Soderking Interviews, News & Articles Thread [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Soderking Interviews, News & Articles Thread

Nolby
12-01-2009, 10:06 PM
I found this interview in the India Times, published today, in preparation for the Chennai Open on January 4, 2019. The other Player Forums have a thread for Interviews, News and Articles, so I thought this would be a good way to initiate it:

Nadal's nemesis, and much more
Ruhi Batra, TNN 1 December 2009, 01:20am IST
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/tennis/interviews/Nadals-nemesis-and-much-more/articleshow/5286165.cms
http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0dZO2vG7Iw9O4/610x.jpg

One of tennis' success stories of 2009, Robin Soderling's rise looks meteoric from afar. But for the Swede, who started the year ranked 17th and won just nine matches in his first 10 tournaments, 2009 has been all about consistency and quality.

He snapped Rafael Nadal's seemingly endless winning streak at the French Open and as a last-minute inclusion at the ATP World Tour Finals in London, beat two of the best players in the world before losing to US Open champion Juan Martin del Potro in a semifinal that saw breathtaking tennis.

In this exclusive interview, Soderling shares his views on tennis, his life and 2009. Excerpts:

When you look back at 2009 - beating Rafael Nadal at the French Open, your first Grand Slam final, making the top 10 - what thoughts cross your mind?
It's been a great year for me. I'm very happy to be in the top 10, it's been my goal for a long time, and now I'm there, it's an amazing feeling.

What is your most vivid memory of that 4th-round match against Nadal?
The tie-break in the fourth set when I was up 6-1 was a good feeling.

Have you seen that tie again on TV?
No, I haven't.

Do you worry that you will forever be remembered as the man who beat Nadal at Roland Garros?
I don't care much but it won't be like that forever. I hope that picture will be erased by other good things.

What are your biggest strengths? Do you think people now consider you a serious threat after the French Open?
I am fairly strong with a big serve and a good forehand. I believe that players have considered me as a threat even before the French Open, I'm just more consistent now.

How difficult is life on the Tour? Andre Agassi talks about how he used to hate tennis and the life that went with it. Marat Safin said he just couldn't take the hotels and flights and training.
I believe everyone feels that way from time to time. You always want what you don't have. But ultimately I love this life. I am sure I will miss it once it's gone.

Agassi's book, Open, has been much in the news. One of the revelations concerns recreational drugs. Do you think that the pressures of being in the limelight takes its toll ?
It is definitely hard to handle all the pressure every week, but it's part of the job. It might just not be for everyone.

Who is Robin Soderling when he's not playing tennis?
I am very easygoing. When I don't play tennis I like to relax and hang out with my friends. My girlfriend would say my biggest hobby away from tennis is to clean, I'm a bit of a neat freak.

Do you have many friends on the ATP Tour? Who do you hang out with?
There are a lot of nice guys on the tour, but I mostly hang out with my girlfriend, my coach and other Swedes.

Do you think it's become impossible now to have a long career?
I wouldn't say it's impossible, but perhaps a bit more challenging. It's very important to work hard physically to prevent injury.

You will be coming to India for the first time, for the Chennai Open (in January). What have you heard about the event and India?
I've only heard very good things about this tournament so I'm sure it will be a great place for me to start the 2010 season. I'm looking forward to playing some good tennis at the Chennai Open 2010 and eating some great food.

Who were the people or players that you admired while growing up?
I never really admired any specific tennis player, but I used to like watching Stefan Edberg play.

Sweden has such a rich tennis heritage. But today you're the only Swede in the top 100...
Sweden is a small country, and to have had so many great players is sensational. As in all sports, success breeds success. I hope I will inspire a few kids to work hard.

What do you think you can do well apart from playing tennis?
I am very athletic, so I'm fairly good at most sports. I don't know if I'm a good cook, but I'm great at ordering food, same same.

What are the five things that you do not travel without?
My girlfriend, my laptop, my cell phone, Kent music and voltaren (anti-inflammatory drug).

swedes_rule
12-02-2009, 07:01 AM
great interview Tim, Thanks! :)

Nidhogg
12-08-2009, 09:39 PM
http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/sa-kan-robin-bli-snabbare_sto2143304/story.shtml

Robin is about to take help by an expert in track & field to improve his techique when running. There has been talk about it since just before the US Open. I actually thought they had already started, cause I've gotten the impression that he has improved his movement lately.

"I want to become stronger, faster, improve my stamina, return better, move better and volley better."

I like the attitude. Always strive to get better.

swedes_rule
12-09-2009, 05:03 AM
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2009/12/Biggest-Upsets-Of-The-Year.aspx

2009 IN REVIEW
The Biggest Upsets of 2009

by ATP Staff

08.12.2009
Robin Soderling© Getty ImagesRobin Soderling ended Rafael Nadal's 31-match winning streak at Roland Garros.

Take a look back at the five biggest upsets of 2009...

1. Roland Garros 4th Round – Robin Soderling d Rafael Nadal 6-2, 6-7(2), 6-4, 7-6(2)

With Rafael Nadal riding a record 31-match unbeaten run at Roland Garros, shockwaves were sent through the tennis world on 31 May as the seemingly indestructible Spaniard was finally beaten in the fourth round.

Chasing an unprecedented fifth successive title at Roland Garros, Nadal was stunned 6-2, 6-7(2), 6-4, 7-6(2) by Swede Robin Soderling, a debutant at the fourth-round stage of a Grand Slam, as a packed Philippe Chatrier court watched on in disbelief. Just four weeks earlier, Nadal had demolished the Swede 6-1, 6-0 in the third round of the Internazionali BNL d’Italia in Rome.

Since making his debut at Roland Garros in 2005, Nadal had lost just seven sets en route to winning four successive titles, but met his match in an inspired Soderling, coached by 2000 runner-up Magnus Norman. Nadal failed to reproduce the blistering form that had seen off former World No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt two days earlier and largely struggled to impose his game at all on Soderling – who in turn played a brave match and maintained a calm demeanour until the last ball.

Soderling executed his forehand to perfection in the first set as he broke serve twice to become the first man to take a set off Nadal at Roland Garros since Roger Federer won the second set of the 2007 final. Nadal restored order by prevailing in a tense second-set tie-break as Soderling’s form began to dip, but the Tibro native was not disheartened as Nadal drew level.

Soderling stepped up to dictate play in the third set and exposed the chinks in the Mallorcan’s armour. He clinched a crucial service break with a strong backhand throwing Nadal off balance to force the error and kept his composure when serving for the set at 5-4 to clinch a two-sets-to-one lead.

Nadal looked set to embark on the inevitable fight back as he broke to lead 2-0 in the fourth set, but an unperturbed Soderling continued to unleash a barrage of fearsome groundstrokes and broke back to love before forcing a must-win tie-break for Nadal. With his title on the line, Nadal was still unable to find his best tennis in the ‘breaker and was powerless to deny Soderling a historic win after three hours and 30 minutes.

“No, defeats never make you grow,” concluded Nadal, who suffered his first-ever loss in a best-of-five-set clay-court match (then 48-1 record). “But you also realise how difficult what I achieved up until today was, and this is something you need sometimes. You need a defeat to give value to your victories.”

It was only the 10th time in the Open Era that the defending champion had failed to reach the quarter-finals at Roland Garros, and it was only the second time in the past 13 Grand Slam tournaments that Nadal had failed to reach the quarter-finals or better.

Soderling built on his superb performance against the 2008 ATP World Tour Champion and went on to reach his first major final, which he lost to Federer.

2. US Open final – Juan Martin del Potro d Roger Federer 3-6, 7-6(5), 4-6, 7-6(4), 6-2

del Potro, FedererIn the first US Open final to go the distance in 10 years, Juan Martin del Potro dethroned five-time US Open champion Roger Federer 3-6, 7-6(5), 4-6, 7-6(4), 6-2 in an epic clash on Arthur Ashe stadium.

Despite his demolition of Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals, del Potro still entered his first major final as the heavy underdog. The Argentine had lost to Federer in all six of their previous meetings, including a crushing 6-3, 6-0, 6-0 defeat at the Australian Open when Federer won 13 straight games from 5-3 in the first set. He was attempting to derail the in-form Federer, who had not lost a match at Flushing Meadows since a fourth-round defeat to David Nalbandian in 2003

The towering “del Po,” known for his laid-back demeanour, struggled with nerves in the first set and a half and in no time at all found himself a set and 3-1 down. That was when his forehand cranked into gear, though. With Federer serving for a commanding two-set lead, del Potro capitalised on a slight dip in the Swiss’ level and two blistering forehand winners saw him heave himself back into contention. Del Potro was a new man. Gone were the shackles of the first set and a half that restricted the right-hander from exhibiting the full force of his ground strokes. He grew in confidence as he forced the set into a tie-break and held strong to close out the set with another forehand winner angled past Federer.

Nerves looked set to hinder del Potro once again in the third set when, after breaking serve to lead 4-3, the Tandil native tightened up – relinquishing the lead before double faulting twice at 4-5, 30/30 to trail by two-sets-to-one. A high-risk strategy in the fourth set proved del Potro’s champion's credentials and he held strong when facing break point threats to force Federer into a tie-break. Ignoring the fever-pitch tension on Arthur Ashe stadium, del Potro took advantage of an early Federer double fault in the ‘breaker and did not look back as he levelled the match, forcing a decider.

Del Potro blew open the match at the start of the fifth set, breaking Federer and holding twice to race to a 3-0 lead. The mighty Swiss was made to rue a missed break-back opportunity in the fifth game as del Potro offered up no further chances and went on to seal the dramatic victory with a second break of Federer’s serve after four hours and six minutes.

The 20-year-old del Potro became the fifth youngest man to win the US Open title in the Open Era and became the tallest Grand Slam winner at 6’6”. He also joined countryman Guillermo Vilas (1977) as the only South American champions at the US Open.

3. US Open 4th Round – Marin Cilic d Andy Murray 7-5, 6-2, 6-2

MurrayThe odds were stacked against World No. 17 Marin Cilic as he went into his fourth-round clash with 2008 US Open runner-up Andy Murray. The Croatian had never advanced to a Grand Slam quarter-final before, never previously defeated a Top 3 player and entered with a 0-3 record against the No. 2-ranked Scot.

Taking advantage of a below-par performance from Murray, though, the then-20 year old enthralled Arthur Ashe stadium with a dynamic display to crush the Briton in the last two sets. After saving four break points in the first set, including two that were set points when he trailed 4-5 15/40, Cilic hit back to earn the first service break of the match at 5-5 as a Murray forehand clipped the net and landed wide. More uncharacteristic loose errors for Murray proved costly as Cilic closed out the one-set lead when the Scot sliced a backhand into the net.

Cilic capitalised on his momentum and his brave, aggressive hitting from the back of the court paid dividends in the second and third sets as Murray had no answer to the Croatian’s dominance from the baseline. Cilic broke serve four more times to set himself up with the chance to serve out victory, and did so in style – with three blistering service deliveries propelling him to match point, which he converted after two hours and eight minutes.

Cilic’s New York fairytale could not continue, though, and the Croatian was ousted in the quarter-finals by eventual winner del Potro.

4. Roland Garros 3rd Round, Philipp Kohlschreiber d. Novak Djokovic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4

KohlschreiberNovak Djokovic came into Roland Garros as arguably the favourite behind four-time champion Rafael Nadal following a stellar clay-court campaign. The Serb reached back-to-back ATP World Tour Masters 1000 finals in Monte-Carlo and Rome (pushing Nadal on both occasions), won the inaugural Serbian Open in Belgrade and then had three match points against Nadal in the Madrid semi-finals before losing an epic four-hour battle in a third-set tie-break.

In contrast, German Philipp Kohlschreiber headed to Paris with a modest record on the clay season, and he had never been beyond the second round at Roland Garros. Djokovic raced ahead 4-1 in the first set and a routine victory looked on the cards. But Kohlschreiber won nine of the next 10 games to blow open the match en route to a stunning 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 win.

"I think I played really one of the best matches ever in a big tournament," said Kohlschreiber.

5. Rogers Cup quarter-finals, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga d. Roger Federer 7-6(5), 1-6, 7-6(3)

Tsonga, FedererWhen Roger Federer goes ahead 5-1 in the third set it’s generally a safe play to make your way to the concession stand to beat the rush. But anyone cutting out early at the Rogers Cup in Montreal this year missed one of the most astounding comebacks of the season.

After dropping a tight first set to big-hitting Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Federer won 11 of the next 13 games to be within one game of sealing his 22nd consecutive victory at 5-1 in the third set. As one of the best closers in the game, victory seemed a mere formality.

But Tsonga reeled off five straight games and then held three match points leading 6-5 with Federer serving at 0/40. Playing his first tournament since the birth of his twin daughters, the Swiss rallied to force a tie-break. But at 3-all Tsonga won the last four points to seal an improbable victory over the two-time former tournament champion.

Invoking one of sport’s enduring truisms, Federer said: "It's never over until it's over… he completely lost his game for an hour there, through the second [and] the third. It was unfortunate I couldn't serve it out."

AgnRus
12-12-2009, 06:24 AM
Soderling: "It was not a tennis elbow"

Robin Soderling downplay the significance of the injury which bothered him during the autumn. "I do not think I will have no trouble in the future" said Soderling to eurosport.se.

http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/atp-tour/2009/soderling-tonar-ned_sto2150750/story.shtml

:dance::rocker::banana:

Nolby
12-17-2009, 02:42 PM
And here is the link to the article (http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/atp-t...41/story.shtml) Nastia found stating that the elbow is huring him again:

http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/atp-t...41/story.shtml

I hope he is ok by the time Doha starts, and pulls out of the unnecessary Abu Dhabi event if he still needs the rest.

Nolby
12-18-2009, 10:30 AM
Robin wins "Suprise Performance of the Year" from Tennis-X.com in their 2009 Tennis Awards (http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2009-12-13/2784.php):

http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2009-12-13/2784.php

Surprise Performance of the Year — Robin Soderling (French Open)

Not the best of friends after Soderling imitated pulling his shorts out of his ass when playing against Rafael Nadal at Wimbledon years ago, the Swede treated the Spaniard like an enemy in their meeting at Roland Garros this year, bullying him off the court. Nadal was ripe for the picking after another long claycourt season, and Soderling simply took it to him — letting his forehand fly, resulting in a lot of unforced errors but also a lot of winners. He knew he couldn’t just sit back and rally with Nadal, and in groundstroke rallies Soderling has the height advantage where the Spaniard’s high-bouncing shots don’t bother him as much as other players. He came in with a game plan and executed, and his forehand was “on.” Not many players can hit Nadal off a red clay court, but the Swede showed how it was done.

Honorable Mention: Nikolay Davydenko (London Finals), Yanina Wickmayer (US Open), Fernando Verdasco (Australian Open), Svetlana Kuznetsova (French Open)


Magnus Norman wins "Coach of the Year" from Tennis-X.com in their 2009 Tennis Awards:

http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2009-12-13/2784.php


Coach of the Year — Magnus Norman

The former world No. 2 and ward to fellow Swede Robin Soderling has taken his charge into the Top 10 for the first time to end 2009, as well as given him the confidence to do what no one has been able to do over the last handful of years — beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open. And the biggest accomplishment for Norman since dating Martina Hingis. “I feel more involved with Robin. He’s younger and listens more. I like that!” said Norman, who formerly coached another Swede, Thomas Johansson, before switching to Soderling near the beginning of the year. Known as a sporadic big-hitter, Soderling has improved his consistency but moreso his attitude under Norman, transforming from a short-fused head case to a more mature player willing to stick it out and grind when things aren’t going his way. “Before starting work with Robin, we looked into what he needed to work on. His mental attitude was an obvious priority. So we talked a lot, discussed things. Before, he was like a teenager on court: now hes a man. He became a great warrior with a cool head. That’s the thing I’m most proud of.”

Honorable Mention: Zlejko Krajan (Safina), Larry Stefanki (Roddick), Franco Davin (Del Potro)

Aaric
12-18-2009, 01:56 PM
Great news :yeah:

Orka_n
12-18-2009, 10:27 PM
Deserved.
I'm happy Norman gets some recognition. If it weren't for him, Robin would never have gotten this far.

*Ljubica*
12-19-2009, 02:50 PM
Congrats to Magnus - seems fully deserved to me :yeah:

Dini
12-19-2009, 04:25 PM
Stefanki and Davin have both done great jobs but no one has influenced a player's temperament as much as Norman has on Soderling this year. Robin used to have the shortest fuse and really go mad at the ball at every opportunitiy; these days under the coaching of Magnus you see him construct points beautifully and pull the trigger at the right times. He's become a better thinker and it has helped the mental aspect of his game too in my opinion. Fully deserved to get that award.

Nolby
12-22-2009, 02:09 AM
Deserved.
I'm happy Norman gets some recognition. If it weren't for him, Robin would never have gotten this far.
More Awards for Robin:

Sports Illustrated,
MOST IMPROVED Player 2009, MEN

Robin Soderling
In addition to beating Rafael Nadal twice, Robin Soderling more than halved his ranking, from 17 to 8. (But how about John Isner, who started the year at 145 and finished at 35, the third-highest American?)

(Note: Franco Davin, the coach of Del Pony, won their Coach of the Year award)
===============================
Sports Illustrated,
Biggest Upset of the Decade, MEN

Robin Soderling
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/si/2009/magazine/specials/2000s/12/12/tennis.highlights.lowlights/robin-soderling-decade.jpg
• Men: Robin Soderling over Nadal, 2009 French Open fourth round. That Nadal lost at Roland Garros for the first time was upset enough. That, as the four-time defending champ, he lost to Soderling -- a modest clay-courter ranked outside the top 20 at the time -- was an all-time shocker. This result laid bare just how competitive men's tennis has become. It also gave some context to Federer's streak of 22 Grand Slam semifinal appearances.
========================
Bleacher Report
MOST IMPROVED Player 2009, MEN
Robin is currently second to Del Potro out of 7 nominees (both Men and Women) in the voting for the Most Improved Player in 2009 for The Bleacher Report: (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/311309-the-most-improved-tennis-player-in-2009-is) http://bleacherreport.com/articles/311309-the-most-improved-tennis-player-in-2009-is . It's basically a two man race at this point, as Robin and Del Pony together have raked in more than 50% of the votes. Vote for Robin when you get the chance. Bleacher Reports argument for Robin winning the award:

Robin Soderling, nominated by JA Allen: Sweden has long been the land of male blond and beautiful tennis players. Led by the enigmatic and immensely popular Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander quickly followed. Stefan Edberg sprang up instantly behind the wily Wilander and made a name for himself at Wimbledon, where his serve and volley game captured the attention of the media and the world.

As the 1990s turned over into the 2000s, it appeared that the once mighty Swedish contingent was on the verge of extinction. Today Robin Soderling is currently the only male Swedish singles player ranked in the top 200. Swedish tennis officials fervently hope the soaring Soderling is about to alter the fate of Swedish tennis.

Soderling, who turned pro in 2001 and lingered on the fringes, always showed promise but never quite living up to his billing. The Swede chose 2009 to fulfill his destiny with his dominating serves and his powerful groundstrokes, enhanced by a backhand almost as potent as his massive forehand.

Starting the year ranked No. 17, in 2009 Soderling began his climb into the top 10. But he started slow suffering with mediocre results and injuries. He lost in the third round at both Rome to Nadal and then at Madrid to Federer.

At the French Open Soderling was seeded 23 and he reached the fourth round of a major for the first time in his career. His next opponent was Nadal, the reigning champion, owner of the red clay of Roland Garros.
The Swede’s defeat of the French Open champion, going for his fifth consecutive victory on the red clay, 6-2, 6-7, 6-4, 7-6, was perhaps the biggest upset of the decade. Soderling is the only person ever to defeat Nadal at the French Open.

Soderling met and lost to Federer in the final. But the world took notice of Swedish tennis as played by Soderling once again. He climbed to No. 12 in the world after his break out performance at Stade Roland Garros.

At Wimbledon, seeded 13th, Soderling once again faced Federer in the fourth round—again the furthest he had ever advanced on the famous grass courts. Although Soderling lost, 6-4, 7-6, 7-6, the Swede’s serve was only broken once by the Swiss.

After Wimbledon, Soderling went on to win the Swedish Open. He became the first Swede to win his country’s tournament since Magnus Norman in 2000. Soderling moved up to No. 11.

An elbow injury slowed his progress during the American hardcourt season. Seeded 12th at the U.S. Open, Soderling made it to the quarterfinals, again his furthest advancement in this major. Inevitably he lost again to Federer.

It was at the Masters Event in Shanghai where Soderling finally cracked into the ATP top 10. The Swede, however, wished to secure a place in the year-end World Tour Finals in London by being in the top eight. That meant he had to do well in Paris at the Paribas Masters.

Unfortunately, Djokovic defeated him in the quarterfinals and ended Soderling’s chance to finish in the top eight.

Ranked No. 9, however, Soderling was the first reserve and when Roddick withdrew, Soderling stepped in. The Swede made it to the semifinals, losing to del Potro and ended the year ranked as the No. 8 player in the world.

Moving up from No. 17 to No. 8 in the world plus scoring perhaps the biggest upset of the year, maybe even the decade makes Soderling a candidate for the most improved player of 2009.
=====================
ESPN
Peter Bodo, Most Improved Player Award for 2009

Robin Soderling
Most improved male: It was a tight race, with guys like del Potro, Fernando Verdasco, Andy Roddick and even Nikolay Davydenko deserving consideration. But at the end of the day, I have to go with Robin Soderling over del Potro, simply because in January of 2009, the idea of Soderling beating Nadal in Paris and ultimately making the ATP World Tour Finals was a far more far-fetched scenario than del Potro winning the U.S. Open.

Nolby
12-22-2009, 02:20 AM
How He Fared in 2009: Robin Soderling Grows Up
Bleacher Report
by Rajat Jain (http://bleacherreport.com/users/94841-Rajat-Jain)
Written on December 19, 2009

http://cdn.bleacherreport.com/images_root/images/photos/000/779/078/RackMultipart.10812.0_feature.jpg?1261247121

One of the (dis)advantages of being a software junkie is I like to come up with weird geeky nicknames without any context, and those are not taken particularly well, especially with the fairer sex. This disappointment is usually covered up by the amusing happiness I get by basking in my own glory of false intelligence.

Robin Soderling was assigned a similar nickname when he created the greatest upset in the history of Roland Garros — BSOD — an acronym for "Blue Screen of Death (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=BSOD) " which we often get while using a Windows Operating System. Soderling became famous after this historic match and his career has steadily progressed after this tournament, rather than being lost after a one off, which further justifies the nomenclature.

Things were not the same for this Swede, though, till he met Nadal at Phillip Chatrier.

Unlike his precedents, he does not possess the ice cool demeanor of Bjorn Borg, the adaptability of Mats Wilander, the elegance of Stefan Edberg, or the raw, but underutilized, talent of Thomas Enquist. And there is only so much that you can achieve with a big serve and a massive ugly forehand which works best only in normalized conditions under a roof.

Yet, mentally stronger people have fought and achieved much better results with even lesser talent that what Soderling had achieved till May this year.

Apart from the deficiencies in his game, Soderling lacked this inherent trait of the Swedes as well. His lack of maturity (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnp9VEb3Vbc) was visibly apparent either when he tried to imitate Nadal or made a fool of himself by incessantly arguing over a straight forward line call against the same player he so hates.

He might not like Nadal for the rest of his life, and this behavior was not expected from a top 20 player, but what it did prove was that Soderling never had any fear while playing against Federer or Nadal, two players who have won numerous matches by mentally defeating their opponent even before the start of the match.

And ironically it was against Nadal, who had brought out the most fragile part of his behavior, when he so effectively turned the tables and revived his ordinary year in which he was facing difficulty winning two straight matches.

To prove that the upset was no fluke, the Swede later launched a dominating victory against Nikolay Davydenko, who himself would go on to enjoy his most successful year and earned a hard fought victory against Fernando Gonzalez to reach his maiden appearance in a slam final, halted only by the person who went on to create history.

Despite his success, Soderling has not been able to solve the Federer puzzle who has beaten him 13 straight times. The heartening fact for him is he is getting closer to solve the mystery with their every meeting.

In Roland Garros, it was an easy three set defeat, which improved to a tight three set defeat at Wimbledon – Federer's favorite surface — and after smashing the racket at the Ashe Stadium, Soderling was a completely different player who almost stretched Federer to a fifth set giving the world No. 1 his toughest competition of the tournament before Del Potro.

Much of Soderling's success has been attributed to his coach Magnus Norman, who has not only improved his physical conditioning and his attitude on court, but added a calming influence on court. Soderling is prepared to play the waiting game of rallying long enough to create opportunities, while his famous relationship with his towel (during changeovers) has helped improved his concentration.

His mental strength was never more visible than in the year's final tournament at London. In his match against Djokovic, he lost three consecutive set points but later rallied to win the first set. In the semi-finals against Del Potro he was serving dangerously at 0-40 down in the first set. Unperturbed, he fired down three aces and two service winners to win five consecutive points, saved the game, and went on to win the first set.

The rejuvenated Soderling may not be that ripe young man who can be looked forward to creating wonders in the coming years. Now 25 years of age, he does not have age on his side to win half a dozen majors, but he will surely look forward to the opening year of the next decade, where he can try to climb into top-5, or win a couple of masters shields.

A major may still seem far fetched, but then many players have won their first major in the late twenties or even the early thirties. Ask Goran Ivanisevic.

If only BSOD can reveal the secret self conversations inside his towel.

Nolby
12-28-2009, 10:19 AM
Soderling Prepares for ‘Gladiatorial’ Battle
Khaleej Times Online (http://www.khaleejtimes.com/index00.asp)
28 December 2009
http://www.business24-7.ae/Articles/2009/12/PublishingImages/12_28_2009/eb46_soderling_28dec_small.jpg
ABU DHABI - Robin Soderling, ranked number eight in the world, surprised everyone – even himself – by making his way to the French Open final earlier this year.

The top ranked Swede reached his first ever Grand Slam, defeating Rafael Nadal to end the Spaniard’s record 31 match winning streak at the tournament and move through to the final against world number one Roger Federer by overcoming Nikolay Davydenko (6-1 6-3 6-1) and Fernando Gonzalez (6-3 7-5 5-7 4-6 6-4).

Soderling lost to the Swiss master (6-1 7-6 6-4) but says he can’t wait for a possible re-match and the chance to get one back against the world’s best player at the Capitala World Tennis Championship.

“Making it through to my first Grand Slam final was a dream come true and something I have aspired to and worked towards my whole life,” Soderling said.

“As any player will tell you, coming up against Roger in a Grand Slam final is always difficult but I’m now very much looking forward to the possibility of playing against him in Abu Dhabi and hopefully going one step better.”

Soderling might just have that chance if he advances through to day two of the Capitala World Tennis Championship and overcomes Federer’s fellow countryman Stanislas Wawrinka on the opening day of the event.

The big hitting Swede will no doubt draw on the success and experience gained in a record year which saw him compile a personal best 47-19 match record during the season. He also reached the quarter-finals (or better) in 11 of his 22 tour-level tournaments.

Following his stunning French Open form, Soderling then went on to earn his first clay-court ATP World Tour title on home soil at the Catella Swedish Open.

In Grand Slam play he posted career-best performances at Wimbledon (fourth round) and the US Open (quarter-finals), losing to Federer both times. He also won one ATP Challenger Tour title at Sunrise, Florida in March and reached the Malaysian and China Opens before the Shanghai Masters where he officially cracked into the top 10 for the first time. Soderling made an impressive performance at the ATP World Tour Final this year, the first time the Swede had qualified for the tournament. He defeated world number two Nadal in his first match, going on to reach the semifinals where he lost out to Juan Martin del Potro.

“It was certainly a great year for me,” said Soderling, who also enjoys playing table tennis and rates his favourite movie is Gladiator.

“I’m now hoping I can carry on that form and get the 2010 season off to the best possible start with wins over the top players competing in Abu Dhabi.”

Soderling started playing tennis at the tender age of five and played in his first official junior tournament in Luxembourg at the age of 14. He became the first Swede to reach the French Open final since his coach Magnus Norman did in 2000 and is currently the only Swede in the top 200 ATP rankings.

AgnRus
12-28-2009, 06:33 PM
MEN'S MOST IMPROVED PLAYER -Robin Soderling

Steve Flink: The Flink Awards 2009

http://www.tennischannel.com/news/NewsDetails.aspx?newsid=6399

Looking at this category strictly in terms of players who are near the top of their profession, I have selected Sweden’s Robin Soderling. At the end of 2008, Soderling was No. 17 in the world. He had finished 2004 at No. 34 and 2006 at No. 25. But he had always struck me as a mindless player until 2009, a man who could self destruct with alarming regularity, a competitor who never seemed to have a Plan B when his A game was not in full working order. I thought he was too uncompromising, going for far too many non-percentage shots on big points.

Across the last year, a lot changed for Soderling, and most of it was for the better. He produced the biggest upset of 2009--- and one of the most significant upsets of modern times--- when he struck down Nadal in the fourth round of the French Open. Nadal was way out of sorts that day as he lost for the first time in five appearances at Roland Garros, and his knees must have bothered him considerably. The fact remains that Soderling was excellent on the dirt, and he brought down Nikolay Davydenko and Fernando Gonzalez to reach his first Grand Slam final before losing to Federer.

Soderling acquitted himself exceedingly well for the rest of the year, made it to London for the ATP Tour World Championships when Andy Roddick withdrew from the event, and reached the semifinals before losing to Del Potro in a close contest. No longer is he a hit or miss player. He has learned to attend to the basics of the game and to rally patiently and probingly until he gets the right opening.

Soderling concluded 2009 at No. 8, and deservedly so. In 2010, he will surely confirm that he belongs in that territory, and perhaps make a strong bid to reach the top 5.

AgnRus
12-30-2009, 06:53 PM
Soderling surges forward

http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091230/SPORT/712299908/1004/rss

http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AD&Date=20091230&Category=SPORT&ArtNo=712299908&Ref=AR&Profile=1004&MaxW=300

ABU DHABI // Robin Soderling does not read press cuttings. He says he cannot worry about what people are writing about him; he only wants to worry about tennis.

Yet if the Swede, who faces Stanislas Wawrinka in Abu Dhabi’s Capitala World Tennis Championship tomorrow, was to glance through recent column inches he might be pleasantly surprised.

After a season in which he defeated two of the three best players in the world, claimed a fourth career title and made the final of the French Open, Soderling is not exactly getting bad press.

In May he pulled off possibly the biggest tennis upset in grand slam history by beating Rafael Nadal in the fourth round of the French Open, bringing the world No 2’s 31-match Roland Garros winning streak in the process.

World No 1 Roger Federer denied Soderling the title in the final, but the 25-year-old proved he was no flash in the pan by reaching the fourth round at Wimbledon and the last eight at the US Open, before he beat Nadal again last month at the ATP World Tour finals in London.

Novak Djokovic, third in the world, and Nikolay Davydenko, ranked sixth, also fell to the big-serving player and Soderling was numbered inside the top-10 for the first time.


In fact, the only criticism levelled at Soderling in recent weeks, and he would have to read his cuttings to find it, is that he does not possess the off-court panache that tennis seems to demand of its stars.

“I would like to ask why that is necessary,” said the world’s new No 8 who, in actual fact, seems approachable, soft-spoken and refreshingly modest.

“I can’t really care what others think of me and I never read newspapers any more. I think I have enough to do thinking about my tennis. I can’t worry about what people are saying.

“I am here to play tennis, I love the sport and when I am on tour I like to spend time with my girlfriend and my family. Perhaps I am not as out-going as some players but you shouldn’t have to give everything of yourself – I try to let my game do the talking.”

Recently, his game has done just that – it’s been shouting in fact. It had a slight stutter in February, caused by a flare-up in his back, but that was forgotten once the clay season began.

Now that he has shaken the injuries that blighted his last few years on tour, Soderling has shed his tag as being simply an indoor fast-court player and added “exceedingly dangerous on clay” to his CV.

“It has been nice,” he said, showing a talent for understatement. “It’s been a long season and it was tough in the beginning because I was out for a while but from the clay season on I had a very good year.”

The highlight was Paris where he beat David Ferrer, four-time champion Nadal, Davydenko and Fernando Gonzalez before losing to Federer. Soderling said confidence gained from that devastating collection of scalps on such a big stage, cannot be overestimated.

“It was great for my confidence,” he said. “I played a lot of matches this year and I won a lot of matches against good players, even though I didn’t play perfect tennis every match. I learned a lot.”

Of course there is room for improvement and Soderling said his best is yet to come. He started 2009 aiming to make the season-ending World Tour finals and break into the 10. He has done that, and those at the business end of the top-10 would do well to watch out for him, although he baulks at setting out his goals in print.

“This year I don’t have specific goals,” he said. “If I concentrate on playing good tennis then I will win a few matches I hope and my ranking will improve.”

It will not affect his ranking but his Capitala match against Switzerland’s world No 21, Wawrinka, is ideal preparation.

“He’s a great player. I played him a few times and we had a lot of tough matches,” said Soderling. “But that’s what I’m looking for – a tough match I can focus on at the start of the season.”

And he could be drawn against Wawrinka again on his seasonal ATP debut at the Chennai Open, two days after the Capitala ends.

Federer, Nadal, Davydenko and David Ferrer, a last-minute replacement for the injured Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, join Wawrinka and Soderling in the Abu Dhabi line up, so the Swede may get another chance to torment Nadal if reaches the final or attempt a maiden victory against Federer if he is successful tomorrow in Friday’s semi-final.

But that, a win against the better-known Swiss, is something Soderling is prepared to wait for.

“I learn something from every match we play, even though he has beaten me every time,” he said of Federer. “We had a couple of close matches where, with a little luck, I could have won but the more times I play him the closer I come to beating him. I never went away from a Federer match feeling I played well. But that’s his skill. He can stop you playing your best. He’s the greatest player in the world.”

Nolby
12-30-2009, 08:19 PM
Thanks for the great article, Nastia. I can't wait for this next match against Wawrinka. It starts in less than 10 hours:

http://i47.tinypic.com/2v0nc5d.jpg

Capitala World Championships (http://www.capitalawtc.com/en/Home.aspx)

Nolby
12-31-2009, 02:16 AM
Swede Taste of Success
http://gulfnews.com/sport/tennis/swede-taste-of-success-1.559800
by Rohan Alvares, Sports Reporter
Published: 00:00 December 31, 2009

Dubai : Making a name for yourself in an era dominated by names like Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal is never easy, but 2009 saw world number eight Robin Soderling do just that, and how.
Not only did the Swede pull of one of the sport's greatest upsets when he stunned Nadal in the fourth round of the French Open - the only man till date to have sent the Spaniard packing from Roland Garros - Soderling carried his dream run all the way to reach a first Grand Slam final where he was stopped by none other than Federer.

And that experience has made the towering 25-year-old confident of going one better in the near future.
Speaking exclusively to XPRESS ahead of the Capitala World Tennis Championship which begins at Zayed Sports City today, Soderling said: "That experience has helped me a lot. The players I beat in Paris, I had beaten them before in smaller tournaments but never in a Grand Slam. I used to make it to the third and fourth round and all of a sudden, I was playing a final. That helps your confidence."

Soderling also believes the men's game has become a more level-playing field today giving players like himself a chance to win a Grand Slam. "The top has gotten tougher. Two to three years ago, Federer and Nadal would be winning everything but today there are 10 or more guys. I consider myself as one of those players with a small chance," he said.

This weekend's event may well be an exhibition, but Soderling insists yet another meeting with Federer or Nadal would be ideal preparation for the new season.

"I always feel I learn a lot from matches with Federer and Nadal. It doesn't matter if I lose. To become a better player, you have to play the best and they are all here in Abu Dhabi."
Soderling also played down his rivalry with Nadal which is said to have begun during their epic rain-hit third round battle at Wimbledon two years ago when the soft-spoken Swede imitated the Spaniard's habit of tugging at his shorts before playing a point.

"Personally I don't know Rafa very well. But he's an amazing player and a great ambassador for the sport. During a match, these things can happen. That match went on for days so it was tough for both of us. But it's all forgotten now," he said.

But it's quite clear who Soderling is a bigger fan of between the world's top two players when asked if Nadal's injury problems had paved the way for Federer's romp to Grand Slam number 14 and 15. "Roger is the best of all time for me. I played them both and I feel he could probably win a lot more Grand Slams in his career even if Nadal is at his best," he replied.

Capitala Carnival
Today
• A chance to meet Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal at the Tennis Village (1.30pm)
• Following the match between Robin Soderling and Stanislas Wawrinka (start after 5pm), one lucky visitor will win an all-expenses-paid trip to Wimbledon courtesy of Etihad Airways.

Daily
The Tennis Village will provide a host of entertainment for the entire family, including a Speed Serve Challenge, Batak machine, player autograph signings, tennis clinics and give-aways. The village is open from 10am daily and free to non-ticket holders

Capitala carnival
Today
A chance to meet Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal at the Tennis Village (1.30pm)
Following the match between Robin Soderling and Stanislas Wawrinka (start after 5pm), one lucky visitor will win an all-expenses-paid trip to Wimbledon courtesy of Etihad Airways.

Daily
The Tennis Village will provide a host of entertainment for the entire family, including a Speed Serve Challenge, Batak machine, player autograph signings, tennis clinics and give-aways. The village is open from 10am daily and free to non-ticket holders

Nolby
01-01-2010, 01:22 AM
I found this article from "The National" on Robin's match yesterday with Wawrinka. It is written from a Wawrinka point of view, and states he is happy that he challenged Robin. The reason I'm posting this is because Stan Wawrinka is a former Top Ten player (ranked #9 in June, 2008) from not that long ago, and is someone that has beaten Roger and has been a personal nightmare for other favorite player, David Nalbandian. The fact that this guy is being called "plucky" for testing Robin and is quoted as saying in the article "I find it inspiring to be so competitive against Soderling,” is hilarious considering Robin's stature a year ago at this very same time. So maybe the first of many articles of people reacting to giving Robin a good match as a "moral victory"? Blows the mind....

