How come Federer Never won Most improved player of the year award??? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

How come Federer Never won Most improved player of the year award???

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
08-17-2009, 04:25 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATP_Awards

Djokovic won twice
Nadal won in 2005

in 2003 Schuttler won- Fed's first slam
in 2004 Johannsen won- Fed won the small slam

either year Fed was clearly most improved

and Djokovic won this award twice (strangely not winning in 2008 even though that was his breakthrough year and probably deserved a win)

Ilovetheblues_86
08-17-2009, 04:30 AM
Because this is a consolation award.

Black Adam
08-17-2009, 04:33 AM
The winners in 2003 and 2004 were the most deserving although Henman would have been a worthy winner in 2004.

jcempire
08-17-2009, 04:56 AM
because He is the best in 7 years

BlueSwan
08-17-2009, 05:01 AM
I think it might have something to do with the level of expectations for Federer. I remember back when he was 17 and started playing "real" ATP tournaments, everybody was saying that this guy had unreal talent and was going to be #1. But for a long time not a whole lot happened, so while he was making rankings progress he was still disappointing people a little. Then when he finally got it all to click it was a bit of a "we all expected it" kind of event, so I suppose that people took it for granted. Unlike Schuttler in 2003, who nobody expected to suddenly be near the top of the rankings.

LEGENDOFTENNIS
08-17-2009, 11:08 AM
By 2003 Federer had already beaten great players, won ATP events and pulled of unreal jesusfed shots. It was just about time he won a GS. He hadn't become amazing in 1 year basically.

ballbasher101
08-17-2009, 03:18 PM
I think it might have something to do with the level of expectations for Federer. I remember back when he was 17 and started playing "real" ATP tournaments, everybody was saying that this guy had unreal talent and was going to be #1. But for a long time not a whole lot happened, so while he was making rankings progress he was still disappointing people a little. Then when he finally got it all to click it was a bit of a "we all expected it" kind of event, so I suppose that people took it for granted. Unlike Schuttler in 2003, who nobody expected to suddenly be near the top of the rankings.

I don't think I need to add anything to this well written response :wavey:.

Myrre
08-17-2009, 03:23 PM
You can't improve on perfection.

gulzhan
08-17-2009, 03:49 PM
He will, this year ;) if he wins USO :p

Lugburz
08-18-2009, 11:40 PM
because he didn't have to improve anything. and still won't need to improve...anything.

TMJordan
08-18-2009, 11:41 PM
Because each year he gets worse. :scratch:

HKz
08-19-2009, 06:37 AM
because they knew he would get plenty of other awards...

maki925
08-19-2009, 09:32 PM
Maybe he was born as a totally prepared and complete player. :lol::lol::lol:

River
08-19-2009, 09:57 PM
He peaked quick, after all. It was already known well before he was #1 that he was bound for the top ranking; so why give him a reward for improving something he already had?

But that's not a compliment, either. The mere fact that he peaked so fast also meant that he would decrease in skill quicker than he would increase, which I believe was and still is the case. He's incredible in most aspects of the game, but while he would try to increase one attribute, time would decrease everything else.

And when you think about it, who was surprised that he would win a slam back then? Just because you won a slam doesn't mean you drastically improved. The ones who won improved much more noticeably than Federer who pretty much didn't need to rise so high to get to where he is now, if you know what I'm saying.