The Tintin Movie thread! - MORE REVIEWS!!! (NO SPOILERS) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

The Tintin Movie thread! - MORE REVIEWS!!! (NO SPOILERS)

The_Nadal_effect
01-02-2009, 05:27 PM
Blistering barnacles!
I finally decided to open the thread, though I only know a few posters on this site who have read Tintin (Castafiore, RonE, Cobalt60 to name a few). Actually, he's hugely popular in Europe and Asia, though not as much in America. Still, what is surprising is that the directors chosen for the trilogy are all from Hollywood!:lol:

Spielberg and Peter Jackson are doing the first two. The third might be a co-direction of SS & PJ or else they'll lock on James Cameron, if information is correct. Okay, maybe Jackson isn't exactly Hollywood, but he is now I guess.

Will be very interesting to see if they can do the series justice. It will be very difficult to replicate the water-colorish 'ligne claire' (clear lines) world of Tintin. Herge -- Georges Remi (the Author with initials reversed)-- was very particular that no one touch his creation, but Spielberg was interested from the mid-eighties itself (within a decade of the author's demise, I speculate), and had
infact obtained permission from the Herge foundation for a movie series using the actor he used for Elliot in ET.

Twenty years later, Spielberg revisited the idea and decided to spin the adventures using motion-capture. The project is tightly under wraps. Eager fans can update themselves at www.letintinmovie.com and the rest of them can read my updates here.:o

I'll try to be regular I promise.:D In the meantime, here's a teaser::p


Tintin Movie Motion Capture Technology Boost

http://www.council-of-elrond.com/castdb/gollum/gollum2.jpg

The Tintin trilogy will be shot entirely in using motion capture technology which will be processed in New Zealand at the Weta workshop which was co-founded by Peter Jackson. You will recognise Weta work on the Lord of the Ring Trilogy.

Click here for Tintin Books, Albums, DVD's and Music from our Tintin Multi-media store.

The technology that brought Gollum to life will be used on the new Tintin movie project. This huge Tintin project has just got a boost because Weta Digital recently announced thepicstoppic.jpg completion of a new “extreme density” data center featuring HP’s new 2-in-1 server blades, which combines two server in a single energy-efficient blade. Weta is running four computing clusters, each equipped with 156 of HP’s Proliant BL2×220c server blades, which hold spots 219 through 222 on the current Top 500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers

Ok, so that sounds a little technical but it is all good news for Tintin fans because it means that this powerful computing will be used to create a wonderful looking Tintin movie. The vision of Jackson/Spielberg combined with these mighty computers to process the data from the motion capture camera will lead to great cinema.

Tags: tintin movie, steven spielberg, tintin film, tintin movie cast list, peter jackson, weta, weta workshop, motion capture technology, weta digital

Filed under Tintin Movie News by admin

cobalt60
01-02-2009, 06:16 PM
:yippee:

Zirconek
01-02-2009, 06:24 PM
In South America it is quite popular, I still have my books collection of Asterix, Tintin and Calvin & Hobbes from my childhood :)

There is a big controversy about a book where Tintin travels to Africa, but I guess a modern Tintin won't have these kind of embarassment.

The_Nadal_effect
01-04-2009, 04:27 PM
In South America it is quite popular, I still have my books collection of Asterix, Tintin and Calvin & Hobbes from my childhood :)

Thanks for that information.
In fact, the creator send Tintin to South America in three adventures, once in Peru, and twice in Brazil/ Cuba. By America, I really meant North America where he visited only once. Only superhero comics are more popular there.

There is a big controversy about a book where Tintin travels to Africa, but I guess a modern Tintin won't have these kind of embarassment.

:lol:
Young Herge was accused of racism and this book was banned.
Though its available in limited editions as the modern reader understands that Herge was only reflecting the culture of that period (1920s-30s).

SloKid
01-04-2009, 05:13 PM
Tintin :hearts:

The_Nadal_effect
08-04-2010, 02:48 PM
Okay, so maybe I wasn't at my most regular in providing an update, but the movie production has been very unsteady. Here's the latest from the movie site:


Tintin Movie Secret of the Unicorn Cast Update

Tintin Movie – More Added to Tintin and The Secret of the Unicorn Cast List

Well there have been some developments regarding the Tintin Movie – Tintin and the Secret of the Unicorn with some casting spots being confirmed. The source for most of this is IMDB whose Tintin movie page lists these actors as voices.

The reason being that the first Tintin movie to be directed by Steven Spielberg will be made using motion capture technology. The first few listed below have already been reported on letintinmovie.com but for a complete overview have been included again here.

Jamie Bell – Tintin

Daniel Craig – Red Rackham

Eric Stolz - Dr. Krospell (rumoured)

Andy Serkis – Captain Haddock

Simon Pegg – Inspector Thompson

Nick Frost – Inspector Thomson

The latest to be added to the cast list are as follows:-

Mackenzie Crook – Unattached (but confirmed on the project)

Toby Jones – Silk

Gad Elmaleh – Bem Salaad

Remember to keep up with the latest Tintin Movie news by coming back to letintinmovie.com.

Cheers!:)

cobalt60
08-04-2010, 11:05 PM
I bet I am going to love this :dance:

JolánGagó
08-05-2010, 12:42 PM
:rocker2:

Orka_n
08-05-2010, 04:16 PM
Tintin! :D

Ivanatis
08-05-2010, 11:59 PM
Craig is in it?:eek: Sounds interesting!

The_Nadal_effect
08-06-2010, 03:07 PM
Craig is in it?:eek: Sounds interesting!

I think he's an interesting choice. Especially after Depp settling into my subconscious as the only possible choice for Red Rackham. :lol:

In anycase, it would be entirely in motion capture, which means that the live actors are going to look like they really belong in the CG world.

Here's an interesting article from http://www.tintinology.poosk.com

This gives us fans of the legendary series a chance to see if the lead fits the role.


JAMIE BELL - TINTIN

Who is Jamie Bell and why is he playing Tintin?

Bell – A Beautiful Mover

Before being cast as Tintin, Jamie Bell was best known for his staring role in Billy Elliot. Bell was just 14 when he took the title role in this story of a working class boy who wants to be a ballet dancer. The film is set against the backdrop of a grim mining town during the bitter, year long miner’s strike of 1984 and was one of the best British films of the last ten years. It has since been adapted into a book and a smash West End stage play.

Jens3h3eXH0

Following such as huge hit is difficult for any actor, but for a child actor such success can destroy their career and their life. But between Billy Elliot and getting cast as Tintin, Jamie Bell went back to basics and built his career from the ground up. He played a role in the low budget, World War I horror film Deathwatch with his future Tintin co-star Andy Serkis (Captain Haddock). Bell then had a small role in the 2002 version of Nicholas Nickleby.

Jamie Bell and the Youthful Looks


His next film, Undertow, did much to make it clear that Jamie Bell could make the leap from child actor to adult actor. The 2004 film stars the 18 year Bell as a troubled teenager on the run from a murderous uncle. Through the film split the critics, the performance of Bell and his co-star Devon Alan won them Young Artist Awards from the Young Artist Foundation.

3kPzuYSFoQQ

There is no doubt that in winning the part of Tintin, Jamie Bell’s youth was significant. Having played one trouble teenager in Undertow, he played a similar role in Dear Wendy. This idiosyncratic film is about a group of gun-totting pacifist and was written by experimental film maker Lars von Trier. The Chumscrubber was Bell’s next film and once again he was playing a troubled teenager, though as a change of pace, this is a dark comedy. Here the focus is prescription medications, video games and the false ideal of middle class American suburbia

N4g2AVe6v-g

Serkis & Jackson

His next film brought him back together with Andy Serkis. Bell got the part of Jimmy in Peter Jackson’s King Kong. Though only a minor role, it was no doubt that it was directly responsible for the casting of Jamie Bell as Tintin. Working with Serkis, Jackson, motion capture and a massive budget provided a great learning experience for Bell and a chance to shine before Peter Jackson.

Finally breaking through into more adult roles in his next film (though for Jamie Bell, Tintin may be a step back in this regard) with Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood. Flags of Our Fathers traces the story of the men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima and were captured on film by war photographer Joe Rosenthal.