Plucky Wawrinka pushes Soderling all the way
Gary Meenaghan Last Updated: December 31. 2009

ABU DHABI // Stanislas Wawrinka, rather than feeling disheartened following his opening-round defeat to Robin Soderling at the Capitala World Tennis Championship, walked off centre court at Zayed Sports City last night with a smile and sense of achievement.

The young Swiss had shown grit and resolve to push the world No 8 to two consecutive tie-breakers, before eventually falling 7-6 (7-4), 7-6 (7-2). Soderling will now meet Roger Federer in today’s semi-final.

In yesterday’s opening set, a determined Wawrinka fought back from a four-game deficit to lead the Swede 6-5, but Soderling showed his own mental strength – and brute force – to powerfully overwhelm his opponent.

The second set was more balanced with each player winning their serve, until Soderling broke to make it 5-4.

Wawrinka, who played Andy Murray in a thrilling match at Wimbledon in the summer, hit an instant reply though, to take the game to 5-5. Having been pushed to a tie-break once again, this time Soderling pulled away to comfortably close out the game and progress to the final four.

Wawrinka says he takes heart from pushing an ever-improving player all the way. His opponent, back in June, reached the final of the French Open, before losing to world No 1 Federer.

“I find it inspiring to be so competitive against Soderling,” said the world No 21, who could have set up a meeting with Federer, his compatriot. “That’s the good thing about playing in exhibitions, when you lose you are not too sad because you are able take the positives. After the first game of the year, I am happy with my game and will use this to motivate me for the next few weeks.”

Wawrinka’s next stop is India, where he will compete in the Chennai Open, which starts next week.

Nolby
01-01-2010, 01:35 AM
Swedes will be back in force, Soderling says
Gulf News, January 1, 2010
http://gulfnews.com/sport/tennis/swedes-will-be-back-in-force-soderling-says-1.560494

http://gulfnews.com/polopoly_fs/leading-the-way-1.560565!image/1304542833.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_475/1304542833.jpg
Robin Soderling hopes many more Swedes will make their mark in world tournaments in the future.
Image Credit: Abdul Rahman, Gulf News

Abu Dhabi : The 2009 French Open finals may have been just the sort of news every Swedish tennis fan was waiting for.

Their No 1 Robin Soderling made it to his first-ever Grand Slam final before losing to Roger Federer while on another promising note, unseeded Daniel Berta became the first Swede to win the boys' title since Kent Carlsson in 1984.

Soderling, who became the first Swede to reach the French Open final since his coach Magnus Norman did in 2000 and is currently the only Swede in the top 200 ATP rankings, said that the Swedes will be back in a few years time.

"The [Swedish] Federation is working in the last couple of years and we have a couple of good, new, young players coming up. Berta has won the French junior event while some girls too are showing promise," Soderling said.

Good displays
"I hope that in a few years there will be a lot more players from Sweden," he said.

After Swedes Bjorn Borg, Stefan Edberg and Mats Wilander had combined to win 24 Grand Slam titles between them, and quite a few others following with some good displays today, it is Soderling battling alone. The French Open finalist is however optimistic that all that will change soon.

"It is like this for every country. You can't be on top every year. It seems like we are coming back a little bit now," he said in reply to a question from Gulf News.

Soderling, who made his debut in the Capitala event yesterday said: "For me, I couldn't have asked for a better start. We have the chance to play matches against the world's best.

"For me it is a great opportunity to get into shape and prepare for the year ahead," said the Swede who before coming here had an impressive season with a 47-19 match record.

He also reached the quarterfinals (or better) in 11 of his 22 tour-level tournaments.

Sexysova
01-01-2010, 09:01 AM
Abu Dhabi R1: Robin Soderling vs. Stanislas Wawrinka

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/6164325ED1B9468A8C74CD39C99F9E7F.ashx?w=148&h=198 vs. http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/5483D739E9D34F4EB633E5F9B1E6A23D.ashx?w=148&h=198

MATCH: http://forum.vaidisova-nicole.com/viewtopic.php?f=80&t=7169&p=12670#p12670

Nolby
01-01-2010, 09:19 AM
Abu Dhabi R1: Robin Soderling vs. Stanislas Wawrinka

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/6164325ED1B9468A8C74CD39C99F9E7F.ashx?w=148&h=198 vs. http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/5483D739E9D34F4EB633E5F9B1E6A23D.ashx?w=148&h=198

MATCH: http://forum.vaidisova-nicole.com/viewtopic.php?f=80&t=7169&p=12670#p12670

So cool! Thank you! :worship:

Should we start a separate video thread? I have quite a few matches including The French Open Ferrer, Rafa, Kolya, Gonzo and Fed matches. And a few others as well. And it seems like in the past year more and more people are creating and uploading matches within a day or two of them being played. We could post them in the Photo Section, but it might be difficult browsing through all the pages of photos to find the videos.

I think we should at this point.

SweTennis
01-01-2010, 04:27 PM
So cool! Thank you! :worship:

Should we start a separate video thread? I have quite a few matches including The French Open Ferrer, Rafa, Kolya, Gonzo and Fed matches. And a few others as well. And it seems like in the past year more and more people are creating and uploading matches within a day or two of them being played. We could post them in the Photo Section, but it might be difficult browsing through all the pages of photos to find the videos.

I think we should at this point.

Yeah, go on.:)

Nolby
01-01-2010, 04:32 PM
Yeah, go on.:)

Okey doke! I think I can have links up for a bunch of vids today if people want to download full matches. I also noticed that the entire matches from the WTFs seemed to available on YouTube right now. :yeah:

Nolby
01-01-2010, 07:06 PM
Soderling Shock for Federer
Jai Prasad V Rai 2 January 2010
Khaleej Times Abu Dhabi
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?xfile=data/sports/2010/January/sports_January15.xml&section=sports&col=
http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0dxu7BQ1phd3L/610x.jpg

ABU DHABI — For Robin Soderling, tonight’s dinner will be relishing while some good night’s sleep will be soothing for accomplishing a deed which has eluded him for quite some time now.

The 24-year-old Swede dispatched World No 1 Roger Federer in a three set 6-7 (8) 7-6 (1) 6-2 semifinal match, much to the disappointment of the nearly- packed stadium at the Capitala World Tennis Championship in the Abu Dhabi Tennis Complex.

In the other match, World No 2 Rafael Nadal had little problems getting past David Ferrer 7-6 (3) 6-3.

The year 2009 has been very good to Soderling, who has improved and has shown amazing consistency. This steady growth has given him the confidence to become a major player as he made a mark, beating the top players in the world. His desire to upset Roger Federer, to whom he had lost 12 times, finally came on a pleasant Friday evening.

Both the players dominated the first set as they managed to hold on to their serves. In the tie-breaker, Federer was in supreme touch as he won 7-6 (8-6).

Federer continued his dominance and went a game up leading 3-1 against Soderling in the second, but the Swede was quick to bounce back as he broke Federer immediately to level it 3-3.

The set again entered the tie-break when both the players held on to their games. In the second tie-breaker, Soderling was way ahead of Federer and only lost just one point in pursuit of his second set victory.

That gave enough confidence for Soderling, entering the decider. He gained the crucial break in the third game and then saved four break points in the next game before breaking Federer again in the seventh game to take the set 6-2.

“He plays really fast and that’s what makes it tough to play against him. But everytime I play him, I feel that I can handle his pace since the last three to four times we have played. “For me the best way to learn is to play matches against him and best players and that is what gives me the confidence,” the French Open finalist said.

Soderling believed that this win would help boost his confidence.

“It’s great to win. It gives me a lot of confidence to start the new year on a high, something that every player wants to do.

“Now I feel like I have beaten all the top guys and I really belong up there now. I could not have asked for a better start with a win against him (Federer),” Soderling said.

Though the shadows during the first set did not pose much of a problem to Soderling, Federer said it was tough for him to play. “It was tough conditions in the first set since there were shadows. With one side shadows and the other sun it becomes difficult.”

The Swiss said that it was disappointing to lose but praised Soderling for his splendid game. “He was good. He is playing really well this season.”

Soderling will meet Nadal in the final on Saturday, while Federer plays Ferrer in the 3/4th playoff.
Spaniard Nadal did not face much of resistance from his countrymate Ferrer. Ferrer looked good at the start holding on to his serves well.

But in the tie-breaker Nadal was quick to wrap it 7-6 (7). The second set was completely lopsided with Nadal wrapping it 6-2.

“I played really well and also served well. I had a few mistakes but totally it was a great game for me. I am really happy to start the season on a winning note,” Nadal said.

Accepting that Soderling would be a tough opponent in the final to beat, he said: “He plays a really good baseline game. He finished the year really well and is high on confidence.”

Sexysova
01-01-2010, 10:03 PM
Abu Dhabi SF: Roger Federer vs. Robin Soderling

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/1327AA13E9744ECD91163A51E0564766.ashx?w=148&h=198 vs. http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/6164325ED1B9468A8C74CD39C99F9E7F.ashx?w=148&h=198

MATCH: http://forum.vaidisova-nicole.com/viewtopic.php?f=80&t=7169&p=12671#p12671

Nolby
01-01-2010, 10:24 PM
Abu Dhabi SF: Roger Federer vs. Robin Soderling

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/1327AA13E9744ECD91163A51E0564766.ashx?w=148&h=198 vs. http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/6164325ED1B9468A8C74CD39C99F9E7F.ashx?w=148&h=198

MATCH: http://forum.vaidisova-nicole.com/viewtopic.php?f=80&t=7169&p=12671#p12671

Oh, that is fantastic! Thanks again, Sexysova! I wish I could give you another good rep! :woohoo:

Nolby
01-02-2010, 01:58 AM
Nadal and Söderling advance through to the final of the Capitala World Tennis Championship
01 Jan, 2010 Capitala World Tennis Championships Web Site
http://www.capitalawtc.com/en/Newsphotos/NewsDetails/10-01-01/Nadal_and_S%c3%b6derling_advance_through_to_the_fi nal_of_the_Capitala_World_Tennis_Championship_2010 .aspx

Rafael Nadal will make his second consecutive appearance in the Capitala World Championship final where he will square up against Robin Söderling, the in-form Swede who stunned world number one Roger Federer today.

Nadal, who lost in the final to Andy Murray last year, looked in fine early season touch against David Ferrer to sweep through to the final, winning 7-6 6-3 in front of a packed Abu Dhabi International Tennis Complex.

The world number two has lost his last two encounters against Söderling, who also ended the big hitting Spaniard’s record 31 match winning streak at the French Open last year, but Nadal says he is ready turn things around.

Nadal said:
“Robin is a really tough opponent. He’s playing really well with powerful shots. He’s coming with confidence and he finished the season very well and right now he’s one of the best players in the world. I’m looking forward to taking him on again.”

“We are playing against the top players in the world. Sure, it’s good for preparation but at the same time, it’s good for your confidence to play good matches against the best players.”

Nadal’s win was overshadowed by the Federer defeat, as he struggled to overcome Söderling’s committed fightback which eventually saw him win 6-7 7-6 6-2.

Federer said:

“I started to struggle a little bit in the third set. I thought he really found his range well. I tried to play a bit more aggressive, try out a few things and change it up, but it didn’t work.”

“It’s about getting in to the rhythm, finding your form, trying out a few things and obviously you do make the wrong decisions at times, especially on a quick court like today.”
Federer will now face Ferrer in a third / fourth play-off beginning at 3pm.

“I’m happy that I’m going to have another chance to play again tomorrow,” he said.

“The crowds really are great here; they love coming out and it’s a lot of fun playing in front of them - they seem like very knowledgeable fans.”

“For the last two years it seems like people love coming out here to watch us play and it seems like a very good date – just look at the field we have.”

It was the first time Söderling had beaten the Swiss Master in 13 attempts.

Söderling said:

“For me, the best way to learn is to play matches against the best.”

“This gives me a lot of confidence for the whole year. I’ve been beating all the top guys so I feel like I really belong up there now.”

“I couldn’t ask for a better start.”

Nolby
01-02-2010, 02:23 AM
Soderling and Wawrinka, On-Court interview - Abu Dhabi 2010 12/31/09
D3AXhwxq9zQ

Soderling beat Federer - Abu Dhabi 2010 - Last game+Interview 1/1/2010
ZSt-168OufQ

Robin Runner-Up Abu Dhabi Trophy Presentation and Ceremonies 2010 1/2/2010

HRouS0fawoE

Nolby
01-03-2010, 12:36 PM
Soderling will not have it easy at Chennai Open
3 January 2010, 04:10pm IST
The Times of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/tennis/top-stories/Soderling-will-not-have-it-easy-at-Chennai-Open/articleshow/5407350.cms)

CHENNAI: For reasons other than his status as the highest ranked player in the singles draw, top seed Robin Soderling of Sweden starts as an overwhelming title favourite in the $400,000 ATP Chennai tournament commencing here on Monday.

The eighth ranked 25-year old Soderling will be arriving here fresh from his maiden win in 13 meetings against Roger Federer whom he beat in an exhibition at Abu Dhabi Friday before losing to Rafael Nadal in the final.

Soderling's claim to fame, thus far, has been the upset victory against 'clay king' Rafael Nadal in the pre-quarter-finals of last year. He lost to Federer in the final that presented the Swiss maestro the only Slam trophy missing in his showcase. In the process, Soderling underlined his growing stature in men's tennis as he broke into top-10 last year.

If seedings hold, then Soderling will be up against Stanislas Wawrinka, the third seed and 21st ranked player from Switzerland in the quarter-finals. Wawrinka, the Lausanne-born 24-year old, who lost to Soderling in Abu Dhabi last week, has had a fairly good 2009 with a victory over Federer at Monte Carlo, and is slated to meet Indian Davis Cupper Rohan Bopanna in the first round.

Bopanna is one of two Indian wild card entries and at 29 years of age, will have to play out of his skin to get past Wawrinka. "It will be a tough match and I am counting on the home support," remarked Bopanna during the draw ceremony Saturday. But then, it will require much more than an adrenaline rush for him to advance.

Placed in the bottom half of the draw is the main home hope, Somdev Devvarman, the surprise finalist last year. Along with Bopanna, the 24-year old Chennai-educated Devvarman was instrumental in putting India back in the Davis Cup World Group last year, and he would need to reproduce that inspirational performance against Germany's Rainer Schuettler in the first round.

Schuettler, at 33, is in the autumn of his career that saw him reach No.5 in 2004, but since then, it has been a gradual slide as he dropped out of the top-100 in 2007 before recovering to his present 85.

However, Schuettler is no stranger to Chennai, having first played here in 1997 when the tournament was shifted from New Delhi and a semi-finalist last year when he conceded a walk-over to Devvarman.

The bottom-half of the draw also includes second seed and defending champion Marin Cilic of Croatia, the second highest ranked player here at 14, besides the fourth seeded Serb, Janko Tipsarevic with the two expected to clash in the semi-finals.

While the 21-year old Cilic, who beat No.2 Andy Murray en route to the quarter-finals of the last year, is scheduled to meet Russia's Igor Kunistyn first up, Tipsarevic will take on the sentimental favourite Carlos Moya of Spain, a wild card entry, in what promises to be an intriguing first round contest.

Moya, winner here in 2004 and 2005, is said to be on his last visit here and has always produced his best in Chennai where he enjoys a huge fan following. His stirring marathon semi-final clash in 2008 against Nadal is still remembered and obviously, the 33-year old Spaniard would like to sign off in style.

Having said that, winner-spotting remains a hazardous pastime given the high level of competition in men's tennis and the discerning feel that at least half-a-dozen players have it in them to come through the 32-man draw unscathed.

Nolby
01-03-2010, 01:21 PM
Interesting article today in Svenska Dagbladet about Robin playing exhos for big money. Did anyone realize that even in losing the finals he earned about 2 million? :eek: Again, please forgive rough translation.

Do not let this become a habit, Robin
http://www.svd.se/sportspel/nyheter/lat-inte-det-har-bli-en-vana-robin_4025263.svd
2 january 2010

by Jonas Arnesen
http://www.svd.se/multimedia/dynamic/00549/soderling-B_549225d.jpg
No showcase tournaments! That is my advice to Robin Soderling for the 2010 season, which begins tomorrow. If he succeeds in avoiding the temptation to make quick money, everything indicates Soderling will be at least as hot as last year.

As the world eight and last year's big surprise, the 25-year-old Robin Soderling is expected during the season to get many lucrative offers to play the money fueled exhibitions.

He accepted the offer from the organizer of the Abu Dhabi and was there for yesterday's Finals defeat to world number two Rafael Nadal. In doing so, he collected the total of around two million in start and prize money.

But because it was an exhibition, it gave Soderling no ranking points, and his victory against Stanislas Wawrinka and Roger Federer are not counted in the statistics.

So what was Robin Soderling really doing in Abu Dhabi just days before his season premiere at the ATP tournament in India Chennai, where he arrived today after a six-hour flight?

Why reduce the only six-week rest period between the seasons and why fly around six hours extra to play a tournament that is meaningless to the sport?

His participation indicated big money and I do not blame for a second Soderling's decision and not the least bit troubled by the total amount of money he made.

On the contrary, it feels natural that he fell for the temptation for the first time in his career to reap substantial benefits by his newfound stardom. But it must not become a habit. At least not if Robin Söderling's primiäry goal is to continue to evolve in order to achieve even greater success. Given his hot form, it is surely just that driving Robin but it does not mean that it is easy for him to say "no" when his agent announces his participation or the organizers offer him this or that thick bundles of U.S. dollars.

The more he says "no" to these offers, the more time he will have to focus on the ATP Tour and that is where the action that determines whether Robin should stay at the top. He reached the top last year and now stands with the difficult task of proving that he is not one in a series of players who reach top only to go into a subsequent season's decline or possibly even collapse off the list.

Through the ages, the biggest stars consistently have said it is difficult to reach the top but it is still easier than to maintain this position and especially true for the season after the big breakthrough.

Söderling's coach Magnus Norman knows what it takes to stay on top and the former world runner-up experience is worth gold during the beginning of the season when many organizers - both to ATP tournaments and showcase tournaments - will outbid each other to get Robin Soderling in the starting field.

A season with multiple rest and exercise periods, and only an occasional showcase tournament is preferable for those who want to stay active all of the eleven-month season, and also increases the chance of finding form at peak periods at Grand Slam and Master 1000 tournaments.

Until early June, Robin has an advantageous position with few ranking points to defend, but he then must defend all the points in the corresponding period last year that took him from 24th to the eighth spot in the rankings. The Dream scenario is that the Swede will have some great successes in the first quarter as he does not have to feel the stress and pressures that will otherwise appear closer we get to the French Open, where of course the 2009 triumphant march began.

I predict (see separate list) that Soderling this season climbs further on the list and then, among other things because he has so much room for new credits in the Master 1000 tournaments. Last season, Robin's best showing was in the quarterfinals and he took only 525 points in those eight tournaments, which was clearly the worst of the players on top.

Nadal has 5 Master 1000 points to defend and although he certainly could offset some of the likely points where he lost at Wimbledon, the 23-year-old Spaniard did not participate in the battle for first place at the end of the year. His constant knee problems are the main reason for why I think he is losing ground on the list where the battle for first place will be between Federer and Novak Djokovic.

Why choose Djokovic as a contender when he now lies more than 2,000 points behind Federer?

The Swiss shall have the Grand Slam two titles (French Open and Wimbledon) and two finals to defend as expressed in points is 6,400, which means that he is in these circumstances may at best gain 1,600 new points.

Federer certainly has a lot to give the top players and could probably take home a 16th and maybe even a 17th Grand Slam title before his career is over but it does not contradict the claim that he has passed the zenith.

We should also remember his five full seasons has been unprecedented in being virtually injury-free and even if the 28-year-old Swiss has a body for less stressful game than many of its competitors, things such as his age will start taking its toll.

Djokovic had an otherwise good 2009 - including a victory and four finals of the Master 1000-played - but the U.S. Open semi-final was his best Grand Slam effort and the score for the four biggest tournaments is only 1530. The 22-year-old Serb, who for years stood in the shadow of Federer and Nadal has a wide range and mastery of all the tennis skills - now he also has the necessary opportunity to become number one. He is only playing the Kooyong exhibition before the Australian Open begins, and should be well rested.

This Tennis season will definitely be more interesting than last year, which was woeful with a number of top players - especially Dinara Safina - who performed horribly in the larger context. Serena Williams was the only one who stood out and if she is motivated and injury-free she will be better again.

Order can not be easily determined - will Justine Henin go all the way after a year and a half of retirement? Anyway, the comprehensive and technical Belgian's awaited comeback is expected on a tour where there are thirteen stereotypical baseliners out of a dozen.

AgnRus
01-03-2010, 02:02 PM
Nadal vs Soderling 2010 Abu Dhabi Exhibition Final

yKel7Reoa0k

Nidhogg
01-17-2010, 09:49 AM
http://answermyquestionjerk.se/magnus/

This is just a quick translation from google.

"The weekend before the Grand Slam is here. Full of people in all areas as locker rooms, cafeteria, fitness center and transportation. I always marvel at what all people do who are here. Anyway, it's wonderful that this year's first Grand Slam starts soon (although it will be 2 months too early). I look confidently forward to the week.
Good training days for us the last 2 days. The balls start to "feel" of the racket and stays a little longer on the tendons. A little more speed in my feet too. We have now scaled down Fysträning and begin preserving some power before the race. Tough lot in the first round. Grannolers is dangerous. Games played in Chennai, where he pressed Cilic and has played evenly against Robin in particular Wimbledon last year. Just assume blåstället!
*** Awesome well done by Sofia to qualify even though she does not play his best tennis. Very strong!
*** Top Players offered entertainment at Rod Laver Arena today to assist victims of the earthquakes in Haiti. Good work!
The weekend before the Grand Slam is here. Full of people in all areas as locker rooms, cafeteria, fitness center and transportation. I always marvel at what all people do who are here. Anyway, it's wonderful that this year's first Grand Slam starts soon (although it will be 2 months too early). I look confidently forward to the week.
Good training days for us the last 2 days. The balls start to "feel" of the racket and stays a little longer on the tendons. A little more speed in my feet too. We have now scaled down Fysträning and begin preserving some power before the race. Tough lot in the first round. Grannolers is dangerous. Games played in Chennai, where he pressed Cilic and has played evenly against Robin in particular Wimbledon last year. Just assume blåstället!
*** Awesome well done by Sofia to qualify even though she does not play his best tennis. Very strong!
*** Top Players offered entertainment at Rod Laver Arena today to assist victims of the earthquakes in Haiti. Good work!
We heard!"

Sofia Arvidsson the bookworm has a good blog on this site as well. I know it's WTA, but her stuff is actually quite funny to read.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=sv&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fanswermyquestionjerk.se%2Fsofia&sl=sv&tl=en

She saved a match point against Domachowska in her first qualifying round and has now made it into the main draw.

MediaRat
01-17-2010, 04:59 PM
It´s great that other people are trying to translate Magnus blog, but I am happy to help out (since I'm from Sweden and got the highest grade in English as well). Since Google translation is not accurate.. ;)

If you want to find all the latest blog entries including the one today, then go to the Chat thread in the Robin Söderling forum and you will find all reflections from Magnus this month from answermyquestionjerk! :angel:

Now keeping our fingers crossed for Robins sholder to stay strong (so it´s not affecting his elbow anymore). Tuesday, 1st round, against Granollers! :woohoo:

Nidhogg
01-17-2010, 05:59 PM
Haha. Tack för tipsen, men jag tycker att blogginlägg gör sig bättre här än i chattråden. Det är för övrigt jag som har översatt många av Pim-Pims blogginlägg. Jag tog mig dock inte tid att översätta just detta mer noggrant. Googles översättningar är rätt så charmiga ibland. :lol:

Sommarsverige
01-17-2010, 08:52 PM
Om ni behöver hjälp så erbjuder jag mig också att översätta artiklarna :) Spelar ingen roll vilka ;)
Tack för all hjälp, är säker på att det finns många som inte pratar svenska som uppskattar det väldigt mycket :yeah:

gam_jonte
01-17-2010, 11:28 PM
Haha, det menar du inte! Många gånger kan det bli helt sjukt :p Måste säga att ni gör ett bra jobb också! Tycker dock inte Magnus bloggar är otroligt speciella, många gånger är det lite för kort info, men det är ju ändå skönt att ha någon som uppdaterar ganska så ofta oavsett. :)

Nolby
01-18-2010, 12:35 AM
Hjälp här är perfekt! Tack! :yeah:

(Observera: Google används för att skriva över på svenska, haha :p)

gam_jonte
01-18-2010, 02:09 PM
Nice Nolby :) Didn't know that google translation could be used in that way aswell. So how is it done, you write what you want to say in english and then it translates into swedish? :p

Nolby
01-18-2010, 03:23 PM
Nice Nolby :) Didn't know that google translation could be used in that way aswell. So how is it done, you write what you want to say in english and then it translates into swedish? :p

No, it's not that good. :p You give "Google Translation Tool" too much credit. I write out something extremely simple it can understand. Then double-check Swedish back to English. :p

Jag måste hitta badrum. :lol:

MediaRat
01-19-2010, 10:17 PM
Latest blog entry from Magnus (Robin´s coach as you all know), translated by myself from answermyquestionjerk.se. Offering my services when I have the time, as some people use google translator and that is not a good tool for this... ;)

- - -
January 19, 2010 by magnus norman
Last update Melbourne 2010

Despite a rather convenient lead of 2-0, it turned into a loss today. Will not say much concerning the actual loss, since you might very well loose against Granollers on a day when nothing is going your way! The important thing though is to analyze why and that of course will take some time!
However, I have to - as main responsible - take some blame for this loss. Robin is, in my point of view, running out of energy totally after playing for 2 hours. There is just no strength left and that is for sure really serious. Even though it was not a well played match, I believe that someone (with Robins force) should be able to "fight down" Granollers. There was no extra power for that today and as I said, that´s no good and something that I have to take responsibility for.
It´s possible to speculate forever, if he had the wrong schedule and should have rested instead of playing certain matches. However, I want to point out that we (meaning only the people close to the daily work) have all the background facts to every decision that is taken. Sometimes you make the right decision and sometimes maybe you should have chosen another path. Only afterwards people get the answers to those questions..
Yes, it´s a tough day.. I am so sorry that we could not provide more entertainment this week, but I promise that we will be back again!

Until then!
- - -

Well, we all know that both Magnus and Robin are fighters! It´s only been 2 weeks of this year and a little shaky start for the World no 8 (who might be a little frustrated that he can not perform as well as he know he can). It would have been great for him to earn some ranking points, as he did not have anything to defend from last year. Hopefully he will get the rest necessary for him to recover with his shoulder/arm and think of a better strategy/planning for 2010, also with a physio coach travelling with him on a regular basis (as a Swedish magazine reported yesterday).

When the going gets tough, the tough get goin' :)

I still believe in Robin :angel:

PS. I was at the Swedish Sport Awards last night and Robin Söderling came in 3rd place for "The best Athletic Performance of 2009". Right after Zlatan!

*Ljubica*
01-25-2010, 05:33 PM
Wasn't sure which thread to put this in, but Robin has just been awarded the final Wild Card for the Rotterdam tournament starting on 8th February. I am going, so will try and bring some reports/updates here.

AgnRus
01-25-2010, 06:03 PM
Wasn't sure which thread to put this in, but Robin has just been awarded the final Wild Card for the Rotterdam tournament starting on 8th February. I am going, so will try and bring some reports/updates here.

Good news:)

Nidhogg
01-28-2010, 01:09 PM
I was also pleased to hear that he'll play at Rotterdam. If he'll just manage to win his first round, which in that case would be his first official win off the season, he should be able to do well there. He will most likely be the third seed, as Nadal is resting for the sake of his knees.

MediaRat
01-28-2010, 11:37 PM
From inside sources, Robin is training just as usual and so far, in a good mood! No signs of injury and full speed ahead (getting everything he needs from his team back home :angel: ).

Let´s just hope their practice is going really well all week (with the right strategy in this process), so that he can perfom at his best!!

Keeping all my fingers crossed for a great tournament, to get the "flow" back and continue his journey in the top 10 field. He has the potential!

PS. Don´t forget to support the Swedish Team at Davis Cup in Stockholm. It's been 12 years since the last time there were DC-matches at the Royal Tennis Hall... so make sure you take the chance while it´s still possible. High class tennis, nice arena!
Paint yourself yellow and blue, or bring a flag, make some noice... Tennis supporters must be better than football fans.. Cmon :worship:

http://dc.ebiljett.nu/

Nidhogg
01-30-2010, 06:59 AM
Ah yeah, the DC tie. I wonder if there's any tickets left by now, haha.

And I look forward to your reports and updates from Rotterdam, Rose. :)

*Ljubica*
01-30-2010, 01:54 PM
Ah yeah, the DC tie. I wonder if there's any tickets left by now, haha.

And I look forward to your reports and updates from Rotterdam, Rose. :)

Will do my best :) Won't be taking a laptop - too much to carry with all my other luggage :rolleyes: So will be reliant on Internet Cafes or (very expensive) connection from Hotel Business Centre - but I'll try my best - even if I make notes and post it all once I get home.

Nolby
02-02-2010, 02:59 AM
Will do my best :) Won't be taking a laptop - too much to carry with all my other luggage :rolleyes: So will be reliant on Internet Cafes or (very expensive) connection from Hotel Business Centre - but I'll try my best - even if I make notes and post it all once I get home.

Maybe you can get Ellen or Noleta to bring their laptops since this tourney is so close to home for them. :p Anyway, I hope you have a great time and I hope you get to see Robin go far in the tournament. It is so crucial that he takes the time to build some points during this time of the year, because he isn't defending anything right now because this was his worst period last year. Maybe he just isn't a Winter player? Anyway, Robin has lots of room in his "Best of 18" for a great ATP500 result. He just has one decent result (Semi in Beijing) in these type of events:

http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx?t=rb

So he should gain points if makes the Quarters, and obviously make huge points if he makes the Semis or Finals. The Rotterdam Tourney web site finally put up the news on his receiving the Wild Card:

http://www.abnamrowtt.nl/main.cfm?pers_id=159&lang=1&c_id=91&site_id=9&main_id=91

Dini
02-02-2010, 10:57 AM
Good luck in Rotterdam, Toad. Let's get a win. :sobbing:

Nolby
02-02-2010, 05:51 PM
Good luck in Rotterdam, Toad. Let's get a win. :sobbing:

Hey Nadine :wavey:

Are you making the trip to Rotterdam with Rosie, Ellen and Noleta this year?

Good to see you. How are studies going?

Dini
02-03-2010, 12:16 PM
Hey Tim :bigwave:

No I'm not. :sad: But I'm still very much looking forward to the tournament - really hoping Robin can do some damage here. He's too good a player not to have a win under his belt two months into the year. Injury is a b!tch. :(

I'm finished with all the studying, finally! I'm confident I've done well, but I still have to wait for the final grades. Thanks for asking. I missed a whole month worth of tennis but there's still 10 months left of this season. :p

Nidhogg
02-03-2010, 06:03 PM
http://tennistalk.com/sv/nyheter/20100127/Söderling_tar_experthjälp

Robin has went to Austria for further treatment on his arm. He's seeing a specialist who has helped many other players who have had issues with the elbow.

Apparently he doesn't feel the injury when he plays, but rather when he's doing everyday stuff, like carrying luggage or saying hi to people.

Nolby
02-04-2010, 09:17 AM
Hey Tim :bigwave:

No I'm not. :sad: But I'm still very much looking forward to the tournament - really hoping Robin can do some damage here. He's too good a player not to have a win under his belt two months into the year. Injury is a b!tch. :(

I'm finished with all the studying, finally! I'm confident I've done well, but I still have to wait for the final grades. Thanks for asking. I missed a whole month worth of tennis but there's still 10 months left of this season. :p

Hey Nadine, :bigwave:

I wrote a long response to your post and Josef's post, but MTF blew up on me again and it never posted. :fiery: Then it was impossible to access MTF for half an hour to find that out.

Short version: It is great that you have the discipline to know when to turn it off and focus on your studies. That is a great quality to have. People missed you quite a bit, but now know you are just very good at being practical. It is good to see you again and hope your grades turn out well.

And hope this Specialist can cure that elbow, because he hasn't been playing the dominating tennis we got spoiled with last year. I hope he isn't making a mistake by coming back too soon at Rotterdam. He should wait until he is 100% before coming back, as it is frustrating to keep seeing him playing at 75% when we know what he is capable of doing. I hope if he plays Rotterdam, it isn't going to affect his recovery time. But it is great to hear he is finally getting the problem seriously looked at.

(I'm copying and saving this on notepad before I hit "Submit Reply" this time :rolleyes: )

Nolby
02-12-2010, 05:51 PM
Soderling Crushes Benneteau, Davydenko Up Next
Rotterdam, The Netherlands

by ATP Staff| 12.02.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/02/2nd-Week/Rotterdam-Friday-Soderling-Routs-Benneteau.aspx

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/3DD5457D7D1A4B3884507FBFDD9E6718.ashx© Getty Images Robin Soderling is looking to reach the Rotterdam final for a second time.

ATP World Tour No. 8 Robin Soderling (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/SA49.aspx) was in a ruthless mood Friday as he crushed Julien Benneteau (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/B747.aspx) 6-0, 6-1 to reach the semi-finals of the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Tournaments/Rotterdam.aspx), an ATP World Tour 500 indoor hard-court event in Rotterdam.

The Swede, who had endured successive first-round losses at the Aircel Chennai Open (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Tournaments/Chennai.aspx) (l. to Ginepri) and the Australian Open (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Tournaments/Australian-Open.aspx) (l. to Granollers) to start the season, showed he is back on top form in the 64-minute rout. The third seed converted all five break point chances he created, while saving the one threat he faced on serve, and won 22 of 32 points on Benneteau’s serve.

Soderling is bidding to reach the final in Rotterdam for the second time, after finishing runner-up to Michael Llodra (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/L428.aspx) in 2008. On Saturday, the Tibro native, who reached his first Grand Slam final at Roland Garros (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Tournaments/Roland-Garros.aspx) (l. to Federer) last year, will take on World No. 6 Nikolay Davydenko (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/D402.aspx), who also impressed in a 6-3, 6-2 dismissal of Jurgen Melzer (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/M762.aspx).
----------------------------------
Other articles have come out now with more insights and quotes from Robin:

"It's tough to say what to improve when you win like this, but I can improve parts of my game. I was lucky to get off to a fast start in the match.

"You can't think about the opponent's feelings - he would do exactly the same thing to me. Once you are up you have to stay really concentrated."

Soderling blew through in to the final four in just over an hour with five breaks of serve against Benneteau, ranked 38th.

The winner improved to 7-2 in Rotterdam, where he played the final two years ago against Frenchman Michael Llodra.

Soderling is into the semis along with top seed Novak Djokovic, who got through Thursday on a walkover when Florian Meyer pulled due to a hamstring pull..

French fourth seed Gael Monfils was aiming for the semis as he played sixth seed and 2007 champion Mikhail Youzhny of Russia.

Soderling said that losing in the first rounds of his only two ATP matches on January in Chennai and Melbourne could have been a blessing in disguise.

"I went home and I was finally able to rest, that was what I had needed after a long 2009 season. "This is the first time in months that I have felt like I was playing my best.

"I played much better today, my game feels like it's going in the right way. I have finally started feeling good and just hope it gets better and better."

Soderling now stands 4-2 over Benneteau, winning his fourth in a row.

Nolby
02-13-2010, 09:40 PM
This is fantastic:

Rotterdam 2010 Soderling Saturday Interview - Thoughts on Beating Kolya and Making Final
RCLlAFlDliE

KingSodaPop
02-14-2010, 04:02 AM
This is fantastic:

Rotterdam 2010 Soderling Saturday Interview - Thoughts on Beating Kolya and Making Final
RCLlAFlDliE

Thank you Nolby for everything you find and post on Robin. This is a great interview! Robin looks so happy! The effort is appreciated. :worship:

I am really looking forward to this Final. It looks like the visit to the doctor in Austria for his elbow might have helped quite a bit. He is looking brand new. :)

Nolby
02-15-2010, 04:52 AM
Robin closes gap on Roddick for #7 Ranking

Only 355 pts now separate them, and he has now put up a nearly 1000 pt gap between himself and #9 Tsonga and #10 Cilic. Remember when he was fighting his tail off at the end of last season to get to #8 and pass Verdasco. It seemed crazy at the time to imagine him competing with Andy Roddick:

New Old This Project Low
Rank Rank Player Week Points Opt
1 1 Federer 0 11350 0
2 2 Djokovic 180 8310 500
3 4 Nadal 0 7520 150
4 3 Murray 0 7300 0
5 5 Del Potro 0 6355 0
6 6 Davydenko 180 5290 180
7 7 Roddick 150 4210 150
8 8 Soderling 500 3855 45
9 9 Tsonga 0 2985 90
10 10 Cilic 0 2970 250
11 11 Verdasco 150 2760 150
12 12 Gonzalez F 0 2710 90
13 13 Monfils 90 2430 45
14 14 Stepanek 0 2240 45
15 20 Youzhny 300 1980 45
16 16 Simon 0 1880 90
17 15 Robredo 45 1845 45
18 17 Haas 20 1830 0
19 18 Ferrer 0 1780 45
20 19 Hewitt 0 1770 0
21 21 Wawrinka 0 1765 100
22 22 Ferrero 250 1760 45
23 23 Berdych 45 1545 90
24 24 Ljubicic 0 1450 20
25 25 Isner 0 1430 10

For a little perspective on Robin's rise, compare Robin and Andy Roddick before the French Open last year. Before RG, they were separated by 19 ranking spots and 2,445 points:

25/5/2009

6 Roddick, Andy (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx) (USA) 4,220 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx?t=rb)
25 Soderling, Robin (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx) (SWE) 1,775 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx?t=rb)

And even 6 months later before the Paris Masters event prior to the WTFs, 4 ranking spots separated them and 1,565 points:


09/11/2009

6 Roddick, Andy (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx) (USA) 4,500 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx?t=rb)
10 Soderling, Robin (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx) (SWE) 2,935 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx?t=rb)


As of today, only 355 points separate them:


15/02/2010

7 Roddick, Andy (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx) (USA) 4,210 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Andy-Roddick.aspx?t=rb)
8 Soderling, Robin (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx) (SWE) 3,855 (http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Top-Players/Robin-Soderling.aspx?t=rb)

Nolby
02-15-2010, 05:29 AM
Thank you Nolby for everything you find and post on Robin. This is a great interview! Robin looks so happy! The effort is appreciated. :worship:

I am really looking forward to this Final. It looks like the visit to the doctor in Austria for his elbow might have helped quite a bit. He is looking brand new. :)

My pleasure, KSP. I'm Tim, by the way. :wavey:

Here is the Victory Interview for the Rotterdam ABN AMRO Champion:

Rotterdam 2010 Final Soderling Interview
TUsMevsApoI

swedes_rule
02-15-2010, 09:11 AM
"I struggled a bit in Australia..."


