recommend me a good tennis book [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

recommend me a good tennis book

Diprosalic
11-26-2008, 04:09 PM
maybe the wrong forum but:

Im searching for a christmas gift for a good friend of mine. he recently started to play and watch tennis. now he's interested in the games history and future and i would like to buy him a good book to catch up. i searched on the internet but did not found anything good.

he loves statistics so it should have that as well.

thanks in advance

PS: the book should be written in english.

Henry Chinaski
11-26-2008, 04:21 PM
Illie Nastase'e autobiography is the best tennis biography I've read. You wouldn't have to be a tennis fan at all to enjoy it.

It has a stats section at the back with all his career results though not sure what else is in it.

adee-gee
11-26-2008, 04:27 PM
Jonny Mac's is good as well. Interesting read.

GlennMirnyi
11-26-2008, 04:47 PM
How to win in tennis, by Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes.

I hope nobody takes this as an offense or accusation to any player, just before the mods start the infraction fever.

Truc
11-26-2008, 05:22 PM
Maybe a compendium like "Tennis Confidential" (Paul Fein - http://www.tennisconfidential.com), it covers a wide range of topics. I only have the 1st book, I don't know the last one. It's not bad, but the 1st book is a bit old now, I guess your friend would like to read stories about the current players too.
There are a few "Fascinating Facts" at the end of each article with some stats too, but it's not the main focus.

There also are some recommendations here:
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=56981
(Adam already gave his standard answer - I agree that Johnny Mac's biography is quite good.)

Damn
11-26-2008, 05:36 PM
How to win in tennis, by Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes.

I hope nobody takes this as an offense or accusation to any player, just before the mods start the infraction fever.

:rolleyes: :smash:

BigJohn
11-26-2008, 07:13 PM
How about Novak Djokovic's monography 'My First Grand Slam' ?

its.like.that
11-26-2008, 07:36 PM
Try these:

My Life as a Prick - Andre Agassi

The One Slam Wonder - Novak Djokovic and Thomas Johansson

GlennMirnyi
11-26-2008, 07:42 PM
Also read part 2 of "My Life As A Prick" by Agassi: "How To Be A Phony".

Burrow
11-26-2008, 07:57 PM
Winning ugly - Brad Gilbert

Serious - Mcenroe

bjurra
11-26-2008, 08:03 PM
Lifting the covers, by Alan Mills

Winning ugly, by Brad Gilbert

I got your back, by Brad Gilbert

Mr Nastase, by Ilie Nastase (my fav)

sheeter
11-26-2008, 08:20 PM
A Champion's Mind: Lessons from a Life in Tennis. Its Sampras's autobiography. Well written and quite interesting.
You can't go wrong with Brad Gilbert's Winning Ugly either.

Ouragan
11-26-2008, 09:45 PM
When did Brad win anything?

r2473
11-26-2008, 10:40 PM
maybe the wrong forum but:

Im searching for a christmas gift for a good friend of mine. he recently started to play and watch tennis. now he's interested in the games history and future and i would like to buy him a good book to catch up. i searched on the internet but did not found anything good.

he loves statistics so it should have that as well.

thanks in advance

PS: the book should be written in english.

There is a book he might enjoy. It has a long title:

"How to be ranked around 100 in the world, pose for Playboy, and get far more press than any WTA player will ever get" by Ash Harkleroad.

I am not sure if your friend will like the statistics (probably something like 31 - 22 - 34 I'd guess).

It seems to translate well into all languages. Very quick read. Really tells you all you need to know about the WTA (present and future).

fast_clay
11-26-2008, 11:27 PM
John Mcenroe: Taming the Talent, by Richard Evans

havent read a book in a loooong time... but used to read heaps...

this one is from and about the year 1990, and author Richard Evans follows Mcenroe around the tour in the infamous year where he was defaulted form the aussie open...

but... for me at least, it wasnt really engaging in the literal sense, but, it was an interesting time for tennis historiaclly as in 1990 was when the 'new' ATP was formed... and, we all are aware what sort of association that is... here, you can study its infancy somewhat... Evans kinds of tries to make Mac out as widely misunderstood...

mcenroe is always an engaging character... for me at least anyways...

heres the last couple of paragraphs from a review...