Then it was back to playing disturbed characters in low budget, UK films as Bell starred in the award winning Hallam Foe (Mr Foe in the US). Playing a part completely unlike the clean cut, asexual Tintin, Jamie Bell is the eponymous Hallam Foe. A voyeur with dark obsessions about his dead mother. The film won various awards and Bell was nominated for Best Actor in the British Independent Film Awards.

Another CGI, high budget film was next for Jamie Bell in Jumper. This was poorly received by the critics and was summed up by one reviewer as “A tightly made film that could have been so much better.

Jamie Bell – Dirty and Dangerous

Having played numerous troubled teenagers in various dark film, there was one more before Jamie Bell became Tintin, and this was the Mother of all dark subject matters – the holocaust. Just released in the UK, Defiance is the story of Jewish resistance fighters in Eastern Europe. The film placed Bell alongside Daniel Craig who is to play Red Rackham in The Secret of the Unicorn.
Tintin – Once, Twice, Three times?

Jamie Bell as Tintin is a great choice. He is an experienced film actor who can deliver great performances. Of special importance to motion capture films like The Secret of the Unicorn is the ability to move. Billy Elliot showed he has clear control of his body and in action films like Deathwatch, Jumpers and Defiance he has shown the right fighting dynamism to be Tintin. What will be interesting is what human qualities Bell will bring to Tintin. The comic book character is very flat and stereotyped, rarely displaying emotion except when angry at a bully or worried about Snowy. Getting the balance between making Tintin a living breathing character for the audience to empathise with and staying faithful to the books will be a difficult piece of acting.

If Jamie Bell pulls off Tintin, then at least one more film awaits. Peter Jackson is set to direct the second film and there is the possibility of a third. Though not confirmed, it seems likely that production of the second film will proceed soon after the first has finished. Probably adapting Red Rackham’s Treasure, the second part of the adventure started in The Secret of the Unicorn. If studios run to form, this will be released a year after the first. Production of the third film will only start if the first film proves to be a success.
Bell’s Big Chance

As Tintin, Jamie Bell has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Working with Spielberg with a huge budget and an internationally famous character could springboard Bell into Hollywood’s A-List. Becoming an action film hero and a sex symbol along the lines of Harrison Ford and Matt Damon is entirely possible. But that requires the film to be a smash and that is no easy thing to achieve, even when working with Spielberg and Jackson.


Some pictures I gathered to add more fuel to the fire:

The big boys with their toys:
http://www.cinemaemcena.com.br/filmes/2787/cinenews/tintin_01.jpg

http://newsinfilm.com/images/2009/04/tintin.jpg

http://www.chinuka.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/Jackson-y-Spielberg-with-Tintin.jpg

Does he look like Tintin?
http://gordonandthewhale.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/jamie-tintin.jpg

This guy below was the previous choice:
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTSiKODlWoPnpy45YfJozr_kbfNbMD4a RtutI5eiPQKE5HCOas&t=1&usg=__8miYsUc_JmGVVklDw74yWBVQILU=

Sometimes, I wish it was live action film, but perhaps the Tintin world won't be justified. Anyways, lets see how it goes ...

Echoes
08-08-2010, 12:10 PM
Young Herge was accused of racism and this book was banned.


In which country? Here there is controversy but the book is definitely not banned.

What raised the controversy are the pics in the middle here:

http://lewebpedagogique.com/reussirenhg/files/2007/12/extrait-tintin-au-congo-1.JPG

On the left:

Tintin: Come on, at work.
The Congolese: Me, tired.

On the right:

Tintin: Aren't you ashamed, leaving this dog do all the dirty job.
Snowy: Come on, pack of lazybones. At work !

I honestly find this controversy ridiculous. I would have understood if he had said "You, Congolese people, are lazybones" but here it's only that pack of people. Had it been white men, there wouldn't have been any problem. On the other hand Hergé admitted he knew nothing of Congo at that time and based his book on the paternalistic (not racist !!!) view that Belgian people had over Congolese people in the Colonial period. "They are kids, we have to educate them."


The Hollywood movie can do the comic good, I think. Since Hergé's death in 1983 the comic's sales have constantly gone down but in 1992/93 because that was the years the cartoons were released (my generation :p). And Tintin, nowadays, no longer appeal to young kids because of the old-school vocabulary (in French).

By the way there have already been two Tintin movies but I don't know if there exist English versions of them: Le mystère de la toison d'or and Les oranges bleues.

Ww34K_YlUTo


And I discovered during the Tour de France that Cadel Evans was a great Tintin fan. :haha:

The_Nadal_effect
08-08-2010, 03:11 PM
In which country? Here there is controversy but the book is definitely not banned.

What raised the controversy are the pics in the middle here:

http://lewebpedagogique.com/reussirenhg/files/2007/12/extrait-tintin-au-congo-1.JPG


Hey Echoes, nice to meet someone else who read more closely into the Tintin books.:)

This is the controversy I was talking of:


'Tintin Au Congo' book banned from Brooklyn libraries for depicting Africans as monkeys

BY Erin Durkin and Simone Weichselbaum
DAILY NEWS WRITERS

Brooklyn's chief librarian has yanked a nearly 80-year-old book from the shelves because it depicts Africans as monkeys.

Tintin Au Congo is the only book in the city library system hidden from public view after a reader complained that it was "racially offensive."

The popular Belgian children's work - due to be made into a movie by Steven Spielberg - is locked behind a series of hidden doors on the third floor of Brooklyn's central library.

"'Tintin au Congo' was relocated," said director Richard Reyes-Gavilan. It "had illustrations that were racially offensive and inappropriate for children."

The curious have to make an appointment to see the original Georges (Herge) Remi piece. The next available date was Monday morning, said a library official.

Donna Lieberman, head of the New York Civil Liberties Union, blasted librarians "for taking the easy way out" and not considering the "long term in engaging in censorship."

Marcus Ramirez, 26, agreed.

"It's art, it's an expression," said Ramirez, 26, a security guard from the Bronx, looking at a recent reprint of the 1930 cartoon from a Brussels newspaper. "Other people get offended? I don't see why.":devil:

Spielberg isn't offended either. The famed filmmaker will put Tintin on the big screen in 2011, highlighting the adventures of the young reporter who travels the world with his dog, Snowy.

Herge was a Belgian enthusiast who pushed a pro-colonial message, as Tintin taught dopey natives right from wrong during his travels to foreign lands.

Even Snowy the dog takes a shot at a young Congolese boy, telling Tintin the child "doesn't look very bright."

Library officials across the city said they've debated pulling about 25 books and DVDs from city shelves, including "Godless: The Church of Liberalism," by Ann Coulter, and a Harold Robbins novel, but rejected the requests.

Only "Tintin" was blacklisted in Brooklyn - and quietly yanked from the shelves in 2007.

"Racism is relevant," said Brooklynite Karina Estedan, 28, who agrees the book should be locked away. :rolleyes:

"The public library caters to the sensitivity of the community. People are trying to erase the mistakes of the past."



I honestly find this controversy ridiculous. I would have understood if he had said "You, Congolese people, are lazybones" but here it's only that pack of people. Had it been white men, there wouldn't have been any problem. On the other hand Hergé admitted he knew nothing of Congo at that time and based his book on the paternalistic (not racist !!!) view that Belgian people had over Congolese people in the Colonial period. "They are kids, we have to educate them."

I agree. But there's more here:


Congolese man wants Belgium to ban 'racist' Tintin Au Congo

A Congolese man is trying to get controversial cartoon book Tintin Au Congo banned in Belgium over its racist and offensive depiction of Africans.

Mbutu Bienvenu holds a placard that shows a scene from the book 'Tintin in the Congo' Photo: AP

Bienvenue Mbutu, a Congolese national living in Belgium, has asked the Belgian courts to ban the book, but has said he would accept a ruling that the book must display a warning about its content. Mr Mbutu has also tried to have the book banned in France.

"Tintin's little (black) helper is seen as stupid and without qualities. It makes people think that blacks have not evolved," :eek: he has been quoted as saying.

A court in Belgium, home to the book's author Hergé, is due to rule on the matter next week.

The book has attracted strong criticism for its crude racial stereotypes in recent years.

Three years ago the UK's Commission for Racial Equality called for the book to be banned, saying it contained imagery and words of hideous racial prejudice.

