John McEnroe- A Byronic Hero [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

John McEnroe- A Byronic Hero

TurtleTennis
09-25-2008, 06:27 PM
Hey everyone,

So I'm doing an essay on gothic elements in society. One example is in Sports and the role of the Byronic hero. I believe John McEnroe is the perfect example for the sport of tennis.

There are alot more knowledgeable people on here on tennis in general and so I would love if people could tell what they think made John McEnroe so different and how he defied the norm.

I can think of a couple: His on court attitude, his success despite his lack of formal technique, his upbringing (growing up in the Bronx). Could people explain this more in depth?

Thanks again!

Caerula Sanguis
09-25-2008, 06:37 PM
All I know is he uses one grip. Backhand, forehand, valley, serve. I'm still amazed how far he got.

Sjengster
09-25-2008, 07:59 PM
Almost never practised, but used his doubles to prepare him physically for singles.

r2473
09-25-2008, 10:42 PM
http://www.umd.umich.edu/casl/hum/eng/classes/434/charweb/CHARACTE.htm

arcus
09-25-2008, 10:42 PM
Don't know about Byronic, but he was certainly Moronic at times :)


Seriously, he was remarkably creative (in terms of shot making); he was tempestuous (putting it nicely) and played the "tortured soul" well; he was anti-establishment and rebellious; he relied on innate talent more than slog. All these are characteristics which could be referred to as Byronic (at a stretch),
I grant you he was more Byronic then lendl!.

JimmyV
09-25-2008, 10:46 PM
If you paypal me 20 bucks I'll write the damn paper for you.

fast_clay
09-25-2008, 11:10 PM
u cheap whore jimmy... :lol:

harry hopmen was largely responsible for perhaps 10-20 years of australian tennis at the top...

when he was asked to coach mcenroe he was like... 'ok... special case... my methods wont work here... let this kid enjoy himself...'

and hopman was a hard, hard, hard man... a real c***

Howard
09-26-2008, 12:43 AM
IMO, McEnroes’ antics and tantrums were as much gamesmanship as they were fits of temper. He was (and probably still is) a colossal asshole, a talented asshole to be sure, but an asshole nonetheless. If that matches Byronic hero, he is one.

Miss Runcible
09-27-2008, 07:49 AM
a colossal asshole, a talented asshole to be sure, but an asshole nonetheless

Add to that 'misogynist', and that would describe Byron pretty well ;)

Although, TurtleTennis, I think Ilie Nastase might be even better material for your essay...

Snoo Foo
09-27-2008, 08:24 AM
I can think of a couple: His on court attitude, his success despite his lack of formal technique, his upbringing (growing up in the Bronx).

FYI it was Queens (and a hoity-toity (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A03E3D7133BF93BA35751C0A9629C8B 63), super-suburban part of Queens at that).

calvinhobbes
09-27-2008, 05:04 PM
Almost never practised, but used his doubles to prepare him physically for singles.

Ouch! How many doubles did he have? . . . . .

drf716
09-29-2008, 04:56 AM
i tried this once,
asking people from the internet to help you in homework...
doesn't work. hehe.

scarecrows
02-16-2009, 04:50 PM
Happy 50th anniversary JMac

ilendl
02-18-2009, 10:32 AM
He was a vulgar punk who took tennis down into the gutter with his disgusting behaviour.
Luckily his achievements were quickly overshadowed by others.
He was also a genuine cheat - as John Fitzgerald and Bill Scanlon (among others) pointed out.