers of rich nations to play for their countries? I'd really like to hear the opinions of the everyday people of poor countries on this.


Basically what it comes down to is you hate immigration in any form.

That's certainly not true.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:31 PM
Kevin Pietersen, Strauss, Bogdanovic do you hate them as well.

Bogdanovic was 7 when his parents moved with him to Britain. There's no degree of responsibility on his side for that. There is a difference when you choose to represent another country purely because of self-interest when you're older and already with visible talent.

I dunno about the other 2.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:35 PM
andy_neyer...u know nothing about this situation...i have talked to dustin personally about this so you really have no f'ing clue u tool

Maybe I don't. Maybe there is a lot more to this story that I'm not aware of. Who knows?

However, I base my opinions based on what I know. Until then, I'll keep my opinion that Brown is a clown. Cheers :wavey:

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 09:35 PM
No, not really. I hold different standards for sportspeople because they're visible faces that represent a nation. I know you migh not agree with that but it's how I feel...

But for the record, most people in the USA, South America, Australia and New Zealand aren't immigrants. There's a difference between being a immigrant and being a descendant of immigrants.

This is true, but we've certainly benefited from that decision.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 09:36 PM
I actually understand all that very well but I disagree with the idea of going elsewhere to get better opportunites. Esp. on the case of someone like Brown who being ranked around the 100th shouldn't be a person in desperate need of economic support.

Also, think about the implications of what you suggest. Should all people in third world countries who don't get proper chances at home should just accept the offers of rich nations to play for their countries? I'd really like to hear the opinions of the everyday people of poor countries on this.

You think if Brown was not forgotten about and dealing with corrupt stooges who are among the reason he hasn't played Davis Cup for years, would think about playing elsewhere? If you do then you are kidding yourself.

The guy is not swimming in riches, you are making it out that he is some Slumdog Millionaire which is rubbish of the highest order.

It's professional sport deal with it, there is money involved and it's like any other field of business. If there are skills individuals that are desirable to richer nations in their chosen field which provide better facilities and support, then they are going to take advantage of these opportunities.

That's certainly not true,

Sure.

Action Jackson
06-20-2010, 09:40 PM
Bogdanovic was 7 when his parents moved with him to Britain. There's no degree of responsibility on his side for that. There is a difference when you choose to represent another country purely because of self-interest when you're older and already with visible talent.

I dunno about the other 2.

Lisnard has to be a clown then.

Read the first section of this thread, that gives background on the disputes.

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 09:44 PM
I actually understand all that very well but I disagree with the idea of going elsewhere to get better opportunites. Esp. on the case of someone like Brown who being ranked around the 100th shouldn't be a person in desperate need of economic support.

What about someone who's not nearly as highly ranked and is a junior or young pro just starting out? They might have trouble traveling to tournaments, paying for coaches, equipment, etc. These are obviously going to impede their development and may very well prevent them from ever reaching the top 100. Do you fault them for seeking funding elsewhere if they have that opportunity? What if Dustin Brown had chosen to do this 7 years ago when he was just starting his career?

Also, think about the implications of what you suggest. Should all people in third world countries who don't get proper chances at home should just accept the offers of rich nations to play for their countries? I'd really like to hear the opinions of the everyday people of poor countries on this.

Well I'm not from a poor country, but I certainly wouldn't fault someone for doing what he or she feels is best for his or her individual situation.

andy neyer
06-20-2010, 09:49 PM
Read the first section of this thread, that gives background on the disputes.

Already did.

cobalt60
06-20-2010, 09:52 PM
When can one nominate for the ACC ? Inquiring minds want to know.

Getta
06-20-2010, 09:59 PM
Lisnard has to be a clown then.

Andrea Collarini, too.

When can one nominate for the ACC ? Inquiring minds want to know.

i have a very long list and would like to display it as seven columns.

Sapeod
06-20-2010, 10:00 PM
When can one nominate for the ACC ? Inquiring minds want to know.
I PMd AJ about ACC, but he hasn't told me anything :shrug:

Chip_s_m
06-20-2010, 10:02 PM
Andrea Collarini, too.