In the book, a black woman bows to Tintin and says: "White man very great. White mister is big juju man!"
Written in the late 1920s it was the second Tintin adventure created by Hergé, who later said it was a youthful sin which reflected the prejudices of the time.

Now UK editions are sold alongside adult books and bear a band of paper around the outside, warning the content is offensive.

It was a 'youthful sin' that reflected the prejudices of the times, as the author said. Lets not forget that Herge's original catholic publisher was a strong influence in his mental make up then.

The Hollywood movie can do the comic good, I think. Since Hergé's death in 1983 the comic's sales have constantly gone down but in 1992/93 because that was the years the cartoons were released (my generation :p).

I am only hoping that the makers of the movie don't mix up the demography they are addressing. The movie, I think will do well if its target audience remains Europe and Asia where Tintin is a household name. If they try to make America their prime target, or even indulge in that thought of creating a new following; there is a good chance that they'll screw big time, or worse, what we'll have would be anything but Tintin. We will see.

Speilberg actually has tough a job at hand this time!

And Tintin, nowadays, no longer appeal to young kids because of the old-school vocabulary (in French).

The following here in India is certainly better among the kids. Primarily because we are still largely conservative and Tintin's neutral sexuality goes down well with the parents too. He never had a girlfriend :help: I can imagine how primitive the books might be for a country as liberal as France, though.

By the way there have already been two Tintin movies but I don't know if there exist English versions of them: Le mystère de la toison d'or and Les oranges bleues.

Ww34K_YlUTo


And I discovered during the Tour de France that Cadel Evans was a great Tintin fan. :haha:

:lol: Hey, I am familiar with the Tintin movies you've mentioned. I haven't seen them but I believe neither successfully got the rhythm of the series. Were they well received on release?

Castafiore
08-08-2010, 04:23 PM
The "Tintin in Africa" books were drawn and written in a particular time frame when these views on "Africans" were common. Those views are now wrong obviously but it's how many back then thought so they were not seen as offensive in that time. I agree with Echoes that the entire controversy is ridiculous and if you read enough about Hergé himself and his other comic books, it's ludicrous to accuse him of racism. Time simply caught up with those books.

Those books should still be sold but perhaps with a couple of paragraphs added to explain that "time frame" and to warn that some of it can now be seen as offensive.

However, it's never been my favorite tintin book at all. On the contrary. I need captain Haddock around.

As Echoes said, Hergé himself admitted that he drew/wrote about Africa (and Tintin in America) based on clichés without doing proper research. After those two, he decided to either invent countries for his other books or he simply did more research to get things as correctly as possible.


I'm very much looking forward to the movies.

Castafiore
08-08-2010, 04:34 PM
The following here in India is certainly better among the kids. Primarily because we are still largely conservative and Tintin's neutral sexuality goes down well with the parents too. He never had a girlfriend :help:
In that time, a lot of the comic books (at least in our area) had few women/girls in it.

Hergé himself (I went to the Hergé museum in Belgium this week, I highly recommend this place to every Hergé/Tintin fan) and there were soundbites from Hergé and you could listen to him explain why he had so few women in his work.
Hergé said that he likes to put his characters in funny situations, sometimes make fun of them, put them in slightly embarrassing situations and Hergé added that he doesn't want to make fun of women so he stuck with men mostly.

It's another time frame thing, I guess.

Echoes
08-09-2010, 01:24 PM
:lol: Hey, I am familiar with the Tintin movies you've mentioned. I haven't seen them but I believe neither successfully got the rhythm of the series. Were they well received on release?

Nah, you're right. Neither of them. I guess it was hard for the audience to identify with the characters being real people. Tintin's face is rond. Nobody has a rond face. So Hergé had a hard time casting the actors. However Jean-Pierre Talbot who was chosen for Tintin was proud because did not say "I choose him" but "It's him !". No wonder Spielberg's actor doesn't resemble him either.

So you're Indian? I think the Indian part of the Cigars of the Pharaoh is one of Hergé's best. I think that's where it all begins, actually. But my fave remains The Red Sea Sharks. :worship:


About girls in the series, it should be reminded that Tintin was primarily meant to be a comics for the scouts, so an all-male youth movement. And the stories had their own rather rapid rhythm. He's constantly on the move. So no doubt a love story would slow down the rhythm.

But for sure, most of the French I know prefer Asterix. :lol:

SloKid
08-09-2010, 01:32 PM
In that time, a lot of the comic books (at least in our area) had few women/girls in it.

Hergé himself (I went to the Hergé museum in Belgium this week, I highly recommend this place to every Hergé/Tintin fan) and there were soundbites from Hergé and you could listen to him explain why he had so few women in his work.
Hergé said that he likes to put his characters in funny situations, sometimes make fun of them, put them in slightly embarrassing situations and Hergé added that he doesn't want to make fun of women so he stuck with men mostly.

It's another time frame thing, I guess.
Where is the Herge museum?

I sadly discovered last week that the Tintin store in Brugge is now empty. But tons of stuff to buy at the airports. :lol:

Castafiore
08-09-2010, 01:56 PM
Where is the Herge museum?
In Louvain-La-Neuve (not far from Brussels).

http://karmatrendz.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/the_herge_museum_01.jpg

I sadly discovered last week that the Tintin store in Brugge is now empty.
Yup, only discovered that two weeks ago myself. :sad:
They need to take their website down.

Castafiore
08-09-2010, 02:02 PM
About girls in the series, it should be reminded that Tintin was primarily meant to be a comics for the scouts, so an all-male youth movement. And the stories had their own rather rapid rhythm. He's constantly on the move. So no doubt a love story would slow down the rhythm.
That's "Totor", Hergé's first real comic book about a young boy scout but Totor has a striking resemblance to Tintin so the guess is - again, according to info from that museum - that Tintin was born out of Totor, his predecessor.

http://lambiek.net/artists/h/herge/herge_totor.gif

The_Nadal_effect
08-09-2010, 02:40 PM
The "Tintin in Africa" books were drawn and written in a particular time frame when these views on "Africans" were common. Those views are now wrong obviously but it's how many back then thought so they were not seen as offensive in that time. I agree with Echoes that the entire controversy is ridiculous and if you read enough about Hergé himself and his other comic books, it's ludicrous to accuse him of racism. Time simply caught up with those books.

Those books should still be sold but perhaps with a couple of paragraphs added to explain that "time frame" and to warn that some of it can now be seen as offensive.

I agree. These are classics and as an afficionado, I wan't the whole series that shows his evolution as an artist. The curious thing about this Congo book though is that Herge reworked the art in it, which he didn't for the previous book, 'In the land of the Soviets'.


However, it's never been my favorite tintin book at all. On the contrary. I need captain Haddock around.

Me too. :devil:
But there are occasions when the illustration is so good, I don't mind his absence. I'm talking 'The Black Island' and the Blue Lotus, for instance.

As Echoes said, Hergé himself admitted that he drew/wrote about Africa (and Tintin in America) based on clichés without doing proper research. After those two, he decided to either invent countries for his other books or he simply did more research to get things as correctly as possible.


Al Capone's cameo! :lol:


I'm very much looking forward to the movies.

...with fingers crossed.:angel:

Castafiore
08-09-2010, 02:47 PM
But there are occasions when the illustration is so good, I don't mind his absence. I'm talking 'The Black Island' and the Blue Lotus, for instance.
Oh, I agree with you on that. The Blue Lotus is fantastic for the art work alone.

The_Nadal_effect
08-09-2010, 04:20 PM
So you're Indian? I think the Indian part of the Cigars of the Pharaoh is one of Hergé's best. I think that's where it all begins, actually. But my fave remains The Red Sea Sharks. :worship:

Thats right! I am an Indian. I love that you mentioned 'Cigars' but I think that an even better political outlook towards india was shown in 'Tintin in Tibet', where at the beginning, Captain Haddock confronts a cow in the middle of the road! :haha:
That is true till date!

The Red Sea sharks is his mightiest work as far as plotting, reality, political view, myth and technical art is concerned (though Flight 714 can compare in the technical art bit). All these work together very well, and Abdullah is unforgettable though I liked him more in Land of black gold.

What I liked best were the scenes from Petra that Speilberg later incorporated into his Indiana Jones' Last Crusade. Can you believe it, he was actually interested in Tintin since then?