.... Understatement of the century!!!! :lol:

Nolby
02-15-2010, 10:45 AM
"I struggled a bit in Australia..."


.... Understatement of the century!!!! :lol:

Richard Krajicek during the trophy presentation said "you found your form in this tournament, but in the prior tounaments, you didn't play very well, did you?"

Robin said "Well, Thank you!" sarcastically and the crowd burst out laughing. :lol:

He took it all pretty well. Krajicek said "I'm so sorry" after that, and Robin just nodded and explained why he was playing so miserably (too many matches; not enough rest). It's a pretty funny moment in the trophy presentation. :p

Actually, I'll just add the Trophy Presentation below as the video thread is getting a little messy. Check out around the 1:25 mark. :lol:

Hjjheb7RGj8

Nolby
02-19-2010, 06:05 AM
Robin Soderling ATP Post-Match Interview, After 2nd Round Victory at Marseille Open 13
February 18, 2010

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Nolby
03-20-2010, 03:25 PM
Indian Wells 2010 Friday Soderling Interview After Defeating Andy Murray in QFS 6-1, 7-6 (4)
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Certinfy
03-20-2010, 04:01 PM
Robin is so nice :rolls:

Nolby
03-20-2010, 07:27 PM
Robin is so nice :rolls:

:lol:

Hey Jase, :wavey:

Robin, Birdshit and Assner are the nicest players on the ATP. :p Love your new sig. :lol:

So Tomas gets another rout, over Mugdasco of all players (I can't remember him EVER being on the receiving end of a rout; have to check his stats on ATP, but that is extremely rare), and then gets in another tight match with Rafa and barely loses AGAIN! :mad: I thought sure Robin was going to follow Tomas when he had those break points on Muzza's serve at 6-1, 5-3 and failed to convert and then lost his service serving for the match and then was down 0-30 at 5-6. He gathered himself though, and came back. He is starting to learn how to win those matches where he is imploding...the last step for Tomas, who despite the QF loss, looks in excellent form.

That video interview by the ATP is very flawed, and the microphone is next to the interviewer, and I have the volume jacked all the way and I can't hear what Robin is saying in it. I'm trying to upload a video correcting the audio, but YouTube is blocking me (it says "Not Broadcast Yet" on my end; but that never happens unless they are blocking the attempted publish). If they ever allow it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaxFWRvZe2w

or I also uploaded a small 17 mb video of the interview with audio corrected so one can hear what he is saying:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=SXIC1QK3

Sorry, about not being around at as of late. I have been so busy with work issues and recording matches (sooooo, soooo close....problems are now more about converting .flv files and finding an easier way to make vids professional looking than getting great footage), I haven't even signed into FB or done anything outside Soda Forum all week. Last time I did, I was so far behind on messages and stuff, I had to write to people "I don't have time to write right now" and "I still love Baggy..." and stuff like that. :sad: I hate work! :mad: Work should be against the law. :p

Nolby
03-23-2010, 11:10 PM
The "Live Chat" informal interview done with Tennis.tv before Indian Wells began on March 14, 2010. This is a fantastic interview for one core reason, it is done in English and gives fans in the West (or those who don't speak Swedish :p) a more personal look at his personality:

LUAShGVODrw

Nolby
03-31-2010, 06:28 AM
Interview on March 30, 2010, After Defeating Fernando Gonzalez 6-0, 6-7, 6-2 to make the Quarter-Finals at the Miami Masters :bowdown:
20nKbvqy2yI

SweTennis
03-31-2010, 09:11 AM
You mean the Miami Masters? ;)

minh
04-01-2010, 01:29 AM
You mean the Miami Masters? ;)
Yeah, sure:wavey::wavey:

Nolby
04-01-2010, 02:07 AM
You mean the Miami Masters? ;)

Corrected! :p Thanks!

Nidhogg
04-06-2010, 01:17 PM
Apparently all is not quite well with the knee. I hope he has just put too much strain on it lately and will be ok with rest.

http://www.svd.se/sportspel/nyheter/soderling-knaskadad-igen_4527137.svd

http://translate.google.se/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=sv&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.svd.se%2Fsportspel%2Fnyheter%2F soderling-knaskadad-igen_4527137.svd&sl=sv&tl=en

I guess this explains the bad movement and many errors in the semi, and his overall up and down play in Miami. He did remarkably well to get as deep into the tourny as he did.

Hopefully they won't rush things now, and let the knee mend.

andy neyer
05-21-2010, 02:14 AM
Nice article taken from the DEUCE magazine about Robin.

Robin Soderling is known for his competitive drive and powerful game, but the journey to the top has revealed a new side of Sweden’s lone wolf.

You can tell by the way that Robin Soderling walks that he is a man who knows where he is going: great big strides, arms swinging with purpose and eyes focused dead ahead. And with 195 pounds packed solidly into a 6’4” frame, he is a big-boned Swede built like a lumberjack who crushes the ball like a bare-knuckle bruiser. Robin Soderling definitely plays hardball.

Born between the two great lakes of Sweden in the small town of Tibro, Robin Soderling grew up riding his bicycle to the tennis courts each day. It was here on those chilly bike rides to and from practice that he visualised his dream of becoming a great player.

“We have had a lot of special players in Sweden,” Soderling says. “It helped me to have so many good examples.”

While Soderling paid homage to past Swedish greats, he developed his own plans for greatness. Like a lone wolf he would do it his way, and with a determination as strong as Nordic steel. Fellow Swede and good friend, Johan Brunstrom believes that those early days gave Soderling the confidence for that he is so well known.

“Robin is by far the most competitive person I have ever met in my life”“In his age group back in Sweden there were three to four guys in the 12 & under and 13 & under that were fighting big time against each other every time they played,” Brunstrom recalls. “Robin came out on top of these battles most of the time. I think that created a big confidence from an early stage which helped a lot along the way throughout juniors and on to the pro tour.”

Guiding Robin Soderling through the juniors and into the Top 50 of the South African Airways ATP Rankings was Peter Carlsson, coach of Team Catella.

“Robin lives for his tennis tournaments,” says Carlsson. “He is really committed to being the best. Robin is the kind of guy who will do everything to win a match.”

Robin Soderling’s career could not have gotten off to a better start. At his first event as a professional, an ITF Futures in Sweden, Soderling was the last man standing. He followed that win up with a runner-up finish the very next week.

“That first tournament win just made him more hungry to win the next week,” recalls Carlsson.

Kalle Flygt played the young Soderling both weeks. “You could see that he had a very big game even at that age,” says Flygt. “His movement then was not strong, but he sure had plenty of other weapons. And he hated to lose.”

Ask anyone who has ever known him and they all say the same thing: Robin Soderling absolutely hates to lose. For he is a natural born warrior, a Viking in the truest sense of the word.

“Robin is by far the most competitive person I have ever met in my life,” says good friend and Davis Cup teammate, Robert Lindstedt. “His desire to win is just incredible.”

Joachim ‘Pim-Pim’ Johansson was with Soderling for many of the early years on Team Catella. Both wanted to be number one on the team and they pushed each other daily. According to Carlsson, “the competition was fierce. And not always healthy”.

“He was very competitive and took his own way,” remembers Johannson. “Robin does not fear anyone. This is a strength that he has had all his life. Even when he was 10 and 12 years old, he always had the feeling that he could be number one.”

There is one word that best describes Robin Soderling’s style of tennis: brutal. Smash mouth tennis at its best. His balls are propelled by a deliberate velocity that explodes off his strings like hellfire missiles. While his serve may not have the easy grace of Richard Krajicek’s or the bullwhip snap of Goran Ivanisevic, it is a bio-mechanically efficient service technique that rocks the court like a thunderbolt. Off the ground, Robin packs heavy artillery. The backhand, solid and dependable, is a clean double-handed forearm press that he can take on the rise while changing direction with a split second snap of the hips. And more than a few players have joked that he could be arrested for carrying a weapon (forehand) onto the court.

“There is one word that best describes Robin Soderling’s style of tennis: brutal”No doubt Soderling’s game is high risk. And when that forehand is on target, it is good night, Irene. But it is a game that demands precision, or possibly perfection. That is another trait that people attribute to Robin Soderling: perfection. Nobody knows that better than Nate Ferguson, of P1Tennis, who has customised Soderling’s racquets since 2004.

“Robin is definitely a perfectionist,” Ferguson states. “And I respect him for that. When I met him he was doing a lot of tinkering with his grip, wrapping layer after layer of trainers’ tape around the end. I called it the butt cap flare. We talked about it, and the balance of the racquet a lot and Thomas Enqvist joked that trying to please Robin with his racquet was mission impossible. After a lot of going back and forth, we eventually created a special molded grip of hard foam that never changes its dimensions. And a balance that worked. Robin was happy.”

Yet for all his power and attempts at perfection, something was lacking in Soderling’s repertoire. For years he seemed to be stuck in a rut, trapped between 40 and 70 in the rankings. In fairness to Soderling, he did have some serious injuries that required intensive rehab and long periods away from competition. Former ATP World No. 2 Magnus Norman had a good idea what Soderling needed and when he got the call, he answered it like the former champ he is.

“In the past he was throwing away matches that he should have won. He was affected by the wind, spectators, by things that he could not control,” says Norman. “What I was trying to do when I took over was to change his mentality, make it a strength. But in the beginning we had a rough time together. We were talking a lot, spending a lot of time together. I am sure he was sick of hearing my voice. Then the week before the French Open, he came to me and said, ‘Now I understand. I really understand what you mean.’

“Robin is very eager to learn new things,” continues Norman. “And he is an analyst. Sometimes he comes back to me and says, ‘I don’t really agree with you. Tell me why you think that?’ Then we discuss it more and more until we both agree on a plan.”

Former World No. 1 Mats Wilander says, “He's quite confident in his own ability and I think that's why he made it to the top of the game. I think he should have been there earlier... Robin is very strong mentally and it took someone who had been there and achieved more than him. Magnus knows what he’s talking about, saying the right thing and coming from the right person.”

Soderling must have learned something from Norman, for he was about to send shockwaves through the tennis world.

“He's quite confident in his own ability and I think that's why he made it to the top of the game”It is a few hours before the clash of two titans, Rafael Nadal and Robin Soderling in the Round of 16 match at Roland Garros. Soderling has just finished warming up and is ready to go, but Norman stops him from leaving the court and suggests one more drill. Soderling agrees and one by one, Norman feeds his charge what he loves to eat: inside out forehands.

Like a Gothic beast, Soderling’s black eyes flash with fury as he covers the advantage side of the court with alarming speed and agility for such a large man. Setting his big feet in a semi-open stance, he launches ballistic forehands across the net that explode like bomblets when hitting the court with plumes of red clay spewing up in the air. It is a stroke that looks more like a roundhouse right knock out punch than a part of a game played by gentlemen. Norman is satisfied that Robin is now ready to enter the arena that has been the undisputed throne of the King of Clay, Rafael Nadal.

Thirty-one times in thirty-one contests, the Spaniard has emerged victorious from Roland Garros. There is nothing in the air on this day that would suggest any other outcome. It would go down as a battle of man versus man, a war in the trenches between two heavy hitters. For four punishing sets, they traded blows. In the end it was the challenger, Soderling, who would eventually lift his arms in triumph while the mighty warrior Nadal was hurled to Valhalla.

“Sweden was so hungry for his success,” says Carlsson. “And Robin delivered.”

Brunstrom agrees. “I think the past one and half years he has improved mentally a lot on the court and has learned to accept that everything can’t be perfect all the time,” he says. “He has really showed that he can dig deep and come out on top in a way he didn’t do before.”

Understanding Robin Soderling the person is not as easy as understanding Robin Soderling the player. As a player there is no doubt that Soderling likes to bang – getting on top of the ball early, driving it down into the court like a hammer and nail – by doing so gaining the advantage of leverage. For his opponents, it is literally fighting an uphill battle.

But how do you figure out a man who once said to the press that he did not join the ATP World Tour to make friends? For starters, according to those who know him best, you have to be patient. Listen to what they have to say about the man ranked No. 7 in the world.

“I practised with him a lot over the years,” says Jarkko Nieminen. “When you know him better, he is more open. I think he has always been extremely talented. And he knew it himself. His own expectations were very high and that was a lot of pressure. He has been on the tour a few years, and maybe now he is more experienced he can handle the pressure. And he is putting all the little pieces together.”

“He does not come to people easily,” says Carlsson. “You have to get to know him. Once you do you can see he is a great guy. We had a really good relationship.”

“Robin is one of my best friends on the tour,” claims Robert Lindstedt. “He is really a nice guy.”

“You have to get to know him. Once you do you can see he is a great guy”“Robin has a very strong personality,” states Norman.” You have to develop a feeling when to approach him. But he is more open now than in the past. Expectations have changed a lot. Very interesting to see how he handles the pressure.”

Fernando Verdasco and Robin Soderling are holding their trophies while standing on a raised platform on center court in Barcelona at the end of the ATP World Tour 500 tournament. The finalist Soderling has the microphone in his hand and he begins by thanking the crowd for their enthusiasm and the sponsors for their support. Though they are neck and neck in the South African Airways 2010 ATP Rankings, Soderling praises Verdasco.

“Congratulations, Fernando,” Soderling says. “You played great. And today you deserved to win.”

We have learned that Robin Soderling is a fiery competitor who hates to lose, but just as important we are seeing that Soderling respects how great the level is at the top of the ATP World Tour. In doing so, he exudes even more confidence, for he is man enough to admit it even though he has just gone down in three tough sets to Verdasco.

“He's ready to win a big tournament,” asserts Wilander, a winner of seven Grand Slam titles. “I think he believes he could win a big tournament and I think he's ready to win. He's matured a lot.”

It may have taken Soderling longer than he expected, but there is no doubt that he has finally arrived. And, since Roland Garros last year, he is sitting where he is most comfortable: in the driver’s seat, with one big foot on the gas pedal going full speed ahead.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/DEUCE-Tennis/DEUCE-May-2010/Robin-Soderling.aspx

Aphex
05-21-2010, 02:32 AM
:haha: Let's go you brutal Gothic Viking beast!

minh
05-21-2010, 03:00 AM
Come on Robin, i believe that you will play well in RG, although most people don't like you, I will always support you, my faith never fade away

Gêmeos
05-21-2010, 04:54 AM
Robin,just do yourself.

scoobs
05-21-2010, 08:12 AM
I always worry when I see an article like this - can't help but half-expect a first or second round loss now.

SwedSerbia
05-21-2010, 09:07 AM
Soderling, the king! :worship:

minh
05-21-2010, 09:37 AM
Sweden viking, RObin :), back in yourself at RG

AgnRus
05-22-2010, 04:30 PM
Soderling on session photo :)

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=392888791338&ref=mf

AgnRus
05-22-2010, 04:55 PM
in french....

A la rencontre de... Robin Soderling

http://www.rolandgarros.com/images/pics/large/b_soderling_robin_01_2010_05_22.jpg

Robin Soderling ne parle pas, il psalmodie. La voix est douce, aigüe, timide. Le sourire chafouin et le regard malicieux. L’antithèse du Suédois à la force brute décrochant ses lourdes frappes sur le circuit ATP. Docteur Robin et Mister Soderling, un joueur aussi dur et colérique raquette en main que doux et calme en dehors des courts. Mais dans la détestation de la défaite, les deux visages ne deviennent qu’un. Perdre, le Suédois abhorre tellement ça qu’il a longtemps payé le prix de cette haine anxiogène.

"Son désir de gagner est incroyable. Robin est de loin la personne la plus compétitive que j’ai jamais rencontrée", explique son ami et partenaire de Coupe Davis, Robert Lindstedt, spécialiste du double. Perfectionniste, le n°7 mondial a appris à vaincre ses démons et "arrêter de perdre des matches en s’énervant bêtement sur des facteurs extérieurs à son jeu", assure son coach Magnus Norman.

"Robin a une vraie soif d’apprendre et il est plus ouvert que par le passé. On a eu du mal au début de notre collaboration, je voulais changer sa mentalité et en faire une force. Il a fini par le comprendre", raconte Norman, finaliste comme son élève des Internationaux de France, en 2000.

"Ma routine quotidienne est la même"

Un an après sa finale inattendue l'an passé, Robin revient apaisé et sûr de ses forces. "J’aurais aimé jouer plus de matches avant de venir ici, mais je me sens de mieux en mieux depuis Rome. J’ai de bonnes sensations à l’entraînement. J’entends souvent que la terre battue n’est pas ma meilleure surface, mais je progresse tous les ans", confie-t-il à la veille de son premier tour. Son bilan maigrichon sur terre battue en 2010 n’altère pas la confiance du tombeur de Rafael Nadal l’année dernière.

Dans son comportement, Soderling, longtemps mal aimé, a su évoluer. Mais sans changer les fondamentaux de sa personnalité. "Mon quotidien n’a pas beaucoup changé depuis ma finale ici. Ma routine sur les tournois est la même. Au sein de ma famille non plus rien n’a pas bougé, on parle des mêmes choses. Pour eux, je suis Robin, pas le tennisman connu. J’ai plus de sollicitations médiatiques et extra-sportives mais je pense gérer ça très bien. Avec moi, c’est la même chose depuis que j’ai 15 ans."

Wilander : "Il est prêt pour gagner un Grand Chelem"

Quand on l’interroge sur ses agacements ostentatoires sur le court, l’intéressé assume. "Je sens encore de la colère sur le court, je travaille dessus avec Magnus. Mais bon, on ne parle que de mes défaites à cause de ce trait de caractère, mais on oublie qu’il m’a aussi permis de gagner plein de matches."

Le succès n’a pas changé l’homme. Ni le joueur, toujours aussi certain de ses qualités. Et de ses défauts. Sans se mettre plus de pression que d’ordinaire. "Je suis heureux tous les jours depuis un an, sincèrement." Pour son illustre compatriote, Mats Wilander, "il est prêt pour gagner un Grand Chelem. Il a beaucoup muri."

Mais pour le moment, Soderling ne voit pas plus que loin que le premier tour. "Je n’ai pas regardé le reste du tableau. Ce premier match sera le plus difficile, comme toujours dans les grands tournois." L’obstacle initial s’appelle Laurent Recouderc. Il est Français et 179e mondial. Le public ne sera pas en faveur de Robin, mais il n'en a cure…

http://www.rolandgarros.com/fr_FR/news/articles/2010-05-22/201005221274543505278.html
-----------------------------------------------------------
in English...

Getting to know... Robin Soderling

Robin Soderling doesn’t speak, he sings. His gentle and melodious voice contradicts his wry smile and the mischievous glint in his eye. Is this really the Swede who smashes his way around the ATP circuit? On court, the calm and sedate Doctor Robin gives way to an irate and furious Mister Soderling, and the Swede’s hatred of losing has long been a thorn in his side.

“His desire to win is incredible. Robin is the most competitive person I’ve ever met,” says his friend and Davis Cup partner, Robert Lindstedt, a doubles specialist. Always the perfectionist, the No.7 seed has learnt to control his temper and “stop losing matches by getting angry at things that have nothing to do with his game”, says coach Magnus Norman. “Robin is always keen to learn, and is much more open than in the past. We had trouble working together at first: I wanted to take his energy and make it his force. He finally got the idea,” smiles Norman, himself a French Open finalist in 2000.

"Nothing has changed"
A year on from his win over Rafael Nadal which shocked the world of tennis, Robin cuts a relaxed figure. “I would have liked to play more matches beforehand but, since Rome, I’ve been feeling better and better. I feel great during training. People often say clay isn’t my best surface, but I’m getting better every year,” he says, despite some sketchy performances on red dirt this season.

Soderling was not always a popular figure and has rounded off some of his rough edges, without fundamentally changing his personality. “Nothing has really changed since I made the final here. My tournament routine is still the same. The same goes for my family, we still talk about the same things. For them, I’m still Robin, the famous tennis player. I have more media and non-sporting requests, but I think I’m handling that well. For me, nothing has changed since I was 15.”

Wilander: "He’s ready to win a Grand Slam"
When asked about his displays of temper, Soderling is honest – as you would expect. “I still get angry on court, it’s something Magnus and I are working on. But people only ever talk about my personality when I’m losing. They forget it also helps me win loads of matches.”

So success has not changed Robin Soderling, on or off the court. As a player, he’s still just as sure of his strengths…and his weaknesses, and sees no reason to heap any extra pressure on himself: “Honestly, I’ve been happy every day for a year,” he smiles. And according to his compatriot Mats Wilander, “he’s ready to win a Grand Slam. He’s grown up at lot”.

For the moment, Soderling is just focusing on the first round. “I haven’t even looked at the rest of the draw. The first match is going to be the most difficult. That’s the way it goes in big tournaments.” And that first hurdle is Frenchman Laurent Recouderc, No.179 in the ATP rankings. The public are unlikely to be cheering for Robin, but we can expect to rise above it…

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2010-05-22/201005221274551237791.html

Guille.
05-22-2010, 05:14 PM
the pic:hearts:

Eden
05-22-2010, 11:26 PM
'The man who beat Rafa' is out to repeat his feat of clay

Soderling is forever reminded of famous win as Paris puts a spring in his step

By Paul Newman
Sunday, 23 May 2010

'When I was growing up there were so many good Swedish players,' says Robin Soderling. 'I loved watching tennis on TV. There was always a Swede doing well in every tournament, so it inspired me'

It may not come for a while yet, but Robin Soderling is looking forward to the day when nobody mentions the match he played on 31 May 2009. It was, after all, only a fourth-round encounter and he has played 383 other matches as a professional. He has also won five singles titles, appeared in a Grand Slam final and earned more than $6.3m (about £4.4m) in prizemoney.
For the next fortnight, however, the Swede is prepared for a constant flow of reminders about the result which L'Equipe, the Paris-based sports daily newspaper, playing on the French term for clay (terre battue), described as a tremblement de terre, or earthquake.
You would be hard-pressed to come up with a greater shock in the history of men's tennis than Soderling's four-set defeat of Rafael Nadal at last year's French Open. The Swede was regarded as a journeyman, little more than cannon fodder for the game's big guns as they targeted the biggest prizes.
Nadal, attempting to win the Coupe des Mousquetaires for a fifth time, was the world No 1 and apparently unstoppable on Parisian clay, having won all his previous 31 matches at Roland Garros.
To the eyes of a disbelieving world, however, Soderling blasted the Spaniard off the court with his thunderbolt serves and bludgeoning groundstrokes. He went on to reach the final before losing to Roger Federer.
It was a match that may well define the 25-year-old's career, but Soderling has never watched a video of it and says he rarely thinks about it. "You play so many matches and there's always the next one to think about," he said. "You're never better than your last match. Even if you win a tournament, you might go to the next one and lose in the first round."
The rest of the world, however, is less inclined to forget. Soderling admitted: "For a long time afterwards people came up to me and said: 'Well done against Rafa.' It doesn't happen quite so much now, but at the end of last year I was always hearing people say: 'Oh look, that's the guy who beat Nadal.' It got to the point where I really felt that I didn't want to be remembered just as the guy who had beaten Nadal. Today, though, it's different, because I think I've played well for a while now."
Although Soderling insists that he was on an upward curve before he beat Nadal, he admits that the victory gave him the confidence to take his game to another level. Until that point he had been ranked in the world's top 100 for more than six years without ever looking likely to make a major breakthrough. In 21 previous appearances at Grand Slam tournaments, he had never gone beyond the third round.
"I remember when I first broke into the top 100 in the middle of 2003," Soderling recalled. "I wondered whether I would ever be ranked better than that. I said to my coach: 'At least I reached the top 100.' He said: 'I'm sure you're going to do much better.' But it was tough. There are so many good players out there."
In the wake of last year's French Open, Soderling won the title in Bastad, reached the fourth round at Wimbledon and the quarter-finals at the US Open (losing to Federer on both occasions), made the latter stages at a succession of tournaments and rounded off the best year of his career by beating Nadal and Novak Djokovic, then the world Nos 2 and 3 respectively, on his first appearance at the season-ending Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London. He broke into the world's top 10 and is now at a career-high No 7 in the rankings.
Soderling says he feels no pressure to succeed at this year's French Open, which begins today. "I've played really well at the start of this year and made a lot of ranking points," he says. "Even if I lose in the first round at Roland Garros, I will have made more points than I made last year. I still feel pretty good and it will be nice to go back, especially now that I know I can play well in Paris."
In the wake of Nadal's defeat last year, it emerged that the Spaniard had been suffering knee trouble – he was out of the game for more than two months and was unable to defend his title at Wimbledon – but Soderling had been unaware of his opponent's difficulties. He gives Magnus Norman, his coach, the credit for making him believe that he could dethrone the king of clay.
"Before the match Magnus said that I should imagine seeing the next day's newspapers, that I should picture myself winning," Soderling said. "He told me to believe that I could win."
He sees the rejuvenated Nadal as the favourite at Roland Garros this year, but insists there are "maybe 10 guys in the world who could win". He added: "Of course Rafa's the best in the world on clay and it's not going to be easy to beat him, but nobody can win every match forever, not even Rafa or Roger."
How would Soderling describe his own game? "I think it's solid. I have a pretty good serve, a good forehand, my backhand is pretty solid. Of course there are a lot of things I have to work on, but I don't feel like I have any big weaknesses. If you look at all the top guys, that's how they play. Every aspect of their game is very good.
"I feel pretty much the same as I did a year ago, but I think the big difference is that now I can beat really good players without actually playing my best tennis. If you look at the top players – Roger, Rafa, Murray, whoever – they don't play their best tennis every match. Maybe it's only five times a year that they play their absolute best, although they still play well almost every time and win a lot of matches. I really feel that I've been doing the same for the last year."
Soderling has plenty to live up to given his homeland's tennis heritage, but he says it was an advantage to have been raised in a country accustomed to the success of men like Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander and Stefan Edberg. "When I was growing up there were so many good Swedish players. I loved watching tennis on TV. There was always a Swede doing well in every tournament, so it inspired me a lot."
Borg sends occasional text messages of support and Soderling also has regular contact with Wilander and Thomas Enqvist, who was the Swede he followed most as a boy. Although Soderling has vague memories of Edberg winning his last Wimbledon title in 1990 – he was just five at the time – it was Sweden's Davis Cup victory over the United States in Gothenburg four years later that really fired his imagination.
Soderling has helped to keep Sweden in the Davis Cup's World Group, but it has not been easy. The next highest-ranked Swede in singles is Andreas Vinciguerra at No 280. "When I first started to play on the tour there were so many Swedes," Soderling said. "Travelling around was easier because we all went for dinner and practised together. Now there are just a couple of Swedish doubles players who I hang out with."

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/the-man-who-beat-rafa-is-out-to-repeat-his-feat-of-clay-1980595.html

AgnRus
05-26-2010, 08:02 PM
Day 4 - Robin Soderling
Wednesday, May 26, 2010


Q. You got off to a very good start and never really seemed to be challenged at any point. Were you surprised at how quick and seemingly easy it was?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. Of course, I mean, second round of the Grand Slam, you're not expecting to win that fast. But as you said, I played well and I got off to a great start. Broke him first game and I served pretty well in the first set, so, yeah, it was a good day for me.

Q. What can you say about the condition? Was it really different from the other day? It's much slower?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it was different. It was much colder and a little bit windy. So it was different. It was not the easiest day to play on, but I think I handled it pretty well.

Q. Is it difficult when you're that dominant to keep your focus?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really. You know, I played so many matches so I know that everything can happen. Of course, you have to keep telling yourself that you have to stay focused because otherwise it can change pretty the match can turn pretty quick.
But I think, you know, I did it all the way today. I was still very focused even to the end, and the last game when he played a little bit better, I was still I kept my focus good.

Q. You've had two short matches, pretty easy wins. Do you have a sense of how you're playing or how things might go further ahead in the tournament, or has it been hard to judge where your game is at?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I don't think like that. You know, I'm happy with the two wins. As I said before, it doesn't matter how I play. What matters is that I won two matches and I'm in the third round. And I will always get a new chance to play better and better for every match.
Of course, I'm feeling good. I won two matches pretty easy in straight sets, and I didn't have to run for many hours on court so far, so I feel fresh and prepared for next round.

Q. Do you remember playing a three set match lasting one hour and 11 minutes?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I don't remember. Maybe I did, but I don't remember.

Q. I know that we are at Roland Garros. Everyone is talking about your last year and so on, but I'm Italian. I need your thoughts on Davis Cup, even if it's very far away. I'm sorry. What do you expect, I mean, that could be part of the team then? I mean, because you are the only Swede here in the men's draw. There were times when there were five or six in the top 10. Do you see any change in the future, and why the situation is so bad, I mean, in Sweden that there is only one player, men, and there are two women, if I remember well. First time there are more women than men.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, but I think it's pretty good for a country with only 9 million people to have a top 10 guy and two women in the main draw.
Of course it's bad if you compare to 20 years ago, but what Sweden had back then I don't think any country will have again, not even the biggest countries like France, like U.S., or Spain. So it's been very good.
I know I kind of feel we're coming back a little bit. We have a couple good juniors. Of course, it will take a while, but I think and I really hope in a few years' time we will have at least a few more players on tour again.

Q. So there is only Pim Pim Johansson who can play with you? And who else could play September?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, well, Vinciguerra played a couple matches, and he's a great player when he's healthy; same with Pim Pim. Of course we don't have that many players, but I think when we're all playing well and we're all healthy, we have a good team.

Q. You going to win?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, we at least will try.

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2010-05-26/201005261274878006860.html

AgnRus
05-27-2010, 02:12 PM
Soderling interview from El Pais

Q: How does it feel to come back to Paris as the 2009 runner-up, back when the championship was won by the Swiss Roger Federer?

A: Everybody likes going back to a tournament in which you've done well the year before. However, I've played here many times. I have good memories and others that are bad, even terrible; playing badly and losing early. You've got to focus on yourself; nothing else will work.

Q. "He threw away matches he should have won. He was upset by the wind, by the crowd, by things that weren't under his control". Those are some of your coach's words.

R. Magnus Norman has helped me. We've argued a lot, both in the beginning of our partnership and still now, to make progress. I'm not the kind of person to nod and do what I'm told without asking any questions. I always want to ask questions. I always argue in order to make progress in our work.

Q. Have you been training the mental aspect of the game?

R. Yes, but I still get angry on court! My temperament has won me many matches, but people only talk about those it has made me lose. It's true that my character has made me lose some matches... it's something we're working on. We talk a lot about it.

Q. And what do you say?

A. That it all boils down to my way of thinking. I used to focus in my feelings, in my game. But winning is what matters!

Q. Your countryman Stefan Edberg used to cover his head with a towel when switching sides. So do you. Why?

A. I don't even know when I started doing that. It's something I do when I'm playing in a large court, with many people around, a lot of activity. It's good for me to cover my eyes, take a towel, cover myself so that I can concentrate in what I must do in the next game.

Q. What were you thinking down there when playing against Nadal?

A. Same as always: "What's winning me points?".

Q. And what was it?

A. Striking the ball really well. Serving very well. That allowed me to dictate with my forehand since the beginning. I did a great job with the ball with my forehand and managed to put pressure on him. That's what one has to do against a player like Rafa.

Q. Is there any player who can repeat what you did in 2009?

A. There are at least 20 who can win Roland Garros.

Q. So many?

A. Of course. Nadal and Federer are just the most likely to do it.

Q. Many experts claim that your best surface is fast hard court.

A. The fact that many people say it doesn't make it true.

Q. Is the press unfair for depicting you as an angry Swede?

A. Who cares! That's OK with me. What matters to me is the opinion of the people who really know me. It's really hard to satisfy everyone. It's a given that not everyone likes me. I have to accept that. It would be too difficult, too tough, to be thinking all the time about what people think or journalists write.

Q. You had said you were going to play in Nice because you wanted to get used to clay before Roland Garros, play some matches... But, as in Madrid, you lost in the first round.

A. One match is more than zero! [laugh]

http://www.elpais.com/articulo/deportes/Discuto/avanzar/elpepidep/20100526elpepidep_6/Tes

Nolby
06-05-2010, 02:38 PM
A little catching up to do....Interview on May 30th after the Cilic Win:

Robin Soderling Interview - French Open, May 30 After Defeating Marin Cilic, 4th Round

Robin Soderling (http://www.tennis-x.com/playernews/Robin-Soderling.php) Interview
French Open
Sunday, May 30, 2010

Q. The match with Cilic, many people, myself, we thought it would be a very close match, hard match that maybe you would end up winning. I would think you would end up winning. But it happened much faster. Unexpected score, probably. How did you feel about that? The second question is: Are you happy to face Federer again, although it's not in the final but it's in the quarters?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think first question I think you're always expecting a tough match, whoever you play against. Against Cilic, we never played before, but he's a great server. Against guys like him, it's almost always tough.
But I think the conditions were a little bit tough today. It was windy; it was cold; it was tough to really get in a rhythm. But I think what was the biggest difference between us is I think I served better than him. I had more first serves in, and I was able to dictate play with my forehand a little bit more.
Second one, well, I mean, it's a quarterfinal of a Grand Slam, and I have to play either one of the top four guys. Of course it's tough to play against Roger, but it's all tough matches. I hope for a good match. It's always fun to play against him.

Q. In Abu Dhabi when you won the exhibition, you said or at least you were quoted as saying that the more times you play him, the closer you get to him. I wondered if you could talk about what your best played match against him has been, and what you did right in that match that you might take into this one.

ROBIN SODERLING: We played so many times over so many years now, so it's tough to remember. But I remember a few times I played against him when I came pretty close, especially one in Halle (http://www.tennis-x.com/tournament/Halle.php) a couple years ago when I served and returned really well.
I think that's what you have to do against him, because of course he's the best player in the world. But even against him you will always get a few chances. Then you have to take them, because he won't give you any second opportunities.
You really have to play well in the important points, which he does so well, and that's why he's so good.

Q. A year ago you came here No. 23 seed, I believe; now you're No. 5. Tell us what is so different from a year ago. Maybe part of that is tell us about Magnus Norman and what he has done to change you at all.

ROBIN SODERLING: I don't know if I changed. I think one year ago or two years ago I think I could play really good tennis. My had highest level then was pretty much the same as now, I think.
But of course I'm winning more matches, and I think I'm winning more matches when I'm not playing my best tennis, which I didn't do so often before. That's the biggest change.
Of course, Magnus helped me a lot with a lot of things on and off the court, so he's been really good for me.

Q. You've become more consistent. Is part of that Magnus?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah. Him and also me. We work together as a team. I think we did a really good job. As I said, you know, I have many things to thank him for. He's been really helpful.

Q. I was wondering which would be a more satisfying victory for you, beating Nadal on clay or beating Federer.
ROBIN SODERLING: I don't know, you know. It depends which tournament, which round, whatever, you know.
They're both really tough players to beat. They're No. 1 and 2 in the world. Beating them, it's a great achievement, I think. I think you have to play your best tennis.
It's very difficult, but it's not impossible, which I showed and which many other players showed in the past.

Q. I think the clay court form before this tournament was maybe not the best. Have you been a little scared? And on the other hand, are you surprised now that it's going so well?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, no. I haven't really been scared. Of course I wanted to win more matches than I did, but I think I played in finals in Barcelona (http://www.tennis-x.com/tournament/Barcelona.php), first clay court tournament, and I end up losing in a tough three sets against Verdasco, which is not a bad tournament.
Then of course I had a bad week in Rome (http://www.tennis-x.com/tournament/Rome.php) when I didn't play well at all. But, you know, it can happen to anyone. It can happen to, you know, Roger, Rafa, everyone. They cannot play their best tennis every week.
So it's been I think overall it's been pretty good, but I think of course I wanted to have some more matches before coming into this tournament. But now I played four really good matches, and I'm feeling good.

Q. If I understand you correctly, are you saying that basically the difference between last year and this year and maybe between a top 20 player and a top 3 or 4 player, 5 player, is that you learn how to win without playing at your best level, that is, knowing how to win without being at your top level?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I'd like to think so. If you look at all the top guys, they're not playing the best tennis every week. Maybe you have three or four, maybe five matches in a year where you feel like you play really, really well.
The other 50 matches you still have to win, and then all the top guys, they win a lot of matches against good players without playing the best tennis. I think that's the biggest difference between a guy ranked in the top 10 and the guy ranked in the top 30, 40.

Q. You've cracked that secret. Can you tell us how it's done? Can you give us just one example of knowing how to win when you're not...

ROBIN SODERLING: Of course, winning a lot of matches against good players gives you confidence. I think this year and also last year I won a lot of matches against really good players, so my confidence is good.
You know, in matches like this, it's very often it's a couple of points here and there which decides the match. And then the guy who has the best confidence wins the match and the points most of the time.

