Players who came back from being 0-6 down in a TB [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Players who came back from being 0-6 down in a TB

EnriqueIG8
09-01-2008, 04:54 AM
Well a Dutch tv commentator just said if Cilic comes back from being 0-6 down I'll eat my up my hat.
That stuff made me think, did a player ever came back from being 0-6
down in a tiebreak and raced through and win the tiebreak?

Post your players who achieved this amazing effort.

elessar
09-01-2008, 04:55 AM
Clement did it against Gasquet in lyon a couple years ago I think :scratch:

Flibbertigibbet
09-01-2008, 04:56 AM
Gasquet would be featured in this ubiquitous statistic. I'm fairly sure he and Clement achieved some sort of similar feat in doubles, but I can't remember when.

Action Jackson
09-01-2008, 04:57 AM
Voo de Mar, the man he will know this for sure and thankfully will produce the answers to this question.

Deboogle!.
09-01-2008, 04:59 AM
I remember Ricardo Mello blew an incredible tiebreak in LA a few years ago, but I do not recall if it was from 6-0 up

selyoink
09-01-2008, 05:00 AM
I know its happened in wta but not sure about the men.

jazar
09-01-2008, 06:50 AM
i remember john mcenroe saying that if someone came back from 0-6 down in the breaker, he would stand on his head and do commentary. and i think they did. i also believe that match involved a dutch player

JMG
09-01-2008, 06:54 AM
It was Jan Siemerink over Richard Krajicek at the US Open 1994.

Krajicek d. Siemerink 7-6(2) 6-4 6-7(2) 6-7(8) 6-4

U.S. OPEN '94; Krajicek Survives Nightmare on Court 16

By HARVEY ARATON
Published: August 31, 1994
The match points kept passing, one after another. Richard Krajicek, who had six lined up, whose mind was already drifting to a shower and back rub in the locker room, couldn't win any.

First, Jan Siemerink clocked a service winner off his racquet. Then Siemerink rifled a passing shot by him. Krajicek tapped a volley wide. Siemerink served and volleyed for6-4. He served and volleyed again for 6-5.

Krajicek, who stands 6 feet 5 inches, who is the only player to defeat Pete Sampras this summer, appeared to be shrinking across the net from his Dutch rival and former traveling partner, before a packed house out on Court 16 at the National Tennis Center.

Soon, as he admitted later, he was also choking, double-faulting for 6-all, blowing another match point at 8-7 and ultimately losing the fourth-set tie breaker, 10-8, to an opponent he had had in the hole, two sets to love. Dutch Death Struggle

"Six match points in a row, seven in the tie break, I couldn't believe what was happening," Krajicek said, after he somehow righted himself in the fifth set and survived a 3-hour-41-minute Dutch death struggle, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, in the first round yesterday of the United States Open. "I really felt the match slipping away, not only the set."

And maybe more than that. After reaching a high ranking of No. 10 in 1992, an injury-plagued Krajicek went sliding, all the way to No. 30, the skid ending when he beat Sampras in Davis Cup play last month. If Krajicek had lost this match, he guessed, correctly, that it would have been the worst defeat of his four-year professional career.

Losing his serve at 15 while serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth was one thing. The tie-breaker nightmare was another thing. But the worst thing would have been this inexcusable collapse against Siemerink, ranked 100th, of all people.

"He tightened up because it was another Dutch player, especially Jan," said Krajicek's coach, Rohan Goetzke, an Australian. Together Again

If anyone understood what was going on between Krajicek and the left-handed Siemerink, it was Goetzke. He coached both during their first two years on the tour. The players, who were born less than a year apart and grew up within a half-hour's drive of each other, traveled together, practiced together and played doubles together.

It was, in fact, after Krajicek reached the semifinals of the 1992 Australian Open and the pair reached the semis of the doubles draw that Goetzke made the choice to drop Siemerink and to exclusively coach Krajicek. He realized Krajicek, one of the biggest servers in tennis, had the better chance of powering his way close to the top.