And Ryan Sweeting. I can't imagine that the Bahamian tennis association is much better than Jamaica's.

cobalt60
06-20-2010, 10:29 PM
I PMd AJ about ACC, but he hasn't told me anything :shrug:

I was being facetious; sorry. And if you still don't understand not to worry.

DanaKz
06-21-2010, 12:56 AM
And Ryan Sweeting.

Sean Berman too.
Whoa, this room is full of clowns!

Smoke944
06-21-2010, 12:58 AM
Carsten Ball?

Action Jackson
06-21-2010, 04:30 AM
And Ryan Sweeting. I can't imagine that the Bahamian tennis association is much better than Jamaica's.

Then there are those Jamaicans who compete for the US in athletics, good for them.

In football there are 3 Croatian players that were raised and went to the state funded academy in Australia Simunic, Seric and Didiluca, they decided to play for Croatia. Business decision.

Filo V.
06-21-2010, 02:38 PM
Melzer def. Brown 6-3 4-6 6-2 6-3

I have to say, I respect Dustin and his story is both heartwrenching and heartwarming, and if he decides to play for the Britain then that is definitely understandable, I think he's overrated on here, in terms of his actual play on court. He has an exciting game to watch, but he's not as good as some of you make him out to be.

Congrats to him making the MD at Wimbledon.

Matchu
06-21-2010, 04:47 PM
He reminds me a little bit of Gael Monfils, and I'm not just saying that because they are both black. He is an entertaining player to watch and a very likable guy. I really hope he represents Jamaica again because he could really get tennis to take off in Jamaica.

As I saw in an interview in Queens they stated he was a marketing dream, and he really is. He is very marketable and if Jamaica pulls their head out and do what they should do they could use him very wisely to grow tennis in Jamaica. If he plays for GBR I will be pretty disappointed because he clearly is mucher more Jamaican than English (but that hasn't stopped anyone else before).

Sapeod
06-21-2010, 04:55 PM
I was being facetious; sorry. And if you still don't understand not to worry.
I know what facetious means :rolleyes:

It's just that doesn't come out very well over the internet.

mackerman
06-21-2010, 06:02 PM
From his post-match interview today:

Q. Are you very disillusioned by the attitude of the Jamaican Tennis Authority?

DUSTIN BROWN: Um, basically saying the same thing over and over again. They're not doing their job. Everybody knows it. Now everybody knows it because I actually start playing in these events.

So I'm just basically repeating myself. They're not doing their job and it's terrible.

Q. And they have never given you any funds?

DUSTIN BROWN: No funds, no coaching, no help. [B]Doesn't really help getting an email two days ago telling me, Congratulations for your wildcard for Wimbledon.:eek::o

I've basically worked really hard and been struggling through and fighting with my parents and everything and I get in in a direct entry, don't have to go through qualifying, it's my second Grand Slam only ‑ the first one was Australian Open ‑ and then you get an email like that from the president, it's like, What are you guys doing at work? Sitting down doing nothing. If the president doesn't know what the No. 1 player is doing, he doesn't care.


I completely agree with Dustin about this. He's the only ranked player Jamaica has on the ATP or WTA Tour. Jamaica only has ONE junior player ranked inside the top 1,000 of the ITF rankings. What exactly are they doing? It's one thing if they genuinely don't have the money to support him, but an e-mail like that shows that they just don't give a shit. If he's eligible to play for Britain, then he should play for a country that would be proud to have a top 100 player representing them.

Getta
06-21-2010, 09:53 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2010-06-21/201006211277140385425.html

D. Brown - 21 June

Monday, 21 June 2010

Q. Well played. Even though you lost, you still managed to entertain the fans out there.

DUSTIN BROWN: Yeah, I realize that. I mean, Jurgen is a great player. I saw his French Open performance, so that was probably not the best draw you could have gotten here. He's is a very good returner.

