Article : Portrait of Miloslav Mecir: The Big Cat (Clips Added) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Article : Portrait of Miloslav Mecir: The Big Cat (Clips Added)

Action Jackson
03-27-2008, 12:15 PM
Too bad during the time Evans didn't call him a Czechoslovak at least, but Mecir has never been a Czech, apart from that it's not a bad write up.

This is 21 years old, but still informative.

This is a portrait, written in 1987, of a player who was expected to become one of the most successful of his era. But an exceptional talent was cut short at the end of the 1980s by a chronic back problem and failed surgery. Mecir had to content himself with a bit of coaching and the captaincy of the Slovak Davis Cup team.

http://soundoftennis.net/cgi-bin/sou...ewArchive&ID=8

Portrait of Miloslav Mecir
by Richard Evans

It is not every player that gets singled out for praise by that most demanding of critics, John McEnroe, but even before Miloslav Mecir deprived the former world No 1 of a chance to claim his fifth WCT crown by beating him in the Dallas final last month, McEnroe was singing the praises of this complex Czech.

“Mecir is an interesting new personality and the game needs as many as it can get,” said McEnroe realising full well that Mecir is likely to cause him a great deal of frustration and annoyance in the coming months. “We have things in common. He tries to out think players and keep them off balance. His game is good to watch. He doesn’t look like a tennis player and I don’t think I do either.”

McEnroe, as perceptive and generous off court as he can be blockheaded and mean spirited on it, is right. Mecir could become the tour’s resident intellectual. Stylistically he poses questions that are constructed to confuse. Facially his bearded, sharply-chiseled features would make him perfect casting for something out of Chekhov. Dressed in a morning coat he would seem wholly at home, brooding in the Cherry Orchard.

When he first emerged from Czechoslovakia three years ago, Mecir seemed to do a lot of brooding. Slow to smile and obviously bewildered by the brash new world in which he found himself, Mecir stunned New Yorkers at last year’s US Open, where he gave notice of his exceptional talent by reaching the final, when he told them he didn’t like their city and wanted to catch the first flight home.

Ivan Lendl, who only gets homesick for Greenwich, Connecticut these days, found Mecir’s attitude equally perplexing – but not quite as perplexing as he found his tactics when the Big Cat, as he is called on the tour, unraveled Ivan’s game with disdainful ease in the final of the Lipton International Players Championships at Key Biscayne in March.

By then Mecir, who had elected to stay at a cheap little hotel on the island instead of at the official hotel situated amongst the concrete jungle of downtown Miami, was loosening up and beginning to enjoy some aspects of America.

“I have my parents with me and at night we stroll on the beach under the stars,” he told me before he beat Lendl. “It is good.”

Moments of tranquility are important to Mecir whose favourite hobby is to find a good river and fish. As this tit-bit of information is about to as much as the world’s press have managed to find out about this man who gives little away, he is asked about it constantly. In Dallas someone asked him which fish he liked to catch best.

“Lendl,” he replied with a grin. “Big fish.”

If Mecir goes on landing fish the size of Lendl and McEnroe, trout and salmon may temporarily lose their appeal as he swims upstream to the highest source of that tortuous tennis river.

Mats Wilander was suggesting in Dallas that Mecir has the ability to become the No 1 player in the world within two years and, after the way he has been playing in 1987, it would be foolish to bet against such a possibility. Until he arrived, jet-lagged, in Tokyo for the Suntory Japan Open the week after Dallas, Mecir had won four of the six tournaments he had entered since the New Year and only Stefan Edberg, in the Australian Open and the Pilot Penn Classic at Grand Champions, Indian Wells, had beaten him.

But, of course, consistency was not the only impressive addition to the multitude of talents Mecir brings to a tennis court. Although nerves still plagued him when he failed to save Czhechoslovakia from defeat against Israel in the first round of the NEC Davis Cup, Mecir is a far more assured performed now than he was in 1985 when he shocked spectators in Dusseldorf during the World Team Cup matches by suddenly serving underhand during his match with Jimmy Connors.

Even more inexplicably he repeated the performance against Martin Jaite in a second round match of the French Open a couple of weeks later. “I just got so nervous I didn’t think I could get a proper serve in court,” Mecir explained afterwards.

Now his serve, although not a thing of beauty when compared to the classical deliveries of an Edberg or Yannick Noah, is at least deep and players admit to having difficulty with it when he kicks one into the backhand.

It says much for the degree of natural talent Mecir brings to the game that, despite the problems he faced with the serve early in his career, his first taste of success came on grass in Adelaide, as long ago as 1983. With an improved delivery and growing confidence on the volley, Mecir confirmed that he will become an increasing threat on grass in the future by beating Edberg on his way to the quarterfinals at Wimbledon last year.

As he appears to treat all kinds of surfaces with an equanimity not shared by all his colleagues in the top ten, Wilander’s predictions may have a sounder base than some people imagine. Certainly he has retained a mystery about his game that is starting to become a psychological as well as a technical weapon.

Players on the tour expect to take a little while to work out the particular style and performances of talented newcomer when they first turn pro, but so few have managed to crack the code that disguises many of Mecir’s stately-looking groundstrokes that an element of panic is beginning to set in.

In particular, Wilander and many of his Swedish colleagues find many of Mecir’s shots undecipherable. Largely, the problem seems to lie with the fact that Mecir can combine the very difficult arts of hitting the ball way out in front of his body while at the same time appearing to delay the stroke until the last second. Players talk of being able to hold the ball on the strings and a computer would probably be able to confirm that the ball stays on the Czech’s strings some mini-fraction of a second longer than most players. But it is fractions that make the difference at the highest levels of the game and, as he turns his wrists – just one for the forehand; two for the backhand – on the point of contact his opponent is still waiting to see which way the ball will go.

This, of course, can be catastrophic to a top class player who is accustomed to judging the path of the ball as his opponent shapes up to hit it. Uncertainty seeps into the brain; confusion and frustration set in and Mecir, poker-faced as ever, is well on the way to another victory. There are going to be a great many more in the future and most, I feel sure, will be well worth watching.

KitinovRules
03-27-2008, 12:42 PM
Indeed he is Slovak. I have seen him as Davis Cup captain here in Skopje last april.