Q. Would you prefer quicker conditions for your next match?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I haven't really thought about it, but I think it doesn't really matter. I think I can play well on both slow and faster surfaces and conditions. So, no, not really.

Q. You're not any more an outsider, but you're one of the top players. Does that add more confidence, or does that add more tension? Does it matter at all?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I don't think about it that much, because, you know, doesn't matter if you're ranked 5 or 50 in the world. You still have to win the matches. On court it doesn't matter what your ranking is. You still have to win the matches. I think that's how you have to think.

Q. Has your life changed at all off the court since you've become a top 10 player?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, no, not that much. Of course, it's been a little bit more hectic. I do more stuff outside the court, but, you know, I try to I try to live the same life.
You know, I think it's pretty similar. I still do the same things every day.

Q. You're not bothered on the street or when you're eating at a restaurant?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, of course, that, but it doesn't bother me that much. I always wanted to be where I am now, and I know that's the sort of things that comes with it. I have to accept it, whether I like it or not.

Q. Just to clarify just in the end on that one point, so a year ago were you somebody who, for example, when you lost those key points, would get down? And are you now a person who, when you lose those key points, you still retain your confidence and keep your energy up? Is that a difference?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, at least I try to. Sometimes it works, and sometimes not.
But, again, as I said, I think I could still play as good one or two years ago as I can do now, but it's you know, it's when I'm not playing when I'm not playing my best tennis, that has changed when I'm winning more matches now.

Nolby
06-05-2010, 03:17 PM
The Fed QF Interviews

Robin Soderling Interview - French Open, June 1 After Defeating Roger Federer in the QFs

Posted on June 1, 2010
Robin Soderling (http://www.tennis-x.com/playernews/Robin-Soderling.php)
French Open (http://www.tennis-x.com/tournaments/frenchopen.shtml)
Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Defeated Roger Federer (http://www.tennis-x.com/playernews/Roger-Federer.php) Quarterfinal

Q. Two years in a row you beat the title holder. How it feels to be a giant killer?

ROBIN SODERLING: Hey, of course it's nice to beat the world No. 1 two years in a row on the center court. I think both times I play really good tennis. I think it's a great feeling.

Q. What about the statistics and now finally winning Federer?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, of course I didn't think about it that much. As I said, I think even though I lost so many times, I always have a chance to win. I came close a couple of times before, and I really feel like one or two times I actually been a little bit unlucky.
With a little bit of lucky I could have won before. Now I'm here finally with a win, and it's great.

Q. You had today the extreme focus?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I try to be focus in every match. Yeah, I think I played really well. Even in the first set it was a pretty good set. I didn't serve that well in the first. That was the only difference, I think.
But overall, it was a great match from the start until the end.

Q. What about the weather conditions and having to stop?

ROBIN SODERLING: Of course it's tough, but I played for so many years now, and this is how it is on outdoor tennis. It can rain, so you have to stay focused. I think I got pretty used to it, so it wasn't that bad.

Q. This is a similar win you had last year against Nadal, like overpowering him with your game. Do you think that the game you played against Federer today you could have played that match maybe if you had more experience or concentration against Federer in the final last year? Of course, your game grew, but maybe it was just a matter of mental preparation, last year's final?

ROBIN SODERLING: Oh, well, of course I think I played a better match today than last year's finals. As I said, it's difficult playing in your first Grand Slam final, no doubt.

You know, now I am in there and I played on the center court a couple of times. Yeah, it was a little bit easier this time.

Q. Swedes used to be pretty big around this town. Are you gonna start a revival?

ROBIN SODERLING: Oh, I hope so. You know, when I grew up, there were so many good Swedish players on tour. I looked up to them and they inspired me.
Hopefully, you know, I can do the same with young kids in Sweden now.

Q. You mentioned you have to play in any conditions. What was it really like? Was it sloppy underfoot? Did the balls get very heavy?

ROBIN SODERLING: The balls got heavy. I think I played good matches in these kind of conditions in the past, and I think it suits my game pretty well. It was a little bit slower, but I managed to serve really well and take the ball early. It helped me a lot.

Q. Swedish conditions, eh?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah.

Q. Last year when you beat Rafa it was a big sort of celebration, your arms waving on court. It was if it was a bit of a surprise to you even. Today, very cool, controlled celebration. Did you really believe today that you could win? Was that the difference?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think, you know, I always believe that I can win. This is a big win, but it's not the final.
You know, still have at least one more match to play, and I don't want to celebrate too much. I want to focus on the next game.

Q. Are you superstitious? This was the 13th match in general.
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, no, I didn't think about it that way. But, you know, again, losing so many times, I think you will come closer to a win eventually. I'm really glad that I won here in a Grand Slam and not in a smaller tournament.
Even though a win against Federer, it's always big.

Q. Berdych beat you in Miami (http://www.tennis-x.com/tournament/Miami.php) 2 2 pretty badly. Do you think there will be any possibility of a replay of that here? What happened there that won't happen here?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, the match before I beat him 1 1. (laughter.)
I know every match is a new match, and he played great this year. He's a dangerous player when he's playing good.
So of course it can happen, but I'm expecting a tough match.

Q. You're going to be the answer to the quiz question who ended Roger Federer's semifinal run forever now. Do you think that's the greatest run of its kind in sports, not just tennis?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, maybe. I mean, it certainly is not easy playing, what is it, 23 or 24 consecutive semifinals, which is just huge.
Well, it's a great run.

Q. When one thinks about clay court tennis, often one thinks of a player with great wheels, great defensive skills, maybe a big topspin forehand, run down all the balls, hang in there forever. Could you talk about your game, how it maybe is different and how it matched up today against Roger?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah. Maybe I don't have the typical clay court game, but I think I can do well on every surface.
Actually, I think I kind of like the slower surface a little bit more than the really fast ones. The last couple of years I played better and better on clay.
So when I serve like this and when I'm feeling like I'm hitting the ball well like this, you know, I think maybe clay is my almost my best surface.

Q. Could you analyze for us what and where was the turning point of the match, where you sensed that Federer was pulling down when you were resting high?

ROBIN SODERLING: Of course he had some chances in the second set. First set he played well. I didn't serve so well. Then in the second it was tough for me, and I saved a couple of really important points.
So I think when I won the second set, which was very big for me, I really felt that I could relax a little bit. After that, I think I start today play better and better.

Q. Once Vitas Gerulaitis said nobody can beat Gerulaitis 17 times in a row. What about you? And is this a better satisfaction than to beat Nadal, the same thing? What is the difference? Are you more confident now than you were maybe one year ago?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it's a tough question. You know, I think they're both big wins, of course. They were both No. 1s. They're different players, and I'm really happy that I showed that I can beat them both.
But again, you know, I don't think about it that much. Of course I lost a lot of times, so it's a great feeling to finally end that streak.
But still, you know, I don't think about who I beat. You know, what matters is that I won and that I won quarterfinals in a Grand Slam and I get the opportunity to play semifinals in two days, which is great.

Q. Each time when you tried to challenge the call and you've been booed badly, how can you manage to stay focused? You just shut all the noise outside of your game? How can you manage that?

ROBIN SODERLING: It's not really difficult. I don't really care, you know. I play for myself and I play for the win, not for the crowd.


Soderling Gets Monkey Off His Back
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John McEnroe on the Soderling Victory
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Robin Soderling Interview with Bill Macatee
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Interview with Robin Soderling about Roland Garros - Part 1
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Interview with Robin Soderling about Roland Garros - Part 2
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Robin Soderling vs. Roger Federer, RG 2010, Top Shot
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There are about 60 other videos uploaded in the past 4 days on YouTube on "Robin Soderling". Can someone help me out with this one? :lol:

Robin Soderlings pappa Bo Söderling
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**I moved Blu's "Soderling Roland Garros" video to the Video thread as it isn't really an interview or news item. Ooops!***

AgnRus
06-07-2010, 06:47 PM
Day 15 - Robin Soderling
Sunday, June 6, 2010


Q. Apart the score, what was the main difference between last year and this year, your opinion?
ROBIN SODERLING: Every match is different. The margins are very small. Of course I didn't play as good this year as I did against him last year. I didn't serve as well. I wasn't hitting the ball as clean.
It was tough today. I didn't really get into the match.

Q. From the beginning, you mean?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it was tough to get into the match. You know, of course he was playing well. He was playing extremely well.
He didn't miss much, but I had to really fight today.

Q. You, yourself, you didn't feel very well?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, it was tough. Of course I can play better. I wish I could have done that, but, you know, he played great. So all credit to him.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about the Berdych match and how much that took out of you going into today's match?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it was a tough match. I think all the matches I played here has been tough in different ways, you know.
It's really difficult to stay focused for two weeks playing many matches. So they're all tough, but physically I feel fine. It was okay. It's not why I lost today.

Q. There was a little incident up with the people. Somebody fell down. Did that disturb your concentration? It was a moment where you were playing, the ball was heavier maybe, but you were starting to play inside.
ROBIN SODERLING: No, no, no.

Q. In any case, do you think there was a moment where the ball was getting, let's say thicker and heavier, and you were inside? Because from outside it seemed that you could change, let's say, at the beginning of the second set.
ROBIN SODERLING: What do you mean, the ball got...

Q. The humid conditions.
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it was humid already from the start. So I mean, conditions were good. Of course, it was a little bit windy, but it wasn't bad at all.
So, you know, it was good for me, and I think for both of us.

Q. You said that it wasn't because of that you lost today. Why did you lose today?
ROBIN SODERLING: Because he played better than me.

Q. Second question: Did you feel that you played differently today than you have been playing the days before?
ROBIN SODERLING: How do you mean, differently?

Q. I don't know. If you have felt that you should play differently today.
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I lost. Of course I should have played in a different way if I wanted to win.

Q. How?
ROBIN SODERLING: You know, I know I played many matches here, and there have been both good and matches where I didn't play so good.
So overall, it's a great week. Of course, today wasn't my best match. But as I said, he played so well today.

Q. Two questions. There's a lot of matches between when you played him here last year and now, but I'm wondering if tactically you felt like he did anything different today than when you played him before. Secondly, just can you talk about the game, the long game in the second set when you had all the break points, and if that really sort of took the steam out of you.
ROBIN SODERLING: No, I think, you know, Rafa always plays kind of the same. He has more or less one game, but he does it so well it's enough to not lose a match on clay for a whole year, which is pretty good.
But as I said, you always know what to expect when you play against him. Yeah, I think in the beginning I was a little bit unlucky; I had a few break chances. I didn't take them, so then of course it was tough.
I don't think it would have changed anything.

Q. Just two questions. First, if now is all good feelings between Rafa and you. Second, if you foresee Rafa long time as No. 1.
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I said, I don't know, like 200 times or even more, I have nothing against Rafa. I think he's a great player.
He definitely has the chance to be No. 1 for a long time if he plays like this. On clay especially he's real difficult to beat.

Q. I think you preferred kind of rainy, humid condition. It was kind of strange weather today. It was raining, rainy morning, but kind of sunny during that match. So could you explain what kind of condition it was? I mean, it was slippy or like the ball was heavy or...
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it was humid, and of course it was a little bit windy. But I think the conditions were really pretty good for tennis today.

Q. Could you go into, a little bit more, the difference between your incredible win last year and the tough result today? What was the difference between the two matches?
ROBIN SODERLING: Okay. (Laughter.)
Okay. You didn't listen to the first question.

Q. I listened, but I wanted you to go into more detail.
ROBIN SODERLING: You know, every match is different, and the margins are really small. Maybe he played a little bit better. I didn't play as good as I did last year. I didn't serve so well. I wasn't hitting the ball as clean.
You know, I had some chances in the beginning, but I didn't take them. And then he won the first and then played really well in the second, so then, you know, that's about...

Q. If I could ask, the problems on converting the breakpoint opportunities you had, why such a big problem today getting conversions?
ROBIN SODERLING: I don't know. He played well. Yeah, I don't know. I have no explanation why I didn't take the break points today.

Q. Obviously you know what to expect from Rafa, but is it any real frustration when winners you would hit against anybody else he goes back and retrieves it, or have you already put that past you, you know you're gonna get that from Rafa and that's the way it is?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. As I said, you know, I think everybody knows what to expect when you play against him. That's why he's so good, because he's moving so well and gets everything back.
He's a great defensive player, but also has a great offensive game, as well. He can really change defense to offense really quick. That's why he's so good.

Q. Could anyone have beaten Rafa today on that form?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. I think the tennis is so tough today, so I think everybody can beat everybody on a good day.
You know, as I said, I think I can beat anybody. But when Rafa is playing like this, you need to have a really good day, which unfortunately I didn't have today.

Q. Is it more difficult for you to lose this final than last year's final?
ROBIN SODERLING: No. No, they're both tough, of course. (Laughter.) Losing a final in a Grand Slam is not great. It's not a great feeling.
But, you know, I wasn't close in any one of them. I lost straight sets last year and the same this year. It's always tougher if you lose a really, really close match.

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2010-06-06/201006061275844712730.html

AgnRus
06-22-2010, 07:28 PM
W: Robin Soderling First-Round Press Conference

June 22, 2010

Q. You didn’t play any tournament prior to this one. Why was that? Why did you opt for not playing?
ROBIN SODERLING: It was actually the same as last year. I was entered to play Halle. I felt like after Paris I played so many matches. I finished the final on Sunday and I had to go the next day to Halle.
It was just a little bit too much. I wanted to rest that week and then have a week off and then have a week of good preparations with a lot of practice. I got in one practice match, which was very good.

Q. Those were two pretty intense weeks in Paris.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah.

Q. Of course, you had the previous experience from last year. How did you deal with all the emotions and physical requirements you had throughout those two weeks and the following days?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it was actually much easier this year. Last year it was a little bit tough, of course, you know, playing in my first Grand Slam final. It was really big for me. I was really tired one or even two weeks after the tournament’s finished.

But this year was much easier. I felt fine only after a couple of days’ rest. I think I learned a lot from last year’s Roland Garros, not only that tournament but from the whole last year when I played a lot of big matches against good players.

Q. We don’t know your next opponent yet because Granollers is going to play Frederico Gil from Portugal next. You know Granollers. Do you know Frederico Gil?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yes, I know him, but I never played him, I don’t think. Granollers, I played a couple times. He’s a tough player to beat. We had a really tight match here last year, and he beat me in Australia. I think either one, it’s going to be a really tough match and I have to play at least the same way I did today.

Q. Your opponent today said you gave him a drumming. He said you just served him off the court.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I served really well. I think when I do that, especially on grass, you know, I always play well. Of course, it’s always difficult to break me. Then I can relax a little bit in the return games.

And today I really did that. I think I played a really good first round match.

Q. He only had two breakpoints. You aced him both times.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, that’s bringing out the best serves when it really matters. It’s great.

But, you know, as I said, when I serve well, I normally play well, as well.

Q. Any advice for him?

ROBIN SODERLING: For him? Well, you know, every match is different. He actually beat me this year in Chennai. He’s a great player. He will probably do well in the future.

Q. No Englishmen here. Just one Swedish player. What can you say? What’s going on in your country? Can you give us an official opinion?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I don’t think I’m the right person to ask. But, of course, we had a down period in Sweden now for a while. We had so much success in the past with so many good players.
But I think it’s like that for any country. You know, you cannot produce good players all the time. I think we have a couple of good juniors doing pretty well. So hopefully, in a few years’ time, I won’t be the only Swedish player on tour.

starluk
06-27-2010, 05:55 AM
He’s a great player. He will probably do well in the future.

Advice for Ginepri? LOL~:smash::haha:

AgnRus
06-27-2010, 04:35 PM
R Soderling - 26 June 2010
Saturday, 26 June 2010

Q. Three rounds and you've not dropped a set yet. You must be feeling very confident about your game.

ROBIN SODERLING: Sure, I think I played against three really good players, and, as you said, I didn't drop a set yet, even though maybe I was a little bit lucky to win the third set today.

But, you know, I'm serving well; I'm hitting the ball well. So far I'm feeling really good.

Q. You're one of two players to have beaten both Roger and Rafa at Grand Slams, and obviously you've done that at Paris. Can you do it again here?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. Well, did I did once, so I'm pretty confident that I can do it more times. Of course it's not easy. They're the two best players in the world. You know, you have to play really well and you have to have a really good day.

But I think if I have that, I think I have a good chance.

Q. Have you done anything different in your preparation between Paris and coming here this year?

ROBIN SODERLING: Compared to last year? No, no, the same.

Q. Is this the best you've ever played on grass?

ROBIN SODERLING: It's tough to say. Maybe I played better matches before. I think what I'm really happy with is that I played really well for three matches, nine straight sets now, without really dropping my level too much.

That's really good. I think that's what you need to do in Grand Slams where they spend over two weeks.

Q. Does the dry weather and the higher bounce help?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. I think it suits me well. To me, doesn't really matter. I think I can do well in any conditions and on any surface.

Q. Is your confidence at an all‑time high now given how you've been playing?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, of course I feel really good and my confidence is good because I think I've been playing really well for a year or almost a year and a half now, beating a lot of good players in big matches and in big tournaments.

So confidence is good. I think that's a really big thing in this sport.

Q. Can you explain what that feels like? If you sort of put the yourself to where you were a couple years ago, can you explain how different it feels when you step on court when you are so much more confident.

ROBIN SODERLING: When I step on court and before the match doesn't feel too much different.

It's just when you come to close moments in the match and when it gets tight, you know, I think I believe more in myself. I normally play better when it really matters.

Q. So does it make you more calm?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, and feel more calm and I believe in myself. I feel that I can go for my shots more and be aggressive. Most of the time it helps to be aggressive in big moments.

Q. You broke Rafa's Roland Garros streak and Roger Federer's semifinals streak. Which achievement are you more proud of?

ROBIN SODERLING: I don't know. They're both really good memories for me and great victories. You know, beating Rafa in Paris, he never lost before that match.

And then always beating Roger ‑‑ they were both No. 1s at the time, so it's tough to say. But they're definitely my two biggest wins in my career.

Q. Roger you beat on the 13th try, I think, and he has lost more than usual. Is he more vulnerable right now? Why? What's the main reason?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think it's really tough up in the top. You know, there are so many good players out there. There are so many players who can really play well and really compete for the bigger tournaments, like the Grand Slams. You know, Roger is No. 2 now, but of course he's one of the best players in the world. Maybe the best player of all‑time.

But you cannot win every match and you cannot win forever. You have to lose sometime. Even Roger has to do that.

Q. With Roger and Rafa having both been taken to five sets this year, is there a feeling that there's more of an opportunity for a group of players just behind them, such as yourself?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really just because of that. They both got through their matches. I know that anything can happen. You can play really bad one day, and then you wake up the next day playing really good.

They're both favorites. Roger is maybe the No. 1 favorite; Rafa is No. 2. A lot players can actually beat them.

Q. Can you talk a little bit how you have to adjust to play a left‑handed player? What is the main difference?

ROBIN SODERLING: Main difference is the returns, I think. The serve is coming from a different angle. It took a while today also to get used to it.

But I think even though he served well, I think I returned pretty well. There were a lot of games where I actually, you know, came pretty close with a lot 30‑Alls, 15‑30s. So I think I returned well today against left‑hander.

Q. Bjorn Borg sees you as a future No. 1. Do you see yourself that way?

ROBIN SODERLING: I haven't thought about it that much. But, of course, if you are No. 6 in the world I think you have a chance to become No. 1.

I know it's not easy. It's terribly difficult. And of course when you have players like Rafa and Roger, it makes it even more difficult.

I think if I can continue to play the way I do now and keep up my level for a long period, I think I have the chance. But, again, there are a lot of players that have the chance to become No. 1.

Q. Having beaten both of them and with their streaks, is it possible for you to put into words how much that's fueling the fire to break through against one of them in a situation like a Grand Slam?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think, you know, the first win against any player is really good. It gives you a lot confidence. To win against, you know, the world No. 1 gives you even more confidence. It will for sure make it easier to play them next time.

Q. What does an endorsement from someone like Borg mean to you?

ROBIN SODERLING: Um, of course it's nice to hear. He's a legend in tennis. You know, I think everybody knows what ‑‑ that he knows what he's talking about. He's been at the top of this game for so long. But I still have to do it. It won't happen because he says that. I still have to work hard.

But as I said, I think I have a chance if I stay healthy, if I work hard, and if I play like this.

Q. How has your life changed off court through this success?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I do more media stuff, but that's about it. I still feel the same. I do the same things, so it hasn't changed too much.

Q. You can still walk around unworried in Sweden, or do people approach you all the time?

ROBIN SODERLING: I haven't actually spent so much time in Sweden. But I don't think Swedes are like that. They're pointing and looking more than approach you.

Unfortunately, tennis is not so big in Sweden as it used to be. Hopefully it will become bigger now when I'm doing well. Hopefully I can inspire kids to start playing tennis again.
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2010-06-26/201006261277567924064.html

AgnRus
06-28-2010, 08:56 PM
R Soderling - 28 June 2010
Monday, 28 June 2010


Q. Congratulations. Is this another important step in your career, reaching a quarterfinals at Wimbledon?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. Well, of course it's always nice to be in the quarters in any Grand Slam.

I think last year I had my best result so far reaching the fourth round, and now one step further at least.

Yeah, it's good.

Q. Do you feel your game on grass is improving?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah, I think that my game overall is improving. I think I always could do well on any surface, grass included.

So I'm playing better and better. You know, I think I can do well, again, on any surface.

Q. This was a closer contest that your last three. Is that just because the opponent was a higher standard? Do you feel you played as well today?

ROBIN SODERLING: I think I played okay. I think I played a little bit better in my previous matches. And even though I felt I was hitting the ball well, but I didn't return so well. My first serve percentage wasn't good enough.

Apart from that, I think it was a good match. He played well.

Q. How did you find playing on Court 12. It's quite a small court. Did you find that a distraction?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really. Of course it's a bit different compared to playing on the Centre Court and Court 1.

But, you know, that's how it is. I think all courts here are good, so...

Q. You haven't lost your service until now. He's probably one of the most underrated returners in the game. What makes him such a tough returner?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, as you said, I think today he returned really well. He was putting a lot of returns back in court. You know, every time I had a second serve he returned really well.

Unfortunately I didn't serve so well this time compared to my last matches, but I think that's why he broke me a couple times.

Q. Was that your main problem this time round? It was such a see‑saw match. Was it because of the serve or a loss of concentration?

ROBIN SODERLING: No. Well, I think I started off the match really well, and then I had some really good chances in the second as well. I was up a break. So with a little bit of luck and if I could've played a little bit better, I think I could have taken it in straight sets.

Again, he played really well. At the end of the second and the third, you know, he returned really good. It was a tough match, so I'm a little bit lucky to have gone through this one.

Q. You had a medical timeout. Was that for anything serious?

ROBIN SODERLING: No. No. My stomach was a little bit upset. The doctor gave me a pill, and then after that it was fine.

Q. There was an instant right at the end where it looked like you spotted the ball girl looking a little bit unwell and you stopped playing. Could you talk us through what happened.

ROBIN SODERLING: Actually, at first I didn't understand what was happening. You know, all of a sudden they stopped play, and then I understood she didn't feel well. Must be tough for them to stay out there for so many hours. I hope she's fine.

It was just pretty bad timing, me serving for the match at match point. It could have happened a little bit earlier. But that's how it is. I hope she's fine now.

Q. What happened to Magnus?

ROBIN SODERLING: He played squash and he hurt his foot a bit. That's it.

Q. You're a Swede in the last eight at Wimbledon. That will excite a lot of people. What are your memories of the Swedes that came before you at Wimbledon?

ROBIN SODERLING: I remember when I was a kid, you know, I was watching Edberg playing against Becker in the finals. I always loved to watch the bigger tournaments, especially Wimbledon, such an old tournament with a lot of tradition.

So it's nice to be in the eight in this one.

Q. When you were growing up, which Grand Slam did you dream of winning?

ROBIN SODERLING: All of them. (Laughter.) Many times.

No, of course I think, for me, Wimbledon is the biggest one. Even though, you know, if I had to pick one I really wanted to win, I would pick Wimbledon.

But it would be okay to win French and US Open as well.

Q. Obviously looks like you'll be up against Nadal again. Given your success against him in the past, you must relish that contest.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, it's gonna be an extremely tough match. He's world No. 1. We played a lot of times and had a lot of tough matches.

Again, it's a quarterfinals in a Grand Slam. It's gonna be tough for sure. But, you know, I think it's definitely easier to play him on any other surface than clay.

Q. What was the key to your success against him in the past, do you think, that you have to reproduce?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think you have to do everything well to beat him. He's such a great player and he moves so well and has a great offensive game and also a great defensive game.

Um, I have to play my own game and take initiative pretty early in the points and serve well.

Q. Are the courts to your liking? Or if it were a little bit colder the ball would bounce a little bit lower, would you prefer it?

ROBIN SODERLING: I'm not sure. I think I ‑‑ only looking at myself, you know, I think I play a little bit better when it's hotter and it's bouncing a little bit higher. But I think Rafa would probably say the same.

To me, doesn't really matter. I take whatever condition it is.

Q. Roger Federer made an interesting comment. He was talking about the England/Germany game, and said that the best players need to play the best players to bring the best out of themselves. Is that something you can relate to?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really. You know, I always try to do my best in any match. But maybe it's different for Roger because he won so many matches and he played so many Grand Slam finals.

Me, I think, you know, I'm trying my best all the time. Sometimes I play well; sometimes I'm not playing as well. That's tennis.

Q. What do you think about next round probably against Nadal? He's winning. Just one game.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, if I play him, you know, as I said sure it's gonna be a really tough match. He's a great player, of course. He's the world No. 1. So I have to play well.

I think if I can do that I have an decent chance.

Q. Better than today?

ROBIN SODERLING: If I have to play better?

Q. Better than today.

ROBIN SODERLING: I'm not sure. It's gonna be a different match. He's a left‑hander, and he's not really playing the same style. So I have to think about that.

But I always hope to play better. You know, I always hope to play really well every match. Hopefully I will do that.
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2010-06-28/201006281277755168722.html

swedes_rule
06-29-2010, 09:47 AM
R Soderling - 28 June 2010
Monday, 28 June 2010

Q. When you were growing up, which Grand Slam did you dream of winning?

ROBIN SODERLING: All of them. (Laughter.) Many times.

No, of course I think, for me, Wimbledon is the biggest one. Even though, you know, if I had to pick one I really wanted to win, I would pick Wimbledon.

But it would be okay to win French and US Open as well.



Any other Aussies Slightly offended by this comment? :lol: just because he always plays crap here doesnt mean we dont want him to win!!

AgnRus
06-29-2010, 01:20 PM
:lol:

AgnRus
06-30-2010, 07:16 PM
R. Soderling - 30 June 2010
Wednesday, 30 June 2010

Q. It was a brilliant start for you. What will you say went wrong for you or what went right for Nadal?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think the difference was that he returned a little bit better than me. Uhm, I was a little bit frustrated today because I didn't put many returns in.

Of course, he served pretty well. But it's not like I'm playing one of the best servers on tour. I have to at least put some more returns back in play.

Q. How was your left foot? You received some treatment at the end of the third set. Was that hampering you a bit?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I have a small blister on my toe. I won't die. I think I'll be fine.

Q. So it's no reason...

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, again, I had a small blister on my toe, so nothing serious.

Q. Did you think it would be more politic to wait until the end of the set, given he was about to serve?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it was hurting me quite a lot. I think it's better to have it fixed than play with it. Don't you think?

Q. Do you think you rushed the first set?

ROBIN SODERLING: I'm sorry?

Q. Do you think you rushed the first set, you were in a hurry?

ROBIN SODERLING: I think I started well. And, you know, in first set I was a bit lucky to win the breakpoints. During the last three sets, I had my chances. Well, in the second and the third. I didn't really take them. So I think that was the biggest difference.

Q. At the start of the second set you successfully challenged the call. Rafa was quite upset that he lost that point. Do you think that kind of fired him up that he improved after that?

ROBIN SODERLING: No. I don't know, I haven't thought about it. It was a really important point. And, you know, I had the ball in play on the breakpoint, but he played well.

I don't know if that was a change. But, again, it was a really important one for me.

Q. You had points on a lot of his service games. I think he had very few when he saved to love. Do you feel he was serving weaker than he has in the past or were you returning well, especially at the start?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I think he served like he always does. He put a lot of first serves in. He doesn't have a huge serve, but it's pretty good, especially on grass.

I didn't return so well. I was a little bit frustrated. I think in my first three matches I returned really well. Last one and this one, not so good. So I think that was the biggest difference.

Q. Do you think, like the Ferrer match, take out of you some points of stamina? I mean, did you feel a little bit tired or not so confident after the Ferrer match?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, no. It was a long match, but yesterday I felt good in practice. And today physically I feel fine.

So, no, not really.

Q. Do you think Rafa is playing as well this year as anyone? How does he compare, his level, as in the French Open?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think he's playing well. He's hitting the ball very well. Of course, he's moving well, as always.

But, you know, it's very difficult to compare how he's playing on grass compared to clay. But he's the world No. 1, and I think he's playing pretty solid tennis. He's got a good chance to win this one.

Q. You say he has a good chance to win the tournament?

ROBIN SODERLING: I think so, yeah. I think everybody still in has a good chance. But now that Roger lost, I'd pick him as the favorite.

Q. If you were to look back and check the Rafa of 2007, the long match between you guys, and the Rafa of today, what's the difference for you?

ROBIN SODERLING: In his game?

Q. Yes.

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think he's playing a little bit more aggressive now on faster surfaces. I'd say on clay he's playing pretty much the same. But, again, on faster surface, he's playing a little bit more aggressive.

Q. I take it would have known about the Federer result. I think it was a bit after the first set. Did that affect your match in any way because you saw he'd gone out?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, no, no (laughter).

Orka_n
07-16-2010, 09:59 PM
http://hd.se/sport/2010/07/10/robin-soderling-om-favorittrycket/

Swedes, please translate what Robin says :help:Alright.

Reporter: Well, Robin, how did it feel to return to Båstad as reigning champion?

Robin: Yeah, that's a special feeling of course. I've grown up [watching] this tournament and I've been here for so many years, and it's always fun. I've got so many good memories from this place, so... it feels amazing.

Reporter: Yes, which is the greatest memory? Except for the Win, I mean.

Robin: Heh, not counting the victory... no, I don't really have a best memory, I have so many of them. It's just Båstad as a city for me... it means tennis. And I've spent so many summers here that there's too many memories to pick from. I remember watching when [Vinciguerra] was in the final... It might have been here that I first took a liking to tennis. And then I played here myself , and in contests for juniors and in Kalle Anka cup and so on (literally: Donald Duck Cup, classic swedish tennis tournament for kids). And I've watched Swedish Open every year, so... Båstad is really something special for me.

Reporter: You return here year after year, but now you return as world #5, is it a different feeling coming here having a ranking that high?

Robin: Actually, not really. Every time I enter a contest, whichever contest it is and whereever it's held, I'm always very focused. It's a great feeling to know that I have a good chance of winning here if I play well, I showed that last year. But on the other hand I'm also very aware that I indeed have to play well. Because it's that tough of a tourney, if you don't play well, you won't win any matches.

Reporter: The conditions seem favorable for you, Tomas Berdych isn't coming...

Robin: Yeh well, he's not coming but as I said, there are many other good players participating. But sure, I have a good chance of winning here if I play well - but I have to do that too.

Reporter: We've got the draw here... it can be an all Swedish affair already in your first match.

Robin: Yeah... it's not too often you play another Swede nowadays on the tour, so... I really hope for Vinci's sake that he wins his first round match, and then that our match will be a good one. We had a great match in the semi here last year, so we'll have to hope for a rematch of that kind.

Reporter: Except for Vinci, there's Filip Prpic and Christian Lindell too. What do you say about them?

Robin: It's good that they've gotten Wildcards, and both... especially Prpic has worked hard for a very long time on the challenger tour, and he's a real good player so it's great that he gets the chance. And it's the same for Christian, he's young and on his way up... I know that it was huge for me when [I]I recieved a Wild card and got to play the best, you learn a lot by doing that.

Reporter: Have your legs recuperated from Wimbledon now?

Robin: Yes, the have. That doesn't take long. I've played many tournaments now so I've gotten pretty good at relaxing, and now I'm fully focusing on Båstad.

AgnRus
09-04-2010, 08:27 PM
An Interview With: Robin Soderling
Saturday, September 4, 2010

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You must be very happy with the way you've been playing in this tournament. You seem to be cruising pretty much through.

ROBIN SODERLING: Except the first round. No, it's been better and better, I think. Started my first match maybe not so great, but after that I think I played two pretty good matches. And today was not easy. It was difficult conditions. I told myself before the match, It's not gonna be pretty. I think during the circumstances, I played a pretty good match.

Q. How would you say this connects to the rest of the summer on hardcourts for you?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I only played two tournaments, and I think, you know, I had two good wins and two losses against good players. Maybe the result hasn't been really what I wanted to, but I played some pretty good tennis, so it's been okay. It's been good preparation for this tournament.

Q. These days, when fans of Roger and Rafa look at the draw, the first thing they look for is, Where is Soderling? How does that feel?

ROBIN SODERLING: (Smiling.) Well, I think they should look for many other players, because I think there's a lot of players who can do really well. Of course, in any tournament, when Roger and Rafa is playing, they will be the favorites. But, again, I think there is many players who can actually beat them.

Q. Have you played any better this year than you did when you played against Federer in Paris?

ROBIN SODERLING: What was that?

Q. Have you played any better than you did in that match in Paris?

ROBIN SODERLING: It's tough to compare matches. It was definitely a very good match. It's tough to say if it was one of my best ones, but of course, you know, it's always difficult to play against Roger. I played him a lot of times, and I think almost except from that last match I never felt that I played well. But that's not because of me. That's because of him, because he makes you play bad. So I think it was a very good match. One of my best five matches this year.

Q. One of his last service games he hit, I think it was a service winner ultimately, but you had some problem with that. I don't know if it was a Hawk Eye issue, or a call issue. You spoke to the umpire a little bit. Do you remember that?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, yeah. It was a let serve. I think during the match there were a couple of strange let calls. I think she called let when not one of us heard, and it then all of a sudden she didn't call it. Yeah, I think it was the machine.

Q. When you came on the tour, what would you have thought was your best surface, and what do you think your best surface is now?

ROBIN SODERLING: Now I'm not sure. (Smiling.) When I started, I had my best results indoors and on faster surfaces. But I think last two years I played very good on all surfaces, especially on clay. So now I'm not sure anymore, which is a good thing, because I really feel like I can do well on any surface.

Q. How close to ideal do you feel this surface is to you in terms of your comfort level on the court?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think it's a good surface for me. I played well here in the past. Um, the thing is that a lot of the courts are not the same. Some courts are a little bit faster. Some courts are a little bit slower. So I think some courts suits me better than other ones. But overall, I think it's pretty good for me. It's not too fast, not too slow. It's good.

Q. Why do you think this is the one Slam that Nadal has not won? You're very familiar, obviously, with his game. You've seen him on all the different surfaces. In your mind, why do you think the US Open has been particularly difficult for him?

ROBIN SODERLING: I think you should ask him. He could easily have won this one, as well. But I think it might be the fastest one, and even though he has improved his game on the fastest surfaces, I think he still is a better player on the bit slower surfaces. Maybe that is why. But I think he will definitely have a good chance to win this tournament a couple of times.

Q. If he is successful here, given his head to head with Roger, do you think it's a matter of time before he'll be looked at maybe as even greater than Roger?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, he's still very young, and of course he needs to win a lot more matches and a lot more tournaments before he's at the same level as Roger. But if he's gonna be healthy, he for sure have a lot of more years, and he's for sure gonna be win many more tournaments. It's tough to say, but he definitely got the chance. He's got a very good game, and he also got a good game for any surface, you know. I think it shows. He won so many tournaments on all different surfaces.

Q. You have a reputation as a giant killer. I'm sure that's a pleasant one to have. Is it ever irritating? Do you feel you're ready to move on to the next level where you're a giant instead of a giant killer?

ROBIN SODERLING: Oh, no, I don't really care. I think Roger and Rafa, they're best two players in the world right now. I think it will remain like that for a couple of years. But, you know, I'm in the top 5. Of course I want to improve. I want to do better. But it's also a matter of doing well many matches, many tournaments in a row, not only ones here and there. I think you need to play at a very consistent level throughout the whole year.

Q. You go about your business very quietly. Is it getting harder to do that with the kind of attention you're getting now because of your recent results?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, a little bit maybe. But, you know, I still feel the same, and I'm doing the same things every day: working on my game and trying not to think about other stuff. I think I've been handling it pretty well. I still want to improve, and hopefully -- I'm still not that old, so hopefully I can do that.

Q. Peter talked about how people look at where you are in the draw. Have you looked a bit ahead? Do you know what's coming possibly next round and the round after?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I saw Montanes won in his match against Nishikori. I will play him in the next round, which will be a very difficult match. We played many times. We had tough matches. Yeah, I think here was the first round last year we had a tough four setter, I think. He's a good player. It's gonna be tough.

Q. Do you know what might happen the round after that?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. Everybody has been telling me that since the draw came out. I'm going against Roger in the quarters. He still needs to win two more matches, and I still have to win one more. It's still far ahead.

Q. Does that bother you people have been telling you, or it's gonna happen no matter what you do?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I mean, I'm the fifth seed, so I know I'm gonna play one of the four top guys in quarters. I mean, they're all good players, so it doesn't really matter who I'm playing.

Q. I assume you're still coached by Magnus. You appear to be very well coached. Can you just comment on the kinds of things you've been doing and how you've been maintaining this level?