Just need to play more often against these guys at these events and have these matches, and just also stay focused with my head. You know, once in a while the guy played well, returned well; and then if he's returning well and I'm giving him, in some games where I got broken, you know, one or two easy volleys which I should put away, and I start messing around. Of course I'm gonna get broken, and that's exactly what happened.

Still, I'm very happy with the way I played. I think I definitely gave him a good match. And, yeah.

Q. He seemed to have trouble reading you. Do you actually make up your decision what shot you're gonna play very far in front of...

DUSTIN BROWN: Well, as far ahead as you can. I mean, if the ball comes, then I know what I'm gonna do. Or I switch it last minute. It always depends.
But normally I pretty much have a good idea of what I'm gonna do.

Q. Because some of shots are unorthodox.

DUSTIN BROWN: For other people, yes; for me, no.

Q. Where did you develop the forehand slice? You don't see that too often.

DUSTIN BROWN: Just a coach, Kim Wittenberg, who I always of working with. An American guy. He always told me, especially when I'm playing on fast surface, you know, I'm always trying to go into the net.

So especially on these surfaces, the forehand slice doesn't come you up. So it's even a lot easier hitting that than the topspin ball, because the ball is gonna jump up higher, especially against the guy who pass really well. It helps a lot.

Q. What was the experience like in the days leading up to it?

DUSTIN BROWN: Definitely nice. Nice to be at the tournament. I have my best friend here, my mom, my aunt. It's just been great. I'm gonna stick around for a couple more days, practice, and then head back to Germany.

Q. It's obviously been mentioned about potentially Davis Cup. You haven't played for any country yet, have you?

DUSTIN BROWN: Played for Jamaica in 2002, but I'm pretty sure the cooling off period is 36 months, so I haven't been playing Davis Cup lately at all.

Yeah, that's one of the questions that's been coming very often lately. But I would say that something has to happen from the LTA. If they're interested, then they have to step towards me. Because just changing my nationality now and getting a British passport is not gonna solve the problem.

So have to definitely have an approach from them and then have a sit down.

Q. Grandparent?

DUSTIN BROWN: Yeah, on my dad's side.

Q. Are you very disillusioned by the attitude of the Jamaican Tennis Authority?

DUSTIN BROWN: Um, basically saying the same thing over and over again. They're not doing their job. Everybody knows it. Now everybody knows it because I actually start playing in these events.

So I'm just basically repeating myself. They're not doing their job and it's terrible.

Q. And they have never given you any funds?

DUSTIN BROWN: No funds, no coaching, no help. Doesn't really help getting an email two days ago telling me, Congratulations for your wildcard for Wimbledon.
I've basically worked really hard and been struggling through and fighting with my parents and everything and I get in in a direct entry, don't have to go through qualifying, it's my second Grand Slam only ‑ the first one was Australian Open ‑ and then you get an email like that from the president, it's like, What are you guys doing at work? Sitting down doing nothing. If the president doesn't know what the No. 1 player is doing, he doesn't care.

Q. Obviously we go back to that Cool Runnings and the bobsled team and everything. Are there a lot of sports in Jamaica where is seems as though you're fighting against what's there instead of with?

DUSTIN BROWN: I don't know, because I don't do any other sports in Jamaica. I play tennis. I've definitely come a cross my struggles and troubles over the years. Now you see Usain Bolt. He's getting along fine with them, I guess. I mean, he's a world record holder, fastest man alive, so I guess they're getting along fine.

I don't know. There's nothing ‑‑ anything I can comment on that.

Q. If the Jamaica Federation fixed their attitude towards you and other players, would you play Davis Cup for them, or would you still look to...

DUSTIN BROWN: Well, definitely a lot of things have to change. It's not only about me. You know, I mean, I could care less and say, Okay, I'll just take my stuff, and when I'm done, then it's done. But then why let them get their way?

At the end of time of I'm done playing, maybe the most talented player will be born in 20 years in Jamaica and won't stand a chance because of their system. So that's actually why I'm ‑‑ the only reason or way you can change a system is when you are doing well and people are listening.