KaxMisha
03-27-2008, 12:46 PM
Thanks a lot for that GWH (and for the Lendl article as well, by the way). I can't help feeling that Mecir should have won at least one slam. Damn back injury. If I could change tennis history, the first thing I would do would be giving Lendl a Wimbledon title and then giving Mecir a slam. Ah, one can always dream. :D

BlueSwan
03-27-2008, 12:49 PM
Right, but people hailing from Czechoslovakia where often referred to as Czechs before the country was split into two countries.

BlueSwan
03-27-2008, 12:55 PM
Thanks a lot for that GWH (and for the Lendl article as well, by the way). I can't help feeling that Mecir should have won at least one slam. Damn back injury. If I could change tennis history, the first thing I would do would be giving Lendl a Wimbledon title and then giving Mecir a slam. Ah, one can always dream. :D
Nahh...part of the fun of tennis history is that so few players have completed a calendar year slam. Llendl got so close, Federer got so close. I think it's kind of funny that Agassi is the only post-Laver player to have done it. Especially given that both his 1992 Wimbledon win and his 1999 RG win were totally unexpected.

Chris Seahorse
03-27-2008, 01:09 PM
Yeah when tennis lost Miloslav to a back injury so early in his career it was a sad loss for the game. That back really did affect his results a lot too over the last couple of years. I remember his last match at Wimbledon against Edberg (who he had almost beat, and should have beaten too just a couple years earlier) in his last match at Wimbledon and it was sad to see. I have no doubt if not for the back injury he would have won slams and could very well as Mats Wilander suggested have gotten to number 1. At least he won his Olympic Gold which I'm sure means as much to him as any Slam win would have. :)

Lunaris
03-27-2008, 02:42 PM
Thanks for the article. The final of Seoul Olympic Games in 1988, which Miloš won, was the first tennis match I have ever seen in my life. I was only 4 years old at that time, but despite that I was aware I was witnessing something unusual as it was kind of a big deal in our at that time still united country.
Shaking hands with this man one year ago is one of my best recent memories related to tennis. I have a lot of respect for him. Shame he met the bane of many great players - injuries.

Kolya
03-27-2008, 03:25 PM
Nice to read this again.

Its a real shame losing the Big Cat so early.

star
03-27-2008, 03:29 PM
How old is that article?

I loved to watch Mecir and he was one of my favorites even though he was the Swede-killer. I was hoping the article was about him today. I'd really like to know that he's happy and successful. :)

Kolya
03-27-2008, 03:30 PM
Here is an interview with Mecir speaking English but with a German voice over.

It starts 5 mins 45 secs.

v3b_ElxEoQU

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 03:00 AM
Mecir had a Czech father and Slovak mother, was raised in Slovakia, this at the time of the break up of the nation was interesting in itself.

http://www.iht.com/articles/1993/01/28/dcze.php?page=1

When a New Border Splits a Tennis Team
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 1993

MELBOURNE: Like many former Czechoslovaks, Miloslav Mecir is part of a family tree with varied branches. His mother is a Slovak, his father a Czech. And although he lives in the Slovak capital, Bratislava, and comments on tennis for Slovak television, his wife is a Czech.

"For me," he said sadly, "the border is something I don't like."

The border was created at the stroke of midnight on Jan. 1 when Slovakia officially became independent of its more populous and cosmopolitan neighbor.

In the world of sport, the effect of the division is already in evidence at the Australian Open. For the last three decades, Czechoslovakia held a firm place among the world's leading tennis nations as its state-controlled system produced a succession of sensational players, beginning with Jan Kodes in the 1960s and continuing with Martina Navratilova, Ivan Lendl, Hana Mandlikova, Mecir and, most recently, Jana Novotna and Petr Korda.

Navratilova and Lendl fled the communist regime and later became American citizens, but Novotna and Korda have continued to represent their homeland. Now, they find themselves in Melbourne with a new affiliation: the Czech Republic.


"Of course, it's a bit different," said Korda, the No. 7 seed, who reached the quarterfinals here. "But you know, it's very hard to realize this thing has happened because I have a lot of friends in Slovakia, and I don't want to change personally. I don't want to say we are from different countries and now we have to hate each other. All I know is that the politicians choose this way, and I have to follow. I am just a tennis player."

The Czechs and the Slovaks are, of course, merely the latest additions to Europe's expanding list of nationalities. Between the demise of the Soviet Union and war in the Balkans, the tennis honor roll has undergone several revisions. Goran Ivanisevic, formerly of Yugoslavia, began declaring his allegiance to Croatia in 1991. Natalia Zvereva, formerly of the Soviet Union, is now representing her native Belarus. And the list goes on.

"I don't look at this like Goran Ivanisevic, who is really proud to play for Croatia," said Novotna, the ninth-ranked woman in the world. "It makes sense that he feels like that because of the problems there. But in our country, everything went a smooth and easy way. So I will just take it as it is.

"What I don't understand is that in one part of the world, people are trying to make a united Europe, and in the other part, nations are breaking into small countries. What kind of Europe is this? Who knows who is Slovakian or Slovenian? Who knows Czech Republic or Czechland or whatever we call ourselves?"

The Czech half of the country was always the stronger in tennis terms. Of Czechoslovakia's myriad stars, only Mecir could be considered a Slovak. A finalist at the U.S. Open in 1986 and the Olympic gold medalist in 1988, he prematurely ended his career because of a chronic back problem.

"I was always playing for Czechoslovakia, not Slovakia, and I wish I could still be playing for Czechoslovakia these days," he said. "It was a good country. Until three months before the split, I still couldn't believe it could happen. But at the end, nothing could stop it, even though I don't think most of the people wanted it in their heart."

With the division, the once-powerful Czechoslovakian Tennis Federation has ceased to exist. Henceforth, each nation has its own governing body for the sport, although the two countries will field combined squads for one more year in the Davis Cup and the Federation Cup.

The Davis Cup team will be exclusively Czech, because Slovakia's best male player is Karol Kucera, ranked No. 208. But the Federation Cup team should include Radka Zrubokova, a Slovak ranked 30th in the world. Slovakia also has another female player in the top 100: Karina Habsudova.

"The tennis development in Slovakia is still very good," said Andrej Bucko, a tennis writer who is covering the Australian Open for the Bratislava daily Pravda. "We have some girls and boys who are highly ranked in juniors. One of our big problems is courts. We don't have so much as the Czechs, and we don't have a big stadium for tennis. We will have to play Davis Cup in 1994 in a hockey rink because we can't build a new one in just a year."

