Don Budge: The first Grand Slam (and the evolution of tennis through history) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Don Budge: The first Grand Slam (and the evolution of tennis through history)

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 04:24 AM
American Don Budge was the first player ever to complete the so-called Grand Slam: winning all four majors in the same year. He did it in 1938. I have found a fresh new clip (at least for me) in Italian with pretty good highlights from three of the four finals (I think Wimbledon's missing sadly). You can clearly see his famous backhand, sometimes deemed the best of all time. I hope you find it as interesting as I do.

I also hope it helps to open the eyes of those of you who think tennis was invented by Jimmy Connors at some point in the seventies. Well, surprise, it wasn't. What's more, Connors didn't even invent the two-handed backhand! In the images from the Australian Open final you can see aussie John Bromwich (bottom) hit the backhand with two hands as well. As early as 1938! It was a long time ago, but you can clearly see that tennis was already played basically as it is today. There wasn't so much Serve & Volleying as in the 50s or 60s, not so little as today or in the early 20th century. I'm sure you can find a pattern there. This is for all of you who don't like the way tennis is played today, and believe it will stay like this forever (yes, I'm looking at you habibko :)). It won't. Quoting Battlestar Galactica: "All of this has happened before, and all of it will happen again".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vE1gHcQyHvQ

Action Jackson
05-15-2009, 04:27 AM
The every era has its clowns, explains this in language easier to understand.

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 04:29 AM
The every era has its clowns, explains this in language easier to understand.

I was kidding about your mod badge in the other thread AJ, don't hold a grudge against me...

Action Jackson
05-15-2009, 04:31 AM
It's admirable to try and educate people when it comes to the game, cyclical trends and the like, some fundamentals will remain the same no matter what generation.

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 04:35 AM
It's admirable to try and educate people when it comes to the game, cyclical trends and the like, some fundamentals will remain the same no matter what generation.

There, good boy. :)

Also, the first minute or so of the clip features Budge against German Gottfried Von Cramm in an epic Davis Cup tie. Old Adolf really wanted that one, but Budge wouldn't allow it.

Action Jackson
05-15-2009, 04:36 AM
There, good boy. :)

Also, the first minute or so of the clip features Budge against German Gottfried Von Cramm in an epic Davis Cup tie. Old Adolf really wanted that one, but Budge wouldn't allow it.

That and the Catholic Church, anyway where's the paella?

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 04:42 AM
That and the Catholic Church, anyway where's the paella?

Every Sunday afternoon at my mother's table. Get it? Not your table. My table. You'll have to make do with the snowflakes.

Mimi
05-15-2009, 04:49 AM
thank you :wavey:

Action Jackson
05-15-2009, 04:52 AM
Every Sunday afternoon at my mother's table. Get it? Not your table. My table. You'll have to make do with the snowflakes.

Baila el Chiki-chiki

JimmyV
05-15-2009, 05:03 AM
http://img32.imageshack.us/img32/741/fc76o2.jpg

mark73
05-15-2009, 05:06 AM
I thought that Connors not only created tennis but also the universe. Thanks for the educational lesson. Surprisingly good tennis by the way by budge.

prima donna
05-15-2009, 05:09 AM
JimmyV, you're quite a clever fellow.

Smoke944
05-15-2009, 05:14 AM
Solid effort at making me laugh Jimmy :lol: :yeah:

habibko
05-15-2009, 05:20 AM
Jimmy delivers once again :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

fast_clay
05-15-2009, 05:55 AM
that's piss funny... :lol:

jonathancrane
05-15-2009, 07:26 AM
It was a long time ago, but you can clearly see that tennis was already played basically as it is today.

:haha:

But thank you, nice video

Arkulari
05-15-2009, 07:30 AM
gracias Har-Tru, me invitas a comer paella? ;)

seriously, this is very very interesting, tennis like history tends to repeat itself, conditions, players, courts, speed, rackets, it all have changed, but the spirit of the game has always been the same ;)

marcRD
05-15-2009, 12:21 PM
Don Budge>Rod Laver because the original is always the best.

Voo de Mar
05-15-2009, 12:49 PM
Funny thread :) :yeah:

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 05:35 PM
:haha:

But thank you, nice video

You don't think the basics of the game are the same now as back then? Obviously, the conditioning and physical power of the players is now staggering compared to what it was back then, but frankly, I don't see any big differences in the way tennis is played.

jonathancrane
05-15-2009, 05:46 PM
You don't think the basics of the game are the same now as back then? Obviously, the conditioning and physical power of the players is now staggering compared to what it was back then, but frankly, I don't see any big differences in the way tennis is played.