I guess it's these tournaments which I'm gonna be playing more in the next couple months and hopefully also years. So all I can say, is if the questions are gonna be asked, I'm definitely gonna answer the questions and say that they're not doing their job.

Q. So if you did get an approach from Britain, you would change but with reluctance, I guess?

DUSTIN BROWN: It always depends. I've played for Jamaica all my life. I'm actually pretty happy to play with Jamaica. Also to be happy which will also kind of like be a thing for Britain, to be one of the only players or to be the No. 1 player.

Because I could play for Germany also because my mom is German; I am German. But in Germany I am No. 13, a Germany has a lot of good players. So Jamaica doesn't have a lot of good players. I'm the only one right now. So it's actually very nice.

And going to a tournament and you see the Jamaican flag, okay, it's there for me and not for another 20 guys. So that's definitely a nice thing.

It's all options. If the LTA would step toward me and definitely offer me things that would help me improve my game and everything just around my game and definitely make my tennis better, then obviously that's one of the things I would have to look at.

Not because I don't want to play for Jamaica anymore. I just have to try to further my career. Anything that would help me definitely is worth listening to and looking at.

Q. 25 is a relatively late age to be making a breakthrough. Why would you say it's taken this time?

DUSTIN BROWN: That's also one of the main things. I don't come from a tennis family, so everything we've gone through, basically, you know, by trial and error. Do you do that? Do you do that? And then you do something and it's like, Okay, it's working, so that's good.

Basically that's it. Not having your own coach over the years. This is actually the first time that I've traveled that I've had now my best friend as my coach here and my mom and my aunt for support.

Normally it's just, you know, the other guys that you know from the tournaments. They will come over and watch your matches, you'll watch their matches. So you have your friends on the tour that will support you, and you support them.

And then on the other side, better now than never.

Q. Did you play many other sports as a kid?

DUSTIN BROWN: When I was young I was actually growing up doing everything because I was a very hyperactive kid. I did football, soccer, judo, swimming, tennis, and actually sometimes even more than one thing in a day. I'd go from judo to swimming and then from swimming to tennis practice.

So I'll go home and then I'll be tired and my parents are like, Okay, now he's going to sleep. Good thing.

Q. Were you better at one or the other?

DUSTIN BROWN: The last things I was doing was basically tennis and football. Then it was basically my parents said, Okay if you want to be really good at one thing you have to make a decision.

I went with tennis because also it's a singles sport and you're responsible for your own good. You could be the best player on the team on one particular day and still lose. Just probably also a little better at tennis than soccer, so that's just what I stuck with.

Q. How old were you when you started playing and how did you get into tennis?

DUSTIN BROWN: I start playing when I was five. We lived knew a tennis court and Germany, and the coach there was actually a Jamaican who was a friend of the family. So I would pass the courts, saw the courts. Sooner or later I said, you know, I want to do this. When I was five, I started playing.

Q. Were you immediately quite good, or did it take a while?

DUSTIN BROWN: Um, when I was playing juniors in Germany I would have days when I would, for example, play against a top junior in my age group where I would do really well or beat them or almost beat them, and then the next day I would play against a kid who basically couldn't hold a racquet and I would lose.

So it was always a little back and forth just focusing and doing the things I was doing. When was young I was playing serve and volley or hitting the dropshots. If you're playing mini tennis and hitting dropshots, it's not good. The guy is two meters away. (Laughing.)

So I guess I'm just building my game all the way up to now. It took a long time, but now, as I said, I won a set today against Melzer. Last year around this time I was playing a Futures in Germany. So it's definitely a far step.

When I played ‑‑ when I saw him play at the French Open he went to the semis. So if someone said, Dustin, you're gonna go to Wimbledon and you're gonna lose in four sets against him, that's okay for me. The guy is a good guy.

Of course I would have loved to win the match, but for today I did my best, and I'm happy with the end result.