But for sure, most of the French I know prefer Asterix. :lol:

I'm still not sure why Tintin and Asterix are compared all the time. Tintin is fiction based in an unfolding reality, Asterix is simply purely fiction distorting history. Besides Herge pioneered the graphic novel and Asterix came bit later.

About girls in the series, it should be reminded that Tintin was primarily meant to be a comics for the scouts, so an all-male youth movement. And the stories had their own rather rapid rhythm. He's constantly on the move. So no doubt a love story would slow down the rhythm.
Arguable because the Castafiore emerald has a slow rhythm. Bond movies, for instance did incorporate damsels in distress in the plot.... and ...
In that time, a lot of the comic books (at least in our area) had few women/girls in it.

Hergé himself (I went to the Hergé museum in Belgium this week, I highly recommend this place to every Hergé/Tintin fan) and there were soundbites from Hergé and you could listen to him explain why he had so few women in his work.
Hergé said that he likes to put his characters in funny situations, sometimes make fun of them, put them in slightly embarrassing situations and Hergé added that he doesn't want to make fun of women so he stuck with men mostly.

It's another time frame thing, I guess.

Hey Castafiore, its great to find you in a thread you belong to!:singer: Aaaah my ....

Now coming back to the subject of Tintin's sexuality, there have been several views on it as the author gave none; and dare I say it, enough interesting pop art, some of which I have put up here:

http://jeffreyhill.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341d417153ef010536b67d5f970b-800wi

http://www.netlexfrance.net/images/2009/mariagedetintin.jpg

http://img.over-blog.com/436x600/0/35/41/52/03/tintin-was-gay.jpg

http://www.richard3.com/photos/tintin.jpg

Other comic books from that period - Asterix for instance where girls were part and parcel of the comic narrative (beginning with the Chief's wife: Impedimenta!)- have used girls successfully even in romance angles. In American comics, of course, we don't need to contemplate the many ways they've incorporated female characters. Why the 'girlfriend' angle matters more to people these days is obvious because of the more confirming attitude to sexuality: 'If you have no girlfriend, you must be gay!' Interestingly, in his last, unfinished book, 'The Alpha-Art', Herge has created a young female character, who, we can only conjecture, is Tintin's love affair. Why he did that is debatable, considering the other 24 graphic novels have revealed nothing in that direction. Was he getting concerned, as with the global popularity of his books, defining Tintin's sexual orientations was getting important?
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ1wMqe0O8suOCjuGEgmuEx2UOoZTI84 pw1Hajqyf5MGhk2Hg4&t=1&usg=__P_e6dFZPA0i5J65bzEpRx8E_hI4=

This article was an interesting allegation when it came out some time back:


Of course Tintin's gay. Ask Snowy
By Matthew Parris
for The Times, January 2009

His adventures have sold more than 200 million copies and been translated into 50 languages, and this weekend he celebrates his 80th birthday. But how well do we really know Tintin? One thing's for certain...


Billions of blue blistering barnacles, isn't it staring us in the face? Sometimes a thing's so obvious it's hard to see where the debate could start. What debate can there be when the evidence is so overwhelmingly one-way? A callow, androgynous blonde-quiffed youth in funny trousers and a scarf moving into the country mansion of his best friend, a middle-aged sailor? A sweet-faced lad devoted to a fluffy white toy terrier, whose other closest pals are an inseparable couple of detectives in bowler hats, and whose only serious female friend is an opera diva...

. . . And you're telling me Tintin isn't gay?

And Liberace was a red-blooded heterosexual. And Peter M... oops - steer clear - burnt fingers once there already. But really, what next? Lawrence of Arabia a ladies' man? Richard the Lionheart straight? And I suppose the Village People were a band of off-duty police officers, YMCA was a song about youth-hostelling, and Noddy and Big Ears are just good friends.

But I'd better make the case because, astonishingly (and though when I googled “Tintin” and “gay” I got 526,000 references), there are still Tintin aficionados who remain in denial about this.
Times Archive, 1983: Tintin in 'racist' trouble

Complaints have been made by librarians about Herge's use of highly offensive stereotypes

Last year, as part of my BBC radio Great Lives series, my guest, the international photojournalist Nick Danziger (who had nominated the life of Tintin), and my expert Tintinologist, Michael Farr (author of Tintin: The Complete Companion and numerous other Tintin-related works), stunned me by not only denying hotly that their hero could have been gay, but even insisting that the thought had never occurred to them. Don't you find, though, that it's often the people closest to someone who never tumble to it?

The argument I set out was straightforward. These are the facts: what we know of Tintin's life:

Background and origins: A total mystery. Tintin never talks about his parents or family, as though trying to block out the very existence of a father or mother. As psychologists will confirm, this is common among young gay men, some of whom find it hard to believe that they really are their parents' child. The “changeling” syndrome is a well-known gay fantasy.

Other sources on background: His Belgian creator, Hergé, whose only and enigmatic reference to Tintin's origins was to describe him as having recently come out of the Boy Scouts.

Early career: On January 10, 1929, Tintin first appears, spreading Catholic propaganda in the church newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle, where in his comic strip he visits Russia (Tintin in the Land of the Soviets) to describe the horrors of Bolshevism. Early entanglements with High Church religion are, I fear, all too common among young gay men.

His journalism: Claiming to be a journalist, Tintin's only recorded remark to his editor (on departing for Moscow) is “I'll send you some postcards and vodka and caviar”. For a cub reporter on his first assignment, a curious remark.

Subsequent career: Appearing sometimes as a reporter and sometimes as a detective journalist, Tintin's baffling failure to show any evidence of dispatching copy to a newspaper (except once) or any sense of deadlines in his life has always puzzled his fans. It is possible to dismiss him as a mere dilettante but more likely that he was some kind of spy. As the remotest acquaintance with (for instance) British espionage will confirm, secret intelligence has always attracted gay men. :eek:I myself applied for and was offered a post in MI6.

Domestic circumstances: Tintin does not, in fact, move in with his sailor-friend, Captain Haddock, until 1940 (The Crab With The Golden Claws). As is so often the case with male homosexual couples, a veil is drawn over how and where the couple met, but Tintin and his mincing toy dog Snowy are invited to share Haddock's country home, Marlinspike Hall. The relationship, however, is plainly two-way, for although when Haddock first meets Tintin (before the sea captain's retirement) he is drinking heavily and emotionally unstable, he is calmed over the years, settles down and is finally ennobled by his younger friend's companionship when, in Tintin in Tibet, he offers to lay down his life for him.

Other friends: Almost all male - as are their friends in turn. Indeed, only Professor Calculus displays any attraction (though frequently confused) towards the opposite sex. However, he never marries.

Thomson and Thompson: Tintin first meets the flamboyantly moustachioed couple on a cruise in 1932 (Cigars of the Pharaoh), learning to distinguish between them by their different moustaches. The Thomson and Thompson life is a fancy-dress party: the pair love dressing up in exotic costumes and are once mobbed in the street for their Chinese opera costumes (The Blue Lotus). On other occasions they are seen (often with their signature bowlers still on) in striped swimming costumes, and a variety of folkloric garbs, always absurdly over-the-top. There is no evidence that either has ever had an eye for women, let alone a girlfriend.

Rastapopoulos: Even Tintin's evil arch-enemy, a cigar-smoking movie impresario and drug dealer (alias: Marquis di Gorgonzola) who is first encountered at a banquet in Chicago (Tintin in America), is never given the blonde on his arm or villain's moll that one would expect. He remains solitary.:smoke:

Snowy: The only unambiguously heterosexual male mammal in Tintin's entire universe. We know that because of Snowy's tendency to be distracted by lady dogs: a tendency in which he is consistently foiled by his master and by Hergé's plot. Pity this dog, wretchedly straight and trapped in a ghastly web of gay human males.

Bianca Castafiore: “The Milanese nightingale” is the only strong recurring female character in Tintin's life, and his only identifiable female friend. A fag-hag if ever there was one.:devil: With her plump neck and beauty spot, this vain, self-dramatising diva with an ear-splitting voice is genuinely fond of Tintin. Significantly, Bianca refuses to remember Captain Haddock's name, calling him variously Maggot, Hammock and Havoc. Equally significantly, Haddock detests the very sight of her. Perhaps most significantly of all, Tintin's creator, Hergé, hated opera.