Siemerink suspected that Krajicek might have figured in that decision. Both players have since taken up residence in Monte Carlo, Monaco, tennis tax-shelter heaven, but, in reality, they have gone their separate ways.

"We know each other very well, but a friend I call somebody that I trust everything to and, no, I don't do that with him," said Krajicek. A Penalty, Please

The tone of the match didn't suggest there was any relationship between the two. Krajicek even asked the chair umpire to assess a point penalty against Siemerink when the latter whacked the ball sky-high in disgust after netting a backhand volley on break point at 4-all in the fifth set.

By that time, it was Siemerink who was stuck in the what-might-have-been. After holding his serve to start the fifth set, he had triple break point against Krajicek in the second game. Given Krajicek's state of mind at the time, a break there might have finished him off. But Krajicek saved himself with a couple of high-kick first serves to Siemerink's forehand, and slowly put aside his frustration.

On match point, Krajicek looked up to serve and saw Siemerink fidgeting, delaying the inevitable.

"What is he, Boris Becker?" Krajicek said.

This time, he converted the match point, his eighth. The two Dutchmen shook hands, grimly. There was no embrace, and Siemerink stalked off, refusing all comment.

Doggy
09-01-2008, 07:48 AM
Mary Pierce def Elena Likhotseva in 2005 in Moscow Russia. Likhotseva up 5-7 6-4 6-6 (6-0), then lost 8 points in a row!!!

tripb19
09-01-2008, 07:58 AM
Soon, as he admitted later, he was also choking, double-faulting for 6-all, blowing another match point at 8-7 and ultimately losing the fourth-set tie breaker, 10-8, to an opponent he had had in the hole, two sets to love.

"Six match points in a row, seven in the tie break, I couldn't believe what was happening," Krajicek said, after he somehow righted himself in the fifth set and survived a 3-hour-41-minute Dutch death struggle, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, in the first round yesterday of the United States Open. "I really felt the match slipping away, not only the set."


:worship:

Tom Paulman
09-01-2008, 08:19 AM
Clement did it this year at Wimbledon against Schüttler, but still lost the tie-break in the end

Horatio Caine
09-01-2008, 08:20 AM
I'm pretty confident Britain's maestro, Arvind Parmar, has done it...one year when he qualified for the Australian Open? :scratch: Hmmm, not sure El Aynaoui would have choked such a lead...maybe a different match? I'm sure he has done it.

Kolya
09-01-2008, 08:37 AM
It was Jan Siemerink over Richard Krajicek at the US Open 1994.

Krajicek d. Siemerink 7-6(2) 6-4 6-7(2) 6-7(8) 6-4

U.S. OPEN '94; Krajicek Survives Nightmare on Court 16

By HARVEY ARATON
Published: August 31, 1994
The match points kept passing, one after another. Richard Krajicek, who had six lined up, whose mind was already drifting to a shower and back rub in the locker room, couldn't win any.

First, Jan Siemerink clocked a service winner off his racquet. Then Siemerink rifled a passing shot by him. Krajicek tapped a volley wide. Siemerink served and volleyed for6-4. He served and volleyed again for 6-5.

Krajicek, who stands 6 feet 5 inches, who is the only player to defeat Pete Sampras this summer, appeared to be shrinking across the net from his Dutch rival and former traveling partner, before a packed house out on Court 16 at the National Tennis Center.

Soon, as he admitted later, he was also choking, double-faulting for 6-all, blowing another match point at 8-7 and ultimately losing the fourth-set tie breaker, 10-8, to an opponent he had had in the hole, two sets to love. Dutch Death Struggle

"Six match points in a row, seven in the tie break, I couldn't believe what was happening," Krajicek said, after he somehow righted himself in the fifth set and survived a 3-hour-41-minute Dutch death struggle, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, in the first round yesterday of the United States Open. "I really felt the match slipping away, not only the set."