ROBIN SODERLING: Ah, yeah, we've been working on many different things. I think if you look at all the top guys, they don't really have any weaknesses. They are all very complete players. That's what we've been trying to work on, you know. We've been working a lot on my footwork, on my movement around the court, and also playing a little bit more aggressive, coming to the net sometimes. It's been working, but we are still working on it, and hopefully I'm pretty sure it can improve even more.
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2010-09-04/201009041283626558325.html?utm_medium=bt.io-twitter&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_content=backtype-tweetcount

AgnRus
09-04-2010, 10:10 PM
Notes On the Anti-Christ

by Pete Bodo

New York—It was a gorgeous day under post-hurricane blue skies, filled with brilliant white clouds sailing through the ether like so many shanked backhands in a Federer vs. Nadal match, a beautiful day for a massacre. And I knew of at least one player who's cut out to perform that job, Robin Soderlng.

You know, the fella seen by fans of Federer, Nadal, or even both as...the anti-christ. The lumbering, brutish, inward Swede not known for his contributions to charity, his buddy-buddy relationship with celebrity athletes, or cameo appearances in music videos. Soderling. The guy who always looks as if just rolled in from a few weeks of felling 300-foot tall evergreens somewhere just south of the Arctic Circle.

Soderling is a constant threat to our conviction that while size and power matter in tennis, they don't count for all that much. And he challenges that assumption in a way that some may find intimidating. He's a histrionics-free tennis player; where others make a fist and pump it, or punch the air, he merely jiggles his after winning a particularly important point, like a reprobate preparing to roll the die at the craps table. Nor does Soderling have any of the trademark exuberance that has become de rigeur in the era of Nadal. His joie de combat is that of a mature man engaged in serious business, not that of a boy succeeding at a sometimes frustrating game. Soderling rolls into a tournament like a gathering storm; it's all lull until all hell breaks loose.

I went out to watch Soderling lock horns with Thiemo de Bakker, a 21-year-old from the Hague, Netherlands. Like Soderling, de Bakker is 6-foot-4, but he gives away nearly 50 pounds in weight advantage (or disadvantage, given that lugging kilos around a court on a hot day is part of the job description). De Bakker is a work in progress ("I need to get more decent with a few things," he concedes, "with executing shots") but he makes good, lean power and can serve bullets.

It was windy out on Armstrong; so much so that when a puff or gust hit the chair umpire's mike, it sounded like the rumble of thunder under a bright sun. Soderling eschewed the obligatory headwear, and while it's cooler than it's been, I get the feeling that it's just as much a reflection of his Spartan proclivities (I'll bet this guy don't need no stinkin' sunblock, either). Soderling survived a five-set scare in the first round, but then he crushed pile-driving Taylor Dent in straights, so I was half expecting the blowout and that's just what we got: Soderling beat de Bakker ("D-Bak," as one New Yorker accustomed to the construction kept shouting) 6-2, 6-3, 6-3.

This gave me a good opportunity to focus on Soderling, rather than the particulars of the match, so let's wander through my notebook:

Set 1: Soderling broke right off the bat, and never relaxed his grip. What struck me right off the bat was the dimensions of his upper body. This guy has wide shoulders, lumberjack shoulders. When he walks, his weight is distributed equally on the balls of his feel, but you can almost feel gravity tugging him from behind; he sometimes looks like he's in danger of falling over backwards. He often hits his forehand from an open stance, his belly protruding, but he gets an enormous amount of power from a combination of shoulder rotation and racquet-head speed.

Set 2: The match was only 32 minutes old and Soderling was already up a set and a break. After he hit one of his many inside-out forehand winners, the fan behind me could only cluck, "Nice...nice...nice." We rightly think of Soderling as a power player; a guy who loads up and goes for broke. While that's an accurate description, it's also true that Soderling has really well grooved strokes, off both wings. His stroking discipline is extremely high for so explosive a guy, which is one of the things that makes him different from, say, Fernando Gonzalez.

One of Soderling's more subtle assests is that he hits relatively flat or with a great deal of spin with equal proficiency. His timing is so good that you can tell whether he's hitting relatively flat or with spin without even looking at the path or angle of his racquet head as he swings. You can hear what he's doing; it's clear as a bell. It struck me that this is a very well-coached guy (credit to Magnus Norman), and when I shared that impression with Soderling afterward he said, "We've been working on many different things.... We've been working a lot on my footwork, on my movement around the court, and also on playing a little bit more aggressive, coming to net sometimes."

Of course, there's only so much you can do with a guy like Soderling, who's OK once he gets rolling, but not so easily started. Sometimes, you can see that his torso is willing but his feet are not, so he wastes a half-step—it almost appears as a stutter-step—moving out. It's as if he needs to go in stages. But his anticipation is decent, his legs are capable of eating up ground quickly, and he's got good reach. De Bakker tried to exploit Soderling's difficulty getting moving, as well as the trouble a man of his size has changing directions quickly, with the drop shot. The ploy was successful a number of times, but not enough to make much of a difference. This is a high-risk gambit. Soderling isn't really the guy you want in a position to shove the ball down your throat; not unless you also want to see it coming out the other end.

I had to smile when Soderling, down on serve at 15-30 and 3-all in the second set, powdered a forehand that landed so close to out that de Bakker, convinced it was long, immediately consulted Hawk-Eye. Soderling knew the ball was good; he felt it and trusted his instincts to such an extent that, despite the relative importance of the call (the difference between 30-all and break point), he didn't even bother to watch the reprise on the big screen.
Set 3: Soderling's limitations are intrinsically bound up with his strengths, which in real-world terms is called making the best of things. While his movement is ponderous, his stroking is rock-solid and smooth. There's an urge to grace latent in his game—you can see it in his ball toss, the way his tossing hand remains extended, palm and fingers gracefully posed, for a noticeably long time. And for a big man, he gets down to the ball when stretched wide with surprising agility and body control; one of his better shots on the day was the rolled, cross-court forehand, hit from way off the court and deep in his own corner. He made that shot repeatedly, and if de Bakker's reply wasn't a big blow down the line with his own forehand, Soderling was right back in the point.

It's common knowledge that Soderling has a fine inside-out forehand. But his iniside-out backhand is also superb. They say that the down-the-line backhand is the real money shot in tennis, so the ability to hit it inside-out, from well inside the sideline ascends almost to the level of an astounding parlor trick. There's a reason this guy has been winning consistently, even if he has struggled some this summer.

When Soderling was asked what surface he expected to be his best, at the onset of his career, he replied: "When I started, I had my best results on indoors and faster surfaces. But I think the last two years I played very good on all surfaces, especially on clay. So now I'm not sure anymore, which is a good thing because I feel I can really do well on any surface."

First and foremost, that's a testament to the advances Soderling has made in technique; for a man of his size and skill sets, the consistency and fluidity of his execution is remarkable.

So where is he going, long-term? He knows that he's the giant killer and occupies a unique niche. When a draw comes out these days, the first question of Federer and Nadal fans is apt to be: Where's Robin? Soderling is so accustomed to this that he finds it amusing. "Yeah, everybody has been telling me since the draw came out: I'm going against Roger in the quarters. But he still needs to win two more matches, and I have to win one more, so it's still far ahead. I'm the fifth seed, so I know I'm gonna play one of the four top guys in the quarters. They're all really good players, so it doesn't matter who I'm playing."

One of the noteworthy ironies in play here is that despite Soderling's Bunyanesque game and appearance, he seems a man capable of seeing all sides of an issue; he's a soft-spoken fellow with a cautious, ambivalent manner and traces of a lisp. I wondered, will he be content as the giant-killer? Does he yearn, as we might expect, to be a giant?

"Oh, I don't really care. I think Roger and Rafa, they're the two best players in the world right now. I think it will remain like that for a couple of years. But of course I want to improve. I want to do better. But it's also a matter of doing well in many matches, many tournaments in a row, not only ones here and there."

All anti-Christs ought to be so mellow.

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/09/notes-on-the-anti-christ.html

Nolby
09-05-2010, 05:48 AM
All anti-Christs ought to be so mellow.o

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2010/09/notes-on-the-anti-christ.html

I saw the title and was feeling angry, as Bodo is the same sensationalistic journalist who wrote last year at the WTFs that Robin was a "Wolf" and poor little Rafa was "an Elk Calf". He has written MANY similar negative pieces on David Nalbandian throughout the years always casting him as some sort of cartoon villain that the elegant and noble Roger and Rafa had to defeat to keep consuming multiple slams that are theirs to own without any challenge warranted or desired.

But now from reading this article, I see Bodo has reached a point where he is actually lampooning himself. This is another "Robin is Evil" article, but in disguise this time (great that he actually watched him play for once :p ), and he is actually starting to realize how ludicrous it it is to pick on the "Giant Killer" as opposed to the Giants. I'm never going to like Bodo, but at least it shows some growth that he is able to able to start self-parodying his own ridiculous personifications. The article actually comes off as somewhat sympathetic to Soda, which in a "Bodo tennis world", is quite an achievement for Robin.

I offer this to Bodo for insight. Robin doesn't care if you want to keep casting him as Wile E. Coyote and Rafa as the Road Runner. He will still politely answer your questions, give you the respect a human being deserves and ignore the fact you don't mention any of his charitable works or the high regard his close friends have for him and his character. He is not going to warm up to the role you want him to wear as a World Wrestling Style Villain; he will keep being himself while you rant and rave, blundering for some entertaining negative angle to take on him. But I give you credit for hinting that you are starting to see how ridiculous your own angles on Soda have been and he isn't properly playing the "Anti-Christ" role as one who would greedily work that angle for a few Machievellian extra bucks the way you work the news journalism world in the same manner. ;)

It might have something to do with the fact he never was a villain, and he always will have his talent, hard work, self-respect and a great game. He will continue to break the rules you set for a boring tennis world where the competition worship Fed and Rafa and roll over for them because the masses worship phoney two-dimensional "star" personas and love seeing the Royalty say "Let them eat cake" to the competition. Robin will continue to try his best to beat them; and if he fails, he will try harder the next time. To Robin, Tennis is still a sport about "competition" instead of "star worshipping" entertainment.

I know that isn't as entertaining as the dumbed down masses desire, Bodo, but you can always continue to write self-parodies of your own cartoon world to keep yourself employed as a Tennis analyst. It has inexplicably worked for you for years now. You know how to get around that "talent" issue and keep the checks coming in. :p Robin and you have so little in common.

AgnRus
09-26-2010, 10:55 AM
Robin Soderling Plays at The Venetian Macau

Asiatatler.com speaks to world’s number five tennis star Robin Soderling on his favorite game, the upcoming The Venetian Macau Tennis Showdown 2010, and beating Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal



Currently ranked number five, and with an ongoing cross-court bicker match with Spaniard Rafael Nadal, Swedish tennis star Robin Soderling has attracted much attention on and off court. But despite all the off-court drama, it really is his game that has turned heads: thanks to his sharp returns as well as his precise and aggressive serves, Soderling has given Nadal and Federer, who have been sitting comfortably in the top ranks, a run for their game. For now, Bjorn Borg remains the legendary Swedish tennis hero; but the pending question is, will the young Soderling soon snatch that title, too? Asiatatler.com speaks to Soderling about his upcoming match, defining moments, and his competition.

Asiatatler.com: This is your first visit to Macau: how long are you there for, and what do you expect at The Venetian?

Robin Soderling: I will be in Macao for two days. I heard the Venetian is amazing and know that Roger, Pete, Borg, McEnroe and Agassi have all played this event over the last years. I hear that they put on a great show with lots of music, entertainment and with the exciting format.

AT: Do you enjoy exhibition matches, or do you ever find it difficult to motivate yourself for them?

RS: Special events allow us to play in places we would not ordinarily reach. Like my visit to Vietnam, Abu Dhabi and now Macau. The higher you reach in the rankings, the more chances like this one has. It's an added incentive to play well so that the rewards both in life experience terms and financially continue. I only play special events when they have a perfect fit with my schedule. I am always super motivated to win so when there is another top player on the other side of the net, I go full power.

AT: Of the other three players at the event, are there any you particularly like or dislike playing against?

RS: I have had some very tough matches against Tomas - last year in a Challenger Final and this year in the semis of Roland Garros - which was very high powered tennis. He got to the final at Wimbledon and I got to the finals after beating him in Paris. Niko is so tough, he is such a dangerous player, he is very fast and gets every ball back. David is also one of the fastest players on the Tour and, he does not miss a lot of the balls, in fact, he reached the Final of the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai.

AT: What's been the proudest moment of your career so far?

RS: There has been quite a few. Beating the defending champion Rafael in Paris last year handing him his only loss at Roland Garros, and finally beating Roger Federer, also the defending Champion at Roland Garros this year both ranked up there.

AT: What are your short-term ambitions - your targets over the next 12 months?

RS: To keep winning, playing well, staying healthy, be positive on court and being the best that I can be. And of course, great results in the Grand Slams.

AT: Who are your idols - both inside and outside tennis?

RS: Sweden has such a rich tradition of top tennis stars with Bjorn Borg of course leading the way as one of the greats of tennis. Bjorn recently said that he thinks I have the game to be 31 so it's is a lot of pressure on me coming from him!

AT: Do you have any ambitions after your tennis career finishes?

RS: Right now I am focused on being the best that i can be. Now is the time for tennis. When I am done, then I will think of other things.

http://www.asiatatler.com/hk/top_stories.php?id=5540

AgnRus
10-06-2010, 01:31 PM
An interview with:ROBIN SODERLING



R. SODERLING/T. Robredo

  4-6/6-1/ 6-4

  THE INTERPRETER: Questions, please.

  Q. Tonight you lose the first set. How do you come back after last two sets?

  ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah, I lost the first set, but I think I played pretty good, anyway. I really felt like I almost played a little bit better than him, even though he won the first set.

  But he came up with some really good tennis at the end of the first set to break me. But then, you know, I stepped up a little bit, and I think second set was really good for me. And then, of course, it was close again in the third, but overall I felt like I was playing a little bit better than him today.

  Q. I just wanted to ask you how much confidence does it give you bouncing back tonight? We've seen so many of the top players kind of bounced out of the tournament quite early, and you fought back. Tell us how, just mentally, what that does.

  ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, of course. I think it's always great to win tough matches for your confidence. And, I mean, to play Tommy in the first round, it's a very difficult first round, I think.

  I think it's kind of late in the season and everybody is a little bit tired, but I'm feeling good physically and mentally, so it's really good to have this win and hopefully I can build on this and play even better in my next match.

  Q. We all know you reached the French Open final twice. We want to know what you learned from that. The other question is does it surprise you you have so many fans in China?

  ROBIN SODERLING: It's a lot of people here, so it's good to have a couple of fans. (Laughter.)

  Yeah, I think I learned a lot from the first year in Paris. I think, you know, before that tournament my results in the Grand Slam were not so good, and then all of a sudden, you know, I made it to the fourth round for the first time.

  After that, you know, I kind of relaxed a little bit. Then I had this great match against Rafa in the fourth round, and, you know, I think after that, you know, I realized that I can actually do well in the Grand Slams, and after that I think I have been having really good results in the Grand Slam tournaments.

http://www.chinaopen.com.cn/en/news/2010-10-06/1436157.shtml

sunzhewyq
10-11-2010, 02:50 AM
7 October 2010   R. SODERLING/N. Almagro
  7 5, 4 6, 6 3
  
  Q. Seemed like you used your serve today to get yourself out of quite a few jams. Was that a big factor today? Also, could you just comment in general on the match?
  ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think we both served really well, especially like on all the important points。
  Yeah, I'm really happy with my serve. I think, you know, when I'm serving well, I'm always playing well, because it makes it easier, you know, to relax and play my game and in my return games, as well。
  You know, I think it was a good match, very small margins, but I was able to play really well to break him in the third set。
  Q. During the game, did the frequent yellings of your opponent affect your performance?
  ROBIN SODERLING: I'm sorry?
  Q. During the game, did the frequent yellings of your opponent influence your performance?
  ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really. I think, as I said, it was a good match. I played against him a lot of times, and, you know, I was prepared. That's the way he is doing during matches. So, you know, I wasn't surprised. It didn't affect me。
  Q. Just wanting to know if the weather conditions this afternoon affected your game in any way and how you deal when the air is not so good, and also when the floodlights came on a bit early, as well. Does the smog effect you in any way and can you prepare for it at all?
  ROBIN SODERLING: We were just discussing if it's smog or fog. I don't know, but it's...
  Q. Well, the U.S. embassy in Beijing have a monitor by the hour, and it says it's at hazardous levels。
  ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, well, I was a little bit surprised when I looked out this morning and saw the weather, because I couldn't see the sun. I think it was pretty okay, you know. I didn't have any problems breathing or anything。
  I think it was a good match. At least, you know, we didn't have to bother with the sun in our eyes or anything like that, so it was good. (Smiling。)
  Q. I can see that you have your eye on the TV. Would you like to play Andy in the semis? Sorry, I couldn't help but notice。
  ROBIN SODERLING: (Smiling。) Well, I mean, I'm playing against Ferrer now and he's a great player. He played so well this year. I have to focus on this match。
  But, you know, it's always very fun and always very nice to play against one of the world's best, so we played a couple of times and I always enjoyed the matches we had. If I'm winning tomorrow and he's winning this and the next match, it would be really fun to play against him。
  Q. You have played with Almagro at the final of the Swedish Open this year. You lose to him. So anything you had changed today that you made a result change?
  ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I tried to play a little bit more aggressive today than I did the last time we played, but it's also different matches because this one the last one was on clay and this one was on hard court。
  There were a little bit difference, but I think, you know, I executed my game plan really well, was serving well and stayed aggressive, because against him you have to do it, because he's hitting the ball really hard and plays fast.

sunzhewyq
10-11-2010, 02:52 AM
An interview with: ROBIN SODERLING

2010-10-09 17:30

D. FERRER/R. Soderling
6-2/ 6-4
THE INTERPRETER: Questions, please.
Q. (Through translation.) How do you evaluate today's performance?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it was not perfect, of course, but I think I was hitting the ball okay.
But he played really well, so of course I wish I had played a little bit better, but it was not so bad.
Q. Do you think the weather affects your performance? Because there is fog and maybe it would be influence your eyesight.
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it's the same for everybody, so I don't think so.

only two questions.....

Ad Wim
10-11-2010, 06:18 PM
Well, he really played awful, but good he gives the credits to his opponent.

AgnRus
10-19-2010, 12:35 PM
Viewing Robin Söderling's 'Claim to Fame' Throughout His Career

By Dimitri Kay (Contributor) on October 18, 2010

http://cdn.bleacherreport.net/images_root/images/photos/001/052/679/103929797_crop_340x234.jpg?1287420039

1. The Underachiever

Söderling use to be known as an underachiever, a person who did not fulfill his true potential. He was credited for reaching the US Open Junior final in 2002, and then making his transition to the main tour in 2003 with a third round appearance at Wimbledon, after qualifying rounds, and a final appearance in the Stockholm final.

But consistent injuries mixed with poor results saw him drop out of the top 100.

2. Mocking Nadal at Wimbledon

In 2007 Söderling and Rafael Nadal met in the third round of Wimbledon.

They played a match that went to five sets and was played over a number of days because of rain delays. Although Nadal won the match, Söderling was the one who got all of the media attention. At the beginning of the fifth set Nadal was ready to serve when Söderling went to his chair to get a new racket.

When coming back on court Nadal seemed frustrated with this action. As Nadal was going through his service motion he stopped and held the ball high.. In response to that Söderling mocked Nadal by pulling at his shorts like the Spaniard is known to do. This caused outrage with Nadal fans and the incident was all over the media.


3. Only person to beat Nadal at the French Open

In 2009 seeded 23rd Söderling went through to the fourth round of a Grand Slam for the first time in his career.

His opponent? Non other than the four time defending champion Rafael Nadal.

One month earlier at the Rome Masters the Spaniard obliterated the Swede 6-1 6-0, therefore, many pundits believed this to be a cake walk for Nadal. However, Söderling scored the biggest win of his career and the biggest upset of the year by beating Nadal 6–2, 6–7(2), 6–4, 7–6(2). He went on to reach the final where he lost to Federer.

4. ‘The Giant Killer’, Beating Federer at the French Open

With this win came many statistics.

Söderling became only the second man to beat both Nadal and Federer at Grand Slam level (other being Del Potro who beat both men while going on to win the US Open). He also became the only person to beat both Nadal and Federer while they were the defending champions and world number ones.

Although the second statistic is a little far-fetched it is a good feat nonetheless. However, Söderling also prevented Federer from reaching his 24th consecutive Grand Slam semi-final since 2004 and stopped him from equaling Pete Sampras’ record of 286 total weeks as the number one seed.

5. Being a fifth seed Swede

All of a sudden the only statistic that is continuously being reminded to us by many pundits and commentators is that Söderling is the only Swedish tennis player ranked inside the top 300. Plus that he is "very dangerous on his day" and that "clay is now his best surface".

It goes nearly unnoticed that he is a two time Grand Slam finalist, but everybody knows that about Murray.

It is time for Söderling to make everyone remember him for a different reason. In order for him to achieve this he has to add some things to his resume.

6.Win a couple of Masters Series titles

These titles do wonders for careers. Davydenko’s career looks much more prestigious with his three titles plus his WTF title that he claimed last year. Plus he is considered a serious threat at these events. Same for Nalbandian.

7.Win at least two titles per year

This will big up his profile and make him a more serious top ten player. This year he has four finals but just one win in Rotterdam. Djokovic and Murray both have two titles this year and both get a lot of recognition. This also has to do with point No. 3.

8.Be more consistent throughout the year. Especially at the slams

Many thought that this would be the year when Söderling put a string of good performances together. However that was not the case. Even if he had one final and two quarter-finals at Grand Slam level he lost in the first round of the Australian Open.

In addition to this he has not always beat the top guys. He has only done so at the French Open. Same with the Masters Series. He reached the semi-finals both at Indian Wells and Miami but has not reached another since. Consistency is everything in tennis as the top four will tell you; Söderling has yet to manage this.

If he manages these three tasks next year, we will not be referring to him as being just the fifth seed, but as one of the “big five." Something that will mean he is feared and respected amongst his peers.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/494432-viewing-robin-soumlderlings-claim-to-fame-througout-his-career

sunzhewyq
10-19-2010, 02:02 PM
obliterate......

make the if Stockholm Open your the second title of this year...

DanaKz
10-20-2010, 05:03 AM
So :) Seems like we can start looking forward for 2011. Brisbane! From AussieOpen official twitter:

Soderling, Petrova, Fish, Hantuchova and Gasquet all starting their 2011 #ausopen preparations at the Brisbane International.

Also Kooyong exhibition's organizers are in negotiations with Robin for their event, so...

2011.
Jan. 03-10 - Brisbane international
Jan. 12-14 - Kooyong (maybe)
Jan. 17-31 - Australian Open.

swedes_rule
10-20-2010, 05:39 AM
:dance::dance::yippee::yippee: SO amazingly happy that Robin is coming to brisbane!!!!

AgnRus
10-20-2010, 03:23 PM
So :) Seems like we can start looking forward for 2011. Brisbane! From AussieOpen official twitter:



Also Kooyong exhibition's organizers are in negotiations with Robin for their event, so...

2011.
Jan. 03-10 - Brisbane international
Jan. 12-14 - Kooyong (maybe)
Jan. 17-31 - Australian Open.

Robin will not play exhibitions before AO.

http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/soderling-andrar-schemat_sto2511461/story.shtml

sunzhewyq
10-20-2010, 04:16 PM
Robin will not play exhibitions before AO.

http://www.eurosport.se/tennis/soderling-andrar-schemat_sto2511461/story.shtml

that's so brilliant.The beginning of 2010 was absolutely terrible...although defeated Roger on kooyong exhibition...

AgnRus
10-20-2010, 04:18 PM
that's so brilliant.The beginning of 2010 was absolutely terrible...although defeated Roger on kooyong exhibition...

maibe in Abu Dhabi?;)

sunzhewyq
10-21-2010, 10:23 AM
maibe in Abu Dhabi?;)

i had made a mistake...robin defeated roger in Abu Dhabi in 2010.....

it looks reasonable for robin to take part in this match....anyway,only if he can have a good result in AO.....:angel:

BTW T.berdych have failed to the third round of Stockholm Open...is this a good news to robin?

AgnRus
10-21-2010, 02:37 PM
i had made a mistake...robin defeated roger in Abu Dhabi in 2010.....

it looks reasonable for robin to take part in this match....anyway,only if he can have a good result in AO.....:angel:

BTW T.berdych have failed to the third round of Stockholm Open...is this a good news to robin?

I do not think so. There are many other strong players, so ...:rolleyes: Robin need to play well in every game if he wants to win.

sunzhewyq
10-21-2010, 03:27 PM
I do not think so. There are many other strong players, so ...:rolleyes: Robin need to play well in every game if he wants to win.

yes,i know this.....but robin leads the H2H with other players...:cool:

AgnRus
10-23-2010, 02:46 PM
Soderling Qualifies For Barclays ATP World Tour Finals

http://www.barclaysatpworldtourfinals.com/~/media/2B3D3AD27F1E486391937F5AB4F4B508.ashx

Robin Soderling has qualified for the 2010 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. Soderling, who reached the semi-finals of the season finale in London last year, becomes the fifth singles player to qualify for this year’s event - to be played at The O2 21-28 November. The Swede joins a blockbuster line-up comprised of Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray.

Soderling, who fell in the quarter-finals of this week's If Stockholm Open, is guaranteed to finish among the world's top eight following today's release of draws at next week's ATP World Tour 250 tournaments in Vienna, St. Petersburg and Montpellier.

“I’ve always dreamed about playing at the World Tour Finals. I had some really good memories from last year. Hopefully I can take that experience and do even better this time. There are only eight players and you play against the world’s best so every match you play could be like a Grand Slam final. I will have to be ready from the first match,” said Soderling.

http://the-slice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Soderling-Release2.jpg

The Swede has enjoyed the best season of his career to date, capturing the ATP World Tour 500 event in Rotterdam, as well as reaching the final at Roland Garros for a second consecutive year. He also reached the quarter-finals at Wimbledon and the US Open and currently lies at a career high No.5 in the South African Airways 2010 ATP Rankings.

Soderling’s qualification also means his self-portrait, created using paint-covered tennis balls, will be displayed as part of the ‘Art of Tennis’ exhibition at La Galleria Pall Mall in London from 8-18 November. Only the world’s top eight players who qualify to compete in the season finale will have their original works of art exhibited in London and auctioned online for charity through: barclaysatpworldtourfinals.com/ArtofTennis.


http://www.barclaysatpworldtourfinals.com/News/Tennis/2010/Pretournament/Soderling-Qualifies-For-Finals.aspx

Yolkina
10-23-2010, 02:46 PM
http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww34/mooraie/Babouin/La%20buvette/67d10f36.jpg

AgnRus
11-01-2010, 04:00 PM
Big names announced for Tennis World Champs

World number one Rafael Nadal will return to Abu Dhabi for the Mubadala World Tennis Championship, Flash has announced.

Alongside world number two Roger Federer, Robin Soderling, Tomas Berdych, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Marcos Baghdatis will join Nadal at the event, set to take place from December 30 2010 to January 1 2011.

The recently upgraded Abu Dhabi International Tennis Complex and Zayed Sports City will play host to the tournament, which for many players, marks the start to their season.

Reigning champ and and world number one Rafael Nadal said; “Abu Dhabi is a very special place to me. I’ve enjoyed the best season of my career so far and it all started with a victory in Abu Dhabi, so it holds great memories. The early season momentum gained in Abu Dhabi is good preparation for the Australian Open.”

The twenty-four year old Spaniard followed up his season opening win in Abu Dhabi writing his name into the record books, by becoming just the seventh player in history and the youngest player in the Open Era, to complete the Career Grand-Slam. Eager to return, Nadal added; “Everything about Abu Dhabi and the tournament from the weather, facilities and the atmosphere in the stadium, make it the ideal place to start my season. Having seen the strength of the field, I look forward to returning to defend my title in a fantastic city that loves tennis and is emerging as one of the world’s great sporting destinations.”

Tickets for the 3-day event are available now.

http://www.digitalproductionme.com/article-3483-big-names-announced-for-tennis-world-champs/
----------------------------

what the hell, Robin? again exos?:mad:

sunzhewyq
11-01-2010, 04:26 PM
Abu DHabi is absolutely a hell........

who can tell me how robin thinks about?another victory aganist Roger or Nadal?

henke007
11-01-2010, 06:38 PM
He probably gets a million bucks just to play!!

swedes_rule
11-01-2010, 11:08 PM
i think thats just stupid... playing abu and then going straight to brisbane the same week? its asking for trouble!!
this year after he lost 1st round AO, i asked magnus if they'd consider coming back to brisbane to try again and he said "we have to try something different, what we're doing now isnt working"

well im sorry magnus, but you lied! this isnt something different!! forget the money and concentrate on AO!

sunzhewyq
11-02-2010, 02:51 AM
i think thats just stupid... playing abu and then going straight to brisbane the same week? its asking for trouble!!
this year after he lost 1st round AO, i asked magnus if they'd consider coming back to brisbane to try again and he said "we have to try something different, what we're doing now isnt working"

well im sorry magnus, but you lied! this isnt something different!! forget the money and concentrate on AO!

Magnus:banghead:.....

BTW,where can you ask the question to him?on his blog or are you a journalist?:scratch:

sunzhewyq
11-02-2010, 07:46 AM
there is a vote for the favorite ATP player in 2010.Let us vote for robin.

here is the link:http://www.atpworldtour.com/Fans/Fan-Favorite/Fan-Favourite-Voting.aspx

swedes_rule
11-05-2010, 12:37 AM
Magnus:banghead:.....

BTW,where can you ask the question to him?on his blog or are you a journalist?:scratch:



i was at the match and spoke to him in person after it... nothing special :lol:

swedes_rule
11-05-2010, 12:38 AM
there is a vote for the favorite ATP player in 2010.Let us vote for robin.

here is the link:http://www.atpworldtour.com/Fans/Fan-Favorite/Fan-Favourite-Voting.aspx


just voted :D it was a tough choice for the doubles favourite though... Lindstedt or Aspelin?? :confused:

Ad Wim
11-05-2010, 09:14 AM
What's the fuzz? He still has a week off after Brisbane.

sunzhewyq
11-05-2010, 09:26 AM
i was at the match and spoke to him in person after it... nothing special :lol:

ok,i knew it.last time,in ChinaOpen, i sat next to him,but he looked so serious that i had no courage to talk to him....After the match,i give a picture drew by myself to jenni..:angel:

swedes_rule
11-05-2010, 10:50 PM
ok,i knew it.last time,in ChinaOpen, i sat next to him,but he looked so serious that i had no courage to talk to him....After the match,i give a picture drew by myself to jenni..:angel:


hes very friendly, as long as you dont interrupt him during a point or something... before or after the match im sure he'd talk to you :) hes really a sweetie :inlove: :lol:

sunzhewyq
11-06-2010, 02:11 AM
hes very friendly, as long as you dont interrupt him during a point or something... before or after the match im sure he'd talk to you :) hes really a sweetie :inlove: :lol:

:cool:next time (if i can),maybe,i will have a try.....:)

sunzhewyq
11-14-2010, 04:53 PM
BNP PARIBAS MASTERS PARIS

Soderling Rains On French Parade To Win First Masters 1000 Crown
Paris, France
by ATP Staff

Robin Soderling will go into the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals as one of the favourites after winning his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 trophy Sunday with a 6-1, 7-6(1) victory over French contender Gael Monfils in the final of the BNP Paribas Masters in Paris-Bercy.

Soderling received 1000 South African Airways 2010 ATP Ranking points as champion and consequently will rise to a career-high World No. 4 on Monday, replacing Great Britain’s Andy Murray. The Tibro native is the first Swede to win one of the coveted ATP World Tour Masters 1000 trophies since Thomas Enqvist defeated Tim Henman in the 2000 Cincinnati final.

“It feels great,” declared two-time Roland Garros runner-up Soderling. “I don't have a very good record in finals, and especially here in Paris. I lost two finals at Roland Garros. Of course it's great to reach the final in a Grand Slam and also in a Masters 1000, but I think a final is that one match you really want to win. I'm really happy that I played well today, and now I'm here winning the title.

“When I won that last point, I just felt so happy and I felt so relieved. I really wanted to win this match so much.”

The 26-year-old Soderling endured a tough road to his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 final and became the fifth player this year to win an ATP World Tour title after being match point down, having saved three match points against Michael Llodra in the semi-finals.

Against Monfils in the final, Soderling overcame his nerves to race to a one-set lead, only dropping six points on his serve and breaking Monfils’ serve twice in the 26-minute opener. Monfils raised his level for a more even contest in the second set, but in the decisive tie-break Soderling quickly seized the initiative and claimed victory in 77 minutes.

“I was extremely nervous before this match,” confessed Soderling. “I didn't sleep much at all last night. I really wanted to do well today, and I'm really happy the way I started the match. I came out playing really well.

“Then after the first set it was a little bit easier for me, even though he started to play a little bit better. I was a bit more relaxed and I was going for my shots. At the end I think I played a really good tie-break. I'm really happy that I played my best tennis when it really matters.”

Soderling won his second ATP World Tour title of the season and the sixth of his career. Earlier this season, he had triumphed at the indoor event in Rotterdam and reached the Roland Garros final for the second year in a row, losing out to Rafael Nadal. He also finished runner-up on clay in Barcelona and Bastad and has compiled a 56-20 match record.

World No. 14 Monfils was through to the Paris-Bercy final for the second straight year after recording one of the best wins of his career in the semi-finals by saving five match points to defeat No. 2 Roger Federer. He lost out in a third-set tie-break to Novak Djokovic last year.

"I'm in a learning process. Every time I get to a final like this something goes wrong, and this time it was the preparation. I had to rush too much," lamented Monfils. "And also, at one stage in the match I tried to change my plan. I should maybe not have done that and keep with simple things. But I like all this, because it shows that when I will finally win my first [Masters 1000] final, it means I did everything right.

"Yesterday I used up a lot of energy, and today I wasn't able to find the extra stamina that I would have needed to be more competitive."

The 24 year old was bidding to become the fifth different Frenchman to win an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title (since 1990) and dropped to a 3-10 lifetime mark in ATP World Tour finals. Two weeks ago he won his third title indoors in Montpellier (d. Ljubicic). The Paris native will close his season in three weeks time when he represents France in the Davis Cup final against Serbia in Belgrade.


http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/11/45/Paris-Sunday-Soderling-Wins-First-Masters-1000-Title.aspx

sunzhewyq
11-16-2010, 11:52 AM
Round Robin Groups had been announced.

Robin is in Group B,together with R.Federer,A.Murray and D.Ferrer..

Not a very good draw....

misty1
11-16-2010, 01:14 PM
he can bet federer and he's in better form then murray so he's got a 50/50 chance there.

i think the only really bad one there is federer

he's got a better shot at getting out of this group than the djokovic, nadal,berdych, roddick one thats for sure

sunzhewyq
11-16-2010, 01:33 PM
he can bet federer and he's in better form then murray so he's got a 50/50 chance there.

i think the only really bad one there is federer

he's got a better shot at getting out of this group than the djokovic, nadal,berdych, roddick one thats for sure

sorry,i don't think so.D.Ferrer is very good player...the last three match with him can show sth. to us...he has a very good reserve....and makes not too many UEs....the match in china and Valencia can prove this...

AgnRus
11-16-2010, 02:53 PM
sorry,i don't think so.D.Ferrer is very good player...the last three match with him can show sth. to us...he has a very good reserve....and makes not too many UEs....the match in china and Valencia can prove this...

agree...

Ad Wim
11-16-2010, 03:33 PM
Very bad draw. Nadal and Berdych were much easier than Federer and Murray and he got both the wrong ones. And he should beat Ferrer, but he lost to him twice lately.
Very tough group, but if he plays like in Paris he should make the SF.

I♥PsY@Mus!c
11-16-2010, 03:45 PM
Thanks for the interview.It's true and as Robin said he didn't have great results in final,honestly I wasn't sure if he could beat Monfils in Paris.But I wasn't as nervous as him,thought he was calm during the match but of course I wanted him to win!Yes he needs this win so badly. :boxing: I was busy and know it's a bit late to post but when he won I was very over the moon. :drink::crazy: First time to win a Master Series is like "first time" - such a sweet thing! :kiss::lick::hearts: I'm like a crazy fangirl but let me wild I'm just very happy for him! :smooch:

Back to RRG topic,oh it's such not a good draw but won't say crappy this time because he has to face top guns,either N or F. :lol: Against Federer I have nothing to say,just play his best.But Andy is a bit injured,he's beatable and I think with confidence Robin can beat Ferrer this time,but I agree Ferrer is a good player that no one should underestimate.

Eden
11-18-2010, 11:20 PM
Soderling Finds The X-Factor

DEUCE
by ATP Staff

01.11.2010

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/EFAB270E39F6451184F996965D89AC28.ashx
Robin Soderling won his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title on the eve of the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals.

He always had the brutal groundstrokes and thunderous serve. Now that Robin Soderling has the mental toughness, he’ll be hard to stop at this year’s tournament.

The first thing you notice about Robin Soderling is his sheer power. Those who saw the Swede in action at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals last year, when he reached the semi-finals, will remember how his brutal groundstrokes had opponents constantly scrambling back in defence.

“Aggressive. That’s the way I like to play,” says the 26 year old. “I like to hit hard and make my opponents run. When that’s working, I always get my best results.”

It’s certainly been working throughout this year. Back in February he won the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam. He also reached the quarter-finals at both Wimbledon and the US Open, and advanced to the Roland Garros final for a second straight year. But it was on the eve of the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals that he posted his finest result of the season, winning his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title at the BNP Paribas Masters. Surely it’s only a matter of time before he gets a Grand Slam title under his belt?

“Soderling has improved a lot of things in his game,” says Bjorn Borg, another Swede who knows a thing of two about success in the majors. “He’s ready to win a Grand Slam tournament. He’s always going to be one of the favourites to win.”