Peggy Alcazar: So apart from a diva fag-hag, the only other remotely significant woman in Tintin's life is a curler-wearing virago. Peggy Alcazar, the butch, bitchy, bullying, cigar-smoking, hard-drinking, flame-haired wife of General Alcazar, may well have been lesbian.

Supporting cast: In fact I can count only eight figures identifiable as women (about 2 per cent) from the complete list of some 350 characters among whom Tintin moves in his life. There are no young women at all, and no attractive women, in any of his adventures.

Oh please, what more could Hergé do to flag up the subtext? Well, you say, how about a real affair of the heart, a proper gay relationship, rather than a convenient domestic arrangement with an old sailor?

Step forward Chang Chong-Cheng, the Chinese boy whom Tintin meets in The Blue Lotus when he rescues him from drowning, who later appears in his dreams, and for whom he is prepared to lay down his life, and finally rescues, in Tintin in Tibet. In this story Tintin hears of a plane crash and dreams that his friend Chang was on board but has survived. He sets out on an odyssey to Asia to find him.

Only three times in his life is Tintin seen to cry: most affectingly when he is temporarily persuaded that his friend Chang has died. But Chang is alive, as Tintin suspects when he finds Chang's teddy bear mislaid in the snow. Chang has been trapped by the Abominable Snowman. Tintin rescues him. This, written after Hergé had had a nervous breakdown and split from his wife, and the story of which he was most proud, completes a change in Tintin's outlook which begins in The Blue Lotus. Over time Tintin's attitude alters from that of a Belgian chauvinist and narrow-minded young Catholic adventure-seeker to being a tolerant, almost peace-loving, teddy-bear-hugging seeker after truth. :o In The Blue Lotus he sympathises with the lonely Yeti, now deprived of Chang's (enforced) company, and even refuses to call the Snowman abominable. Tintin has seen the folly of prejudice. In Hergé's last (unfinished) story, Tintin and Alph-Art, the youth is even seen as a motorbiking peacenik, wearing a CND badge on his helmet.

The time-sweep of these stories, 1929 to 1983, may have altered Tintin's attitudes but never his appearance. He remains about 16 throughout. But then, as we all know, gay men don't age as others do. :rolleyes:

We'll never know. Tell yourself, if you like, that it was just that Tintin hasn't yet met the right girl. Or maybe that it's only a stage he's going through. But if you expect a Belgian Catholic born in 1907 to have unmasked the hero of his blockbuster series of comic adventures as an out-gay activist and homosexual icon, you expect too much. Hergé was no Andy Warhol (Hergé's great admirer). But Snowy saw everything; Snowy knows all. And Snowy never tells.:lol:

- - - -

Could it be true? (writes Hugo Rifkind)

Were Asterix and Obelix also gay?

Almost certainly not. True, the formidable Gallic warriors spent an awful lot of time together - and true, Obelix did seem to sleep over at Asterix's house quite a lot, despite having a nearby house of his own. Nonetheless, they each had frequent and intense crushes on various long-limbed beauties (Asterix principally with Panacea; Obelix with Mrs Geriatrix) and in one later work (see Asterix and the Class Act), Obelix is also revealed to have eventually sired a long line of warriors.

Was Dylan on drugs?

Probably. There was surely an unspoken pusher/addict dimension to the relationship between Florence and Dougal vis-à-vis the provision of sugar lumps, but Dylan, unquestionably, was the real stoner in The Magic Roundabout. He was a hippy rabbit, he was always far too out of it to understand anything, and he played the guitar. And, well, he was called Dylan. In 1965. Carrots, indeed.

Was George from the Famous Five a lesbian?

Tricky. As one of the two girls in the Famous Five stories, George wore boy's clothes, had boy's hair and wandered around saying “I want to be a boy”. Still, any sort of subsequent homosexual or transgender adulthood seems unlikely. For one thing, in the 2008 television series Famous 5: On the Case the adult George is happily married to a car mechanic called Ravi. For another, this is Enid Blyton we are talking about, and she was about as socially progressive as Bernard Manning.

Was Aslan a white supremacist?

Totally. Or at least, C.S. Lewis was. Throughout the Chronicles of Narnia Aslan's avowed enemies are the Calormemes of Calormen, a country that is in the desert and full of people who wear turbans, baggy trousers and pointy shoes. They have arranged marriages, put the symbol of the crescent on their money, fight with scimitars and, in The Last Battle, are referred to as “darkies”. Let's face it, they're not from Norway, are they?

Was there anything dodgy about Captain Pugwash?

Absolutely not, aside from the way that it put a rather favourable gloss on the whole “pirate” thing. In fact, at the beginning of the 1990s, the creator of Captain Pugwash, John Ryan, successfully sued two newspapers that had fallen for the urban myth that there was. In truth there was no Master Bates, no Seaman Staines, and the cabin boy was called Tom. There was a character called Pirate Willy, mind, but that was probably an oversight.


Also, this article here which is in Spanish (I think):
http://diway.over-blog.com/article-22908454.html
I wonder what it says though:confused:

Ivanatis
08-09-2010, 04:54 PM
I honestly find this controversy ridiculous. I would have understood if he had said "You, Congolese people, are lazybones" but here it's only that pack of people. Had it been white men, there wouldn't have been any problem. On the other hand Hergé admitted he knew nothing of Congo at that time and based his book on the paternalistic (not racist !!!) view that Belgian people had over Congolese people in the Colonial period. "They are kids, we have to educate them."


Right what I think. Times were different. Criteria what's racist and what isn't were way different back then. Just like Disney who published some short films in the 30s and 40s which would receive really harsh criticism for those today (and I'm not referring to war propaganda films like Blitz Wolf).

Echoes
08-13-2010, 03:38 PM
Also people don't often realise that Tintin in Africa was meant to be a humoristic book. His later work was not written strictly for humor. As Castafiore said, he made more research.

The Land of Black Gold however is as funny as hell. I still remember the Thom(p)son circling round in the desert not realising they were guided by their own traces. And the oil jerrycan !! "Oh we've also lost our jerrycan. Let's go back and fetch it". Awesome. :lol:

Hasn't Spielberg met Hergé, himself, shortly before his death? He'd learnt about Tintin just before when he read an article in a magazine that compared Indy to Tintin. :wavey:

Kolya
08-14-2010, 10:56 AM
Daniel Craig... interesting.

The_Nadal_effect
08-28-2010, 07:29 PM
Just found this on youtube
2O2elQVYta0

These guys sound so businesslike, I wonder if they will be able to pull it off. Nonetheless, their video is funny; and not to forget they had to wait for a while before Tintin could happen - only about 35 years!

Initially, I had some doubts about how realistic the look of the mo-cap movie will be. This video that talks about how realistic emotions can work out better in motion capture than animation. Some mo-cap lessons for the uninitiated:

1wK1Ixr-UmM

The_Nadal_effect
10-30-2010, 07:58 PM
A couple of funny interviews from the cast of Tintin:

sOh08MTTKzk

Cute!

But what's with Simon's comment that Thomson twins aren't fraternal brothers? I've assumed that since childhood as has anyone else I know....

8o4ARrB6ad8

:lol: This guy's hilarious!

cobalt60
10-30-2010, 10:50 PM
Need to refamiliarize myself with the comics before seeing this movie:yeah:

The_Nadal_effect
11-03-2010, 09:26 PM
Need to refamiliarize myself with the comics before seeing this movie:yeah:

And your hubby should too. ;)

Keep an eye on this thread, doc; got some interesting things lined up.:devil:

The_Nadal_effect
11-03-2010, 09:30 PM
Also people don't often realise that Tintin in Africa was meant to be a humoristic book. His later work was not written strictly for humor. As Castafiore said, he made more research.