And maybe more than that. After reaching a high ranking of No. 10 in 1992, an injury-plagued Krajicek went sliding, all the way to No. 30, the skid ending when he beat Sampras in Davis Cup play last month. If Krajicek had lost this match, he guessed, correctly, that it would have been the worst defeat of his four-year professional career.

Losing his serve at 15 while serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth was one thing. The tie-breaker nightmare was another thing. But the worst thing would have been this inexcusable collapse against Siemerink, ranked 100th, of all people.

"He tightened up because it was another Dutch player, especially Jan," said Krajicek's coach, Rohan Goetzke, an Australian. Together Again

If anyone understood what was going on between Krajicek and the left-handed Siemerink, it was Goetzke. He coached both during their first two years on the tour. The players, who were born less than a year apart and grew up within a half-hour's drive of each other, traveled together, practiced together and played doubles together.

It was, in fact, after Krajicek reached the semifinals of the 1992 Australian Open and the pair reached the semis of the doubles draw that Goetzke made the choice to drop Siemerink and to exclusively coach Krajicek. He realized Krajicek, one of the biggest servers in tennis, had the better chance of powering his way close to the top.

Siemerink suspected that Krajicek might have figured in that decision. Both players have since taken up residence in Monte Carlo, Monaco, tennis tax-shelter heaven, but, in reality, they have gone their separate ways.

"We know each other very well, but a friend I call somebody that I trust everything to and, no, I don't do that with him," said Krajicek. A Penalty, Please

The tone of the match didn't suggest there was any relationship between the two. Krajicek even asked the chair umpire to assess a point penalty against Siemerink when the latter whacked the ball sky-high in disgust after netting a backhand volley on break point at 4-all in the fifth set.

By that time, it was Siemerink who was stuck in the what-might-have-been. After holding his serve to start the fifth set, he had triple break point against Krajicek in the second game. Given Krajicek's state of mind at the time, a break there might have finished him off. But Krajicek saved himself with a couple of high-kick first serves to Siemerink's forehand, and slowly put aside his frustration.

On match point, Krajicek looked up to serve and saw Siemerink fidgeting, delaying the inevitable.

"What is he, Boris Becker?" Krajicek said.

This time, he converted the match point, his eighth. The two Dutchmen shook hands, grimly. There was no embrace, and Siemerink stalked off, refusing all comment.

Great read.

I never knew there was such bad blood between Krajicek and Siemerink.

BgStallion
09-01-2008, 12:06 PM
The most recent case I remember was in Hamburg 2006 when Robredo came back from 0-6 in the 1st set tiebreak against Ferrer. He went on to win the title afterwards :D

opeth84
09-01-2008, 12:11 PM
I could be wrong (it may have been from 0-5) Roddick came back from 0-6 to beat PHM at wimbledon last year in the tie break? But im not sure so don't crucify me if im wrong :p

MusicMyst
09-01-2008, 01:59 PM
i remember john mcenroe saying that if someone came back from 0-6 down in the breaker, he would stand on his head and do commentary. and i think they did. i also believe that match involved a dutch player

You're correct and earlier this week, the clip of John commentating for a few minutes while standing on his head (and quite red-faced) was played. :lol:

Corey Feldman
09-01-2008, 03:46 PM
I knew about the Krajicek one as well because of Mcenroe saying he would stand on his head if it happened - and was made to eat his words

he joked the same kind of thing in Paris 4 years ago if Henman beat Coria in the semis

i remember when Henman led 6-3 4-2 - Mac "my head is beginning to hurt" :rolls:

PiggyGotRoasted
09-01-2008, 04:39 PM
Boris Pashianski

Sunset of Age
09-01-2008, 05:16 PM
It was Jan Siemerink over Richard Krajicek at the US Open 1994.

