Is this what people mean when they talk about 'pushing'? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Is this what people mean when they talk about 'pushing'?

L James
10-03-2009, 08:01 AM
I've heard a lot of talk on these forums about "pushing". Whilst I think I have a general grasp of what this refers to, I found this quote from Simon, after his won over Korolev, interesting. Is this the pusher's mentality?

“It was hard to play him,” Simon told reporters. “He hit the ball really hard. Finally my plan was to hold my serves and wait for his mistakes.”

orangehat
10-03-2009, 08:58 AM
If you saw the match you would surely have understood it comprehensively. Simon was just pushing all his forehands into the court when he could have gone for a deeper or more angled shot. He was just pushing everything back so that Korolev could bash it mindlessly for a UE.

HeretiC
10-03-2009, 11:24 AM
There is a little bit of misconception about term "pushing" in here. Pushing was a legitimate part of tennis training schools up until 15-20 years ago. It is a way of hitting the ball, instead of full swing player move the raccquet handle forward too and thus it does look like the ball is pushed instead of hit. It was considered as a safe play, recommended in a moments when a player is not feeling confident enough in his shots.

sammy01
10-03-2009, 01:18 PM
If you saw the match you would surely have understood it comprehensively. Simon was just pushing all his forehands into the court when he could have gone for a deeper or more angled shot. He was just pushing everything back so that Korolev could bash it mindlessly for a UE.

the thing is if the opponent is going to give you mindless errors theres no need to do more. simon knows when he has to step it up and go for more.

duong
10-03-2009, 02:07 PM
I've heard a lot of talk on these forums about "pushing". Whilst I think I have a general grasp of what this refers to, I found this quote from Simon, after his won over Korolev, interesting. Is this the pusher's mentality?

yes that's it, I mean not exactly the sentence you quote but it's Simon's mentality in those matches.

Yet Simon attacks sometimes, and for instance when he plays Murray, he's the one who attacks :lol:

... yet he loses of course :lol:

Simon is more than a piusher and even more, he's a very good pusher

since you know what's the greatest quality of the "pusher" ? the LEGS (70% of modern tennis btw)

As tennis fans are used to looking only at the shots, they speak about the fact of "pushing" only
... but Simon's game might be also defined by "great running and moving" -it would be more accurate actually-

Simon is underrated everywhere ... as all pushers are :lol:

Murray could have made pushing very popular and rated more.

Yet he failed in that ... and now I think he will get persuaded by many that he has to change his game ;)

"Pushing" lost a great opportunity :lol: ... yet we have not finished with that game ;) :

for instance, Simon started this year thinking of changing his game to attack more, change his serve, etc ... he used it a little bit in Australia if some saw his matches especially against Ancic.

Yet, after then he lost his confidence and his game :shrug: -to be honest he also had physical problems, yet I think that the way he tried to change his game troubled him, troubled his confidence especially.

Simon was very lucky with the draws this year : probably that saved his confidence for the rest of the year ;)
(but he still has some pain in his knee)

FlameOn
10-03-2009, 02:11 PM
I think Monfils also says something like this at times. During one of his matches against Safin this year he said his strategy was "push the ball back and see what happens". I think it's pretty good that most of the ATP players that are pushers admit that they are so. The WTA tour's most pushiest pusher, Caroline Wozniacki, when answering interview questions about her game-style describes herself as an "aggressive player". :lol: :haha:

Haelfix
10-03-2009, 04:25 PM
There are multiple types of pushing. Murray and Simon are half counterpunch, half retriever. Hewitt is a perfect example of a pure counterpuncher and invariably ends up with a lot of winners in a match. So the plan is to rally until the opponent attacks and gives you enough pace and is sufficiently out of position to hit something by them. A retriever is more like a Michael Chang type player.

Another type of pushing is Muster, Monfils and Nadal (circa 2005), where basically they never go for a winner and instead hit rally shots or moonballs the entire match and play great defense when the opponent has them in difficulty. In Nadals case the offensive element is that his rally strokes get deeper and deeper, with more and more action and the opponent ends up so far out of position that theres almost no place he can hit the ball and he risks a UE.

Aaric
10-03-2009, 07:01 PM
Pusher = Murray
That´s it ;)

FedFan_2007
10-03-2009, 09:08 PM
Death to Pusher tennis.

malisha
10-03-2009, 11:26 PM
simon knows when he has to step it up and go for more.


There is no need to outhit Korolev and ofcourse he knows when he is getting smashed.
The thing is even when he realises it he cant change anything other that push the ball to the other side and prey for an UE.