The Land of Black Gold however is as funny as hell. I still remember the Thom(p)son circling round in the desert not realising they were guided by their own traces. And the oil jerrycan !! "Oh we've also lost our jerrycan. Let's go back and fetch it". Awesome. :lol:

Hasn't Spielberg met Hergé, himself, shortly before his death? He'd learnt about Tintin just before when he read an article in a magazine that compared Indy to Tintin. :wavey:

Hey, how come I missed this post last time around. :confused:

I went nuts over that scene you mentioned from Land of Black Gold. :haha: And I was an adult when I read that book

As for Spielberg meeting Herge; that is news to me too. :wavey:

BigJohn
11-03-2010, 09:32 PM
Pics here

http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=29355

The_Nadal_effect
11-04-2010, 09:57 PM
First peep, everyone (Thanks BJ):

http://www.empireonline.com/images/cover/large/2581.jpg
http://www.empireonline.com/images/image_index/hw800/45763.jpg
http://www.empireonline.com/images/image_index/hw800/45762.jpg

Snowy!!!!:eek:

Tintin :help:

Haddock Close Up :woohoo:

I take home hope from the fact that I haven't seen these images move as yet. I am sure many other fans do as well. Evidently, these are scenes in the making; the rendering of the water against the boat and Captain's artificial arms justify that!

Courage, guys!:cool:
Its not there as yet; there's work to be done but they've still got a year left before the release! Lets hope Hollywood doesn't screw it up big time.

The_Nadal_effect
11-04-2010, 10:06 PM
As per IMDB, the movie is slated for release on the 28th December 2011.
:wavey:

Chair Umpire
11-14-2010, 06:40 PM
Those captions looks amazing.

The_Nadal_effect
12-23-2010, 09:24 AM
Those captions looks amazing.

I like these new images even better.:)
the lighting looks good. The first ones were sort of :help:


http://sydhit.com/wp-content/uploads//Tin-Tin-Brothers-500x228.jpg

http://maxcdn.fooyoh.com/files/attach/images/1068/790/495/005/tt2.jpg

http://sydhit.com/wp-content/uploads//Tin-Tin-Desert-472x500.jpg

By the way, we're just 365 days away. So fellow fans, please watch out for this space in a bit. I'm doing a year-ending pirated album cover tribute for Herge!:D

The_Nadal_effect
12-27-2010, 01:04 PM
Here's celebrating the lingering spirit of always wanting more adventures of Tintin. As fans, we're never satisfied till he's driven to the nether corners of the galaxy, or trapped inside a mirror. So here, I have some great pirated artwork from die-hard fans often bordering on the psychedelic. Enjoy, and see you next year with movie trailers and more art tributes!

Ciao-nara!:wavey:

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1154880421.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1154880769.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1155553733.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1217241829.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1215108517.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1154978916.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_wL-5bnm3pSM/TD1zKUUiOkI/AAAAAAAABC8/i77Sb6eJ3ZU/s1600/7+crystal+balls.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1165012234.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1198438456.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1176228086.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1159097456.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1206313088.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1159553638.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1203794406.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/photos/adesso.blogspace.fr/images/gd/1225873611/LA-PAIX-DES-BRAVES-ANDRE-JUILLARD.jpg

http://static.blogstorage.hi-pi.com/blogspace.fr/a/ad/adesso/images/gd/1172790216.jpg

Orka_n
05-17-2011, 06:43 PM
Teaser trailer is out:
ddiKjC_4BOo

Looks pretty promising. :banana:

cobalt60
05-22-2011, 05:12 AM
I can't wait.

The_Nadal_effect
09-17-2011, 08:53 PM
Really impressed this time around:

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.28.24-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.28.44-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.28.55-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.28.59-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.01-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.03-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.06-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.08-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.10-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.15-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.17-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.20-AM.png

The_Nadal_effect
09-17-2011, 09:00 PM
http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.31-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.39-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.43-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.46-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.49-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.52-AM.png

http://tintinology.poosk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Screen-shot-2011-09-17-at-9.29.55-AM.png


Allan is spot on! This is how he'd look if he were brought to flesh. As is Captain Haddock now. You can see the slightly unshaven look in the Thompson Twins (inspiration for a band by a similar name, I read!). The parchment is WOW. But crucially, Red Rackham (Craig)'s looks have not been revealed.

:yeah: Only three months to go! Time to keep this thread alive and kicking!

The_Nadal_effect
10-17-2011, 07:10 PM
First Review out! Not much love from the Guardian critic but the fans seem optimistic after the preview. Movie releases in December. Read it here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2011/oct/16/tintin-adventures-secret-of-unicorn

SloKid
10-17-2011, 07:24 PM
First Review out! Not much love from the Guardian critic but the fans seem optimistic after the preview. Movie releases in December. Read it here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2011/oct/16/tintin-adventures-secret-of-unicorn
I wouldn't put much weight to what Xan Brooks says, he comes off as a bit of a twat quite often in his reviews. :lol:

Castafiore
10-18-2011, 09:20 AM
First Review out! Not much love from the Guardian critic but the fans seem optimistic after the preview. Movie releases in December. Read it here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2011/oct/16/tintin-adventures-secret-of-unicorn
It's most certainly not the first review.

The first reviews were from the Belgian press (= from Hergé's home country) because they got to see it first and those reviews were good.
Blistering Barnacles: Spielberg travels to the land of Tintin and wins over a nation (http://www.newser.com/article/d9qbg27g1/blistering-barnacles-spielberg-travels-to-land-of-tintin-and-wins-over-a-nation.html)


New trailer:
op3w_ICK4us

King Midas
10-18-2011, 12:54 PM
they should of shot this with real actors

SloKid
10-18-2011, 01:11 PM
they should of shot this with real actors
Technically they did.

The_Nadal_effect
10-18-2011, 07:00 PM
It's most certainly not the first review.

The first reviews were from the Belgian press (= from Hergé's home country) because they got to see it first and those reviews were good.
Blistering Barnacles: Spielberg travels to the land of Tintin and wins over a nation (http://www.newser.com/article/d9qbg27g1/blistering-barnacles-spielberg-travels-to-land-of-tintin-and-wins-over-a-nation.html)


Thanks for the article, Castafiore. I like this part though:

"Bull's eye," headlined the Dutch-speaking De Standaard newspaper. "A pure jewel" the Francophone Le Soir had on its front page, showing that the ever-bickering linguistic groups in this culturally divided nation had found a rare issue on which they could agree.
:lol:

I wouldn't put much weight to what Xan Brooks says, he comes off as a bit of a twat quite often in his reviews. :lol:

Yeah, a lot of Guardian readers said the same thing

SloKid
10-19-2011, 10:21 AM
Another Guardian article on the movie:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2011/oct/18/how-could-do-this-tintin :o :facepalm: :rolleyes: What an exaggeration.

Castafiore
10-19-2011, 01:05 PM
It's so utterly over the top, that review. Comic book devotees are just about the hardest crowd to please, though.

Each time one of the classic comic book, regardless of its origin, gets made into a movie, you get a whole group screaming bloody murder. :o

I'm going to watch the movie next week, if things go well. I don't expect the movie experience to match Hergé's magic on paper but I do have faith in the Spielberg/Jackson/Moffat combo. (not forgetting the film score by John Williams, another legend)

The last trailer (the one I posted here) had a LOT of action in it which looks great but I do hope that the storyline is solid (instead of jumping from gag to gag).

The Adventures of Tintin: the secret of the unicorn --> soundtrack clips (http://www.jwfan.com/?p=446)

The_Nadal_effect
10-19-2011, 09:13 PM
Thanks for the article, Slokid. I actually enjoyed the author's fanboyism, but yeah, he was way over the top about some things.

Hey Castafiore: Please don't forget to post your opinion here after watching the movie next week (lucky you! We have to wait till Nov end).

As things are heating up, I thought it might be a good idea to put up some of the great artwork other artists put up as tribute to Tintin. One (con?)artist everyday till we fans have watched the movie and know who was more inspired from the series, these comic artists or the Hollywood Brigade!

I'll start with Yves Rodier's work here:

http://img43.imageshack.us/img43/4661/15915059.jpg

http://img43.imageshack.us/img43/5129/52168521.jpg

Fans can read the whole comic here; if you scroll downwards this forum:

http://www.bdgest.com/forum/ou-telecharger-des-pastiches-de-qualite-de-tintin-t14835-20.html

Some of his older album covers. I believe he drew up the whole of 'alpha-art' (Herge's last and unfinished Tintin) at the age of 15:
http://img29.xooimage.com/files/a/9/d/secret_mail-1873af6.jpg

http://27.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_llcw73p2gi1qk0jbeo1_500.jpg

This is a minor gem (Tintin on the Red Planet):

http://perlbal.hi-pi.com/blog-images/123467/gd/1183131651.jpg

Certinfy
10-19-2011, 09:21 PM
Just saw the trailer when at the cinema today and I have to say it absolutely blew me away, looks beyond stunning. :eek:

The Magician
10-20-2011, 12:34 AM
4mYNR2haNyU

Unless it's exactly like this I won't be watching it :p

The_Nadal_effect
10-20-2011, 06:44 PM
4mYNR2haNyU

Unless it's exactly like this I won't be watching it :p

I am quite stunned by the success of the TV series because it just doesn't match up to the aesthetics, vibrancy or details of the comic book - even the animation is all wrong, any artist would tell you. The movie would fare better there.