Q. Can I ask you about your superstitious. You like the same ball back.

DUSTIN BROWN: I like the same ball, but it's also a thing that I've gotten in the habit of over the years not in rush myself. So if I go back and go for the ball again and wait until I get the ball back, I won't be rushing myself.

A lot of times if I got nervous then I'll be starting to rush myself on the serve back. So if I always wait until the same ball comes back I give myself time.

Q. You also seem to, if you've played a bad shot with a ball, then you get it and put it in your pocket for the remainder of the game.

DUSTIN BROWN: No, actually most of the time I always have a ball in the pocket. I don't know why that is, but I just got used to it. Doesn't really make a difference what ball it is. Just a ball in the pocket.

Q. Do you have any actual superstitions, like don't tread on the lines?

DUSTIN BROWN: No, nothing like that. The game is hard enough as it is. I don't want to make myself any more...

Q. Not during the points.

DUSTIN BROWN: Of course. But, no, I mean, none of that stuff.

Q. What about from here on? The rest of year, what are you looking to achieve?

DUSTIN BROWN: Well, definitely establish myself well inside the top hundred so I will be in the main draw in the Masters Series events and the Grand Slams and in the tour event.

And then over time, hopefully play these matches more often and then start winning rounds at these events and getting further and further. Just have to keep going. It's been an unbelievable year for me.

My goal at the beginning of the year was to be top hundred and to be in the main draw at Wimbledon. It worked out great. I mean, compared to Indian Wells and Miami, where I also played this year, I played terrible. I think I made four games in both tournaments.

So this tournament at this level definitely was a better tournament. Even though I lost it Jurgen, I'm happy with my result.

Q. Where do go from here next?

DUSTIN BROWN: Probably spend a couple more days in London. Practice here. Haven't seen my best friend that often. Also spend time with my family.
Then go back to Germany for a Challenger on clay, then I go back to the States for Newport, and then come back to German for Stuttgart for ATP.

Q. So clay, grass, clay?

DUSTIN BROWN: Yeah, that's what the schedule looks like right now. I mean, not any different. I practice on grass now, on grass or on fast surfaces. Earlier in the year I had a schedule where I was playing clay/hardcourts. On the clay court of course I'm gonna stay back and play from there; but as soon as I go on a faster surface I'm gonna come in.

So it's gonna take couple hours of practice, and then I'll have it back in the system. Should be fine.

Q. Will you play that forehand slice on the clay court as well?

DUSTIN BROWN: Often, but definitely more suitable for the grass or for the faster hardcourts.

Q. Is there something about you that's typical German?

DUSTIN BROWN: I'm always actually on time, and I hate people that are late. It's just a thing that I've always‑‑ the clock on my phone is always ten minutes ahead so I don't get anywhere late.

Q. That's it?

DUSTIN BROWN: Basically, yeah. And the way I look. (Laughter.)

Q. Is it true that the Jamaican tennis president congratulates you for the wildcard in Wimbledon?

DUSTIN BROWN: Yeah, we just said that a few moments ago. Two days ago I got an email. Just sitting there in the bed and it's like, Oh, what are these guys doing?
Basically just saying, Congratulations for achieving the wildcard at Wimbledon.

Q. What's his name?

DUSTIN BROWN: Phillip Gore.

KarlyM
06-21-2010, 10:39 PM
The president of Tennis Jamaica thought he got a WC? What a f--king idiot! :rolleyes:

ShotmaKer
07-01-2010, 07:43 PM
Also, think about the implications of what you suggest. Should all people in third world countries who don't get proper chances at home should just accept the offers of rich nations to play for their countries? I'd really like to hear the opinions of the everyday people of poor countries on this.


I think I can relate to that. We used to have, until a few years ago, the highest ranked African player in the Juniors.