Krajicek d. Siemerink 7-6(2) 6-4 6-7(2) 6-7(8) 6-4

U.S. OPEN '94; Krajicek Survives Nightmare on Court 16

By HARVEY ARATON
Published: August 31, 1994
The match points kept passing, one after another. Richard Krajicek, who had six lined up, whose mind was already drifting to a shower and back rub in the locker room, couldn't win any.

First, Jan Siemerink clocked a service winner off his racquet. Then Siemerink rifled a passing shot by him. Krajicek tapped a volley wide. Siemerink served and volleyed for6-4. He served and volleyed again for 6-5.

Krajicek, who stands 6 feet 5 inches, who is the only player to defeat Pete Sampras this summer, appeared to be shrinking across the net from his Dutch rival and former traveling partner, before a packed house out on Court 16 at the National Tennis Center.

Soon, as he admitted later, he was also choking, double-faulting for 6-all, blowing another match point at 8-7 and ultimately losing the fourth-set tie breaker, 10-8, to an opponent he had had in the hole, two sets to love. Dutch Death Struggle

"Six match points in a row, seven in the tie break, I couldn't believe what was happening," Krajicek said, after he somehow righted himself in the fifth set and survived a 3-hour-41-minute Dutch death struggle, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, in the first round yesterday of the United States Open. "I really felt the match slipping away, not only the set."

And maybe more than that. After reaching a high ranking of No. 10 in 1992, an injury-plagued Krajicek went sliding, all the way to No. 30, the skid ending when he beat Sampras in Davis Cup play last month. If Krajicek had lost this match, he guessed, correctly, that it would have been the worst defeat of his four-year professional career.

Losing his serve at 15 while serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth was one thing. The tie-breaker nightmare was another thing. But the worst thing would have been this inexcusable collapse against Siemerink, ranked 100th, of all people.

"He tightened up because it was another Dutch player, especially Jan," said Krajicek's coach, Rohan Goetzke, an Australian. Together Again

If anyone understood what was going on between Krajicek and the left-handed Siemerink, it was Goetzke. He coached both during their first two years on the tour. The players, who were born less than a year apart and grew up within a half-hour's drive of each other, traveled together, practiced together and played doubles together.

It was, in fact, after Krajicek reached the semifinals of the 1992 Australian Open and the pair reached the semis of the doubles draw that Goetzke made the choice to drop Siemerink and to exclusively coach Krajicek. He realized Krajicek, one of the biggest servers in tennis, had the better chance of powering his way close to the top.

Siemerink suspected that Krajicek might have figured in that decision. Both players have since taken up residence in Monte Carlo, Monaco, tennis tax-shelter heaven, but, in reality, they have gone their separate ways.

"We know each other very well, but a friend I call somebody that I trust everything to and, no, I don't do that with him," said Krajicek. A Penalty, Please

The tone of the match didn't suggest there was any relationship between the two. Krajicek even asked the chair umpire to assess a point penalty against Siemerink when the latter whacked the ball sky-high in disgust after netting a backhand volley on break point at 4-all in the fifth set.

By that time, it was Siemerink who was stuck in the what-might-have-been. After holding his serve to start the fifth set, he had triple break point against Krajicek in the second game. Given Krajicek's state of mind at the time, a break there might have finished him off. But Krajicek saved himself with a couple of high-kick first serves to Siemerink's forehand, and slowly put aside his frustration.

On match point, Krajicek looked up to serve and saw Siemerink fidgeting, delaying the inevitable.

"What is he, Boris Becker?" Krajicek said.

This time, he converted the match point, his eighth. The two Dutchmen shook hands, grimly. There was no embrace, and Siemerink stalked off, refusing all comment.

:lol:
Jan Siemerink: :worship: Krajicek: :ras:

Nacho
09-01-2008, 05:27 PM
Lleyton Hewitt def Marc Lopez 7-6 (6) 6-2 in Barcelona 2002

I'm not 100% sure though...