The lack of good facilities could lead to a talent drain. Ludmila Richterova, a 16-year-old Slovak ranked eighth in the world, has asked for Czech nationality.

"Her coach lives in Prague, and the conditions for training are better there," Bucko said. "We can have some problems in Slovakia with organizing tennis things. We are not very skilled with management and sponsorships because our tennis administrators are not so experienced on the international level. They also don't speak English so well."

The administrators are perhaps more fluent in English at the reorganized Czech Tennis Federation in Prague, but according to Korda, the system is suffering.

"I think this change is going to hit hard on both sides," Korda said. "The big problem on our side is that everybody who knows how to handle a racket is teaching in Germany and making money for living. We don't have any coaches in my country, and between 16 and 20 years old, we don't have so many young players. It's getting a little better with the young ones at 10, 12 and 14 because they can get sponsors. Money talks, you know."

And it is this attitude that reflects a change even more profound than the new border between the Czechs and the Slovaks. When Korda and Novotna were growing up, tennis was controlled by the state. Since the Velvet Revolutionin 1989, tennis is ruled - like nearly everything else - by the market.

"When we were young, the idea was to play for trophies, to be somebody like Lendl or Navratilova or Mandlikova," Novotna said. "That idea isn't there anymore. Now, the youngsters are starting to play because they see the potential of money. It will be more and more like that, I think.

"In our time our parents would do anything so we could travel, so we could go out and maybe learn something from the West and be a little bit different. Now, the parents pay for the coaching, they pay for the practice time, and soon they're saying, 'That's enough. Send some money home.' I personally am very happy for what happened in 1989, but it's not always pretty, capitalism."

Nor is it always easy to change old habits overnight. Bucko, a supporter of Slovakia's independence, has been waging a personal crusade against political incorrectness since his arrival in Australia.

"Look at this," he says, unfolding an article from The Canberra Times. "They write that Australia will recognize 'the two independent Czech republics.' There is only one Czech Republic. People outside, the people in America or Australia, they don't really understand."

That may be true, but even Bucko has some catching up to do. His Pravda business card still reads: Bratislava, Czechoslovakia.

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 03:05 AM
After he won the Olympics.

THE SEOUL OLYMPICS: TENNIS; Mecir Beats Mayotte for Gold
By PETER ALFANO, SPECIAL TO THE NEW YORK TIMES

It was 64 years between gold medal points, a period that spanned the careers of Bill Tilden, Don Budge, Rod Laver and Bjorn Borg, several of the legendary names in tennis. None had the opportunity to accomplish what Miloslav Mecir of Czechoslovakia did today, when he won the Olympic gold medal, defeating Tim Mayotte, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.

Mecir, 24 years old, is the No. 10 ranked player in the world, a sleepy-eyed player with a whispy beard, nicknamed the Cat for the way he covers the court with deceptively quick, silent strides. Injuries had made this a disappointing year until now, as Mecir's best showing was reaching the Wimbledon semifinals.

In a departure from the expressionless mask he usually wears on the court, Mecir threw his racquet into the air and ran to the net with a smile after Mayotte netted a backhand volley on match point. Several minutes later, Mecir, Mayotte, Brad Gilbert and Stefan Edberg of Sweden took part in the medal ceremony, all appearing to enjoy the Olympic moment that modern-day tennis players never grew up thinking they would have a chance to enjoy. Good Feeling

''It's a very good feeling,'' Mecir said. ''It's difficult to say how this rates, however. I've played in so many tournaments. It is nice, though, to hear people cheering not only because I'm a good player, but because I am playing for them also.''

Mayotte, 28, has been one of the biggest boosters of Olympic tennis the past two weeks, saying it was a welcomed departure from the normal preoccupations of the tennis tour. There was even something worthwhile finishing second today as he left the Olympic park stadium court with a silver medal draped around his neck.

''It's strange because here, the emphasis is on medals instead of 100 percent on winning,'' Mayotte said. ''So there is consolation in getting to the medal group. The ceremony was fantastic, it's such a different way of doing things.''

The tennis, however, did not look any different than it usually does. Mayotte, one of the more accomplished players on the tour, relies on a serve and volley game. Miloslav the Magician may be the most versatile the way he appears like an apparition at the net or along the baseline, hitting tantalizingly soft shots, followed by a ripping backhand or forehand winner.

Mayotte won the first set on the strength of his serve, but he was aware that Mecir, a superbly conditioned player, is a slow starter. Before Mayotte even had time to enjoy his advantage, Mecir broke him in the opening game of the second set, hitting a forehand pass on break point. Dictates Play

Mayotte never recovered. Mecir used an accurate, if not overpowering serve, to put the ball in play, then sat back and pulled the strings, moving Mayotte from side to side, bringing him to the net, putting him on the run with lobs.

He broke Mayotte again in the seventh game, this time whipping a forehand passing shot down the line and closed out the set on his serve with a backhand winner. ''He was keeping me in motion,'' Mayotte said. ''I knew I would have my work cut out for me. He made so many of his first serves, hitting them deep that I couldn't get to the net.''

Mayotte rallied surprisingly well, but this is Mecir's game. He broke Mayotte in the fifth game of the third set, smacking a forehand service return winner at the American's feet. He was barely being challenged on his own serve, winning 28 of 30 points during one stretch. He closed out the set at love, forcing three errors, then placing a soft backhand winner down the line.

For all intents, the match was over. Mecir kept up the pace in the final set, Mayotte reaching back on his serve, looking for an equalizer. He never found it. This was Mecir at his best, when he can beat any player in the world.

''I have to spend some time with my friends to think about how this feels,'' he said. ''It's a great day.''

Judging by the smiles worn by Mayotte and the two bronze medalists, Gilbert and Edberg, it was one of the rare times in tennis when even the losers had something to cheer about.

Clay Death
03-28-2008, 03:06 AM
Mecir had a Czech father and Slovak mother, was raised in Slovakia, this at the time of the break up of the nation was interesting in itself.

http://www.iht.com/articles/1993/01/28/dcze.php?page=1

When a New Border Splits a Tennis Team
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 1993

MELBOURNE: Like many former Czechoslovaks, Miloslav Mecir is part of a family tree with varied branches. His mother is a Slovak, his father a Czech. And although he lives in the Slovak capital, Bratislava, and comments on tennis for Slovak television, his wife is a Czech.