Lofo Ramiaramanana :

http://rijaramasindray.free.fr/fmt/images_produits/16.jpg

i know the dude since he was a little boy, since my coach, with whom I've been training for the most part of my life, was also the appointed coach of the Federation for the promising kids. of course Lofo had his own personal coach too. i saw the kid develop, until he got a grant from the ITF to train in an aggregated Tennis camp in South Africa. that's when he started to compete at international level, and made his way through the Juniors ranking until he became the top African seed.

having said that, the ITF grant was not enough to really make it to the pro Tour as he was still struggling to improve his rankings because he could not afford to play at all the relevant tournaments. he was seeking for more help from the Malagasy Federation. but the Federation is heavily corrupt - I know that they do receive sponsoring from ITF but the money just isn't put to proper use. disappointed, he was considering to play for another country. i think his first choice was Mauritius, but then he picked South Africa.

how do i feel about it ? well, i sure as hell am not happy because it's been a long time since i have cheered for a player from my country on the pro Tour. last player was Dally Randriantefy who was ranked #44 in the world at some point in her career. but it'd be selfish from me to hold that against him. he was trying to make a career out of it, and that implied a lot of sacrifices from his family. i would have done the same if i were him. i just know that the Malagasy Federation and the politics, who never miss an opportunity to get their noise in the sport business as soon as there's some real money at stake, is just corrupt to an extent that it's not worth hoping and waiting for it to improve. Lofo was not the first and probably won't be the last to make such a decision since tennis is a popular sport in Madagascar, with respect to subsaharan Africa in general. he's now ranked between #1100 and #1500 in the world and is training in France. not sure he's ever gonna be a top player though, he's only about 5'7"-8" tall and that's really not enough to compete with the top guys today.

tennischick
07-02-2010, 02:38 AM
not sure that these islands have the resources to support a sport like tennis. if Dustin had chosen to play soccer or cricket, Jamaica would have found the money. but tennis? it just doesn't count.

Action Jackson
07-15-2010, 05:13 AM
not sure that these islands have the resources to support a sport like tennis. if Dustin had chosen to play soccer or cricket, Jamaica would have found the money. but tennis? it just doesn't count.

Yes, there are limited resources this is without a doubt but they didn't offer any support.

Doesn't help when the Jamaican tennis president didn't know he got into Wimbledon directly.

yonexforever
07-15-2010, 02:30 PM
Im not surpirsed the Jamaican Tennis Gods havent taken a more active role.
His ahem.. birthplace/economy etc may have a lot to do with why he has gotten no support.
There are also politics involved.. there is an ongoing war of words which wont help either.
I scanned the yardie press for news of his exploits in Rhode Island for example and found nothing!
Now that may be more of a cosequence of the local sports writers unfamiliarity with the enormity of his succes and their general non interest in Tennis to begin with.

I still think its exciting to see his results, wish I could actually see him play in person.
Im hoping he plays the Open.
I dont think he should hold out any hope for any funds form Jamaica at this point.
Its a shame though really for the entire Caribbean, the weather seems tailor made to produce a top flight player, and there is a large tennis playing, though affluent community.
He probably should have tried to get private corporate support which is how other sports/athletes get and supplement travel money etc.

HoorayBeer
07-15-2010, 03:50 PM
Maybe if he showed he could win a Grass tournament he would get supported by JTF the way USTA supports Rajeev.

Action Jackson
09-03-2010, 07:27 AM
Good for him, that he will get a TV match irrespective of the result.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2010/sep/03/us-open-andy-murray-dustin-brown


Camper van kid Dustin Brown aiming to stall Andy Murray

• Pair face off in second round of US Open
• Jamaican says he does not envy Murray



They have never met, never even spoken. "Well, I know him from the TV, yeah," says Dustin Brown of Andy Murray, who will make him more famous in New York today than he might ever have dreamed while slogging around Europe in his camper van for years, picking up small cheques in small towns.

Brown does not make it on to TV often, except when he crashes the party like he has done this week at the US Open, blitzing the Spaniard Rubén Ramírez Hidalgo in straight sets in the first round. Even that match, out on uncovered court eight, went under the television radar.