The_Nadal_effect
10-20-2011, 07:38 PM
The featured artist for the day is Enki Bilal, the amazing Serbian filmmaker and graphic novelist. He directed the movie based on his comic trilogy 'Immortal'. Couple of his tributes:

For Bilal, Tintin is always wounded, injured or underground. Because that's how he perceives nobility in the 21st century:
http://www.illustrationartgallery.com/acatalog/BilalTintin.jpg

What I like best about this image is this is how Bilal sees Tintin. As we can see, Tintin generously cuts off his own ear to put it on the Fetish. :yeah:

http://www.sterilisation-hopital.com/public/humour/.Tintin_Bilal_m.jpg

The_Nadal_effect
10-21-2011, 07:11 PM
Today's featured artist is the brilliant Polish comic creator Grzegorz Rosinski (of 'Thorgal' fame). Here, we can see his tribute to Herge's Prisoners of the Sun, sketched in 1981. Herge's original frames in their 'ligne claire' style are below his drawings. BTW, 'Prisoners of the Sun' is up next after 'The Secrets of the Unicorn' in the movies.

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/5002/rosinstintinpl1bloguu6.jpg

http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/9739/rosinstintinpl3blogtk9.jpg

The_Nadal_effect
10-23-2011, 07:36 PM
Like many other fans - and Moulinsart - I was initially offended by Ole Ahlberg's portrayals of Tintin. His dark and seductive tributes felt way over the top considering how Tintin has no love interest in the series, but in retrospect, I feel Ahlberg tries to reclaim the sexual territory and with his erotic paintings finally put a cap on Tintin's sexual orientation. Here are some of his surreal tributes:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ucsME-AsFQU/Sn3PF85jmOI/AAAAAAAABww/ilJMdCP3qzk/s800/Ole+Ahlberg++4.jpg

http://theartistandhismodel.com/images/Ole%20Ahlberg%20-%20balance.jpg

http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/Ole%20Alhlberg%20Tintin.jpg

http://www.interartny.com/images/Ahlberg/Ole-04.jpg

http://www.galeriewolfsen.dk/images/kunstmagasin/ole_ahlberg/ole-ahlberg_profil-foto.jpg

http://www.galeriewolfsen.dk/images/grafisk_vaerksted/seneste_udgivelser/ahlberg_grafikklub_275px.jpg

http://www.internationalauctioneers.com/lot/image/8/811/2796225.jpg

http://oleahlberg.dk/images/slideshow/34.jpg

http://www.gerly.dk/Pics_Ole%20Ahlberg/weight.jpg

http://www.gerly.dk/Pics_Ole%20Ahlberg/frise.jpg

http://www.gerly.dk/Pics_Ole%20Ahlberg/vision.jpg

The_Nadal_effect
10-24-2011, 07:05 PM
Today's featured artist is Harry Edwood, one of the most prolific Tintin pirates if any. Like Rodier, he came very close to mimicking Herge's drawings.

http://tintinpirates.free.fr/Harry_Biarritz.jpg

http://images-00.delcampe-static.net/img_large/auction/000/124/720/757_001.jpg

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_yc6Q90xZ6uQ/SSs2fPO-bQI/AAAAAAAAD3I/Bc1BuB0BlBM/s400/tintp1.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_fFjLauwyxIk/TVGhBe1gPJI/AAAAAAAAAVo/j2yeo0iV4Ak/s1600/heros.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_fFjLauwyxIk/TVGhZ_WHWQI/AAAAAAAAAV4/DxRMn4UCRHk/s1600/lampion-au-luxembourg.jpg

http://www.naufrageur.com/articles/harry/elfes1.jpg

Here, fans yearning for more Tintin can find Edwood's complete comic on 'Le Elfs de Moulinsart' at the following link:
http://www.naufrageur.com/a-harry.htm

cobalt60
10-24-2011, 07:15 PM
Thanks for posting all this stuff- absolutely wonderful!
Can't wait for the movie!

The_Nadal_effect
10-25-2011, 07:31 PM
Thank you for your kind words, Doctor Sue!:D

POP ARTIST TRIBUTES today!

First up, Andy Warhol's personal tribute to Herge. Apparently, he was inspired by Herge's clear outline style. There's a nice interesting piece by a journo I've put under the tribute where she explains the connection between the artists:

http://www.paulgravett.com/articles/091_herge100/warhol_tintin_small.jpg
http://s3.amazonaws.com/twitpic/photos/large/366060968.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJF3XCCKACR3QDMOA&Expires=1319566801&Signature=ZJ5cwWZBjKfefFoGNXezLNVr2YY%3D

http://www.thecultureconcept.com/circle/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Herg%C3%A9-with-Warhol.jpg

Iconic American artist Andy Warhol was quoted in 1999 as saying ‘Hergé has influenced my work in the same way as Walt Disney’. ‘For me’ he said, ‘Hergé was more than a comic strip artist’. Warhol utilized the drawing style developed by Hergé, which is known internationally in the world of art as the ‘linge claire’ technique.

He also made a series of paintings commissioned by Hergé with himself as subject. An exhibition at Paris’s prestigious Pompidou Centre in 2006 put forward the idea of Hergé as an artist. And as it is one of the world’s most iconic modern art institutes it made a huge impact and caused controversy. Laurent Le Bon Co-curator of “Hergé” the exhibition said at the time to the reporter from The Independent ‘the importance of this show is that we are showing the work of Hergé in the same building as Matisse and Picasso’.

Hergé was a wonderful storyteller in pictures but there will be always those who dispute his claim to be an ‘artist’. Is it reasonable to separate the pictures from the stories and call them art? As The Independent reported the minimalist French artist Jean-Pierre Raynaud, who was a friend of Hergé, believes such a claim can be justified. “He has a precision of the kind I love in Mondrian. He has the artistic economy that you find in Matisse’s drawings. He perfectly crystallises what he wants to say and, as a result, his work never ages.”

Fans can read the entire article here:
http://http://www.thecultureconcept.com/circle/ten-thousand-thundering-typhoons-the-adventures-of-tintin

Next is the iconic pop-artist Roy Lichtenstien (Don't tell me you don't remember those comic book panels hanging in every dim and shady bar!)who did this cover for a novel called TINTIN IN THE NEW WORLD:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/dd/TintinNewWorld.jpg

Finally, we have pop artist Guy Peellaert's tribute - he did album covers for Rolling Stones and Bowie - through his creation Pravda:
http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Denis-d-apres-Herge-Pellaert-et-Warhol-2008-.jpg

http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Peelaert-Pravda-par-Denis-Tintin.jpg

The_Nadal_effect
10-26-2011, 08:27 PM
These five utterly bizarre tributes were entire albums dedicated to Tintin. Each of these artists, Calza, Roulin, Maret, Mibe and Sen are accomplished comic artists and made Tintin tributes based on their own style. Each book costs 25 euros and these are supposed to be pastiches! Anyways ...

http://paub.perso.neuf.fr/ETL/FB/Tintin/Radock/t2_couve100calza.jpg

http://paub.perso.neuf.fr/ETL/FB/Tintin/Radock/t2_couve100maret.jpg

http://paub.perso.neuf.fr/ETL/FB/Tintin/Radock/t2_couve100mibe.jpg

http://paub.perso.neuf.fr/ETL/FB/Tintin/Radock/t2_couve100roulin.jpg

http://paub.perso.neuf.fr/ETL/FB/Tintin/Radock/t2_couve100sen.jpg

Castafiore
10-27-2011, 08:41 AM
So, I saw the Tintin movie last night. As you can tell by my username and my avatar, I'm a big Tintin fan (Hergé fan, he has written more than Tintin. His Quick & Flupke series is awesome for example). Needless to say, I went in with high expectations.

I’ll leave out story spoilers.