"For me," he said sadly, "the border is something I don't like."

The border was created at the stroke of midnight on Jan. 1 when Slovakia officially became independent of its more populous and cosmopolitan neighbor.

In the world of sport, the effect of the division is already in evidence at the Australian Open. For the last three decades, Czechoslovakia held a firm place among the world's leading tennis nations as its state-controlled system produced a succession of sensational players, beginning with Jan Kodes in the 1960s and continuing with Martina Navratilova, Ivan Lendl, Hana Mandlikova, Mecir and, most recently, Jana Novotna and Petr Korda.

Navratilova and Lendl fled the communist regime and later became American citizens, but Novotna and Korda have continued to represent their homeland. Now, they find themselves in Melbourne with a new affiliation: the Czech Republic.


"Of course, it's a bit different," said Korda, the No. 7 seed, who reached the quarterfinals here. "But you know, it's very hard to realize this thing has happened because I have a lot of friends in Slovakia, and I don't want to change personally. I don't want to say we are from different countries and now we have to hate each other. All I know is that the politicians choose this way, and I have to follow. I am just a tennis player."

The Czechs and the Slovaks are, of course, merely the latest additions to Europe's expanding list of nationalities. Between the demise of the Soviet Union and war in the Balkans, the tennis honor roll has undergone several revisions. Goran Ivanisevic, formerly of Yugoslavia, began declaring his allegiance to Croatia in 1991. Natalia Zvereva, formerly of the Soviet Union, is now representing her native Belarus. And the list goes on.

"I don't look at this like Goran Ivanisevic, who is really proud to play for Croatia," said Novotna, the ninth-ranked woman in the world. "It makes sense that he feels like that because of the problems there. But in our country, everything went a smooth and easy way. So I will just take it as it is.

"What I don't understand is that in one part of the world, people are trying to make a united Europe, and in the other part, nations are breaking into small countries. What kind of Europe is this? Who knows who is Slovakian or Slovenian? Who knows Czech Republic or Czechland or whatever we call ourselves?"

The Czech half of the country was always the stronger in tennis terms. Of Czechoslovakia's myriad stars, only Mecir could be considered a Slovak. A finalist at the U.S. Open in 1986 and the Olympic gold medalist in 1988, he prematurely ended his career because of a chronic back problem.

"I was always playing for Czechoslovakia, not Slovakia, and I wish I could still be playing for Czechoslovakia these days," he said. "It was a good country. Until three months before the split, I still couldn't believe it could happen. But at the end, nothing could stop it, even though I don't think most of the people wanted it in their heart."

With the division, the once-powerful Czechoslovakian Tennis Federation has ceased to exist. Henceforth, each nation has its own governing body for the sport, although the two countries will field combined squads for one more year in the Davis Cup and the Federation Cup.

The Davis Cup team will be exclusively Czech, because Slovakia's best male player is Karol Kucera, ranked No. 208. But the Federation Cup team should include Radka Zrubokova, a Slovak ranked 30th in the world. Slovakia also has another female player in the top 100: Karina Habsudova.

"The tennis development in Slovakia is still very good," said Andrej Bucko, a tennis writer who is covering the Australian Open for the Bratislava daily Pravda. "We have some girls and boys who are highly ranked in juniors. One of our big problems is courts. We don't have so much as the Czechs, and we don't have a big stadium for tennis. We will have to play Davis Cup in 1994 in a hockey rink because we can't build a new one in just a year."

The lack of good facilities could lead to a talent drain. Ludmila Richterova, a 16-year-old Slovak ranked eighth in the world, has asked for Czech nationality.

"Her coach lives in Prague, and the conditions for training are better there," Bucko said. "We can have some problems in Slovakia with organizing tennis things. We are not very skilled with management and sponsorships because our tennis administrators are not so experienced on the international level. They also don't speak English so well."

The administrators are perhaps more fluent in English at the reorganized Czech Tennis Federation in Prague, but according to Korda, the system is suffering.

"I think this change is going to hit hard on both sides," Korda said. "The big problem on our side is that everybody who knows how to handle a racket is teaching in Germany and making money for living. We don't have any coaches in my country, and between 16 and 20 years old, we don't have so many young players. It's getting a little better with the young ones at 10, 12 and 14 because they can get sponsors. Money talks, you know."

And it is this attitude that reflects a change even more profound than the new border between the Czechs and the Slovaks. When Korda and Novotna were growing up, tennis was controlled by the state. Since the Velvet Revolutionin 1989, tennis is ruled - like nearly everything else - by the market.

"When we were young, the idea was to play for trophies, to be somebody like Lendl or Navratilova or Mandlikova," Novotna said. "That idea isn't there anymore. Now, the youngsters are starting to play because they see the potential of money. It will be more and more like that, I think.

"In our time our parents would do anything so we could travel, so we could go out and maybe learn something from the West and be a little bit different. Now, the parents pay for the coaching, they pay for the practice time, and soon they're saying, 'That's enough. Send some money home.' I personally am very happy for what happened in 1989, but it's not always pretty, capitalism."

Nor is it always easy to change old habits overnight. Bucko, a supporter of Slovakia's independence, has been waging a personal crusade against political incorrectness since his arrival in Australia.

"Look at this," he says, unfolding an article from The Canberra Times. "They write that Australia will recognize 'the two independent Czech republics.' There is only one Czech Republic. People outside, the people in America or Australia, they don't really understand."

That may be true, but even Bucko has some catching up to do. His Pravda business card still reads: Bratislava, Czechoslovakia.


i saw him conduct a clinic against Becker at the U.S Open once. what a graceful athlete for being as tall as he was. he also gave johhny mac fits with his movement.

his 2 losses to Lendl in slam finals were tough.

Merton
03-28-2008, 03:14 AM
Thanks for the articles, the Big Cat was perhaps the best player ever among those who did not win a slam. A pity we never saw a Chezhoslovakia team of Lendl-Mecir in DC at that time, it would certainly be a decent team.

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 03:19 AM
Thanks for the articles, the Big Cat was perhaps the best player ever among those who did not win a slam. A pity we never saw a Chezhoslovakia team of Lendl-Mecir in DC at that time, it would certainly be a decent team.

They didn't really play that well as a team, though Smid was a quality doubles player. Lendl really didn't believe in the whole Czechoslovakia thing, as he was living in the US quite early in the 80s.