Murray did not see it. He was still finishing off the Slovak Lukas Lacko in the literal and figurative glare of Arthur Ashe Court, the featured TV match on ESPN. So this, without question, is the biggest day of the Jamaican's eight-year career, and may be one of the Scot's trickiest if Brown gets his booming serve going as he did when he aced Hildago 21 times on Wednesday. For that reason alone, the fourth seed will not take Brown lightly, a hungry opponent 119 places below him in the world rankings. The likelihood is that Murray's wicked return of serve will check Brown's power.

If they were to make a tennis version of Trading Places, Murray and Brown would provide perfect story material. On one side of the net there is the complex, intense Scot, reluctant owner of a red Ferrari, with more than $12m (£7.8m) in the bank and counting, who does not have a coach because he let the last one go and has not yet sifted through the candidates for the job of guiding his career to the next high point. He travels with his friends, family and trainers, has a condominium in Florida and every expectation of one day being No1 in the world.

Facing him is the freewheeling, dreadlocked hipster whose wind-in-the-hair, nomadic existence on the circuit has earned him an average of $29,182.50 a year, roughly an eightieth of Murray's annual income. The gap between immense wealth and scraping-along money is reflected in the rankings. It is a ruthless meritocracy.

"The last year has been very good for me," Brown says, "ranked from maybe 400-something to inside the top 100, and that with limited support from federations, limited practice. I think there's definitely much more to come. If I get the chance, financial backing and, you know, have my own coach travelling with me...

"I'm getting a purse of maybe $18,000 here. So I will go home with a plus. If you're playing challengers and you're maybe going to Australia to play a challenger, or to Johannesburg, and you lose in the first round, you could go home with a minus."

Brown does not have a coach, either. He cannot afford one. So his friend Daniel Puttkammer, a Swiss who has done a bit of coaching in the past, is with him. Does he not envy Murray just a little? "Well, it depends. There are a lot of people who have a lot of money. But it also depends if you're still a free person. I'm very free. I can do what I want. If I don't feel like playing, for example next week, then I'll go home.

"Being in his position and having his type of money, there are a certain amount of contracts that you're tied down to and definitely rules you have to follow.

"So that's why, probably, I don't have any contracts, besides Topspin Clothing and Air Berlin, because of playing Bundesliga [Germany's club league tennis]. I've been free most of my life. I'm definitely looking to make sure I don't give away too much of my freedom and have other people deciding for me where I have to play, where I have to train. Then I just can't perform good."

They are not trading places tonight, then, just fizzing forehands, drop shots and maybe even the odd stare. It is not a fairy tale. Not yet. Not unless there is an almighty upset. When we turn the TV back on for the third round, in all probability it will be Murray's determined features we will see. But Brown's will light up New York for a while.

Action Jackson
09-15-2010, 11:29 AM
Good that Dustin has made the ATP uncovered.

http://tinyurl.com/326x8qy

laurie-1
09-15-2010, 12:47 PM
I would be more than happy to see Dustin Brown represent Britain. Not only is he a natural athlete with talent and potential if he gets good coaching, he would certainly get the British public excited with his unorthodox style, he would give Tennis a good profile here and get youngsters excited, precisely what British Tennis needs.

Horatio Caine
09-15-2010, 03:44 PM
He won't become British.

I watched the BBC clip of him during the US Open (as a preview to the Murray match) and he said that the LTA hadn't got back to him. It is probably safe to say that they won't, considering that it is likely he will soon fall away a little from the main spotlight. Besides, while he is a nice crowd-puller, his general playing ability isn't that much better than that of Boggo or Ward imo...him playing for us isn't going to significantly boost our prospects.

Obviously the other main issue is his age, and whether it is true that he has to play under our flag in normal pro events for 2 years. If that is the case, then he'd be at least 28 by the time he is eligible to play Davis Cup, and at the moment we are looking more to the younger players.

I think he even hinted in that BBC clip that he might play for the Jamaica team again...