Along with Stefan Edberg, Mats Wilander and Thomas Enqvist, Borg is one of the Swedish legends whose shoes Soderling is trying hard to fill. “I had a few idols when I was younger, especially all the Swedish guys,” Soderling remembers. “There were so many when I grew up. There was always someone to watch and always someone who played well. They inspired me a lot.”

Soderling was born and grew up in the small town of Tibro, which lies between Sweden’s two big lakes Vattern and Vanern, in the south of the country. His father Bo is a lawyer, his mother Britt-Inge a housewife, and his older sister Sandra a teacher. Soderling first took up tennis at the age of five. He remembers cycling to and from his local tennis courts, even during the harsh winters.

His childhood friend, the current Swedish doubles specialist Johan Brunstrom, recalls how, even as a youngster, Soderling used to fight really hard on the court. “In his age group there were three or four guys who were fighting big time against each other every time they played,” he says. “Robin came out on top of these battles most of the time. I think that created a big confidence from an early stage which helped a lot throughout juniors and on to the pro tour.”

Another Swedish player who remembers how strong Soderling was as a youngster is former Top 10 player, Joachim Johansson. “He was very competitive and took his own way,” he says. “Robin does not fear anyone. This is a strength that he has had all his life. Even when he was 10 and 12 years old, he always had the feeling that he could be No. 1.”

But Soderling has had to work very hard to harness his power game. His coach, former World No. 2 Magnus Norman, reveals how together they have improved Soderling’s mental game.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/DEUCE-Tennis/DEUCE-Finals-2010/~/media/CFAB32626EEE4356BF9DAB87C3C4E941.ashx?w=250&h=180&as=1

“In the past he was throwing away matches that he should have won,” he says. “He was affected by the wind, spectators, by things that he could not control. What I was trying to do when I took over was to change his mentality, make it a strength.

“But in the beginning we had a rough time together. We were talking a lot, spending a lot of time together. I am sure he was sick of hearing my voice. But Soderling is very eager to learn new things, and he is an analyst. Sometimes he comes back to me and says: ‘I don’t really agree with you. Tell me why you think that?’ Then we discuss it more and more until we both agree on a plan.”

Soderling hasn’t always been the most popular player on the circuit. He once even admitted he didn’t join the ATP World Tour to make new friends. His coach is well aware that sometimes his protégé’s character can appear as hard as his groundstrokes. “Robin has a very strong personality,” he says. “You have to develop a feeling when to approach him. But he is more open now than in the past. Expectations have changed a lot. Very interesting to see how he handles the pressure.”

And there will certainly be a huge amount of pressure here at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. Last year, on his debut at the season finale, he narrowly lost in the semi-finals to Juan Martin del Potro, in a third set tie-break.

“Hopefully I can take that experience and do even better this time,” Soderling says positively. “There are only eight players, and you play against the world’s best, so every match you play could be like a Grand Slam final. I will have to be ready from the first match.”

Story reproduced with permission from the official Barclays ATP World Tour Finals tournament program.
Order your copy online: http://merchandise.theo2.co.uk/

Source: http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/DEUCE-Tennis/DEUCE-Finals-2010/Robin-Soderling.aspx

sunzhewyq
11-20-2010, 03:38 AM
Soderling Comfortable With Life As A Top Player
London, England
by James Buddell | 19.11.2010
http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/48E8467D453240388411E8E160E1B577.ashx

Robin Soderling, the leading indoor specialist in the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals field, who achieved a career-high No. 4 in the South African Airways 2010 ATP Rankings after his BNP Paribas Masters, insists "a ranking is just a number, but it won’t change anything."

The Swede comes into the London season finale with a 20-4 indoor record over the past 12 months – seven victories more than the nearest of his fellow qualifiers, David Ferrer (13-3). He has a 56-20 match record on the season, highlighted by a second successive runner-up finish at Roland Garros.

“I feel like I’m improving and I like being a top player," said Soderling at the London Marriott Hotel County Hall on Friday. "It is what I have worked hard for. This is where I want to be. It always adds more pressure. I play many more matches now where I am a favourite. I think I have handled it well over the past couple of years.

DEUCE Magazine: Soderling Finds The X-Factor | Buy Finals Tickets


“I’ve always liked to play indoors. Growing up in Sweden, I’ve grown up on the surface so I go into every tournament with confidence. I feel good. I think I have had a good season and been very solid and played well throughout the whole year. The past week, winning my first [ATP World Tour] Masters 1000 title was great and I did it on a pretty similar surface to the one here in London.”

Soderling, who has recovered from a stomach bug, will meet British favourite Andy Murray in the first round robin match on Sunday. The pair has met on four occasions.

“I think every match has been even against Andy, they’ve always been tough matches. Even though three of them were a few years ago, they were close. It will be tough, but it will be close. I’ll have to play well to win. It not, it will be extremely difficult.

“He moves extremely well, returns well and doesn’t give you anything. He is an extremely tough player to play against and you always have to play well to beat him.”

Soderling’s Art of Tennis self-portrait was sold at auction for $5,100 on Thursday night. He admitted, “It was really nice to create it and it was for a good cause. It makes me happy that someone wants to buy it and help Children in Need.”

sunzhewyq
11-25-2010, 07:55 AM
Soderling won't bother with the math vs. Federer
11/24/10 5:52 PM | Johan Lindahl

Robin Soderling is not troubling himself with any useless what-if calculations over his long-odds chances of qualifying into the semi-finals in London.

His immediate goal is to try and somehow beat Roger Federer. The Swiss is one win away from reaching the weekend final four at the eight-man spectacular.

Should Federer win five games in their final Group B match with the Swede, he's through to the semis, according to ATP calculations. Soderling earned his only win over Federer in a French Open quarter-final last spring but has lost his 13 other meetings in the series.

"I haven't thought about it," the Swede said of the sometimes-complex round-robin calculations which characterise almost every edition of the ATP year-end event. "I want to win the match, it's easier. I've played so many matches. Every time I go on court, I step out there to win - I don't think about the results."

Soderling admits he's got a huge ask if he's to upset a Federer whose game has been in full flower so far this week. "He's a really tough player, No. 2 in the world and playing really good right now.

"He's played two unbelievable matches so far in this tournament. Like always against him, I need to serve and return well and try to be aggressive. He's playing really fast. It's really tough to play against him when he's on. I have to try and not give him too much time."

Find the latest tennis odds at Unibet.com

AgnRus
11-26-2010, 04:42 PM
WTF: Robin Soderling Thursday Press Conference

November 26, 2010
R. FEDERER/R. Soderling
7-6, 6-3

Q. The backhand at 6-5 and also the first game of the second set, you had two breakpoints, do you think those were the two key turning points?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, we will never know. But of course, you know, I think against a player like Roger, you know, you need to have a little bit of luck to win. And I definitely didn’t have the luck on my side today.
I’m not saying I would have won anyway. But, you know, those two points were really big and I needed both of them.


Q. On the set point when you let the ball go, did you know immediately it was a mistake?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I think he miss-hit it a little bit. At first I was pretty sure it was going out. As soon as I let it go, I felt like this one is going much closer to the line than I expected. Of course, it went in. So, yeah, it was a little bit unlucky. But it’s my fault.


Q. Since you played with Andy Murray and Federer, could you compare a little bit what the different feeling is to play against these two guys? Who do you think may be in better form?

ROBIN SODERLING: They’re very different players. You know, they’re both great players, of course. Me personally, I think it’s always a little bit more difficult to play against Roger. He’s playing a little bit faster. Maybe Murray, his defensive game is a little bit better than Roger. But, of course, they’re both really good players and they’re both really tough to play against, so…

Q. You’ve done very well this year. Career-high ranking. Assuming this is your last match, moving on to next year, are you playing any tournaments in the lead-up to the Australian? Do you feel confident about keeping up this level of form?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think I played pretty well now for two years and I don’t see why I shouldn’t play well next year. Yeah, I will play in Brisbane before Melbourne next year. First, of course, I will have a little bit of rest and then I will try to practice hard a couple of weeks before I leave for Australia.

Q. You seem to be flying the flag on your own for Swedish tennis. What do you think is the problem with Swedish tennis?

ROBIN SODERLING: I don’t know. I don’t think. I’m not the right guy to ask, you know. Of course, we had so many good players in the past. But I think it’s not really fair to ask for that many players again. I mean, Sweden is a very small country. I think we shouldn’t compare to what has been. I think we should focus on what’s coming.
Of course, it doesn’t look very good. But I think there’s still a couple of good juniors coming up, and the Federation is working much better again. So hopefully in a few years’ time, I won’t be the only Swedish player on tour.

Q. Does that actually put more pressure on you? Does that change the way you think at all?


ROBIN SODERLING: No, not really. Of course, you know, tennis is an individual sport. I’m very focused on my own game.
But, of course, you know, when I first started to play on tour, we were a lot of Swedes. It was much easier. We had more fun outside the court. We could practice together. We could help each other. It’s not the case anymore.
So, of course, it was a little bit more easy a couple of years ago.

Q. You had a great year, very consistent. What do you think you can still improve? Don’t answer that you can improve everything because I know.

ROBIN SODERLING: Everything (smiling).


Q. What do you need more? For instance, today, I think some volleys were at eight, over number 5 or 4 in the world, and you lost your first break because you didn’t go to the net on the previous ball.

ROBIN SODERLING: Yes, of course, it’s one of the things I’m working on. I’m also working a lot with my movement around the court. I think I improved a little bit on that. But I still have much more job to do.
But again, you know, you don’t want me to say ‘everything,’ but I think I need to improve everything. Even though my forehand is good, I can still hit it a little bit better, I can use it a little bit different. My serve is good, but I can still try to work on the percentage on my first serve. Backhand is good, but…
It can be everything.
That’s what you need to do if you want to be on top of the game.

Q. You were just talking about your start to the year with Brisbane. When will you begin training? Where will you train? How far in advance will you get to Australia?


ROBIN SODERLING: Oh, I will have a little bit of vacation now. It’s been a very long season. I feel it both physically and mentally. And then I will probably practice a couple of weeks in Monte-Carlo before I leave for Australia. I will probably leave one or two days after Christmas.

Q. Just in case Ferrer beats Murray in straight sets tonight, you probably will end up playing Nadal on Saturday. Any thoughts about playing him on this kind of surface?


ROBIN SODERLING: No, I won’t be playing him ’cause I will be at home then.

THE MODERATOR: Robin is out of the tournament.



Q. Are you going to Sweden for Christmas?

ROBIN SODERLING: I will be in Monte-Carlo for practice and then I will go back to Sweden to visit my family for a couple of days for Christmas and then, yeah, leave for Australia. That’s my plan.

http://tennisconnected.com/home/2010/11/26/wtf-robin-soderling-thursday-press-conference/

sunzhewyq
11-27-2010, 05:36 PM
WTF: Robin Soderling Thursday Press Conference



fcVVeUOFxg8

swedes_rule
11-27-2010, 10:11 PM
that article makes it sound like hes not going to abu dhabi doesnt it? shame it doesnt say if magnus will join him next year :(

sunzhewyq
11-28-2010, 01:53 AM
that article makes it sound like hes not going to abu dhabi doesnt it? shame it doesnt say if magnus will join him next year :(

but the schedule of 2011 showed the Abu Dhabi Exhibition on the offical website of robin....So i think he will still in that match...:cool:

AgnRus
11-28-2010, 05:03 AM
He'll play in Abu Dhabi.

http://robinsoderling.se/schedule/

Ad Wim
11-28-2010, 08:49 PM
Looks like a nice, balanced schedule. Constantly taking weeks off in between, and no 3/4 weeks in a row. That's good for him. Only thing that's disappointing, is that he doesn't play Dubai.
And it's a bit strange he is skipping Monte Carlo, but plays for 4 weeks in a row after that...

Anything on Norman yet?

Björki
12-01-2010, 07:33 AM
it's confirmed no more Robin/Magnus in 2011. :awww:
The article is on Magnus webseite.

http://answermyquestionjerk.se/

DanaKz
12-01-2010, 07:38 AM
:sad::hysteric:

Sommarsverige
12-01-2010, 08:06 AM
I also just read it :(

Of course I can understand Magnus, but I am sooooooooo very sad about it :sad: :sad:

swedes_rule
12-01-2010, 08:22 AM
i just read it too :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad:

sunzhewyq
12-01-2010, 08:37 AM
OMG,that is really a sensational news......although,many people talked about this .....it came true ...

sunzhewyq
12-01-2010, 10:42 AM
who is the best choice as a coach for Robin ????

Ad Wim
12-01-2010, 10:57 AM
I still don't think it's that bad. A coach loses his influence after a few years, a new impulse could just be what Robin needs to take it to an even higher level.

I don't really know who are available. Didn't Roddick part wit Stefanki lately? Brad Gilbert maybe?

sunzhewyq
12-01-2010, 12:29 PM
I still don't think it's that bad. A coach loses his influence after a few years, a new impulse could just be what Robin needs to take it to an even higher level.

I don't really know who are available. Didn't Roddick part wit Stefanki lately? Brad Gilbert maybe?

the title on twitter of Brad Gilbert is Tennis Analyst, Former Tennis Coach, Best-Selling Author.....

former tennis coach does it mean he will not be a coach any more???

starluk
12-02-2010, 07:04 AM
He'll play in Abu Dhabi.

http://robinsoderling.se/schedule/
anybody could tell why he doesn't play Monte-Carlo?...Again?:eek:

AgnRus
12-07-2010, 04:58 PM
2010 Best Matches Of The Year

1. Rafael Nadal d. Andy Murray, 7-6(5), 3-6, 7-6(6), Barclays ATP World Tour Finals SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/9F1D7B10B03F4F68A616ED6F4740BCE8.ashx

“Today is the reason why I play tennis,” declared British favourite Andy Murray after a heart-breaking three-set defeat to the competitive titan that is Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals of the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals.

Both players went into the eagerly anticipated match with much to gain should they reach the final. For Murray, it was the chance to end a year of mixed fortunes with the biggest title of his career on home soil. For World No. 1 Nadal, the chance to cap one of the greatest seasons by any player in the Open Era, having already won three Grand Slam championships and completed the clean sweep of ATP World Tour Masters 1000 clay-court tournaments.

For three hours and 11 minutes, raucously supported by the 17,500-strong crowd at The O2, Murray had produced arguably his best tennis of the year in a high-quality match, which featured superb shot-making from both. But despite recovering from a 3-5 deficit in the third set, and leading 4-1 in the ensuing tie-break, the Scot could not close out victory against Nadal, who was utterly determined to reach the title match at the season finale for the first time.

“It was a fantastic match,” said Nadal. “I am very happy to beat a great champion like Andy. For me [it] is an amazing victory. I am very happy for everything because [it] was a really difficult match against one of the best players of the world.”

2. Novak Djokovic d. Roger Federer, 5-7, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2, 7-5, US Open SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/6B8ED7212F8D41688E46C19CA2DED5FA.ashx?w=250&h=180&as=1

He would not go on to win the US Open, but Novak Djokovic certainly left his mark on Flushing Meadows after saving two match points to defeat Roger Federer in a pulsating five-set semi-final clash, thus denying the Swiss a place in his seventh straight US Open final.

Having lost to Federer in each of the three previous years at the US Open, including in the 2007 final, Djokovic explained afterwards, “I just knew I have to be patient and not lose my emotions too much, because that was the case in the past where I was losing the momentum with him. He uses that nervousness of the opponent. He feels it."

Indeed, the Serbian showed nerves of steel when, at 4-5 15/40 in the fifth set, he saved two match points with a swinging forehand volley and a down-the-line forehand winner. He went on to win the final three games, trumping Federer in a 22-shot rally to close out the match after three hours and 44 minutes.

The result came one year on from Federer’s defeat in the 2009 US Open final, in which he had been two points from victory against Juan Martin del Potro. The five-time US Open champion ultimately paid the price for committing 66 unforced errors to Djokovic’s 38 and afterwards expressed the disappointment he shared with many tennis fans, that he would not have the chance to reignite his rivalry with Rafael Nadal in the final. “I would have loved to play against him here. I did my hard yards the last six years making it to the finals, and he was unfortunately never there. And now one point away from this happening, obviously it's a bit of disappointment.”


3. John Isner d. Nicolas Mahut, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(7), 7-6(3), 70-68, Wimbledon 1st Rd.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/20920091422A4278B09FE7F7A7AEEA0B.ashx?w=250&h=180&as=1

It may not have featured exciting rallies or brilliant shot-making, but it was a magnificent display of serving, fitness and perseverance and for the score line alone, the John Isner - Nicolas Mahut Wimbledon classic makes the Top 5 list.

Isner and Mahut managed to eclipse the visit of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to the All England Club on the first Thursday of The Championships as they concluded their record-breaking, first-round clash on Court 18. The longest tennis match on record lasted 11 hours and five minutes over three days, broke a host of tennis records, and finally ended with Isner hitting a backhand – his 246th winner – down the line to pass Mahut. The fifth set alone had lasted eight hours and 11 minutes – 98 minutes more than the previous longest match on record

“The guy's an absolute warrior,” said Isner of the defeated Mahut. “It stinks someone had to lose. To share this with him was an absolute honour. Maybe we'll meet again somewhere down the road and it won't be 70-68.” Until Isner broke in the 183rd and final game of the match, there had been 168 consecutive service games held between both players; there were only three service breaks in the entire match, totalling 980 points. Both players broke records with the number of aces they hit - 113 for Isner, 103 for Mahut - and 490 winners in total were struck.

Two weeks later, Isner and Mahut won the ESPY Award for Best Record-Breaking Performance, having finished the match just in time to make the ESPY Awards cut, with nominations announced that same day.


4. Robin Soderling d. Michael Llodra, 6-7(0), 7-5, 7-6(6), BNP Paribas Masters SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/CE5DB6A982F64C44ABA4BD40FA13283B.ashx?w=180&h=250&as=1

Frenchman Michael Llodra had delighted the home support at Paris-Bercy throughout the week, beating Novak Djokovic and Nikolay Davydenko to reach his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 semi-final, and had two-time Roland Garros runner-up Robin Soderling on the ropes before his fairytale run came to an end.

In a throwback to old fashioned tennis, serve and volleyer Llodra had the crowd rocking as he exploited the slick indoor hard court to slice and dice the big-hitting Soderling. After fighting back from a 1-4 deficit in the final set, the 30-year-old Llodra squandered three match points in a gripping 12th game of the third set, and Soderling held on to clinch victory in the decisive tie-break after two hours and 49 minutes of action.

"Today it was a great match. It wasn't maybe pretty, but I'm here as a winner," reflected Soderling, who went on to win his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title with victory over Gael Monfils the following day. "I think tennis is a very mental sport, because everybody can play; everybody is so good. So it's the mental [aspect] that's going to decide a lot of matches."


5. Gael Monfils d. Roger Federer, 7-6(7), 6-7(1), 7-6(4), BNP Paribas Masters SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/29D15F5852AC4534A70591566E275894.ashx?w=180&h=250&as=1

Fans at the BNP Paribas Masters on semi-final day surely had the golden ticket as they witnessed two of the best matches of the year, back-to-back. After the crowd had suffered the disappointment of seeing Michael Llodra edged out in the first semi-final, Paris-born Gael Monfils lifted the roof of the Palais Omnisports as he defeated Roger Federer to reach the final for the second year in a row.

Monfils was lifted by the home support to save five match points on serve in the 12th game of the final set, having earlier fought back from a 1-4 deficit. The No. 12 seed then clinched victory in the decisive tie-break after two hours and 41 minutes. It was his first win in six meetings with 16-time Grand Slam champion Federer.

“I'm happy I won against Rog. He's someone I admire a lot. He's a legend of tennis, ‘the’ legend, and beating him is a beautiful victory. I will remember that for my whole life,” declared Monfils. “And also it happened in very special conditions for me, in Paris, so it's only happiness.”

For Federer, it marked the fourth time in 2010 that he had lost a match having held match point opportunities. As well as in the US Open semi-finals against Djokovic, he had squandered three match points in a third-round defeat to Marcos Baghdatis in Indian Wells and two weeks later he had missed a match point chance in a fourth-round loss to Tomas Berdych in Miami.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/Best-Matches-Of-The-Year.aspx

AgnRus
12-07-2010, 05:14 PM
Pistolesi Söderling's new coach

Italian coach Claudio Pistolesi, 43, will take over as trainer for Swedish tennis star Robin Söderling, newspaper Svenska Dagbladet reports. [6 december kl 19.02]

It was expected that Söderling would chose a coach outside of Sweden after Magnus Norman resigned and Pistolesi will start in the middle of December when Söderling is in his home in Monte Carlo to prepare of the next season. Pistolesi has previously coached Italians Simone Bolelli and Davide Sanguinetti, Japanese Ai Sygiyama and German Michael Berrer.

Söderling and Pistolesi will evaluate the result at the end of February next year and if both are happy with the result they will sign a contract, according to the newspaper.

misty1
12-08-2010, 12:19 AM
2010 Best Matches Of The Year

1. Rafael Nadal d. Andy Murray, 7-6(5), 3-6, 7-6(6), Barclays ATP World Tour Finals SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/9F1D7B10B03F4F68A616ED6F4740BCE8.ashx

“Today is the reason why I play tennis,” declared British favourite Andy Murray after a heart-breaking three-set defeat to the competitive titan that is Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals of the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals.

Both players went into the eagerly anticipated match with much to gain should they reach the final. For Murray, it was the chance to end a year of mixed fortunes with the biggest title of his career on home soil. For World No. 1 Nadal, the chance to cap one of the greatest seasons by any player in the Open Era, having already won three Grand Slam championships and completed the clean sweep of ATP World Tour Masters 1000 clay-court tournaments.

For three hours and 11 minutes, raucously supported by the 17,500-strong crowd at The O2, Murray had produced arguably his best tennis of the year in a high-quality match, which featured superb shot-making from both. But despite recovering from a 3-5 deficit in the third set, and leading 4-1 in the ensuing tie-break, the Scot could not close out victory against Nadal, who was utterly determined to reach the title match at the season finale for the first time.

“It was a fantastic match,” said Nadal. “I am very happy to beat a great champion like Andy. For me [it] is an amazing victory. I am very happy for everything because [it] was a really difficult match against one of the best players of the world.”

2. Novak Djokovic d. Roger Federer, 5-7, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2, 7-5, US Open SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/6B8ED7212F8D41688E46C19CA2DED5FA.ashx?w=250&h=180&as=1

He would not go on to win the US Open, but Novak Djokovic certainly left his mark on Flushing Meadows after saving two match points to defeat Roger Federer in a pulsating five-set semi-final clash, thus denying the Swiss a place in his seventh straight US Open final.

Having lost to Federer in each of the three previous years at the US Open, including in the 2007 final, Djokovic explained afterwards, “I just knew I have to be patient and not lose my emotions too much, because that was the case in the past where I was losing the momentum with him. He uses that nervousness of the opponent. He feels it."

Indeed, the Serbian showed nerves of steel when, at 4-5 15/40 in the fifth set, he saved two match points with a swinging forehand volley and a down-the-line forehand winner. He went on to win the final three games, trumping Federer in a 22-shot rally to close out the match after three hours and 44 minutes.

The result came one year on from Federer’s defeat in the 2009 US Open final, in which he had been two points from victory against Juan Martin del Potro. The five-time US Open champion ultimately paid the price for committing 66 unforced errors to Djokovic’s 38 and afterwards expressed the disappointment he shared with many tennis fans, that he would not have the chance to reignite his rivalry with Rafael Nadal in the final. “I would have loved to play against him here. I did my hard yards the last six years making it to the finals, and he was unfortunately never there. And now one point away from this happening, obviously it's a bit of disappointment.”


3. John Isner d. Nicolas Mahut, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(7), 7-6(3), 70-68, Wimbledon 1st Rd.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/20920091422A4278B09FE7F7A7AEEA0B.ashx?w=250&h=180&as=1

It may not have featured exciting rallies or brilliant shot-making, but it was a magnificent display of serving, fitness and perseverance and for the score line alone, the John Isner - Nicolas Mahut Wimbledon classic makes the Top 5 list.

Isner and Mahut managed to eclipse the visit of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to the All England Club on the first Thursday of The Championships as they concluded their record-breaking, first-round clash on Court 18. The longest tennis match on record lasted 11 hours and five minutes over three days, broke a host of tennis records, and finally ended with Isner hitting a backhand – his 246th winner – down the line to pass Mahut. The fifth set alone had lasted eight hours and 11 minutes – 98 minutes more than the previous longest match on record

“The guy's an absolute warrior,” said Isner of the defeated Mahut. “It stinks someone had to lose. To share this with him was an absolute honour. Maybe we'll meet again somewhere down the road and it won't be 70-68.” Until Isner broke in the 183rd and final game of the match, there had been 168 consecutive service games held between both players; there were only three service breaks in the entire match, totalling 980 points. Both players broke records with the number of aces they hit - 113 for Isner, 103 for Mahut - and 490 winners in total were struck.

Two weeks later, Isner and Mahut won the ESPY Award for Best Record-Breaking Performance, having finished the match just in time to make the ESPY Awards cut, with nominations announced that same day.


4. Robin Soderling d. Michael Llodra, 6-7(0), 7-5, 7-6(6), BNP Paribas Masters SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/CE5DB6A982F64C44ABA4BD40FA13283B.ashx?w=180&h=250&as=1

Frenchman Michael Llodra had delighted the home support at Paris-Bercy throughout the week, beating Novak Djokovic and Nikolay Davydenko to reach his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 semi-final, and had two-time Roland Garros runner-up Robin Soderling on the ropes before his fairytale run came to an end.

In a throwback to old fashioned tennis, serve and volleyer Llodra had the crowd rocking as he exploited the slick indoor hard court to slice and dice the big-hitting Soderling. After fighting back from a 1-4 deficit in the final set, the 30-year-old Llodra squandered three match points in a gripping 12th game of the third set, and Soderling held on to clinch victory in the decisive tie-break after two hours and 49 minutes of action.

"Today it was a great match. It wasn't maybe pretty, but I'm here as a winner," reflected Soderling, who went on to win his first ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title with victory over Gael Monfils the following day. "I think tennis is a very mental sport, because everybody can play; everybody is so good. So it's the mental [aspect] that's going to decide a lot of matches."


5. Gael Monfils d. Roger Federer, 7-6(7), 6-7(1), 7-6(4), BNP Paribas Masters SF

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/~/media/29D15F5852AC4534A70591566E275894.ashx?w=180&h=250&as=1

Fans at the BNP Paribas Masters on semi-final day surely had the golden ticket as they witnessed two of the best matches of the year, back-to-back. After the crowd had suffered the disappointment of seeing Michael Llodra edged out in the first semi-final, Paris-born Gael Monfils lifted the roof of the Palais Omnisports as he defeated Roger Federer to reach the final for the second year in a row.

Monfils was lifted by the home support to save five match points on serve in the 12th game of the final set, having earlier fought back from a 1-4 deficit. The No. 12 seed then clinched victory in the decisive tie-break after two hours and 41 minutes. It was his first win in six meetings with 16-time Grand Slam champion Federer.

“I'm happy I won against Rog. He's someone I admire a lot. He's a legend of tennis, ‘the’ legend, and beating him is a beautiful victory. I will remember that for my whole life,” declared Monfils. “And also it happened in very special conditions for me, in Paris, so it's only happiness.”

For Federer, it marked the fourth time in 2010 that he had lost a match having held match point opportunities. As well as in the US Open semi-finals against Djokovic, he had squandered three match points in a third-round defeat to Marcos Baghdatis in Indian Wells and two weeks later he had missed a match point chance in a fourth-round loss to Tomas Berdych in Miami.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/Best-Matches-Of-The-Year.aspx

really dont agree with that order

wawrinka's matches against murray and querrey...one of them should be there

Ad Wim
12-08-2010, 06:51 PM
Pistolesi Söderling's new coach

Italian coach Claudio Pistolesi, 43, will take over as trainer for Swedish tennis star Robin Söderling, newspaper Svenska Dagbladet reports. [6 december kl 19.02]

It was expected that Söderling would chose a coach outside of Sweden after Magnus Norman resigned and Pistolesi will start in the middle of December when Söderling is in his home in Monte Carlo to prepare of the next season. Pistolesi has previously coached Italians Simone Bolelli and Davide Sanguinetti, Japanese Ai Sygiyama and German Michael Berrer.

Söderling and Pistolesi will evaluate the result at the end of February next year and if both are happy with the result they will sign a contract, according to the newspaper.

Good news that he found a new coach so fast. Don't really know the guy but if he got Bolelli to number 36 he's got some skills if you look at Bolelli's results this year...

And the good thing is as well that he agreed on some kind of trial period.

sunzhewyq
12-09-2010, 02:30 AM
Pistolesi has also coached the former WTA NO.1 Monica Seles and before this,he had been the sparring partner of Monica.

According to the interview and the comments,he is a mature coach.he made no promise before the co-operation.

Flavio_Sverige
12-09-2010, 09:23 AM
Pistolesi has also coached the former WTA NO.1 Monica Seles and before this,he had been the sparring partner of Monica.

According to the interview and the comments,he is a mature coach.he made no promise before the co-operation.

So good luckl for him and for Soderling in 2011! :D

AgnRus
12-16-2010, 07:13 PM
Soderling Back To Work At ATP World Tour Training Camp

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/BC7BF6E2F7B24D9E90DEBB97FBA197CC.ashx

World No. 5 Robin Soderling is beginning his 2011 preparations this week at an ATP World Tour training camp in Monte-Carlo after an extended vacation in the Maldives.

"I am actually trying to work on my weaknesses as much as possible, trying to play more aggressive and come to the net a bit more," said Soderling, who is joined at the training camp by fellow pros Ivan Ljubicic, Andreas Seppi, Simone Bolelli, Fabio Fognini, George Bastl, Benjamin Balleret and Jean-Rene Lisnard.

"So far I only practised a couple of days but it’s been really a lot of fun and I am happy to be back on the court again after two weeks vacation."

In addition to two practice sessions a day under the direction of new coach Claudio Pistolesi, Soderling has been working with fitness coach Ali Ghelem off the court, with his workout schedule encompassing dynamic exercises, coordination drills, sprints, interval training, weight lifting and light endurance.

"I work a lot on agility and coordination to be faster on the court and also on injury prevention," said the 26-year-old Swede.

Soderling parted ways with Magnus Norman following the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, and said about working with Pistolesi, "We only work 3-4 days together with Claudio. He used to be a good player, has been around for many years and he’s already taught me many new things so I am really looking forward to working with him."

Despite his busy training regimen, Soderling took time out Wednesday afternoon to attend the Monte-Carlo Country Club kids' Christmas party, posing for photos with Santa and signing autographs for the children.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2010/12/Other/Soderling-Training-Camp.aspx

sunzhewyq
12-17-2010, 03:19 AM
it looks like the cooperation with Claudio is very harmony....good luck to him.

AgnRus
01-18-2011, 06:02 PM
Robin Soderling - 18.01.11
Tuesday, 18 January, 2011

Q. A good start?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, of course. Winning in straight sets, it's a very good start. I struggled a little bit in the first set. But I think after that I played better and better. At the end, I played pretty good I think.

Q. Of the Grand Slams, the Australian Open hasn't been kind to you. You haven't got past the second round. Do you think you can do better this year?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I hope so. But I have to take one match at a time.

As you said, I haven't had much success here in the past. That's why, you know, it's even more important to really focus on the next match all the time. Now I got past the first round and I have a difficult match coming up and I have to play well.

If I win this one, I have to take the next match.

Q. Any particular reason why you haven't played well here?

ROBIN SODERLING: Uhm, no. I don't know. It's a surface that I think should suit my game pretty well. I played a couple of good matches. But, as I said, I never had the results.

I don't know why, but hopefully it will change this year.

Q. Is it much different this year under your new coach?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, well, we've been working not for long, but we've been working really good since December. And, of course, in my game there's not going to be any big changes. But we're still working on a lot of details. There's still things I can improve in my game.

I think, you know, already in this couple of weeks I improved. I think I played this year so far really well. Hopefully we can continue to work on it and I'll become a better player.

Q. How do you approach a Grand Slam compared to another tournament knowing it could last for two weeks, have five set matches?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think it's different. I think I had some problems with the Grand Slam tournaments in the beginning of my career. As you said, you know, it's over two weeks, and you always have one match, then you have the next day rest. So it's tough to stay focused for two full weeks. Every day, you know, you have to be able to relax between matches.

I think that's what I learned the last couple of years. I think that's why I had more success in these tournaments.

Q. You deal better with the days off in between?

ROBIN SODERLING: I think so, yeah. Because the days off, it's really a matter of trying to relax and rest, you know, because you spend in five set matches a lot of energy, even if you win in straight sets. You really have to recover between the matches. I do it really good right now.

Q. With your improvement in the last two years, do you bring any different mindset to a tournament like this? Do you come here not fearing anyone?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I'm not fearing anyone, but at the same time I fear all. I know that when I play well, I can beat everyone. But the same time, I really have to play well because last year it really showed. I didn't play well at all and I lost first round.

So I think it's a matter for every player, even the best players, that they really have to stay focused every match. For me that's the most important thing.

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2011-01-18/201101181295340190176.html

sunzhewyq
01-20-2011, 12:53 PM
Robin Soderling - 20.01.11

Thursday, 20 January, 2011

Q. What were some of the positives you could take out of the match tonight? ROBIN SODERLING: Well, it was a different match, you know. He played real aggressive and served well. Always against him the margins are very small.
But I think I stayed focused the whole match, was moving pretty well. It was a pretty good match. I didn't spend too much energy. I won in three straight sets.
I'm feeling good.

Q. With five matches to go before a possible final, what is your strategy? Do you have a strategy worked out or do you take it one match at a time?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, of course you have to focus on one match at a time. But now after the matches, it's good that I didn't spend five hours on the court. Instead, you know, I played two matches and both went to three sets, straight set matches.
I played very good, so I'm not feeling tired at all, which is very good now coming into the third round.

Q. This is unchartered territory for you at Melbourne Park. Why have your past campaigns been derailed so quickly?
ROBIN SODERLING: I don't know. I got this question I don't know how many times. I don't know. That's my answer (smiling).
I really feel that I can play well on every surface. So here the conditions and the surface in Melbourne should suit my game very well. And I think, you know, I missed the tournament here a couple of times, and then I played some pretty good matches, but the result hasn't been good.
But hopefully, you know, now I feel like I'm playing really well and I have a lot of experience from doing well in other Grand Slams. So hopefully, you know, this year it will change.

Q. Do you feel like your preparations this year were a little bit more involved? Do you feel this has helped your run into the tournament here?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think, first of all, I had a great off season. Even though it was short, I've been practicing well and been really focused to do well here in Australia. That's a little bit what's missing so far for me.
Of course, I had a great start. I played really well in Brisbane. I decided to go early to Australia this time instead of going to Chennai or Doha. I played well and had a good week here of practice. I'm feeling really good.

Q. Why did you decide to go to Brisbane?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I tried everything. You know, I did different things every year. But this year I really felt like I wanted to give it a really good chance to do well here and I wanted to come here early and have at least two weeks before the tournament, you know, to give myself time to really find my form and play well.
But I think I played really well from the first day I arrived in Brisbane from the first match and then the whole tournament. So I have a lot of confidence. I really showed that I can play well down here.

Q. Do you know much about your next opponent?
ROBIN SODERLING: I don't think we ever played before. I might be wrong. My memory's not so good. But he's a great player. We practiced a couple times. He's playing really fast and close to the baseline. He's been on the tour for quite some time, so he's very experienced.
It's going to be a tough match.

Q. You obviously overtook Andy Murray's No. 4 ranking coming into this tournament. Is that a mere statistic or does that give you a bit of an edge or a confidence boost?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, of course, it's always nice to be No. 4 in the world. It's something that many players will never achieve in their careers.
But I'm trying to not be too focused on the rankings. I try to be focused on my game, trying to, uhm, practice hard and trying to improve. I think if I can do that, then I think I have a good chance to do really well and climb up the rankings. But it's also a matter of how the other guy's playing. I can still play well, but a few guys playing even better. I have to stay focused on myself first.

Q. How do you feel the surface and conditions here might suit your game or not suit your game?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, as I said, I think I can do well on any kinds of surface: slow, fast, indoors, outdoors. The things with Melbourne, the thing I struggle with a little bit before is that the conditions are changing a lot here. One day it's 30 degrees, the next day it's 20 and windy, sunny, cloudy. So that's tough. But I think it's tough for everybody.
Again, you really need to stay focused and really think about your own game instead of what's happening outside.

Q. What do you invest your prize money, like property or shares?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I try to do a little bit different things. I'm not the one who's doing my finances. I have some properties. I have some stocks, some different things. It's just a matter of saving it for maybe using it after your career.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2011-01-20/201101201295520923912.html

sunzhewyq
01-20-2011, 02:36 PM
Soderling happy to go unnoticed


Thursday, 20 January, 2011
By Alix Ramsay

If you look very carefully at the draw, you might just spot Robin Soderling. There he is, lurking in the top half, placed nicely to face Andy Murray in the quarterfinals and Rafael Nadal in the semifinals. But, for some reason, no one seems to have noticed him.

The world No.4 eased into the third round with a simple 6-3, 7-6, 6-1 win over Gilles Muller and then sat down to assess his progress so far. Not half bad, was his considered opinion: two matches played, not a set dropped and plenty of running still in his legs. This was a grand start to a tournament that has given him trouble in the past.

This is Soderling's sixth visit to Melbourne Park and his two wins this week have served to double his tally of victories at the Open. For a man who can play on any surface - not only is he regarded as one of the best indoor players in the world, he has also reached two French Open finals - he has never quite fathomed the business of playing in Australia.