How many times Budge & co came to the net on the video? ;)

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 05:55 PM
How many times Budge & co came to the net on the video? ;)

I'd say about the same as today. Not sure I get what you mean... you think they come in less or more than today? I wish it was a longer video though so we could get a better sample.

FedFan_2007
05-15-2009, 05:57 PM
Don Budge won on 2 surfaces(clay & grass). I consider Rafa's current feat of owning 3 slams on 3 different surfaces to be a much greater achievement. Even if he fails to win US Open, what he's currently done FO-W-AO is probably greatest achievement ever, maybe alongside Fed winning 6/7 slams from 2005-2007 and making the French final in the only one he lost.

Voo de Mar
05-15-2009, 05:58 PM
Budge and Laver look like mugs (I mean their faces and bodies), hard to believe they are goats ;)

MisterQ
05-15-2009, 06:00 PM
Budge and Laver look like mugs (I mean their faces and bodies), hard to believe they are goats ;)

They are GMOATs.

FedFan_2007
05-15-2009, 06:02 PM
All the older players(before 1985) looked like mugs. It wasn't until Becker/Edberg arrived on the scene that we finally got handsome tennis players who would win slams. Now Feliciano, Haas and Ferru continue the fine tradition!

tangerine_dream
05-15-2009, 06:05 PM
Every time I watch tennis with my grandfather he always ends up talking about Don Budge. :lol: When I go to Rhode Island I need to check out his matches.

Did anybody read this book yet? It's on my list.

http://i40.tinypic.com/2apz5e.jpg

Nice mini-review of it:

"Forget Federer versus Nadal, and Borg versus McEnroe. Marshall Jon Fisher convincingly demonstrates that the greatest tennis match of all time was Gottried Von Cramm versus Don Budge in the 1937 Davis Cup semifinals. This is one of the best sports books you will ever read. But it's more than a sports book: as absorbing as the drama unfolding on Wimbledon's Centre Court is, it's surpassed by the drama of history swirling outside it. Fisher masterfully weaves biography, history, and sports--and sex and romance and the drums of war--into a thoroughly riveting narrative. Full of ironic twists and astonishing revelations, A Terrible Splendor is a literary triumph." —Scott Stossel, Deputy Editor, Atlantic Monthly

FedFan_2007
05-15-2009, 06:15 PM
tangerine_dream - screw that sissy 1937 "lawn tennis". If Budge/Cramm were so great how come they couldn't produce doomsday stroking vamos topspin and defend like a demon? RAFA RAFA RAFA!!!

Voo de Mar
05-15-2009, 06:19 PM
Marshall Jon Fisher convincingly demonstrates that the greatest tennis match of all time was Gottried Von Cramm versus Don Budge in the 1937 Davis Cup semifinals.

Budge won 6-8 5-7 6-4 6-2 8-6.

Judging by the scoreline nothing extraordinary :o

Har-Tru
05-15-2009, 06:31 PM
Budge won 6-8 5-7 6-4 6-2 8-6.

Judging by the scoreline nothing extraordinary :o

Problem is, you cannot judge by the scoreline.

Voo de Mar
05-15-2009, 07:41 PM
Problem is, you cannot judge by the scoreline.

I think would be difficult to judge even by watching the match as well. The wider context is required in this case, I mean many other matches from this period. I saw several matches from the 70's and indeed, I think Borg-Gerulaitis in the Wimbledon's semifinal 1977, would be considered as one of the best matches in that decade, I don't think as one of the best matches in tennis history though. IMO tennis decades are incomparable between themselves.

Har-Tru
05-16-2009, 10:22 AM
I think would be difficult to judge even by watching the match as well. The wider context is required in this case, I mean many other matches from this period.

You're absolutely right.


I saw several matches from the 70's and indeed, I think Borg-Gerulaitis in the Wimbledon's semifinal 1977, would be considered as one of the best matches in that decade, I don't think as one of the best matches in tennis history though. IMO tennis decades are incomparable between themselves.

Hmm not sure. I want to believe you can compare different generations. It's not easy obviously, but definitely more sensible than comparing players from different generations (as so many trolls love to do).