Mecir used to get very nervous and had some big chokes, well he had Edberg on toast at Wimbledon in 88, but his back was really fucking him over and his nerves didn't help either.

i saw him conduct a clinic against Becker at the U.S Open once. what a graceful athlete for being as tall as he was. he also gave johhny mac fits with his movement.

his 2 losses to Lendl in slam finals were tough.


I have an old article that I will scan on here, about those 2. Lendl said he hated the way he had to play Mecir, but it was effective.

Mecir's only win over Lendl was worth watching though in Miami, so the timing of this was worth it.

Clay Death
03-28-2008, 03:20 AM
Thanks for the articles, the Big Cat was perhaps the best player ever among those who did not win a slam. A pity we never saw a Chezhoslovakia team of Lendl-Mecir in DC at that time, it would certainly be a decent team.

indeed. thanks for sharing the article. i may have to get hold of some of his matches and watch them again. i was just a kid then and didnt really fully appreciate his awesome baseline game and his movement.

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 03:47 AM
Two of the best brains out there, this was posted in the point construction thread. The worst thing about this is that clown Mary Carillo.

z2bzlj4ypvw

wGlvPu-PE24

Clay Death
03-28-2008, 03:55 AM
Two of the best brains out there, this was posted in the point construction thread. The worst thing about this is that clown Mary Carillo.

z2bzlj4ypvw

wGlvPu-PE24
thanks man. i enjoyed the hell out of that. i think i will watch it a few more times.

Big Cat`s movement seems so effortless. the backhand passes are out of this world.

incredible stuff.

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 04:00 AM
Wilander did very well to win this match. Watch towards the end of the 1st clip, the way he has Mats on a string and takes the piss out of him.

When he coached Kucera, this is what he said about that infamous match with Agassi at the US Open.

'I think it is the most interesting match in my career,'' Kucera said, who gained his sobriquet, ''the little cat,'' because he moves like his mentor, Miloslav Mecir, of ''big cat'' fame. After he saw a couple of his nine lives evaporate Monday night once Agassi started making a comeback, it was his mentor, Miloslav Mecir, who cautioned him to stick to tennis and to leave the show business -- including moonballs, tantrums and imitations -- to his desperate opponent.

Clay Death
03-28-2008, 04:10 AM
Wilander did very well to win this match. Watch towards the end of the 1st clip, the way he has Mats on a string and takes the piss out of him.

When he coached Kucera, this is what he said about that infamous match with Agassi at the US Open.

'I think it is the most interesting match in my career,'' Kucera said, who gained his sobriquet, ''the little cat,'' because he moves like his mentor, Miloslav Mecir, of ''big cat'' fame. After he saw a couple of his nine lives evaporate Monday night once Agassi started making a comeback, it was his mentor, Miloslav Mecir, who cautioned him to stick to tennis and to leave the show business -- including moonballs, tantrums and imitations -- to his desperate opponent.

will do. this is fascinating stuff. brings bask so many memories i ahd as a kid. i could never forget that stripe across his shirt.

once again, thanks for sharing. i am definitely ordering a few of his matches that he played against Becker and Johnny Mac. he toyed with them.

rocketassist
03-28-2008, 04:17 AM
Two of the best brains out there, this was posted in the point construction thread. The worst thing about this is that clown Mary Carillo.

z2bzlj4ypvw

wGlvPu-PE24

Couldn't the male commentator just quietly tell her to shut the fuck up? :cuckoo:

Quality player and I can see the similarities with Murray in point construction.

Action Jackson
03-28-2008, 04:22 AM
Couldn't the male commentator just quietly tell her to shut the fuck up? :cuckoo:

Quality player and I can see the similarities with Murray in point construction.

Murray will never be that good, that's the difference. Only thing that is similar is maybe the slow elongated walk.

Hahaha, as for telling her to shut the fuck up, it would have been good.

Clay Death
03-28-2008, 04:24 AM
Couldn't the male commentator just quietly tell her to shut the fuck up? :cuckoo:

Quality player and I can see the similarities with Murray in point construction.

mary carillo is just a moron. fucking female version of justin gimmelstob.

tough loss for the Big Cat. Wilander just played incredible defense on this day.

both of these guys are superb tennis minds.

Kolya
03-28-2008, 08:39 AM
Don't insult Mecir but comparing him to Murray.

Action Jackson
05-21-2008, 09:23 AM
Big Cat On The Prowl
Miloslav Mecir preys on the game's top players
Jaime Diaz

Miloslav Mecir remembers the pride he felt the first time he saw a videotape of himself playing his seemingly effortless and impassive brand of tennis. "I looked to me to be quite natural," he says in English that can still be described as live from Slovakia. "I was very happy about this."

But something powerful compelled Mecir to look only once. "It is very strange," he says. "I know it is better for me not to feel anything about my game. Only to play."

Mecir is one of the few who has resisted the temptation to scrutinize his born-to-the-game gift. Most tennis aficionados have decided he is the most intriguing new star in the game. This year the 22-year-old Mecir has reached the finals in five of the eight tournaments he has entered, and has won four. On Sunday he beat John McEnroe 6-0, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2 to win the WCT Finals in Dallas. It was his first victory over McEnroe in three tries and helped establish Mecir as a prime contender to win any one of this year's Grand Slam events.

Mecir dominated McEnroe both physically and mentally. During an ugly and prolonged McEnroe tantrum that cost him a penalty point in the third set, Mecir remained characteristically calm. "It's not very nice to play in such an atmosphere," he said later. "I told myself only to stay patient. I try to behave as my parents taught me."

After the outburst McEnroe's game sagged. Although he was impressive in defeating top-seeded Stefan Edberg in the semifinals, his performance against Mecir shows he has not fully reclaimed his ability to sustain concentration or to dig deep when the match is on the line. Mecir dispatched McEnroe with the same subtle but lethal style that first drew notice at last year's U.S. Open, where he upset Boris Becker before losing to Ivan Lendl in the finals. "Playing him is like bleeding to death," said Canadian pro Glenn Michibata after Mecir beat him in Auckland in January.

Though maddening to opponents, Mecir's game is beautiful to watch. The 6'3", 180-pound Mecir keeps his head as still and erect as a periscope when he strikes the ball. He prefers to play inside the baseline and take the ball early with short, smooth strokes that are next to impossible to read. Never overhitting the ball and always on balance, he sends back acutely angled blocks and spins that either force an error or allow him to close in and put away an easy volley.