ChinoRios4Ever
09-01-2008, 06:32 PM
I'm not 100% sure, but i remember Rios vs Boetsch in RG 1996.

He was something like 0-6 or 1-6 in one TB and Marcelo still won that tb. :eek:

Voo de Mar
09-07-2008, 09:55 AM
Voo de Mar, the man he will know this for sure and thankfully will produce the answers to this question.

I know only that tie-break mentioned by JMG. Mantilla was leading 6:0 in the tie-break against Ferreira in Dubai 1998 and later saved 2 setpoints to win 12-10.

I'm not 100% sure, but i remember Rios vs Boetsch in RG 1996.

He was something like 0-6 or 1-6 in one TB and Marcelo still won that tb. :eek:


Boetsch was leading 6:2 in that tie-break and it was in 1997 (he wasted also one setpoint at 5:4 :) Rios won 7-6(6) 6-3 6-4.

Black Adam
09-07-2008, 11:55 AM
I remember back in 2005 Roddick was leading in a tiebreak 6-0 before Enquivist pulled back to 6-6 but Roddick went on to win 8-6

Nathaliia
09-07-2008, 12:19 PM
I saw smth a bit different, but also funny. In a challenger Kunitsyn was twice 1-6 down in deciding set tie-break and won both times :lol: He couldn't breath at the and of the second match not because of the fatigue, but because psychically he was done. I guess he put all his concentration into coming back.

Voo de Mar
09-07-2008, 01:04 PM
I remember back in 2005 Roddick was leading in a tiebreak 6-0 before Enquivist pulled back to 6-6 but Roddick went on to win 8-6

The same story at this years Wimbledon (Schuettler-Clement match).

ChinoRios4Ever
09-07-2008, 09:32 PM
Boetsch was leading 6:2 in that tie-break and it was in 1997 (he wasted also one setpoint at 5:4 :) Rios won 7-6(6) 6-3 6-4.

:eek: :worship:

Pfloyd
09-07-2008, 09:36 PM
Why would this be called an amazing feat? In MTF it would be called "choking", not doubt.

Fedex
09-07-2008, 11:03 PM
It was Jan Siemerink over Richard Krajicek at the US Open 1994.

Krajicek d. Siemerink 7-6(2) 6-4 6-7(2) 6-7(8) 6-4

U.S. OPEN '94; Krajicek Survives Nightmare on Court 16

By HARVEY ARATON
Published: August 31, 1994
The match points kept passing, one after another. Richard Krajicek, who had six lined up, whose mind was already drifting to a shower and back rub in the locker room, couldn't win any.

First, Jan Siemerink clocked a service winner off his racquet. Then Siemerink rifled a passing shot by him. Krajicek tapped a volley wide. Siemerink served and volleyed for6-4. He served and volleyed again for 6-5.

Krajicek, who stands 6 feet 5 inches, who is the only player to defeat Pete Sampras this summer, appeared to be shrinking across the net from his Dutch rival and former traveling partner, before a packed house out on Court 16 at the National Tennis Center.

Soon, as he admitted later, he was also choking, double-faulting for 6-all, blowing another match point at 8-7 and ultimately losing the fourth-set tie breaker, 10-8, to an opponent he had had in the hole, two sets to love. Dutch Death Struggle

"Six match points in a row, seven in the tie break, I couldn't believe what was happening," Krajicek said, after he somehow righted himself in the fifth set and survived a 3-hour-41-minute Dutch death struggle, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, in the first round yesterday of the United States Open. "I really felt the match slipping away, not only the set."

And maybe more than that. After reaching a high ranking of No. 10 in 1992, an injury-plagued Krajicek went sliding, all the way to No. 30, the skid ending when he beat Sampras in Davis Cup play last month. If Krajicek had lost this match, he guessed, correctly, that it would have been the worst defeat of his four-year professional career.