Filo V.
11-13-2010, 10:21 PM
Dustin is one win away from being in the top 100 and potentially clinching a AO MD position and YE top 100. He's in the finals of Aachen beating Ram in straights in the SF and plays Sijsling in the final. Let's hope he gets it done, he would bring so much to the ATP tour.

kyleskywalker007
11-14-2010, 12:36 AM
Just saw this thread and good luck to Dustin! Seems like he deserves what he is getting. Good on him for not giving up :)

hyperren
11-14-2010, 01:55 AM
...and I guess he's German now.

out_here_grindin
11-14-2010, 02:14 AM
Alright Dustin! I am a little dissapointed that he is now representing Germany but its his decsion and if he feels more German than its good that he made the switch

Hewitt =Legend
11-14-2010, 02:38 AM
I'm surprised it took him this long to switch nations, The Jamacian Tennis Federation is a joke. Hope he wins tomorrow.

BlueSoul Formula
04-28-2011, 01:45 AM
I find this player a very interesting character. Maybe not the best tennis player but I am pleased to see a thread on his life in the tennis world. It's the many stories like this that make tennis a beautiful multi-sided dice

abraxas21
04-28-2011, 01:51 AM
i know i'm mostly alone here but for some reasons i never liked this overhyped sold out rasta bloke.

GlennMirnyi
04-28-2011, 02:57 AM
i know i'm mostly alone here but for some reasons i never liked this overhyped sold out rasta bloke.

Overhyped?

Quite the contrary.

He's way more German than Jamaican... even his English has a German accent.

Tennis Fool
06-21-2012, 03:16 PM
I'll root for him just for his hair!


http://www.wimbledon.com/images/pics/large/b_q03_brown_04_aeltc_n_tingle.jpg

Li Ching Yuen
06-21-2012, 03:17 PM
I heard from Agassi that that is in fact...a wig.

ServeVolley
06-21-2012, 03:34 PM
I watched his match in Halle. He has a huge serve, to go with the hair. :p

mooncreek
06-21-2012, 03:40 PM
You have been deprived of the joy and agony that is watching Dreddy matches. Imagine a really aggressive version of Monfils (he's friends with him and Tsonga). When he's on, it is absolutely beauty and he's a great showman. When he's off, you're wondering what the hell he's doing. Big serve, often at net, better at doubles, loves playing on grass.

I saw him in person at the US Open when he beat Ramirez Hidalgo. His next match that year was on Arthur Ashe Stadium (against Murray) and the large Jamaican contingent in the New York area came out. I highly recommend looking for the first set of that match because his style is clearly not influenced by professional coaching.

When he made the main draw of Wimbledon for the first time, the Brits wanted to claim him from Jamaica (who don't care about tennis) but finally settled on Germany (he was actually born there and does speak German).

octatennis
06-21-2012, 03:45 PM
He used to drive his car throught europe.

tommyg6
06-21-2012, 04:12 PM
I follow Dustin Brown on twitter. He usually answers most of my tweets which is cool. He's a pretty cool guy and I like his style of tennis. I had malibu rum to celebrate his qualifyin win into Wimbledon yesterday.

tommyg6
06-21-2012, 04:13 PM
You have been deprived of the joy and agony that is watching Dreddy matches. Imagine a really aggressive version of Monfils (he's friends with him and Tsonga). When he's on, it is absolutely beauty and he's a great showman. When he's off, you're wondering what the hell he's doing. Big serve, often at net, better at doubles, loves playing on grass.

I saw him in person at the US Open when he beat Ramirez Hidalgo. His next match that year was on Arthur Ashe Stadium (against Murray) and the large Jamaican contingent in the New York area came out. I highly recommend looking for the first set of that match because his style is clearly not influenced by professional coaching.

When he made the main draw of Wimbledon for the first time, the Brits wanted to claim him from Jamaica (who don't care about tennis) but finally settled on Germany (he was actually born there and does speak German).

LOL, the Brits must be desperate. trying to claim players from commonwealth nations lmao. Gotta love British tennis!

SVK
06-21-2012, 07:43 PM
He is a hot mess in a good way...definitely worthy of watching.

gators0708
06-21-2012, 08:37 PM
Love watching him play, he's very good on grass! Hope he's on a tv court!!