When Mecir gets in trouble, he relies on the quickness in his muscled legs to run down shots. His ability to cover the court with long, even strides has earned him the nickname Big Cat. And according to Becker, Mecir's two-handed backhand is the best in the game.

"He's just too good for me," said Mats Wilander after Mecir beat him 6-1, 6-1, 6-3 in the first round in Dallas. "You never feel like you're controlling the match. It feels like you're doing everything you can and it's still all up to him."

Indeed, Mecir has controlled Wilander and his fellow Swedes as well as any player in the world. Against Wilander, Edberg, Anders Jarryd and Joakim Nystrom, he has a remarkable 18-11 record, which has earned him another nickname: Swede Killer. "In two years," says Wilander, "I think Milos will be No. 1."

Mecir likes all the attention he has received of late, but he likes his mystique even more. When asked why he is one of the few top-ranked players without a coach, he says, "It is good for me that everyone else has one. They wonder why."

He makes such pronouncements from behind a scruffy beard that gives him the mien of a beat poet. In interviews he often half-volleys questions with playful answers. When asked why he gets along with McEnroe, his temperamental opposite, he said, "Well, we don't meet very often." Mecir is an avid fisherman, but when asked what kind of fish he most enjoyed catching, his answer was quick: "Lendl."

Mecir is a self-professed nature boy. At a tournament in Washington, D.C., two years ago, he couldn't be found before a match. Just as he was about to be defaulted, he emerged from a nearby wooded area cradling a turtle. "I like to look how the country is and have private time," he says. "I have very good memories of when my grandfather took me to the wild country in Czechoslovakia."

Mecir was born in Bojnice, a small city in the republic of Slovakia in the eastern corner of Czechoslovakia. All the other leading players from his country, including Lendl, Tomas Smid, Martina Navratilova and Hana Mandlikova, are Czech. Mecir is the first Slovak to achieve a high world ranking.

His parents, Ladislav Mecir and Blazena Mecirova, are both technical engineers, and from them Milos inherited an analytical bent. When Snauwaert, the racket company he represents, recently asked for suggestions to improve its product, Mecir drew a detailed blueprint on the spot.

He began playing tennis at six. By age 16 he was the Czechoslovakian junior champion. He turned pro in 1982 and toiled in anonymity until 1985—when he won the sympathy of every hacker who has ever gagged in a match. After going up 4-0 in the final set against Jimmy Connors at the World Team Cup in Düsseldorf, he became so nervous that he served underhanded and lost the match. The next week at the French Open, Mecir again served underhanded. "I was mentally very tired," he says. "I don't have this problem since I am used to the circuit."

This year Mecir has been on a tear. "It is not one thing," he says. "Just more confidence." By winning the New South Wales Open on grass in February, he became one of only a handful of players to have won tournaments on all four surfaces (clay, hard, indoor carpet and grass). But his biggest victory to date came in March when he avenged his U.S. Open loss to Lendl by winning the Lipton International Players Championship in Key Biscayne, Fla.

"You have to have a special weapon to beat him," says Wilander. "Becker has the serve, McEnroe the volley. But I think he will always give Ivan or any all-around player trouble. You have to be an extreme player to beat him." Adds Becker, "You must play a tactical game against him. If you play just tennis, you'll lose."

Even though Mecir won $360,888 last year and has already won $418,824 this year, he says his life-style has changed little. Whenever he has a break in his schedule, he returns to Czechoslovakia, where he stays at his parents' home in Bratislava or in an apartment in Prague. "I was happy when I had little money; I'm a little happier now," he says. "I still like to go to Czechoslovakia. Then I can give some to my parents and my brother, to see them happier also."

But Mecir is not without ambition. He speaks openly of wanting to win Wimbledon. "That's where I wish to do the best," he says. "I have a very good time playing on grass."

The questions about No. 1 have started, but Mecir handles them with his usual equanimity. "I am satisfied," he says. "If I wasn't satisfied right now, I don't know when I should be."

Kolya
05-21-2008, 09:45 AM
Nice article on Mecir.

Thanks PMK.

stebs
05-21-2008, 11:40 AM
Thanks for digging these up GWH they are good reads. Mecir still the greatest without a slam in the open era and the opinions guys like Wilander had on him show what a great player he was.

Action Jackson
05-21-2008, 11:50 AM
No probs stebs, people don't actually realise how talented and gifted Mecir was. Best of all he was his own man, danced to a different beat, no coach, learnt the game on his own terms.

I have some other articles, at hand, something needs to be done on GM.

stebs
05-21-2008, 12:15 PM
No probs stebs, people don't actually realise how talented and gifted Mecir was. Best of all he was his own man, danced to a different beat, no coach, learnt the game on his own terms.

I didn't follow tennis as closely as I do now when Mecir was at his best so I don't know as much about the people (only about the tennis, mostly slam performances) but for sure Mecir always struck a chord with his relaxed manner. To be like that on court you realised he enjoyed the game and cared but at the same time if he never was good at tennis he would've had another life and been fine whereas with a lot of players you really feel tennis is what they've got and not much else.

Kolya
05-21-2008, 12:21 PM
I would have loved to see Mecir win Wimbledon in 1988. He was a bit unlucky.

Action Jackson
05-21-2008, 12:22 PM
I didn't follow tennis as closely as I do now when Mecir was at his best so I don't know as much about the people (only about the tennis, mostly slam performances) but for sure Mecir always struck a chord with his relaxed manner. To be like that on court you realised he enjoyed the game and cared but at the same time if he never was good at tennis he would've had another life and been fine whereas with a lot of players you really feel tennis is what they've got and not much else.

Well, there is a reference in this thread as to how his parents raised him when he had a dig at Agassi. This is the thing, when he played well, it was great to watch, but when he was off, it looked like he wasn't trying, but the facial expressions were the same.

In the Lendl match at Miami, he took the piss out of Lendl on court, it was so funny and dry.

stebs
05-21-2008, 12:25 PM
Well, there is a reference in this thread as to how his parents raised him when he had a dig at Agassi. This is the thing, when he played well, it was great to watch, but when he was off, it looked like he wasn't trying, but the facial expressions were the same.