As was clear going into the movies, they used 3 Tintin books for this movie.
(1) The crab with the golden claws
(2) The secret of the unicorn
(3) Red Rackham’s treasure


Just a few thoughts:

The movie starts with the secret of the unicorn (with a very nice cameo for Hergé). Tintin and Haddock were already friends in book (2) but the moviemakers wanted to introduce captain Haddock (which happens in book (1)), so they had to change quite a bit to make that happen. In the beginning of book (2), Haddocks tells about his ancestor sir Françis of Hadoque and he does so with ferver and passion. It’s a hilarious part of the book so I was afraid that I was going to miss out on that with the changes to the movie. However, I didn’t need to fear: they simply moved that part to another section of the story and they handled captain Haddock’s storytelling scene very well.

Beforehand, I feared a bit for Tintin’s dog Snowy. (the dog has his own text balloons in the books for example). Another fear squashed. In fact, Snowy was just about my favorite character of the bunch, which was a surprise. He is really, really cute.

I loved seeing Brussels at the start of the movie, including those lovely, lovely cars back in the day (instead of removing Tintin from his time and putting him in the modern world of today, as they did for The Smurfs movie). I plan on visiting that flea market where Tintin bought the ship some time next week or so.

Jamie Bell does a fantastic job with Tintin. I love his voice.

Bianca Castafiore makes an appearance, which doesn’t happen in those 3 books. Very nice touch, though! The friend I was with was surprised to see that she can actually sing very well but that was no surprise to me because Castafiore is a famous opera singer after all. It’s just that Haddock HATES opera singing (Castafiore was introduced by Hergé after one of his friends, Edgar P. Jacobs (another great comic book artist) took him to an opera once. Hergé didn’t like it at all and he introduced Castafiore as a joke to his friend so that he could make fun of opera throughout the series).

Going into the movie, I was afraid of the pace of the movie. Hergé was a master story teller and the rhythm he used to tell his stories was a delicate and careful procedure. He excelled in that. For the movie, Spielberg had to speed it up to get more action in. He did that well but I must say that I do prefer Hergé’s story telling rhythm (but then again, paper is more patient).

In the very beginning of the movie, there’s an animation to introduce the main crew who have worked on this movie. Really great fun to see, but it would have been even better if they’d used the clear line Hergé was famous for.

I don’t know when exactly but at some point in time (was it the 50s?), the US market showed an interest in publishing the Tintin series in the USA on the condition that they would be adapted for the US market. They asked Hergé to make some changes. They had done so with Lucky Luke (made by Morris) as well. Lucky Luke smokes but the US editor figured that this wasn’t a good role model for kids so they asked Morris, the artist, to remove the cigarettes. Since Morris couldn’t simple delete the cigarettes because Lucky Luke does clearly have something between his lips, Morris replaced the cigarette with a straw. So, Morris complied.
Hergé was asked to cut down on captain Haddock’s swearing and insults + Hergé had to remove the alcohol. Luckily for us, Hergé refused. Remove Haddock’s swearing and love for the bottle and you might as well erase the entire character. (I've always wondered if this was part of the reason why the Tintin books never really broke through in the USA, because Hergé didn't want to adapt the series to that market).
For this movie, I was afraid that they were again going to cut down on these habits of Haddock. On the contrary, they went the other way. In the books, Haddock clearly loves his drink but not all the time. It’s only once in a while that you see those scenes but there’s plenty in between when Haddock is clearly sober. In the movies, he goes from one bottle to the other. I think that they went too far with that. Mixed feelings about the movie's Haddock. He's great fun at times but they went too far in other parts.

Professor Calculus was introduced in book (3), Red Rackham’s treasure. He plays a crucial part in that book. He does not appear in the movie at all. I miss him.

Hergé’s bad guys were never bad through and through. They always had some sort of quirk that made you chuckle. Spielberg’s bad guy is evil through and through. Ivan Saccharin disappears quite quickly in the books but he’s a huge part of the movie (they changed quite a bit actually). I also have mixed feelings about that.

All in all, I had great fun. It's clear to see that the movie was made by people with love and respect for Hergé's work but...
The books >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> the movie (but that's usually the case, isn't it?)



My score for the movie: 7/10 (so good without being excellent)

cobalt60
10-27-2011, 12:05 PM
You are awesome Hilde- this was a great write up prior to seeing the movie!!

The_Nadal_effect
10-27-2011, 07:16 PM
Thanks Castafiore for that amazing write up!
*YOU MUST SPREAD SOME REPUTATION BEFORE GIVING IT TO CASTAFIORE AGAIN*

I love it when people get into the details of Tintin. That's where all the joy is as any lifelong adult fan would know!

IMO, Omitting Calculus was a master-blunder, as far as I'm concerned. Perhaps, the storytellers would have thought that introducing a main character in the third book of the movie might be too late, but if they could shift the storytelling of Sir Francis Haddock to another location, can't see why they wouldn't do the same for Calculus. Could have shifted him somehow to act 1. Big bummer, especially because the chemistry between Calculus and Haddock rocks with humour (Destination Moon, anyone?)!

Everyone else as well who intends to watch the movie, even first time fans of the movie itself, be so kind as to drop in a few lines or entire reviews for the rest of us, but WITHOUT SPOILERS of course!


The thread title will continue to remain 'The Tintin movie anticipation thread' till its official world-wide release. Thereafter, I will change it to 'the Tintin movie thread'.

Castafiore
10-28-2011, 08:58 AM
^ I'm looking forward to reading reactions to the movie from you all. :)

I went to the Hergé museum in Louvain-La-Neuve last year (the location sucks, by the way. The museum itself rocks. The building itself is worth the trip). There, they explained why Hergé added so few female characters. Hergé himself said that he liked to make fun of his own characters and he felt that it isn't appropriate to make fun of ladies. Glad to see that he somewhat changed his mind by introducing Bianca Castafiore.

The_Nadal_effect
11-17-2011, 10:44 AM
Well, I just caught up with THE SECRET OF THE UNICORN yesterday evening and there was plenty I enjoyed about it.

To begin with, I caught the 3D version of the movie which looked awesome!!! Just for the technical wizardry of it, I'd rate this movie 10/10! Also, the animation is excellent: the makers took care to simply mould the 2D faces of every major or minor character into 3D. Even the look of the 'extras' is from the Herge universe. The detailing was spot on! So that's a flying start! Herge might have been really pleased by the visual aesthetics of the movie, if nothing else.

As for the movie itself, it is not at all faithful to the book. Although that is common occurrence in adaptations, Spielberg has taken some over-the-top creative liberties and added scenes that are totally absent in the series, and that was kind of annoying, especially towards the climax when Haddock and Saccharine come face to face and fight. Thankfully, he makes do without adding new characters: That would have been catastrophic. For me, what made the movie successful was that in recreating characters we could neither hear nor watch move and emote in their original 2D strips, the filmmakers retained a healthy balance between humanizing and cartooning the characters.

Jamie Bell as Tintin was spectacular. He not only emoted but moved as a young, kinetic Tintin might have (Almost like Michael J Fox in Back to the Future!). He restrained himself to serving as the fulcrum for the unfolding plot, which unraveled like a Bond flick for kiddies. The character humour - which I felt was the most difficult translation to make - was handled deftly, though it left with plenty still to be asked, to reach Herge's level of richness. I hope they work this part a bit more in the remaining two movies of the trilogy. The captain's restrained use of his favorite abuses was equally important (he says 'Barnacles' once almost like 'oh, shit!' - great touch!) for the humour as were the handling of Thompsons Twins' penchant for tomfoolery. Snowy did not talk back to Tintin (fans might vary on that one - because Snowy can after all emote when in private with Tintin) but it still works out well in the movie. The additional slapstick humour in the movies must have made up for the restrained character humour for the kids that watch the movie.

Purists - aka Tintinophiles - might be disgusted with Spielberg's commercialization of a work of art (which the books certainly are!) but given the good that might come off from this release (new Tintin fans, many of whom might now go read the books for once!), the whole ordeal might be worth it.

Will I watch it again? Perhaps. Will I anticipate the next one? Definitely.
Overall rating: 7/10


(*One tribute shot I missed: Tintin standing on the frame of the screen as he does so often on the panel of the comics. And oh, yeah, like MTF's Castafiore - I did miss Professor Calculus!)