With this in mind, the Swede decided to try something different this year. Instead of playing his way around the globe on his way to the Open, Soderling arrived in Australia good and early and began his preparations by playing in Brisbane. Clicking into top gear on day one, he ripped through that draw to claim the title without dropping a set. Carrying that form into Melbourne, he is not only looking good, he is feeling rather confident.
"It's good that I didn't spend five hours on the court," Soderling said. "Instead, you know, I played two matches and both went to three sets, straight‑set matches. I played very good, so I'm not feeling tired at all, which is very good now coming into the third round.

"I had a great off‑season. Even though it was short, I've been practicing well and been really focused to do well here in Australia. That's a little bit what's missing so far for me. Of course, I had a great start. I played really well in Brisbane. I decided to go early to Australia this time instead of going to Chennai or Doha. I played well and had a good week here of practice. I'm feeling really good."
That will come as music to Jan Hernych's ears. The Czech took the scenic route around Tomaz Bellucci of Brazil, nicking the win 8-6 in the fifth set, and now faces Soderling on Saturday.

"I don't think we ever played before," Soderling mused. "I might be wrong. My memory's not so good. But he's a great player. We practiced a couple times. He's playing really fast and close to the baseline. He's been on the tour for quite some time, so he's very experienced. It's going to be a tough match."

No doubt the attention will again be focused elsewhere as Soderling tries to make his way into the fourth round. With Nadal taking top billing, the Poms following Andy Murray's every move and Bernard Tomic causing most of Australia to hope against hope that they have a champion in the making on their hands, Soderling tends to get overlooked. And yet now that he convinced himself that he can play in the southern hemisphere, the Swede has the beating of anyone.

"I tried everything," he said. "I did different things every year. But this year I really felt like I wanted to give it a really good chance to do well here and I wanted to come here early and have at least two weeks before the tournament to give myself time to really find my form and play well. But I think I played really well from the first day I arrived in Brisbane from the first match and then the whole tournament. So I have a lot of confidence. I really showed that I can play well down here."

With a huge serve and a thumping forehand, the courts here ought to suit Soderling to a tee; now that he believes he can win here, anything seems possible. And you never know: if he lives up to his seeding and gets to the sharp end of the tournament, someone might even notice that he's here.

AgnRus
01-22-2011, 07:06 PM
http://www.australianopen.com/images/pics/large/b_soderling_14_01.jpg

Entourage: Pistolesi on Robin Soderling
Saturday, 22 January, 2011
By Georges Homsi

Q : How is your association with Robin going so far ?

CP: Extremely well. Already on the first week of the year we won a title, so I couldn't have hoped for a better start. We have a good communication, and as of now, things couldn't be better.

Q: How is working with him different from the other players you have coached?

CP: Well, he's a champion. He's very motivated, very professional and very committed, and that makes him easy to work with. He really wants to maximise his potential and that is pleasant to see.

Q: On which aspects of his game are you mostly working on at the moment?

CP: Well, I think that the improvement comes from balancing all the different aspects of what makes a champion. So we try not to give too much of a priority of one aspect to the detriment of another. He has a great physical trainer whom he has been working with for seven years, his name is Ali Ghelem and he's from Stockholm. And technically, I don't want to change anything, but rather I want to add new weapons to his arsenal. For example, I want him to feel more comfortable at the net. This will take some time, and we are still early in our cooperation, since we started only five or six weeks ago. But I think that if he can win more points at the net while keeping his incredible efficiency from the baseline, this could bring an extra dimension to his game. And he is very motivated for that, he is mentally very stable.

Q: How would you describe your association?

CP: He's a great person. We have fun being together on the circuit. We have a fun relationship, and so far so good.

Q: Do you spend a lot of time with him off the court?

CP: Of course. The job is all day long, not only the practice sessions. We both love tennis, and we love talking tennis. Sometimes we work with videos, he goes to the gym, and sometimes we analyse his match. We haven't had so much time together yet, so mostly it's preparing the tournament, and working around it.

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/articles/2011-01-22/201101201295486314081.html

sunzhewyq
01-23-2011, 04:59 AM
Robin Soderling 21.01.11
Saturday, 22 January, 2011

Q. Your ninth in a row, yet to drop a set here. How do you assess your performance so far? Are you just cruising along very confident?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I played three matches here, and, of course, as you said, I haven't lost a set yet.
I'm playing pretty good. But there's still a couple of things I need to improve, I think. I know I can play much better. But overall it's been pretty good.

Q. Do you need a four or five set match to test yourself?
ROBIN SODERLING: No. I don't think. I played many matches this year already, so I'm pretty happy I won three matches in straight sets.

Q. Does that weigh in your favor, that you haven't gone outside three sets in that first week?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. I think, you know, physically I feel very good. I haven't spent too many hours on court yet and I'm already in the fourth round, which is very good.
So I think for me it's a little bit of an advantage, yeah.

Q. There's been a lot of attention on Roger and Rafa in the past couple weeks. Do you feel you're sliding under the radar in terms of media attention and that sort of thing?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah, I think there's always going to be a lot of attention on Roger and Rafa, of course. You know, they're No. 1 and 2 in the world. I think in every tournament they play, they will be the favorites.
But I think there's many guys who can actually compete against them and have a chance to win the tournaments like this when they're playing well.

Q. Do you feel like you're ready to compete against those guys in the final of a Grand Slam and perhaps to go that step further?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. I already played two Grand Slam finals and I beat them both in Grand Slams. But, again, of course they will always be the favorites, and we are the guys who need to play really well if we're going to have a chance to beat them.
Every match, you know, I will always have a chance.

Q. Do you ever hear from Borg at all, best wishes? You've play better here than he ever did.
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, sometimes. We meet sometimes, and sometimes he calls me, sends me texts. It's nice.

Q. You may play against Tsonga. You never lost a set against him.
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, we played many times. Even though I haven't lost a set, we had tough matches. He's a great player. I always played very well against him. Hopefully, you know, if I play him now, I will play well again.
But you never know, he's a tough player, and he obviously likes it down there in Australia, being a finalist a couple years ago.

Q. But you play well against him because you like his game?
ROBIN SODERLING: I'm not sure. You know, I always play well, as I said, against him. But he's a tough player. I don't think anybody can say they like his game because he's very good and it's always tough against him.
But I've been lucky to play good against him.

Q. Now you work a little more with your new coach, can you tell us a little bit about the relationship you have?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah. You know, so far it worked very well. We haven't lost a match yet together, which is not many players can say that (laughter).
But still it's very fresh. We had a couple of good weeks at the off season. But of course it's very different, you know, working together when you have the time at home, really practicing, than when you're at a tournament.
But we worked on a couple details in my game which I feel I already improved. But hopefully, you know, the time goes on and we have more time to work on it. Hopefully it will keep improving.

Q. What kind of details?
ROBIN SODERLING: I'm trying to play a little bit more aggressive, come to the net a little bit more. Of course, my net game, we worked on a lot, how to move at the net. Also my serve, I'm trying to mix it up a little bit more than before.
And, again, you know, it's working fine so far.

Q. When Europe is freezing and you come to Australia which is very hot, how do you adapt?
ROBIN SODERLING: It's nice to get some tan (laughter).
No, I always like to come down here during the winter when it's cold back home in Europe. But it's not very difficult. You know, we travel a lot. We play on different places all the time.
This year I choose to come here pretty early. I played in Brisbane and I had a week of practice in Melbourne just to get prepared. And I think, you know, it worked well.

Q. Roger and Rafa are the players who play always on the Rod Laver Arena. Sometimes you go other places. What do you prefer, to go on the center court or to play near to the crowd?
ROBIN SODERLING: You know, it's very different. There's always courts you like better and there's courts you don't like as much. But sometimes it can be the center court, sometimes it can be an outside court. It's very different.
But I try not to think about it too much. Just focus on my game. Here all the courts are very similar, so it's not a big difference.

sunzhewyq
01-24-2011, 04:23 AM
Robin Soderling - 24.01.11
Monday, 24 January, 2011

Q. You had your right foot taped at 4 1 in the fourth set. Did that hinder you right throughout the game? What's the extent of the injury?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I had a blister on my toe, but it's nothing serious. You know, of course it hurts a little bit, but it's nothing bad.

Q. It didn't hinder you at all?
ROBIN SODERLING: Maybe for one game. But then I got it retaped and fixed, and then it was fine.

Q. You won the first set. Seemed to struggle in the rest of the sets. What was the story there?
ROBIN SODERLING: Well, yeah, I think I struggled throughout the whole match. I won the first set, yeah, but I didn't win it because I played well.
You know, he wasn't on it at the start. Then he started to play much better, which I didn't. Then, you know, he played much better.

Q. What did you think of him as a player? What are some of his qualities?
ROBIN SODERLING: He's a good player. You know, he has a great backhand and he's moving very well. He's a great counter puncher. He has a good chance to do really well, I think.

Q. Did you underestimate him today?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, no, I didn't. I never underestimate anyone. I just didn't feel good. I didn't play good enough. Simple as that.


Q. What was the problem to your foot? I think in the second set I saw something. Also on your serve, there were some first serves 136 kilometers per hour, which is not your usual speed.
ROBIN SODERLING: I had some problems for a couple games with the sun. It was tough to see. I tried to put it in a little bit safer.
But, yes, of course, 130 kilometers per hour in the first serve is not great. It's not something I'm proud of. That's how it is.
I struggled many times in this tournament. And I think, you know, I never had a good first month in my career. But still, you know, I won a title and made it to the fourth round here.
At least it's much better than the past years.

Q. You're not going to fire Pistolesi as your new coach?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, definitely not. He's a great coach. As I said, we had the best start ever, so I'm sure it's going to be good.

Q. Can you tell me what Pistolesi has brought to your game, some new things?
ROBIN SODERLING: I mean, it's still very new. We haven't worked for so long. We actually only worked for two or three weeks when I'm not playing tournaments, which is really the time you can really work on things. During tournaments it's different.
But, you know, he's a great coach. He's got a lot of experience. We worked on a couple of details in my game, which I think is improving.

Q. Like what?
ROBIN SODERLING: Like my net game. You know, I'm trying to come to the net a little bit more. We try to work on how to move at the net, which I still have a lot to learn.
But it's not going to be perfect in a couple of weeks. It will take some time. But I think we're both very confident that I'm going to improve.

Q. Can you put your finger on why the Australian Open has been a bit of a bogey tournament for you?
ROBIN SODERLING: No. I wish.

Q. Is it the weather or heat?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, today was not very hot. The weather's always different. You know, it's never two days in a row where you have the same conditions, which is very tough. But, of course, it's the same for every player.
You know, I thought it was tough for me in Australia. But, you know, I played really well in Brisbane. I played some very good tennis.
But this tournament, you know, I've been struggling a lot this year, too. You know, I fight through three matches, which I'm very proud of, but I never felt that I played really well, which you need to, especially in a Grand Slam.

Q. Rafa talked the other day that he wasn't playing well but managed to pull it out. Do you feel even though you weren't playing well, you should have pulled it out?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I had some chances. As I said, I did it for three matches. I couldn't do it for the fourth one. Yeah, I had some chances. But, you know, my two biggest weapons is my serve and my forehand. They were not weapons today. Then it's tough. I was really fighting.
As you said, I was up a break. Maybe with a little bit of luck, I could have won. But he played better than me.

Q. Did you have a tough time with his slice?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, he's a good player. But mostly I had tough times with myself.

Q. Where are you going next?
ROBIN SODERLING: I will play in Rotterdam next.

Q. Then?
ROBIN SODERLING: Then probably Marseille. So two indoor tournaments in Europe.

Q. If you were to point to the main strength or skill of Dolgopolov, what would you point to? What is the main skill of this guy for you?
ROBIN SODERLING: He's a great player. He has a really good backhand and he's moving well. He's defending very well. He's a great counter puncher.

Q. How much do victories over Nadal and Federer in previous years has built up a great player and you believe in yourself that you're gonna be a top player?
ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I think all my victories in the past years give me a lot of confidence. I really show to myself that I can do well, I can win a lot of matches, and really compete, yeah, for the Grand Slam tournaments, all the big tournaments.
I think, you know, confidence is maybe the most important thing in this sport.

Q. You're so different, at least you seem so different, to Pistolesi. He is always telling jokes. I don't know if he does it with you. But I know him since he was 18 years old. Do you like the company also or you don't see away from tennis?
ROBIN SODERLING: No, we spend a lot of time together. He's a great guy.
I think you're wrong. I think we're very similar. It's just that I don't tell you guys jokes (smiling).

Q. Well, start.
ROBIN SODERLING: No (smiling).

AgnRus
03-18-2011, 08:27 PM
Robin Soderling Charity

“Robin Söderling stiftelse” is a charity founded by Robin Soderling. It is dedicated to supporting research in Sweden to cure children’s diseases, fund treatments for children with terminal illness, and help children to improve their lives. The foundation is still in the developmental stages, but you will be able to learn more in the upcoming weeks at Soderling's website www.robinsoderling.se.

“I am fortunate enough to be healthy and have sport as my profession" said Soderling. "I fight on the court to win matches but there are many children in the world who have to fight every day to stay alive. I cannot imagine what they and their families have to go through and if I can make a small difference to better their situation, it would mean the world to me.“

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2011/Charity/Robin-Soderling-charity.aspx

sunzhewyq
03-19-2011, 03:57 AM
Robin Soderling Charity

“Robin Söderling stiftelse” is a charity founded by Robin Soderling. It is dedicated to supporting research in Sweden to cure children’s diseases, fund treatments for children with terminal illness, and help children to improve their lives. The foundation is still in the developmental stages, but you will be able to learn more in the upcoming weeks at Soderling's website www.robinsoderling.se.

“I am fortunate enough to be healthy and have sport as my profession" said Soderling. "I fight on the court to win matches but there are many children in the world who have to fight every day to stay alive. I cannot imagine what they and their families have to go through and if I can make a small difference to better their situation, it would mean the world to me.“

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis/2011/Charity/Robin-Soderling-charity.aspx

:worship:so proud of Robin,meanwhile,i hope he is out of illness

sunzhewyq
03-29-2011, 05:48 AM
J. DEL POTRO/R. Soderling

6 3, 6 2

An interview with:

ROBIN SODERLING

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. I'm from Mexico, Robin. How do you feel about the tournament? I understand that it was a difficult match, and I would like to know your perception about playing the first match and having such a difficult match against Del Potro?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I don't think it mattered who I played. You know, it's a matter of just me not playing good at all right now. I mean, I struggled really much for two tournaments now, and it's been really tough. So I definitely not playing good tennis right now.

Q. How is the situation, how is your perception coming into the clay season? How do you feel after a difficult two tournaments in the hard court season?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, well, you know, I always like to play on clay. It's a surface where I have played well before and I have good results. Hopefully I can work pretty well now for a couple of weeks, and then, you know, at the start of clay I be playing good.

Q. Obviously Juan Martin, that's a tough floater third round; that should be a final. Were you prepared for such a tough match so early in the tournament?

ROBIN SODERLING: Yeah, I'm always prepared for tough matches. You know, I know anyone can be a danger, you know. I have to play well every match to have a chance to win, which I didn't do. And then that's why I'm here with a loss.

Q. Did he show you something today that you haven't seen from him since the wrist surgery? Was this the old Juan Martin maybe from two years ago?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I don't know. I haven't seen him play since his comeback. I played him at the end of 2009, and we had a tough match. I'm not sure. You know, obviously he's playing well. I wish I could have played a little bit better.

Q. Was the weather a factor for you today at all?

ROBIN SODERLING: Why? Why?

Q. The weather?

ROBIN SODERLING: The weather why?

Q. The heat

ROBIN SODERLING: No. No, I mean, it's been like this every day. I played good here before, so it was fine.

Q. In February you played very solid, two tournament wins. I have the feeling players just tried everything against, but you just won all your matches. What's the difference now?

ROBIN SODERLING: Well, I played 10 times better then. That's the biggest difference now. The indoor tournaments I play really well. I didn't miss at all; I was serving well; moving well now. I'm not doing any of that, you know. But I had some tough times after Marseilles. I got sick, and, you know, I have some small injuries which I struggled with for a while. I haven't been able to practice the way I wanted to. But, you know, again, I wish I played a little bit better, at least.

Q. What was wrong? Was it just technical or anything else bothering you?

ROBIN SODERLING: No, I'm not playing well. I'm not feeling well. I'm not moving well. I'm not serving well. You know, my serve is normally my biggest weapon. I'm not serving well. My backhand is not good. There are a lot of things I need to work on.

DanaKz
04-10-2011, 12:45 PM
http://www.tennisworldusa.org/online/Tennis_Magazine.php Tennis World USA Online Magazine made a great interview with Claudio! You have to navigate to page 30 or something like that. :)

DanaKz
04-10-2011, 01:54 PM
I downloaded free pdf version of magazine from website and uploaded on enterupload here http://www.enterupload.com/eu8zptsz6a6f/offline.zip.html It's zipped

Benget
04-10-2011, 09:33 PM
Thank you DanaKz it was a great read :)
Lets see what they can do in the clay season!

sunzhewyq
04-11-2011, 07:10 AM
WOW, it is really a pretty good magazine on tennis...very professional and convenient..like it very much。。。

thanks Dana..

Björki
05-02-2011, 01:22 PM
Robin split from Pistolesi? :eek:

Swedish Open Tennis @Facebook
Robin bryter med sin tränare Pistolesi. Rätt eller fel?

sunzhewyq
05-02-2011, 05:15 PM
Soderling splits with coach of five months
Mon, 02 May 09:46:00 2011

Soderling has parted ways with his coach Claudio Pistolesi, just five months after joining forces with the Italian.

Soderling, who was coached by Magnus Norman until December last year, enjoyed a blistering start to the year by winning three of his first four tournaments in Brisbane, Rotterdam and Marseille.

His only ATP loss in the first two months of the season was at the hands of Ukrainian Alexandr Dolgopolov in the fourth round of the Australian Open.

But since then the Swedish world number five has been struggling and last week's straight sets loss to Juan Martin Del Potro in the quarter-finals at Estoril appears to have been the final straw.

"It's true, they will end their co-operation," Soderling's agent Nina Wennerstrom said. "He's an amazingly good coach and Robin respects him a lot.

"There have been many things in their work that has been working very well but there have also been some parts that they have had different points of view.

"They have decided to end this together but they've done it as friends. Robin is proud of what he has achieved but knows that he can get even better. After all, he's just 26.

"We'll be looking at some options and we will make a decision quite soon. It's an intense time of the year with the French Open and lots of other tournaments. We'd like to find a replacement as soon as possible."

Soderling has reached the final of the French Open in each of the past two years, losing to Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal respectively. The Swede also boasts the record of being the first, and so far only, man to beat Nadal at Roland Garros, which he did in 2009.

Pippa Davis / Eurosport

http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/02052011/58/soderling-splits-coach-five-months.html

MaxPower
05-06-2011, 03:57 PM
Hello im pretty new here but long time Söderling fan. I did a little quick translation of an interview with Söderlings new coach Fredrik "Fidde" Rosengren since its only available in swedish.

Q: Why do you take the job as Soderlings new coach?

I've asked that myself. First of all i got the time. It's good timing right now. Then i still like the matches, the adrenaline, the tension. At the same time I don't like the lifestyle that comes with it, the traveling, loneliness in hotel rooms. That's something I do not want. It was a big reason I quit.

Q: How well do you know each other?

I've been following Robin since he came out on tour as a junior. We know each other that way but not on a really close level.

Q: When did you get the question?

Got it first time last year when Magnus Norman stepped down. We had a meeting but at the time i wasn't ready for the traveling. I said no.

Now not long ago he called me again. We talked for an hour or so. I mostly listened. Then he wrote a fantastic mail and I think it's awesome that he himself took contact and not anyone else and then I also know he really wants me. Still I have criticized Robin many times in my job as tennis commentator both to him and about him. I have said some "truths" and still he wants to work with me and then I feel like he might know I was right about some things.

Q: How long did you think about the offer?

Well it's been moving fast, but sure it's been a few sleepness nights. The family is important to me and i needed their support. Also my job here in Växjö TS (town where he works with tennis in Sweden) that has to work as well.

Q: His former coach, Pistolesi, has sometimes been described as somewhat defensive in his way to think about tennis, what about you?

Others should answer that. I just really love tennis no matter what i do, coaching, commentating, teaching the kids in Växsjö and so on. What matters most do me as a coach is that my player(s) believe in me and think i can make them elevate their game. That's what's most important.

Q: What do you think Robin needs to find his top claycourt game?

Tennis on Robin's level is mostly "north of the shoulders". Its about the mental game. Everyone knows how to hit a forehand/backhand. What he needs is harmony and joy, and most importantly to stay healthy. If you are not healthy you don't train well. If you don't train well then you don't play well. The training always mirror your results in matches. The most important part is that we will have fun, talk a lot, and from that we will pull in the same direction otherwise it wont work.

Q: Is it about strength or technique?

No it's not about technique and he already has the strength. It's about being healthy and having fun. At Soderling's level there is immense daily pressure to do well, of course that steals a lot of energy. Then it's important to devote your energy to the right things. It's important to be able to relax. Hey just look...he is number 5 in the world. Then you shouldn't walk around troubled, you should think your life is damn good.

Q: Right now he is playing in Madrid, you are here in Växsjö, when will you meet?

Hopefully on monday in Rome after he has won Madrid (*smiling*). But yeah in Rome and I will be there a week then go back home for some things. Then Paris of course. I will not be full time. I have given Robin a schedule that I think will work well, about 80-90 days until the seasons end. He was happy with that. It feels good, really good.

Q: Robin has been around for quite a while now, had many coaches etc, will you push him or mostly a go-to guy for discussions?

Both. You kinda asked me before what kind of style I have as a trainer. I'm very straight with my players. I say what I think. That doesn't mean I'm always right but my aim will always be to help Robin improve. I never go to sleep at night not having said something because I'm afraid to lose my job or such things. I don't care about that at all and then he can fire me. I have to say what i think and believe and Robin can sort it out or say he disagree. Then it wont be any problem. You don't have to agree with each other on everything but just pull in the same direction and if we decide on something go for it and make it work.

The original interview (swedish) http://svtplay.se/v/2414940/tennis/_fidde__rosengren__viktigast_att_vi_har_kul

Björki
05-06-2011, 05:52 PM
Thank you.

sunzhewyq
05-06-2011, 07:15 PM
Hello im pretty new here but long time Söderling fan. I did a little quick translation of an interview with Söderlings new coach Fredrik "Fidde" Rosengren since its only available in swedish.



Q: What do you think Robin needs to find his top claycourt game?

Tennis on Robin's level is mostly "north of the shoulders". Its about the mental game. Everyone knows how to hit a forehand/backhand. What he needs is harmony and joy, and most importantly to stay healthy. If you are not healthy you don't train well. If you don't train well then you don't play well. The training always mirror your results in matches. The most important part is that we will have fun, talk a lot, and from that we will pull in the same direction otherwise it wont work.



Hi,welcome here...i like that viewpoint..cannot agree any more.:)

AgnRus
05-07-2011, 07:23 PM
MaxPower, many thanks and wellcome!:worship:
I hope you will help us with translations from Swedish!:hug:

MaxPower
05-08-2011, 11:50 PM
MaxPower, many thanks and wellcome!:worship:
I hope you will help us with translations from Swedish!:hug:

Thank you. Yes I will probably drop in every now and then with some interesting translations for his international fans.

Robin has said himself that he is usually a bit more open in his swedish interviews. He was more open with the ATP interviews before but that sort of backfired on him around 2006-2008 and some people thought he was arrogant while in reality he is a really friendly guy. Just very competitive...

Media also blows things up like the rivalry he had with Nadal following that crazy wimbledon 5-seter in 2007. It wasn't good for Robin and he has become smarter since then. But also more boring with media ;)

sunzhewyq
05-19-2011, 04:27 AM
Somdev Devvarman has a great future: Soderling
From Times of India

BANGALORE: Robin Soderling, the 26-year-old Swede, finalist at Roland Garros last year and ranked No. 5 in the world, is looking to close in on the big guys this season.

Having started the year with three titles - Brisbane, Rotterdam and Marseille - he has sent out warnings that he's ready to step up for a big title.

Seeded fifth in the ATP World Tour's Masters 1000 event in Rome, in what will be his last big tournament before the French Open, Soderling spoke to TOI about his form and chances in a telephone interview.

Excerpts:

You've been ranked close to the top for sometime now

I have the game to be at the top of the rankings. I have played some very good tennis and beaten some great players. The ranking is a reflection of where you stand in the game. What I need to do to get to the next level is to be consistent, to consistently play at the level where I can compete with the top guys in big matches.

Which of the four Grand Slams are closest to your heart?

When I started out, I never thought I would reach my first Grand Slam final on clay (at Roland Garros in '09 and then again in '10). That's the way it turned out. I think I can do well in all four majors, my game suits all the surfaces. Still, Paris is special because of the success I have had there and I think my best chance to win a Grand Slam is at Roland Garros.

Can you talk a little about the rise of Novak Djokovic?

It's really too early in the season to be talking about who might finish the year as No. 1, but for sure Novak is playing great tennis and as things stand now, he is playing the best tennis on the Tour. However, there's still a lot of tennis left to be played this year, there are three Grand Slams still to go. It's too early to make that call.

Have you watched Somdev Devvarman play?

I haven't played him in a tournament, but I watched him play in Miami, where he did very well. He's a great player. He's very quick around the court, he's consistent too and he has had some really good results this season. If he improves a small part of his game, he's going to be very difficult to beat. I think he has a great future.

AgnRus
05-20-2011, 08:00 PM
The Last Time... With Robin Soderling


DEUCE
by James Buddell
18.05.2011

http://www.atpworldtour.com/~/media/942D628F23AD4F51847088CA072735E1.ashx

World No. 5 and two-time Roland Garros finalist Robin Soderling reveals the last time...

I cooked for myself or others?

The last time I ever cooked... err.... I never cook! When I am home my girlfriend cooks for me or we go to a restaurant. I have never cooked for my parents. No. I might have boiled an egg for breakfast once. I can cook pasta, but not much.


I flew economy class?

I flew here to Estoril. Every time I fly short routes around Europe I go economy. Only the longer flights I book a business class ticket.

I met a childhood idol?

[After much consideration]... I met Mats Sundin, the ice hockey player, who played for the Toronto Maple Leafs. I met him only a couple of weeks ago in Stockholm.

I shared a hotel room with another player?

It must have been a long time ago. Probably at a Futures tournament.

I paid money to hire a court or buy tennis balls?

Last year in Barcelona, I came a week before the tournament and we couldn’t get the balls we wanted. We went to a sports stores, a Decathlon, to buy 20 cans of balls. After I paid, the guy asked me for my autograph. Hiring a court... it must have been a long time ago. I can't remember.

I played a practical joke in the locker room?

We do it a little bit in Davis Cup, but not on the tour. Every time I go to the tennis and I am in the locker room, I like to focus on my game so I don’t do it too much.

I forgot a family member’s birthday?

Yeah, for sure I have. Whenever it is my Mum’s birthday, my Dad always reminds me and my Mum reminds me of my sister’s birthday. Without them I would probably forget them all.

Being famous helped me?

It helps a lot at restaurants in Sweden. The popular restaurants are always full. So being recognised does help me get a table, which is very nice.

I strung a tennis racquet?

It must have been 10 years ago. I remember I was really slow. I can string, but it takes me one hour, an hour and a half. It takes me a while. My string tension hasn’t changed much since I was a junior. Maybe a little bit looser, one kilo.

I lost something important?

I lost my computer on a plane a year ago. It was really tough. I had so many important things on it and I had no back-up. So that was brutal.

I last asked someone for their autograph?

I remember I collected a lot of autographs of tennis players as a kid. But recently it was Henrik Larsson, the Swedish footballer. I asked him for an autograph for my sister’s son.

I played another sport that might have caused me a minor injury?

No, I try not to play other sports. Sometimes I play ice hockey in Sweden in the winter, but not too much. In Davis Cup we play football and you’re always close to injury there!

I was asked if I was a tennis player?

It must have been when I was last in the United States. When you stand in an elevator and you see the person wants to strike up a conversation. ‘Hey, you play tennis?’ It normally happens when I am carrying six tennis racquets.


I missed a flight?

I am always pretty late, but I am careful. It was a long time ago. Probably Munich several years ago. After I had had surgery they changed gates and I couldn’t walk to the gate fast enough. I was on crutches hobbling along. I must have missed it by five minutes!

I had a bad hotel experience?

I’ve always stayed at pretty good hotels. I am not that picky. If there is a good bed I like it. I have never really had a bad experience. Maybe in juniors we went to somewhere in eastern Europe and the hotels weren’t great.

I played on a bad court surface?

It was probably really bad whenever you play on clay courts in Sweden. Apart from Bastad, which has great courts. We only play two or three months outdoors, so the courts do get pretty uneven.

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/DEUCE-Tennis/DEUCE-Roland-Garros-Wimbledon-2011/Robin-Soderling.aspx

AgnRus
05-29-2011, 11:03 AM
TENNIS & TIMEPIECES – A Watch Connoisseur in Paris

Roland Garros is underway and there is a lot of watch-related news. Aficionado Robin Söderling is looking for another great run in Paris in order to reward himself with a good timepiece.



WORLDTEMPUS - 27 May 2011

Miguel Seabra

During the Australian Open in January, Robin Söderling was asked what people would be most surprised to know about him. The Swede, currently number five in tennis’s world rankings, answered, “Probably that I love watches.”

http://www.worldtempus.com/uploads/RTEmagicC_11_0527_Soderling1.jpg.jpg
Robin Soderling with his Graham Chronofighter Oversize Deep Purple © Worldtempus/Robin Soderling

For insiders, this wasn’t a big revelation. The two-time French Open finalist is a true aficionado and always wears interesting timepieces on his wrist. He’s not the only one, but he is a man who likes “different” watches. “If you walk around the tennis tour, everybody seems to have a nice watch – but I don’t really like the obvious ones. In the beginning, maybe yes, but then to have a good brand or a nice model that not many others have is a pretty nice feeling. These are the types of watches you find when reading a lot of watch magazines,” he says before jokingly adding, “Well, half of what I read about watches I don’t even understand, but I still think it’s cool and I try to learn!”

The more Söderling learns about watches, the more careful he is about choosing his next timepiece: “I never go out just to buy a watch, I never decide on the spot – I always like to look at different watches and to think about it. I buy them as a reward. I always think that the next time I win a tournament I’m going to buy that particular watch I’ve been thinking about.”

Time to Kill

His reward doesn’t have to be related to a tournament win, actually. A year ago, after beating Tomas Berdych in the semifinals at Roland Garros, he got the Hublot Big Bang he’d been eyeing. When will he get his next timepiece? Maybe soon. Söderling is back in Paris trying to at least emulate his killer performances of the past two years, where he ended two outstanding Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer records: in 2009, in the fourth round, he beat Nadal and still is the only player to have ever beaten the Spaniard at the French Open. In 2010, he overcame Federer in the quarterfinals, ending the Swiss champion’s incredible run of 23 consecutive semifinals at Grand Slam tournaments.

Federer is a well-known Rolex ambassador, whereas Nadal has caused quite a sensation sporting ultra-expensive Richard Mille timepieces, from the $550,000 RM027 tourbillon he wore last year as his good-luck charm to his new RM035. And Roland Garros is sponsored by Longines. Söderling is still thinking about a possible sponsorship and looking at different brands, but he won’t rush; he never has when it comes to watches.

“Good watches are expensive. When I was young and started to win more matches, I really felt I could buy a good watch and I wanted to have a Rolex – and actually the first really nice watch I bought was a pre-owned steel Daytona chronograph that I saw in a shop in London in 2006. I still like it a lot, but these days it’s my girlfriend Jenni who has been wearing it; it became a bit small for me, but I reckon small and thin watches are back.”

http://www.worldtempus.com/uploads/RTEmagicC_11_0527_Soderling2_01.jpg.jpg
Miguel Seabra of Worldtempus discusses watches with Robin Soderling at the Estoril Open in Portugal, where the Swede tries on an IWC Portugieser Yacht Club © Filipa Cunha Lima/Jornal do Ténis

He didn’t have to buy the second good timepiece of his collection. “I got a gold Bulgari Diagono Professional Diving as a gift from the tournament in Bastad – they were happy I played there for so many years, and I was really happy with the present.” During this very interview, Söderling is wearing an Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Volcano, also known as “The Jarno Trulli.”

“I bought it during the U.S. Open in 2009,” he says. That year, in New York, he had been undecided between the Royal Oak Offshore and a Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Compressor Extreme W-Alarm. Then he opted for the Volcano.

Deep Purple, Hard Rock

There’s a watch in his collection that Soderling particularly appreciates and whose strong looks match his powerful “hard-rock” style of tennis: a Graham Chronofighter Oversize Diver “Deep Purple.” “I had been looking at Graham, because [former Australian Open champion] Thomas Johansson has a friend who owns a watch store in London and they sell Graham – he showed them to me a few years ago.” The “Deep Purple” is a stunning limited edition of 500 pieces of the Chronofighter Oversize Diver in black-and-purple. It perfectly embodies the Swedish star’s taste for niche brands and exquisite, sporty timepieces. “When my girlfriend Jenni and I went on vacation last December, we went diving a lot and I really wanted to test it, so I brought the Graham along.”

At the Estoril Open in Portugal, Söderling took the time to visit a small watch exhibition by tournament sponsors Boutique dos Relógios in the VIP area. There he appreciated some fine timepieces from several top brands – from Richard Mille to IWC. “For a man, a watch truly is the best thing,” he says. “I don’t really like earrings or necklaces or bracelets, so a watch is the best accessory and a way of expression for a man.”

http://www.worldtempus.com/fileadmin/user_upload/images/news_pics_2011/11_0516_0531/11_0528_Soderling_cover_King_magazine.jpg
With a rare Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Concept on the cover of Swedish men's fashion magazine King (@ King modemagasinet) © King

And what better way to express himself than wearing a fabulous Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Concept at the photo shoot for the cover of King magazine? “They brought it from a watch store in Stockholm called Nymans Ur; it’s a really nice store where they sell some incredible watches...unfortunately they didn’t let me keep it after the shooting was over.”

Maybe he’ll get it if he finally wins Roland Garros. It won’t be easy; he is on collision course with Nadal, who he is expected to face in a blockbuster quarterfinal. In six appearances at the French Open, the Spaniard has won the title five times – and Söderling was the only one to defeat him on Paris’s slow red clay courts. If and when they face each other, time will surely stand still for all tennis (and watch!) aficionados.

http://www.worldtempus.com/uploads/RTEmagicC_11_0527_Soderling3.jpg.jpg
Which one next? The Swedish star is a watch aficionado, but he never rushes his watch buys © Filipa Cunha Lima/Jornal do Ténis

http://www.worldtempus.com/en/news/top-news/detail/article/1306507616-tennis-timepieces-a-watch-connoisseur-in-paris/

Jomp1
05-31-2011, 11:06 PM
http://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/tennis/article13101090.ab This Interview by fellow Swede Sofia Arvidsson is too good not to be translated for non-Swedish fans. Bare with me for using google translate and making some smaller corrections. Here we go:

http://gfx2.aftonbladet-cdn.se/image/13101089/480/normal/2667189bc59ba/30s88-robinsofia-967__mngl_20110530sp5x010%2Cspo_1.indd_7164.jpg

PARIS. Robin Soderling, 26, looking uneasily at the girl with the voice recorder.
- No annoying questions now.
It is no ordinary reporter, but tennis buddy Sofia Arvidsson, who sits beside him in the players lounge at Roland Garros.
They got to know each other as eleven-year-olds and have been hanging around ever since.
She, for one, knows the Swedish world number five - and it shows.
Here is the interview Robin Söderling will never forget..