But there are inconsistencies, it seems to me, in Evans’ account of
the springs of McEnroe’s behaviour and in his biographer’s reactions and
partial justifications of it. He deplores the tantrums and rudeness. And
yet his account of McEnroe’s apparent warmth as father and husband -
sometimes in Evans’ hands a mite schmalzy - sits strangely with the
admission of McEnroe’s less than charming attitude to strangers, and this
in turn sits oddly with accounts of McEnroe’s patience in dealing with
offensive drunks in a bar in Nice. At times Evans bends too far from what
are reasonable expectations of a mature adult in dealing with strangers
(on the practice court in the host club, in the hotel lobby, on the plane)
in order to justify McEnroe’s behaviour, pleading that he was at the time,

after all, the world’s highest-ranking player, while at other junctures


making play of McEnroe’s unassuming and unobtrusive nature. Does a
certain arrogance peep in the back door? Where does arrogance shade
into competitiveness and single-minded drive and perfectionism? And,
in fairness to both Evans and his subject, what understanding is necessary
in making judgments, given the fact that almost everything of a modern
touring tennis genius’ life is public - open to the camera, tape recorder,
press hound, and to the often brazen public?

Taming the Talent,

despite these cavils, is interesting for its
insider’s view of the different levels at which the tennis ‘industry’
operates, the players’ and entrepreneurs’ roles in it, its insights into the
media’s urge for smutty stories on the one hand and its eager earnings
from the sport on the other, the pursuit at all these levels of the mighty
dollar, the fickleness of the gallery and the changes for the worse in
partisanship in crowd behaviour - the New York crowd singled out -
which McEnroe deplores as a professional.
Graeme Kinross-Smith
Deakin University

Forehander
11-27-2008, 02:47 AM
James Blake: Breaking Back.

One of the most pointless book I've read thus far in my life. But I thought it would be interesting for people to see just how stupid this book is. Go for it.

CyBorg
11-28-2008, 06:04 AM
The best books are those that are sold used:

Gianni Clerici's The Ultimate Tennis Book is a gem and may be the best of those large older illustrated tomes. It's a work of art in itself, but I don't think you could buy a new one. Out of print, I'm quite sure.

Another beautiful one is Gene Scott's Tennis Game of Motion - also wonderfully illustrated, but probably can only be found in used state.

Both books are quite old (70s), so they don't cover the contemporary game. But they just don't make them like they used to.

Bud Collins's encyclopedia is probably the best sold historical manual out right now. It's pretty good, but the illustrations are in black and white. It's good for beginners and provides a lot of essential statistical stuff, along with year-by-year breakdowns of history, though there's no info on the pro circuit in the pro/amateur split days.

Saumon
11-28-2008, 07:12 AM
What about Spadea's book? :lol:

bjurra
11-28-2008, 12:02 PM
What about Spadea's book? :lol:

It is entertaining. Have you read it?

Diprosalic
11-28-2008, 03:46 PM
thanks for all the sugestions

i bought him this:
http://cdn.overstock.com/images/products/muze/books/9780942257410.jpg

im going to buy some of the recommended biographies for myself

10K Futures Qualifier
11-28-2008, 05:15 PM
Break Point by Vince Spadea

Hard Courts by Jimmy Connors

Breaking Back by James Blake

Karolina_Sprem
11-29-2008, 01:24 PM
The best EVER tennis book in my opinion is from Monica Seles "From fear to victory"...
Great, great book where Monica talks about her tennis career...starting from the childhood and her 1st tennis steps...how she started...her moving to America and the tragic situation in Hamburg 1993...her comeback... Really good book...
It's nothing about statistics...so not good book to give as a present to ur m8...

fast_clay
11-29-2008, 10:04 PM
Murray's books 'Not Without My Muscles: Volume 3' and the do-it-yourself guide 'Re-Heatable Haggis and How I Escaped From British Mediocrity.'