In the Lendl match at Miami, he took the piss out of Lendl on court, it was so funny and dry.

Well, to a certain extent he could be compared to Kolya in the modern game. At least the facial experessions Nikolay makes remind me of the way Mecir held himself on court.

In terms of talent I think I would compare Mecir to Nalbandian but the Slovak more consistent by far and because of that ended up achieving more than Nalbandian is likely to do so. Obviously, the games they play are not similar, just the level relative to the other players of the day.

Action Jackson
05-21-2008, 12:31 PM
Mecir, I really don't think can be compared to anyone playing the game now. The closest one would have been his protege Kucera.

stebs
05-21-2008, 12:34 PM
Mecir, I really don't think can be compared to anyone playing the game now. The closest one would have been his protege Kucera.

Well one of the reasons he was so well liked and still is today is the unique way his game worked.

Kolya
05-21-2008, 12:45 PM
I would say the closest to Mecir was Kucera, the way they moved around the court gracefully and fast and how they both used their heads to out think their opponents. Both had great temperament but also both struggled with pressure at times and injuries limited their potential success.

Nalbandian is like the closest out of all the current players but he is less graceful and deceptive.

Action Jackson
05-21-2008, 12:48 PM
Well one of the reasons he was so well liked and still is today is the unique way his game worked.

It's good some people, do appreciate the difference and too bad Milo got nervous and the back problems, but I still remember he was the last man to use a wooden racquet.

I bumped up another thread as well, with some good articles, a welcome change from the drivel at the moment.

Action Jackson
06-04-2008, 10:38 AM
Here is the legend at the Prostejov Challenger.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y18/svein_sveynsson/max_1212488607.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y18/svein_sveynsson/max_1212500059.jpg

fast_clay
06-04-2008, 01:52 PM
Right, but people hailing from Czechoslovakia where often referred to as Czechs before the country was split into two countries.

yes thats true... pre '89...

he is slovak but his surname is actually czech.

fast_clay
06-04-2008, 01:56 PM
Here is the legend at the Prostejov Challenger.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y18/svein_sveynsson/max_1212488607.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y18/svein_sveynsson/max_1212500059.jpg

the big cat is a true fukn hero of the game... an oasis of brilliance in the sea of new power...

Action Jackson
07-14-2008, 05:43 AM
the big cat is a true fukn hero of the game... an oasis of brilliance in the sea of new power...

The perfect description, the antithesis of Lendl, though both had a very sharp sense of humour.

NYCtennisfan
07-14-2008, 06:20 AM
The Big Cat...what a talent. The way he could hold the ball on his BH side was simply incredible, a pure, pure talent. Four matches stick out in my mind:

1. His 1986 SF against Becker. Shotmaking galore all over the place, late into the night.

2. His collapse against Edberg at Wimbledon. Absolutely schooling the eventual champ with effortless ease and then the collapse.

3. His Miami win over Lendl. Incredibly played, especially the BH as he was holding the ball with it all match long and Lendl didn't know if he was going DTL or CC.

4. The 1986 USO Final against Lendl. He was tired from battling Becker and after the first few games, he knew it was a hopeless case trying to beat Lendl.

Action Jackson
07-14-2008, 06:46 AM
Mecir's best matches were in the 1985 Hamburg and Rome, where he made Wilander look like an imbecilic kid.

Wilander even when his motivation was down, he never got thrashed like this on clay.

Kolya
07-14-2008, 02:09 PM
Mecir's best matches were in the 1985 Hamburg and Rome, where he made Wilander look like an imbecilic kid.

Wilander even when his motivation was down, he never got thrashed like this on clay.

Mecir looks in good shape.

How about Mecir's match against Wilander in the 1988 Wimbledon QF?

fast_clay
07-14-2008, 08:30 PM
Mecir's best matches were in the 1985 Hamburg and Rome, where he made Wilander look like an imbecilic kid.

Wilander even when his motivation was down, he never got thrashed like this on clay.

i am mates with a massive talent... i dont believe the guy needs a coach... cos, he is a natural... just needs direction to find what sort of play he finds appealing...

i sent him links to the USO mecir VS wilander match... my friend is 22, but, couldn't believe was he was seeing... he couldnt understand why he saw himself as a young scholar of the game, yet miss ever hearing about such a game...

of note PMK, on the 2nd vid... is the backhand return down the line... 4:15...

i look at this shot and think: you could only ever hope that such hands would find a racquet in them... pure instinct...

when points are quick mate... you can only wish for them to look this way...

NYCtennisfan
07-15-2008, 03:34 AM
Mecir's best matches were in the 1985 Hamburg and Rome, where he made Wilander look like an imbecilic kid.

Wilander even when his motivation was down, he never got thrashed like this on clay.

Unfortunately, I have never gotten to see those matches, only knew of the results. That must've been some kind of clinic he put on.

Action Jackson
07-15-2008, 05:19 AM
i am mates with a massive talent... i dont believe the guy needs a coach... cos, he is a natural... just needs direction to find what sort of play he finds appealing...

i sent him links to the USO mecir VS wilander match... my friend is 22, but, couldn't believe was he was seeing... he couldnt understand why he saw himself as a young scholar of the game, yet miss ever hearing about such a game...

of note PMK, on the 2nd vid... is the backhand return down the line... 4:15...

i look at this shot and think: you could only ever hope that such hands would find a racquet in them... pure instinct...

when points are quick mate... you can only wish for them to look this way...

There are lots of things and information around, that hasn't been truly accessed, at the same time most people only want to know about the very top and don't look a bit deeper. Mecir and Mats were overlooked, but for different reasons.

Yes, the pace of the game was slower, but very technical and the use of angles, then sneaking into the net to finish the points off. I actually have that particular match in full and Wilander was lucky to win it.

Unfortunately, I have never gotten to see those matches, only knew of the results. That must've been some kind of clinic he put on.

I saw it in Sweden, that was when Swedish TV always had tennis and when Eurosport actually did mens events.