I sit here with Robin Soderling.
- How exciting!
First question: If you could switch lives with a sports personality for one week, who would you choose and why?
- Then I would choose someone who plays in a football or hockey team, who does not need to think about anything, just traveling to matches with a toothbrush. Everything is fixed, so he does not need to care about anything other than the sport.
Has the response you get at the events changed a lot since you became a top 10 player?
- Mmmm. It has.
In what way?
- Everybody is so damn ugly now. Ha, ha, ha. Nah, I'm just kidding. It is the opposite.
They are all sucking up?
- Yes, the tournament directors are sucking up like crazy all the time, especially in the smaller tournaments. And then it is never a problem to book courts, ask for additional "badges" ... Such small things are never a problem, but it was always in the past.
Like for me, you mean? For those of us who are left in the backyard.
- I know nothing about that. Is that so? Ah, you are also up here soon.
Your girlfriend Jenni is very interested in fashion. Do you ask her what to wear?
- Yes - and then I always do the opposite. Ha, ha, ha.
If you have to choose, would you invite Rafael Nadal to dinner or dancing a waltz with Nicolas Almagro?
- Then I would invite Nadal to dinner seven days a week. It's nice that even he can get food for the day. I do not think he can afford to pay for dinner itself.
Then maybe there would be some bullshit...
- What?
Between you two, as well.
- No, we are buddies.
All right. Who among all the players don't you wanna play?
- Hyung-Taik Lee. It's so damn nice that he has retired. Do you remember him, a Korean?
Yes.
- I played him three times and it was totally impossible.
You got to travel a lot with me during juniors. Can you state another reason why you have become so good?
- That I was grumpy and never gave up. I fought all the time, even when it was tough and did not feel good.
Have you ever wanted to do something but thought "No, this I can not do, because I am Robin Soderling"?
- No, I think I do all the things I want to do.
In other words, you behave?
- I didn't say that, but I do what I want anyway. Ha, ha, ha.
Answering the next question, you need to be nice. Which of the male players do you think I would fit well with?
- Well...
Tell me someone good-looking, Robin.
- Who is good looking, then? I think you believe...
No, tell me who you think I fit well with.
- Julien Benneteau.
Benneteau?
- Yes, I have heard that he is in love with you.
I think not.
- He is, isn't he? A little. Haven't you heard?
I must have missed it. What do you do to relax from tennis?
- It depends where I am. At an event, there's not much to do. At home I like to fish.
In a boat, then?
- Yeah, whatever. Then, when we are on vacation, I like to dive. It's really fun. If I am in Sweden I go to like football or hockey, but that is not so often.
I was on your and Jonas Björkman's hotel room in Beijing. Your clothes hung almost in alphabetical order and you wrap your racquet very carefully. Are you Careless with something?
- Yes, I am unfortunately a bit bad with times. I'm an time optimist and everything takes so much longer than I think it'll do.
Once, at Heathrow, you and I went on board the wrong plane...
- It was your fault. It was only your fault.
The question was: Do you still think it is my fault?
- It is clear that it was your fault. You ran away... "Won't the plane fly soon?"
It stated "Boarding Gothenburg" on the table.
- Yes, but it was the wrong flight.
A lady was sitting at your place...
- Yes, I remember. "Move, you're sitting at the wrong place!" It was not very well done, Sofia.
Which is your toughest loss?
- The final in Bastad last year.
If we played mixed, we would probably shoot the balls at each other. Who would it be if you could choose to play with someone else?
- Damn, I'm thinking if I would even consider playing mixed at some point.
Come on. You have promised to play with me in the Olympics.
- Do I have to choose someone else? I just want to play with you.
It could be someone you just think is good-looking.
- I would rather choose someone who I think I would play well with.
Then say who it is!
- Sure, but then it won't be anyone good-looking. All the good ones are looking bad. Wait, I have to think... Who the hell might be good in doubles? I think... Eh, who's that girl grunting so much?
Victoria Azarenka?
- Yes, Azarenka. She is good in doubles, huh?
Yes, she's okay.
- Then I would take her.
What do you think is the very hardest about being a tennis player?
- Traveling is damn hard sometimes. Wait for the airplane, waiting for luggage, transport... It would have been nice to play in the same place all the time.
What are you doing in ten years?
- Playing on the veteran tour.
In Anders Järryd's foot steps...
- Ha, ha, ha. He has been a full time professional for 35 years now. No, I will not play on the veteran tour, but hopefully I'm working with something associated to tennis because I think it is so fun. Not as a coach, but maybe with some event.
What is your biggest dream?
- In tennis, do you mean?
It can be anything...
- To win a Grand Slam.
If you got five million, would you play the first round at Wimbledon in a dress?
- Euro?
No, Swedish kronor. Come on now, so money blind you can not have become. Of course you would.
- No, I would probably not actually.
Five million, Robin!
- No, I would not. Would you?
Absolutely!
- In a dress? Ha, ha, ha. Would you play naked for 50 million, then?
No, I do not think so. If you could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be?
- I'd probably choose something that you felt good eating - or would you eat candy for the rest of your life?
What you think taste good.
- Then I would choose "Flying Jacob". (Swedish dish with chicken and banana ;))
Mmm, that's yummy. Last question: What, besides winning, makes you really happy?
- When my family and close ones are happy. That makes me happy too. That's more fun than being happy myself, I think.
When we thank Robin Soderling for a nice interview.
- Thanks!

Sofia Arvidsson

sunzhewyq
06-01-2011, 01:53 AM
http://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/tennis/article13101090.ab This Interview by fellow Swede Sofia Arvidsson is too good not to be translated for non-Swedish fans. Bare with me for using google translate and making some smaller corrections. Here we go:



Thanks Joe

ha,ha,ha,what a funny interview....Robin felt so happy and made many jokes:p

swedes_rule
06-01-2011, 10:16 AM
great interview, thanks joe!!!

Björki
06-01-2011, 10:38 AM
Thanks Joe :)

AgnRus
06-01-2011, 10:46 AM
Thank you Joe! :)

solowyn
06-01-2011, 10:55 AM
:lol: Super cute.

MaxPower
06-01-2011, 11:32 AM
great work in this thread. And thanks Joe89. Would have missed that gem if you hadn't done that

As a special before todays BIG match I did a quick translation of the part where a swedish tennis expert and journalist grade the players going into the match. http://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/tennis/article13112229.ab
Shows what kind of "homers" we have in the swedish press :lol: (but I like it!)


Robin vs. Rafa

Serve - Robin 5, Rafa 4
Söderling got one of the tennis worlds heaviest serves. One of the projectiles in this years tournament was measured to 230kmh. Only John Isner and Ivan Ljubicic has served harder. Nadal has developed his serve during the past year and can start the play with bigger variety.

Groundstrokes - Robin 5, Rafa 5
Söderling's forehand is one of the tours most feared shots, but also his hard flat backhand can create nightmares.
Nadal loves to control the game with his forehand - also strikes hard, and with extreme topspin

Volley Robin 4, Rafa 4
Both players are decent at the net, but on clay it is rare that the show it. Robin and Rafa rather stay at the baseline.

Physique - Robin 4, Rafa 5
Robin is one of the strongest players on the tour but far from the fastest. Nadal got it all, the quickness, endurance, power. Yes the 24-year old from Mallorca is a physical standout.

Current Form - Robin 5, Rafa 3
The swede follows his proven winning concept and raises his level for every round.
The world number 1 however hasn't looked that good and secure. It's not a coincidence that he has been doubting himself.

Confidence - Robin 5, Rafa 3
Djokovic stole the claytitles in Madrid and Rome, which has affected Rafa's confidence. He plays without confidence and needs to be more aggressive to find his true self. Soderling on the other hand plays relaxed and with great confidence

Experience - Robin 3, Rafa 5
Rafa has won 41 out of 42 matches in Roland Garros and is now chasing his sixth RG title.
Court Philippe Chatrier can be seen as his living room and to that Soderling, despite 2 final apperances, has no open invitation.

In Total: Robin Söderling 31 - Rafael Nadal 29


EDIT:
Going to be fun to see how they get out of their Soderling hype now after the loss. Expecting some bad articles tomorrow

MaxPower
06-02-2011, 10:51 AM
good post match article from http://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/tennis/article13117551.ab

Soderling knocked himself out
of the French Open
http://gfx.aftonbladet-cdn.se/image/13117550/800/normal/2d73cffd227f7/02s81-robin-50__mngl_20110602sp5x010%2Cspo_1.indd_8351.jpg
Robin at the press conference

PARIS. Sportbladets tennis reporter: He can not blame anyone but himself

How is it to play tennis in a squashhall?
Ask Robin Soderling.

Against a player like Rafael Nadal, the ball always comes back, and then it will be disastrous to miss yourself. Soderling did not look heartbroken when he met the press after the loss in the quarter-final against Nadal, but I wonder what he felt inside. He knew he had a chance against the world number one who was in search of form rather than for his sixth French Open title. He knew it was a final spot in the pot, because the winner gets to meet an injured Scot.

Then something happened that shouldn't happen. Robin Soderling failed to decide the points and was forced into long rallies. "Rafa" ran, ran, ran and held the ball in play. Much more than that Nadal did not need to do to win 6-4, 6-1, 7-6.

Has no B-plan

Soderling put only 57 percent of first serves, and when it clicks he can't find any comfort in his basic game. It was clear yesterday, and since the guy from Vastergotland has no B-plan, it looked like it did.

There they stood and threw the ball over the net - until Soderling became frustrated and lost. At one point the ball crossed the net selvedge 23 times. The Swede has to get faster points, especially against players like Nadal.

Many argue that the Spaniard was brilliant in the quarterfinals, but in my eyes is "Rafa" still a lot to prove. In previous games, he had to be more aggressive - and that's when he has spread the ball both left and right.

I'd be surprised if "Rafa" wins

It was Soderling himself that lost yesterday. Yes, I would say that the Swede played himself out in the French Open. His forehand was not good, his serve poor, his backhand miserable. There was no new final to Robin Soderling, and he can not blame anyone but himself.

Instead, it will be Nadal who learn to take it to the finals, but I'd be surprised if he wins it.

I say congratulations anyway.

"Rafa" turns 25 tomorrow, and the best gift he received was the one he got early yesterday.

ad-out
06-02-2011, 05:37 PM
Joe89 - What a fun interview. Thanks for the translation!

MaxPower
06-21-2011, 08:27 PM
by request: http://www.svd.se/sport/malet-robin-ska-ha-roligt_6257128.svd

The goal: Robin should have fun

http://www.svd.se/multimedia/dynamic/00747/rosengren_747149c.jpg

Wimbledon. The honeymoon is over. In Wimbledon Robin Söderling and his coach Fredrik Rosengren should feel that their collaboration bears fruit. One of Rosengrens most important tasks is to make the world #5 to enjoy his situation.
At least concering tennis Robin Soderling is not enjoying himself. Instead he pushes himself so hard at times that he breaks down which we saw in the Paris QF vs Rafael Nadal

The spanish world number one, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic enjoys being in the limelight and often raise their game in big matches where they often walk in with a smile and wave to cheering specatators.

Even if Robin Soderling should not be compared to "the bull Ferdinand" (famous cartoon character that is very reluctant to fight, shown on christmas every year in Sweden) that always was dragged into the bullfighting-arena the 26-year old "västgöten" (man from Western Gothia, part of Sweden) is sometimes under so much pressure that he puts on himself that it limits his game. Therefore Rosengren will focus on his adepts mental health and normal common sense to get Robin to understand that he really is one of the world's best players and appreciate it

-When he starts with his childishness and talk about how bad he is I'm talking to him. But I'm not shouting I'm just saying how good he is, says "Fidde".



Both of you have very direct opinions and are a bit hotheaded - has it shown in some way?


-No, we discuss a lot but not much prestige in it. Ten years ago I couldn't back down, I always wanted my will through. Nowadays I don't have to win any wars.

-Everyone says that Robin must be controlled hard but I don't think that is correct at all.



How has your first month been?

-Amazing. Robin is very relaxed and maybe it is that he must get used to feeling good before he can use it more in his tennis.

The serve is one of the keys for "Fidde" to read how his adept is feeling on the court.
-The serve is unbelievably good when he is relaxed. If he is tense then the serve often goes right down in the net and the more he misses the power he puts into it with even worse result.


They have changed a few details in Robin's serve motion and the purpose is to gain more rotation in the body -"then the ball gets more spin""- and to put less pressure on the shoulder with a more smooth end of the motion. A somewhat earlier swing in Robins flat backhand is another detail they have been working on during practices so that Robin, by getting under the boll, can gain more controll.


The other day they practiced on an offensive BH slice Rosengren got very surprised by how Soderling worked with the on grass so effective shot.

- Robin knew it to perfection and I stood with my jaw wide open. Why has he been hiding it all these years? I hope he dares to use it even during match.

Why not already tomorrow versus the on grass very lethal german Philipp Petzschner who himself have one weapon in the backhandslice. Even if grass tennis has become slower the serve and returns are more important than on other surfaces.

- Robin should take risks in the return situations because you will not break playing safe and it is hard to get back into a point.

- If the returns are missing he can block back in one game but the basic plan is to be aggressive, says Frederik Rosengren.

MaxPower
06-21-2011, 08:31 PM
The other day they practiced on an offensive BH slice Rosengren got very surprised by how Soderling worked with the on grass so effective shot.

- Robin knew it to perfection and I stood with my jaw wide open. Why has he been hiding it all these years? I hope he dares to use it even during match.

Why not already tomorrow versus the on grass very lethal german Philipp Petzschner who himself have one weapon in the backhandslice.

Good find btw. This showed today! times x 100. So happy Soderling got an amazing coach now

AgnRus
06-21-2011, 09:00 PM
Many thanks !!!:worship:

sunzhewyq
06-22-2011, 01:24 AM
The goal: Robin should have fun

Wimbledon. One of Rosengrens most important tasks is to make the world #5 to enjoy his situation.

-When he starts with his childishness and talk about how bad he is I'm talking to him. But I'm not shouting I'm just saying how good he is, says "Fidde".


if Robin can enjoy himself more,the result will be less important...Com'n Robin,Let us have some fun...:)

Sunset of Age
06-22-2011, 01:31 AM
Best of luck to Robin in his upcoming matches. :rocker2: :D

AgnRus
09-26-2011, 05:49 PM
Robin Soderling: A Big Man Felled

By Marianne Bevis(Featured Columnist) on September 26, 2011

http://cdn.bleacherreport.net/images_root/images/photos/001/372/013/117302483_crop_650x440.jpg?1317042884

His was the first in an avalanche of withdrawals that rolled through the opening week of the U.S. Open—and perhaps the biggest.

When Robin Soderling announced, on the day he was to begin his Flushing Meadows campaign, that he could not play his first match, most assumed it was down to the wrist injury that had kept him out of competition throughout the U.S. Open Series. The tweet that followed, however, talked of illness.

Hi my friends, I am sorry but I just couldn’t play today. I had no energy, had stomach ache, headache and talking to the doctor we decided that I just couldn’t play. I really hope to recover quickly.

Other players made their exits with apparently similar symptoms, and so the media’s eyes quickly moved on to scan the draw and assess the improved prospects for the seeds in Soderling’s quarter—John Isner and Juan Martin Del Potro, in particular.

It was more than week before Soderling revealed— again in a tweet—that he had glandular fever.

It’s been a difficult period but I am getting better. Doctors confirmed that I have had mono for quite some time and this truly explains my lack of energy but my health is improving and I hope to be back on the court as soon as possible.

Although Soderling was scheduled to play in Bangkok next week, he has now revealed he will be unable to play any of the Asian swing. The virus is still with him and he must rest for at least a month more.

Soderling has not played a match since winning his fourth title of the year in Bastad in July. The title at his home tournament, however, masked what was already a worrying dip since his run of success early in 2011.

http://cdn.bleacherreport.net/images_root/article/media_slots/photos/000/208/593/117136974_crop_340x234.jpg?1317042825

He concluded the spring hard-court season with second-round losses at both Indian Wells and Miami and followed them with opening-match defeats in the first clay events at Barcelona and Estoril.

He enjoyed a brief upturn through the Madrid and Rome Masters and Roland Garros after beginning a new coaching partnership with fellow Swede Fredrik Rosengren and sounded full of confidence about his prospects for the rest of the year.

“Now finally, my body feels good," Soderling said. "I struggled a little bit with some injuries the past couple of months…I am going to work hard now and hopefully I can do well in the States.”

Instead, he now looks into an abyss of lost ranking points and the likelihood of missing the World Tour Finals in London. For Soderling has big points to defend both in Asia—where he last year reached the quarters in Kuala Lumpur, Beijing and the Shanghai Masters—and in the European indoor season—quarters in Stockholm, semis in Valencia and his first Masters title in Paris.

Indeed, with David Ferrer already ahead of him in the top five, Soderling faces the possibility of slipping behind Mardy Fish, Tomas Berdych, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Del Potro by the end of the year. Should he be unable to play for the rest of the season, he could fall outside the top 10 for the first time in more than two years.

His absence at a third consecutive end-of-year final in London will be a loss not just to him but to the event, for there has always been something about the Swede that makes him stand apart from the rest of tour.

While he follows in the footsteps of countrymen such as Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander and Stefan Edberg who painted a Scandinavian image of fleet-footed, nimbly-built, flaxen-haired players, Soderling claims little of that inheritance.

http://cdn.bleacherreport.net/images_root/article/media_slots/photos/000/208/597/96653508_crop_340x234.jpg?1317042940

However, what he lacks in grace of movement he makes up for in weight of shot. He strides rather than walks the baseline and hits a tennis ball with the kind of power that snaps like a pistol shot.

He plays in an era that expects its stars to be open access, media friendly and style conscious, when he prefers low key, private and unstarry. Few other players of Soderling’s stature, for example, would have not more than 30 words devoted to their “personal life” on Wikipedia. His own website is equally sparse when it comes to himself—and the ATP site, too.

Soderling does not joke like Novak Djokovic, charm like Rafael Nadal, nor is he conversationally expansive like Roger Federer. Instead, he is more reticent about stepping into the media limelight. He chose the quiet summer hiatus, for example, to launch not one but three charitable campaigns.

In fact, so successful is he at maintaining a low profile that it’s easy to forget Soderling made his persistent rise into the elite top five during one of the sport’s most competitive periods and has stayed there for over a year—until now.

In handling such a disappointing setback after winning three of his first four tournaments in 2011, Soderling has remained just as low-key. The latest tweet keeps it simple, as usual:


Very sorry to disappoint my fans, tournaments, and sponsors but I am still not able to play. My mono is not completely cured yet and so I have to take another month off. Hope to be ready for Stockholm Open in the middle of October.

Whenever he does make it back, it will be without fanfares, fireworks or fuss. Let us hope it is soon.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/865753-robin-soderling-a-big-man-felled

swedes_rule
09-27-2011, 07:33 AM
I really like this article :) i think its very well written.

Naudio Spanlatine
10-22-2011, 12:44 AM
he withdrew from paris, so sad whats happening to him and this mono illness:sad:
http://sports.yahoo.com/tennis/news;_ylt=AtDc4sE3gyhPYAxyYRizwkI4v7YF?slug=reu-mensoderling

MaxPower
08-22-2012, 08:13 PM
Söderling will not make it back to the world elite
http://gfx2.aftonbladet-cdn.se/image/15294911/480/normal/5b0d51f9deac7/Borg.jpg

Björn Borg is skeptic about the swedish tennis stars future: "How much is he prepared to give when he comes back?"

Robin Söderling has not played a Grand Slam tournament since Wimbledon last year. Now Björn Borg is doubting Robin's chances to play himself back to the absolute top.

- That he comes back to the shape and consistency he had before I don't think it will happen, says the tennis legend to Sportbladet.


US Open begins on monday, but just like the four previous Grand Slam-torunaments there is no swedish player in men's singles.

Robin Söderling is still in uncertain struggle with mono and has not played a match since July 17th last year, when he demolished David Ferrer in the Swedish Open-final in Båstad.

The situation doesn't only worry the 28-year old from Tibro, but also the greatest in swedish tennis. Behind Söderling there is nothing, then nothing, then nothing and then anonymous players like Patrik Rosenholm, Michael Ryderstedt, Christian Lindell and Carl Bergman.

- Me and everyone else that loves tennis hope that Robin gets the chance to come back. We all wait for the day when he can play matches again. Robin is needed for swedish tennis, says Björn Borg.



Maximum bad luck

Sportbladet met the former world number one at a hotell in central Stockholm.

Robin Söderling was ranked number 4 at best. He reached two consecutive finals in French Open and won 10 ATP-titles before the sickness forced him away from tennis.

-He's had maximum bad luck, says the 56-year old Björn Borg, who doubts that Söderling can find his former self.

-I think he will have huge problems to get back to the absolute topp. If he becomes fully healthy he can still win big tournaments, but to win a Grand Slam title, to be number one an to be in the absolute top I think will be very hard.

That Björn Borg is skeptic is not only due to Robin Söderling being without match practice and dropping some of the physisque he'd built since childhood.

-The mental aspect is another important thing. Robin has not played tennis for a long time and is becoming a father soon. He's dropped the 100% focus, because there is a life outside tennis. To then throw yourself into the tough training and focus on tennis to 100%....How much is he willing to give when he comes back? I don't know how he thinks.




Everyone tries

Do you have any contact with Robin?

-No, but I've seen him occasionaly. I know he feels better, but not good enough.

Do you know what ranking Swedens highest ranked player, Patrik Rosenholm, has on the ATP-ranking?

-I'd guess around 300.

377. That number most associate with text-tv, not swedish tennis,

-Exactly, haha. We can only hope it turns and we all know what Björkman, Johansson, Norman, Kulti and Tillström does....Everyone tries. There is organization, will and knowledge, but it takes five to seven years before we can see new names from Sweden. We simply need patience.

Are you tempted to commit to any project?

-No, there is many skilled in the younger generation that are already involved, that has knowledge and knows tennis. They are making an awesome job, says Björn Borg.

source: http://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/tennis/article15294916.ab

sunzhewyq
08-23-2012, 01:24 PM
yeah..that is the big difference between men's and women's tournaments on the returning from a long break. Some Female players, like Maria Sharapova and Kim Clijsters, can come back from the injury or as a mother player and even win the GS titles. But on men's tour, the competetion is so cruel. A huge gap has been digged between the top class and the rest.

It is a really long way to go.....

AgnRus
11-26-2012, 03:28 PM
Robin Soderling not giving in just yet

But as battle with mono stretches on, the new parent prepares for life's next steps

Updated: November 26, 2012, 10:51 AM ET
By Ravi Ubha | ESPN.com

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2012/1126/ten_g_soderling_576.jpg

On a Saturday morning in Stockholm, Robin Soderling is taking the dog for a walk.

"Can you hold on for a second, please?" Soderling asks over the telephone. "A car is coming and I have no leash."

He and longtime partner Jenni Mostrom became parents for the first time six weeks ago and together they live in a newly purchased apartment. Given Soderling's career earnings of more than $10 million, money isn't an issue.

It all seems so perfect, and Soderling knows he has it good.



But for the 28-year-old, one thing is missing: A return to the tennis court. For the past year and a half, the two-time French Open finalist has been out of the game because of mononucleosis. While Roger Federer and Andy Roddick had milder cases of the viral illness, Soderling, like Mario Ancic, wasn't as fortunate.

As 2013 approaches, Soderling -- unranked after occupying the fifth spot when his hiatus began -- doesn't know if he will ever play professionally again. The uncertainty is at times almost unbearable.

"The hope, the hopelessness, then the hope again, then the hopelessness -- that really kills me," Soderling said. "I feel really good, then I start to practice, and then I think maybe in a couple of months I can come back and I really believe it. Then I do a bit too much and wake up one morning not feeling well again."

The latest setback occurred recently.

Soderling was buoyed because he was able to train every other day for an hour. But instead of gradually picking up the pace, a cold and flu meant he had to stop again. He rested for 2½ weeks before gently resuming training.

"In the past couple of months I had my best weeks and days, which gives me the hope, but I get setbacks and feel worse again," Soderling said. "Overall it's getting better but I'm not as desperate to come back anymore tomorrow. I will give it a shot, of course, but I learned to live with the thought that maybe it will not be possible. Whatever happens, I will feel I did all I could."

Soderling has consulted a plethora of doctors, even flying to California in the spring for another expert opinion. Earlier tests revealed that his thyroid wasn't functioning properly, leading to extreme fatigue. Now the results are improved, but the Swede isn't 100 percent.

"In some people, mono can affect them for a long period of time," Paul Chatrath, a London-based ENT consultant and surgeon who has treated mono patients, said in a telephone interview. "Others seem to get rid of it more quickly. It is thought to be due in part to the severity of the initial infection and also to do with the individual person's own immune system and the ability to fight it off from the first attack."

Soderling thinks about the summer of 2011 and wonders if pausing prior to or after the French Open would have limited the damage. At Roland Garros, where Soderling and his heavy forehand ended Rafael Nadal's reign in 2009 and snapped Federer's semifinal streak at majors a year later, he was tired in the mornings and following short practice sessions.

He managed to reach the quarterfinals, losing to Nadal, who has been sidelined himself for five months with a knee injury. Bernard Tomic beat Soderling in the third round at Wimbledon.

"Wimbledon was not good at all," Soderling said. "I was vomiting in the morning and I had a fever. I don't know why I played. But then it's Wimbledon and you want to play, and that's what you've done your whole life. You've pushed away your feelings of tiredness and tried harder."

As a clay-court tournament approached in Bastad, Sweden, Soderling said he felt "dead" and considered pulling out. Suddenly there was an upturn in his health, he competed and went on to win the title, dropping only 13 games in four matches.

"I played, and played really well, but I felt something wasn't right," he said. "A few days later for the first time I got really, really sick."

His extended break was underway.

For Fredrik Rosengren, Soderling's most recent coach, it was a case of deja vu. He was Ancic's coach when the Croatian was stricken in 2007. Despite reappearing on the tour, Ancic was never the same and retired at the age of 26.

"The only thing I can be is support," Rosengren, who last week accepted an offer to become Sweden's Davis Cup captain with Soderling's blessing, said in a telephone interview. "I can support him every day to tell him that tennis is not as important as his health. This is the only thing that counts in life; tennis is the second thing here.

"At the same time, I know that he wants to come back and play tennis. He loves the lifestyle, the travel. He actually said to me when we were walking in the streets of Stockholm during (October's) Stockholm Open: 'It would have been so nice to play (at the stadium) tonight.'"

Soderling said it's not as painful to watch tennis on television now as it was months ago, and the arrival of daughter Olivia has altered his perspective. Soderling was taking a cooking course when Jenni, who was about a week past the original due date, called and told him to get home.

The moment had come.

Olivia, according to dad, sleeps through the night -- "we've been lucky," Soderling said. With a slight chuckle, Soderling admits to changing diapers "5 to 10 percent" of the time.

"For the first time in my life I'm not putting myself first, which is a very strange feeling," Soderling said. "It's also nice. All my life I've been focusing on tennis, training, getting results. Jenni and I wanted to have kids pretty early, but we waited. We always thought it was better in the future. Now I don't understand why we ever waited."

The wait for Soderling's return to tennis continues.

"I don't want my career to be finished yet," he said. "I feel I have at least five more years in me. But I still have a lot of things to be thankful for. The (mono) could have happened when I was 18 or 20. I was 27. Up to now I've had a good career."

http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/8676619/tennis-robin-soderling-eyeing-comeback-accepts-career-over

swedes_rule
11-27-2012, 09:48 AM
well i guess its confirming what we all already had assumed but still makes me pretty sad :(

nadejda
12-05-2012, 05:50 PM
eh Sod, I hope he come back for at least a season on tour! I cannot think about not seeing him on tour again!
Best of luck for him! I am optimistic! :)

viruzzz
12-28-2012, 06:31 AM
Please, dude, get well soon.
I was watching some of his best highlights, wow, amazing tennis. We can't lose this player yet. It'd be so unfair to the sport :sad: :sad:

Smoke944
12-29-2012, 09:59 PM
Get well soon Robin.

viruzzz
04-10-2013, 11:16 PM
Missing him so much. :sad:
No news this year?

emotion
04-10-2013, 11:21 PM
:sad: watching him on tennis channel right now

Sent from Verticalsports.com Free App (http://www.verticalsports.com/mobile)

AZ-12
04-20-2013, 09:09 AM
Interesting interview with Robin in swedish media: http://www.expressen.se/sport/tennis/soderling-varfor-ska-jag-satta-ett-datum/ Hopefully someone can translate the key parts. (Unfortunately I have a flight to catch, so I won't have time myself).

MaxPower
05-25-2013, 05:08 PM
Interesting yes but no news.


I'm NOT getting the wibe he's close to a comeback. When Båstad comes around it's been 2 full years.


At least Ancic had a fallback plan and studied to lawyer. Robin I don't know what his fallback is. He still aims for comeback but his progress is so slooooooow.

Even if he is too stubborn to set a date (that's like the main-point in his recent interviews) I think he should. He asks why?, but with slow progress and even more time away from the tour the chance his comeback becomes a total failure increases. I think mentally that could be more devastating than just wrap it up and move on in his life.

AgnRus
06-17-2013, 02:54 PM
can someone translate this?
(yes, I know that Robin is not going to play soon (maybe he will never come back), but still curious)

http://video.eurosport.se/tennis/courtside-avsnitt-2-soderling-edberg-dissar-federer-och-hellbergs-anekdot_vid282281/video.shtml

MaxPower
06-24-2013, 05:51 PM
can someone translate this?
(yes, I know that Robin is not going to play soon (maybe he will never come back), but still curious)

http://video.eurosport.se/tennis/courtside-avsnitt-2-soderling-edberg-dissar-federer-och-hellbergs-anekdot_vid282281/video.shtml

They talked almost nothing about Robin in that whole segment. Robin said he didn't watch much of RG but that the result was expected on the men's and women's side. Host asked him how it felt to be the only guy who's defeated Nadal in RG.

He said he'd rather be the guy who won 8 titles than being known as the guy who beat the guy who won 8 titles. Yet they all agreed it was a nice achievement.

Then he said he thought that Tsonga's win over Federer wasn't that unexpected. He also rather wanted Tsonga vs Nadal in the final than Ferrer vs Nadal because as he said Tsonga has a big forehand and serve while Ferrer pretty much has to win vs Nadal playing Nadal's own game and that's very hard.

He had some interesting opinions on the top player dominance and that it's hurting small tournaments. If small tournaments can't get a star almost no-one cares about them. So he said many ATP 250s would probably prefer to be exhibition tournaments :eek:

Thought it was important to have interests outside of tennis and kinda wish he had thought about that earlier. They were impressed with Ancic that managed to land a degree while still playing tennis.

For Wimbledon he believed more in Federer and Murray. Edberg then came and talked abit about serve and volley and the people in the studio all agreed that the returns today are too good so it's hard to be successful with S&V so many players don't train it much.

He said about grass that the courts are better these days and play more like hardcourt so it's easier to adapt. He didn't play any warm-up tournaments himself mostly because he's done well in RG the past years as active player. He also thought that it's gotten easier every year to adapt and thought that veterans can have a slight edge. He still didn't have much faith in Tommy Haas having a real chance of winning Wimbledon.

The commentator Alsterback had some interesting idea that it's tricker to get nervous on grass and Robin agreed since it's harder to "keep the ball in play" and play defensivly. He also thought that some players like Federer are insanely hard to play on grass because his slice is so efficient and they compared to RG where it was almost useless and players like Tsonga had no problems at all with it.

Then some credit to veteran Anders Järryd and Robin was impressed that he could stay so high tanking in BOTH doubles and singles.




Nothing about his own comeback. Maria Tomsvik wished him good luck and so forth at the very end of the show. And I know from before Soderling has been hitting with the other guy, Magnus Alsterback (Eurosport commentator & friend). Also think Robin looked healthy! So some hope at least, I'm crossing some fingers for autumn indoor season but not sure there is time.

AgnRus
06-24-2013, 07:29 PM
MaxPower, thank you so much!:hatoff:

AgnRus
09-25-2013, 07:59 AM
Nu satsar Söderling på nya bollar

Tennisstjärnan Robin Söderling har förlikat sig med tanken att karriären kan vara över.
Men tolka inte det som om han gett upp hoppet om comeback.
– Jag vet att kroppen kommer bli helt bra och det ger mig ett lugn, säger den tidigare världsfyran som under sitt långa uppehåll bland annat utvecklat en ny boll som ska minska skaderiskerna.

http://gfx.svd-cdn.se/multimedia/dynamic/01084/robin-s_derling_1084026c.jpg

Den är godkänd av ITF (Internationella tennisförbundet) och även om den kan användas på alla Grand Slam- och ATP-turneringar är det fortfarande mest en dröm. Min tanke är inte att bli rik på det här utan att ge tillbaka lite till svensk tennis genom att nå ut till klubbarna, säger Robin.

Han fyllde 29 år i augusti och det är drygt två år sedan han spelade sin senaste turnering.

– Även om tiden gått snabbt är jag inte lastgammal. Det finns många, ja, i alla fall flera spelare som är över 30 år och som varit borta länge och som gör bra resultat.

Robin är frisk från körtelfebern men kroppen har inte återhämtat sig fullt ut och han kan ännu inte träna för fullt.

– Jag blir sakta bättre men den sista biten är seg. Kör jag med hög intensitet kommer mattheten tillbaka. Det är som om kroppen har ett försvar som säger ifrån. När jag förut hörde Per Elofsson och andra berätta hur de kände sig kunde jag inte sätta mig in i det men nu förstår jag precis.

Läkarna säger att Robin en dag ska få tillbaka alla sina krafter men vet inte hur lång tid det tar.

– På ett sätt hade det kanske varit en lättnad om loppet varit kört. Då hade jag kunnat släppa alla tankar kring tennis och bearbeta det.Nu är det kanske, kanske inte, kanske...

– Jag skulle i och för sig kunna bestämma mig i för att skita i det här men det vill jag inte göra så länge chansen finns. Ibland har jag tänkt att det kanske skulle vara bäst att jag gick ut och sa att jag lägger av men i bakhuvudet ha kvar tanken på comeback.

Du menar för att slippa alla frågor och för att kroppen kanske slappnar av på ett annat sätt?

– Ja, både och.

Har du satt en deadline för när du måste kunna träna för fullt för att hoppet om comeback inte ska överge dig?

– Nej, det skulle bara sätta press och tänk om jag skulle känna mig hur stark som helst en månad efter en sådan där deadline.

Jag har fått många mejl och samtal från personer som säger att de kan hjälpa dig och du har väl...

Robin skrattar och bryter av frågan.

– Det har varit tusentals mejl. Jag har testat massor av saker och sen finns det de som skulle bota mig på telefon. Det skulle ta bara fem timmar och kosta mig 100 000 kronor.

Och?

– Nej, det där trodde jag inte på. Men samtidigt tänker man någonstans, tänk om det där hade funkat. Det hade ju lätt varit värt hundratusen att bli frisk.

Du levde med och för tennis dygnet runt – hur har du hanterat omställningen?

– Man har ju hört att den del blir nästan knäppa då de inte längre kan tävla men det är ju ändå inte så att livet tar slut då. Eftersom jag inte slutat kan jag jag inte veta exakt hur det kommer att kännas men hälsan är viktigast och det tänker man nog inte på förrän man mår riktigt dåligt.

Precis som så många andra idrottare mitt uppe i karriären hände det att den tvåfaldige Grand Slam-finalisten under de mest hektiska perioderna såg fram emot pensionering eller åtminstone en lång period under vilken han skulle slippa baksidorna med en elitkarriär.

– Nu saknar jag allt det där som jag såg fram emot att slippa.

Vad saknar du mest?

– Pressen, det där att allt jag gjorde syftade till att jag skulle komma så bra förberedd som möjligt till en tävling. Kan jag äta ett äpple nu? Kan jag göra det eller det? Allt var avvägningar för att jag skulle prestera så bra som möjligt på banan.

Kommer du att få uppleva den stora utmaningen igen om du inte gör comeback?

– Nej, i alla fall inte på samma sätt och det är inte heller viktigt för mig. Jag är enorm tävlingsmänniska i tennis men inte annars. Man kommer snabbt in i nya rutiner och även om jag under första tiden av mitt uppehåll inte hade så mycket tålamod utan mest tänkte på att komma tillbaka vänjer man sig vid en annan tillvaro.

Det har inte minst dottern Olivia sett till.

– Hon är elva månader och sex dagar, säger Robin som strålar då han berättar om sin och sambon Jenni Moströms ögonsten.

– Den här tiden är fantastisk och det händer hela tiden nya saker.

När du gör comeback kan du inte träffa familjen lika ofta?

– Jag skulle ta med familjen så mycket som det går, ja, alltså så mycket som det går för ett litet barn att resa. Men visst skulle det bli en viss omställning igen, säger Robin som under det senaste året ägnat mycket tid åt att utveckla ”RS – all court''.

– Jag har alltid varit materialare och även om det finns bra bollar på touren är det ingen som varit exakt som jag tycker att en boll ska vara. Tunga bollar ger kontroll men sliter på kroppen och lätta bollar flyger iväg. Därför ville jag ta fram en lätt boll som ger kontroll och är skonsam mot kroppen.

Och?

– Jag är helnöjd och har också fått mycket positiv feedback av alla som testat dem.

http://www.svd.se/sport/soderling-satsar-pa-nya-bollar_8551582.svd
--------------------------


Guys, retell, please!:help:
All these rumors about Bercy were not true, if I understood correctly.

AgnRus
10-10-2013, 04:37 AM
http://www.svt.se/nyhetsklipp/sport/article1519804.svt

Is there any news in this video? or not? :help:

MaxPower
10-15-2013, 02:07 PM
http://www.svt.se/nyhetsklipp/sport/article1519804.svt

Is there any news in this video? or not? :help:

I'd say no. It's a good interview but he's dodging the main question.

He says there is still no recovery when he trains hard. He doesn't want to set a time limit on his return. He's pretty happy with his life blabla. Time for other things. Doesn't feel stressed anymore about coming back.

I guess one alarming thing is he said on the topic of keeping in shape that his jeans feel a less tight these days. Sounds like he lost some weight. Unfortunately building muscle takes time and I dunno if he ever will get back to his top shape of 2010-2011. Doctors couldn't help him much. Some speculation that those 4 weeks or so he played with mono really pushed him over the edge.

He wants to come back and he wants to end his career on his own terms. When pushed on the question about "what is realistic?" he said: Well retiring might be the realistic option. (alarming!) Yet he also took some inspiration from Haas and thought that one positive thing is these 2 years off could maybe have bought him another year or so. Still refuses to set a timelimit but says he knows it's getting harder for every passing day


One positive thing is he says in practice it can still feel as good as 2011. Says tennis is like cycling so it still feels really good. But also says you can't really practice the match situations


Also touches on the doping topic but just says he doesn't care or read much news. Says most athletes suffer that kind of negative attention when something like this happens and caring about it takes him nowhere.

AgnRus
11-06-2013, 04:27 PM
from an interview with Jonas Bjorkman :

.......
-Any news on Robin Soderling, have you seen him recently?

- He wants to be back, there’s no doubt. Every time we come to Bastad or Stockholm, he more or less disappears because he doesn’t want to be too close. But I practised with him two weeks before the tournament.

He plays maybe twice a week but very very slow. Maybe five, 10 minutes then he rests for 10 minutes. So he’s still suffering from his illness and it’s a shame. Because the way he hits the ball, if he’s able to be completely healthy, it’s no doubt that he’ll be top 20 in six to eight months because he hits the ball so well.

He has to do a lot of work obviously because he’s dropped so many kilos because he has no muscles left. His physique is not there, he has to do a lot, but once he gets to that stage he can be top 20, I think even top 10.

http://www.sport360.com/tennis/jonas-bjorkman-proud-his-place-swedish-tennis-history

swedes_rule
11-10-2013, 01:33 AM
Thanks for sharing :hug:

i still dont think he'll be able to come back to the level he was before but its always nice to hear news :)