NinaNina19
11-29-2008, 10:56 PM
Andy Murray-hitting back. I'll pm you my address.

LinkMage
11-29-2008, 11:37 PM
"How to smash like a pro" by Agustin Calleri and Jose Acasuso.

brent-o
11-30-2008, 04:20 AM
I thought Arthur Ashe's book was really interesting. I don't remember what it was called. Despite all the hype (and deserved too), I find him and Billy Jean King to be fascinating people.

EDIT: It's called Days of Grace.

guapogreg08
11-30-2008, 04:42 AM
i second brent-o, both of bjks autobiographies are very interesting. also, if youre not afraid of some womens tennis, venus envy by jon wertheim is not only the greatest tennis book ive read, but one of my favorite books period. its tremendously entertaining and readable, ive read it countless times.

FluffyYellowBall
11-30-2008, 12:00 PM
James blake-Breaking Back.
I dont see how anyone could not like this book. Its so personal to any tennis fan. I loved it.
Im midway through Serious-Mcenroe. It's good till now.

TheBoiledEgg
12-02-2008, 02:20 PM
The Book of Tennis (2003)

tnnstalkr
12-04-2008, 12:11 PM
maybe the wrong forum but:

Im searching for a christmas gift for a good friend of mine. he recently started to play and watch tennis. now he's interested in the games history and future and i would like to buy him a good book to catch up. i searched on the internet but did not found anything good.

he loves statistics so it should have that as well.

thanks in advance

PS: the book should be written in english.

I had a similar interest, but sports fans don't necessarily play the game themselves. Material on how to be a competent tennis player is plentiful, but all the other knowledge sources of the players, the organizations, and the tournaments are date sensitive and best studied on the internet, where the information is dynamic, although difficult to validate sometimes. Even authorities like ATP's website are faulty on occasion.

I chose Tennis for Dummies by Patrick McEnroe et al. to get solid on the fundamentals of the sport. If inquiring on it at amazon.com, you will be able to view the Table of Contents using their nifty preview feature.

The rest, and what I believe your friend is really after, is about the players, the stats, and the surrounding melodrama, trivia, and general news, the hobby of following the sport. He should subscribe here as a start. The rest seems to come with watching and otherwise following a full tournament season at whatever age or professional level is of interest, especially the professional game, wherein one learns about the players and developments a fan's interest in specific people for whatever reason that appeals. One way or the other, fans and players themselves will seek out interpersonal melodrama in any sport. It is more than a list of players, statistics and tournaments.

A significant factor is the great deal of money involved and that the most talented and physically gifted young people, with many alternative opportunities, have dedicated themselves to playing tennis at a very high level. That might include skipping, postponing, or compromising on important parts of their educations. Life after tennis needs to be part of the vision, but the stakes are high.

It seems to me that there is still room for someone to write a Guide for the Tennis Fan, but it will be more about where to look for information than the information itself. A printed book could become dated very quickly otherwise. Such a guide could be a website or part of one with a grander scope. Personally, I find that to be a collection of various links requiring some organization and supplementing.

Perhaps this thread could become a sharing of useful links, sources of statistics and sites which already organize tennis information to some degree. One has to sort of cut and paste to get what they need.

MisterQ
12-05-2008, 04:21 PM
I chose Tennis for Dummies by Patrick McEnroe et al. to get solid on the fundamentals of the sport. If inquiring on it at amazon.com, you will be able to view the Table of Contents using their nifty preview feature.



This is a decent book, but they should update the last section (or have they?) on the Ten Best Male and Female Players of the Open Era, and the 10 Best Matches. It was published in 1998, and this last section quickly became outdated, with Agassi's reemergence; and the Williams Sisters, and perhaps Davenport. And more recently, Federer, Nadal, Henin...