Losing his serve at 15 while serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth was one thing. The tie-breaker nightmare was another thing. But the worst thing would have been this inexcusable collapse against Siemerink, ranked 100th, of all people.

"He tightened up because it was another Dutch player, especially Jan," said Krajicek's coach, Rohan Goetzke, an Australian. Together Again

If anyone understood what was going on between Krajicek and the left-handed Siemerink, it was Goetzke. He coached both during their first two years on the tour. The players, who were born less than a year apart and grew up within a half-hour's drive of each other, traveled together, practiced together and played doubles together.

It was, in fact, after Krajicek reached the semifinals of the 1992 Australian Open and the pair reached the semis of the doubles draw that Goetzke made the choice to drop Siemerink and to exclusively coach Krajicek. He realized Krajicek, one of the biggest servers in tennis, had the better chance of powering his way close to the top.

Siemerink suspected that Krajicek might have figured in that decision. Both players have since taken up residence in Monte Carlo, Monaco, tennis tax-shelter heaven, but, in reality, they have gone their separate ways.

"We know each other very well, but a friend I call somebody that I trust everything to and, no, I don't do that with him," said Krajicek. A Penalty, Please

The tone of the match didn't suggest there was any relationship between the two. Krajicek even asked the chair umpire to assess a point penalty against Siemerink when the latter whacked the ball sky-high in disgust after netting a backhand volley on break point at 4-all in the fifth set.

By that time, it was Siemerink who was stuck in the what-might-have-been. After holding his serve to start the fifth set, he had triple break point against Krajicek in the second game. Given Krajicek's state of mind at the time, a break there might have finished him off. But Krajicek saved himself with a couple of high-kick first serves to Siemerink's forehand, and slowly put aside his frustration.

On match point, Krajicek looked up to serve and saw Siemerink fidgeting, delaying the inevitable.

"What is he, Boris Becker?" Krajicek said.

This time, he converted the match point, his eighth. The two Dutchmen shook hands, grimly. There was no embrace, and Siemerink stalked off, refusing all comment.

Could you imagine if Krajicek went on to lose that match? :eek: :eek:

selyoink
09-08-2008, 03:17 AM
Mary Pierce def Elena Likhotseva in 2005 in Moscow Russia. Likhotseva up 5-7 6-4 6-6 (6-0), then lost 8 points in a row!!!

That was the wta match I was thinking of.

jole
09-08-2008, 04:38 AM
I remember Ricardo Mello blew an incredible tiebreak in LA a few years ago, but I do not recall if it was from 6-0 up

Think Hrbaty came back and beat him after being 6-0 down. Then he blew the next match. :p

Voo de Mar
09-08-2008, 08:09 AM
I remember Ricardo Mello blew an incredible tiebreak in LA a few years ago, but I do not recall if it was from 6-0 up

There was 6:1 for Mello, later 8:7 and 9:8 - Hrbaty saved 7 match points and won 4-6 7-6(9) 6-2 :)

Sebby
09-08-2008, 12:54 PM
It was Jan Siemerink over Richard Krajicek at the US Open 1994.

Krajicek d. Siemerink 7-6(2) 6-4 6-7(2) 6-7(8) 6-4

How amazing it is ! I can't believe that happened to a player with a monster serve like Krajicek at the US OPEN ! :eek:

Voo de Mar
09-08-2008, 01:35 PM
How amazing it is ! I can't believe that happened to a player with a monster serve like Krajicek at the US OPEN ! :eek:

Krajicek played a few thriller matches at the US Open. Beside this dramatic match against Siemerink he lost there three times 6-7 in the 5th set (C.Costa, Tebbutt, Kafelnikov), won two matches being 0-2 down and tie-break in the third set (Marcus, T.Martin) and lost a match against Lendl being 2-0 up and 5:4 (40-15) on serve in the 4th set - he wanted so badly to finish the match with an ace that made 2 double faults in a row on both match points :o