Mecir made the ball talk, it was slow and heavy clay, just absorbed Wilander's shots and just kept him off balance. Well when a guy who moved as well as Mats says "this guy made me feel like I'm on ice skates".

fast_clay
07-15-2008, 05:34 AM
There are lots of things and information around, that hasn't been truly accessed, at the same time most people only want to know about the very top and don't look a bit deeper. Mecir and Mats were overlooked, but for different reasons.

its funny you know... this bugs me pretty hard... i fully agree that mecir's game was the anti-venom to lendl's poison... such a simple diffusion... but... the brutal dominance of lendl throughout the 80's kind of set the blueprint for success... (martina also to an extent) ... yet, what bugs me, and will forever amaze me, that the anti-blueprint actually hailed from the same czechoslovak region... (morava - lendl is actually the closest part of czech to svk)... hence my fascination with the place...

and... as you say... people do not tend to scratch the surface... and instead of nuturing and encouraging true geniality to the top (mecir), its actually easier to put in the years to bang out a mechanically relaible shot in a brutal, tradesman like fashion (lendl).... but is it really easier... or has something just been fully overlooked...?

history says its what worked / dominated...

history chooses not to remember an operation which had a 1% liklihood of failure...

prima donna
07-15-2008, 05:42 AM
I really have enjoyed watching clips of Mecir's matches, both those included in this particular thread, as well as those on youtube -- however scarce they may be.

Action Jackson
07-15-2008, 05:56 AM
Once I get the whole uploading from DVD on youtube, then I will see what I can put up on there, when it comes to Mecir.

Action Jackson
07-15-2008, 06:01 AM
its funny you know... this bugs me pretty hard... i fully agree that mecir's game was the anti-venom to lendl's poison... such a simple diffusion... but... the brutal dominance of lendl throughout the 80's kind of set the blueprint for success... (martina also to an extent) ... yet, what bugs me, and will forever amaze me, that the anti-blueprint actually hailed from the same czechoslovak region... (morava - lendl is actually the closest part of czech to svk)... hence my fascination with the place...

and... as you say... people do not tend to scratch the surface... and instead of nuturing and encouraging true geniality to the top (mecir), its actually easier to put in the years to bang out a mechanically relaible shot in a brutal, tradesman like fashion (lendl).... but is it really easier... or has something just been fully overlooked...?

history says its what worked / dominated...

history chooses not to remember an operation which had a 1% liklihood of failure...

Well, Lendl wasn't the most gifted, but he knew what he needed to do, to achieve success and yes he is the father of the modern game, whether people like it or not. Lendl is from Ostrava, so he is actually closer to Poland.

Both of them have their place in the history of the game, but for different reasons. I mean look at their respective outlooks and it says it all. Lendl was very driven, ruthlessly efficient, and not as naturally talented, but he made up for it.

Mecir was a very different individual, danced to his own tune, loved fishing and being in nature, like the interviews he didn't like the big cities like New York.

At the Aus Open, he never stayed in a hotel, he stayed with a very kind and likable Slovak family in Melbourne, who I have met many times. How many top 10 players would stay with a local family.

boughtmypoints
07-15-2008, 11:56 AM
GW,

As you probably know Mecir was my favourite player to watch from the last 40 years.

I found the best vantage point to watch him was behind the service line; he would have me in hysterics as he played with the ball (and his befuddled opponent).

I also saw him at his nadir, 4 tournaments from the end at IW 1990. I had always thought he cynically did a final year on the tour just to pick up first round prize money cheques, as was common with the east europeans. But in looking back at his record, he actually showed a lot of integrity when exiting the tour, playing just a handful of tournaments after his back gave out.

Action Jackson
07-15-2008, 11:59 AM
It was great watching him play, he was languid and had a very low centre of gravity for a tall guy, then he did have a long trunk and short legs.

His facial expressions were always the same, when he was winning or losing, but when he was losing, it looked like he didn't care.

Glad, he went out as well as he could, given the circumstances.

Deivid23
07-21-2008, 11:45 AM
Nalbandian is like the closest out of all the current players but he is less graceful and deceptive.


People love wankfests about retired players, and many people think saying past things were better than current ones makes you look smart, I was not interested in tennis when Mecir was at his peak, but having seen footage of him I don´t think Mecir can match the talent Nalbandian has, sorry

Action Jackson
07-21-2008, 12:39 PM
People love wankfests about retired players, and many people think saying past things were better than current ones makes you look smart, I was not interested in tennis when Mecir was at his peak, but having seen footage of him I don´t think Mecir can match the talent Nalbandian has, sorry

Which people would that be? It's not a question of looking smart, it's a totally different game now, back to when it was then. Mecir never got coached, whereas Nalbandian did, one learnt to play with wood and was the last player to play with a wooden racquet, the other hasn't. There are too many differences.

The difference from top to the overall level was much greater then than now, but the level at the top (Federer and Nadal ) are exceptions is lower than at that time, they'd do well in any era, like any of the greats would.

Just look football it was a lot slower then, than it is now, the differences in levels between have shrunk in time. It just means it's a different game, whether it's better or not, is dependant on the viewpoint.

Deivid23
07-21-2008, 02:47 PM
Which people would that be? It's not a question of looking smart, it's a totally different game now, back to when it was then. Mecir never got coached, whereas Nalbandian did, one learnt to play with wood and was the last player to play with a wooden racquet, the other hasn't. There are too many differences.

If there are so many differences why saying Mecir was the greatest player ever not to have won a GS? Or why should we take for granted Murray won´t ever be as good as Mecir when he´s just turned 21?

alfonsojose
07-21-2008, 02:52 PM
Sexy legs :drool:

Action Jackson
07-22-2008, 05:43 AM
If there are so many differences why saying Mecir was the greatest player ever not to have won a GS? Or why should we take for granted Murray won´t ever be as good as Mecir when he´s just turned 21?

Mecir made 2 GS finals and made the semis at the other 2 Slams, therefore one of the few players to get to the semis of all Slams at least once, yet not win one. Facts are when he was playing Lendl, Becker, Edberg, Wilander, McEnroe up to 85 where the big guns then, all of them great players at the same time. He had a 4 year window before the back problems set in. He had the game, the ability, but not the mental strength.

When Murray does that, then you will have a case.

If you can't see the game has the changed, then you are just having a laugh. The difference in court surface speed has shrunk, the composition of the balls are different, lighter balls for clay, heavier for grass, the game is more physical than before, technological advances have impacted and changed the way it's played, this is very clear.

Deivid23
07-22-2008, 06:28 AM
Mecir made 2 GS finals and made the semis at the other 2 Slams, therefore one of the few players to get to the semis of all Slams at least once, yet not win one. Facts are when he was playing Lendl, Becker, Edberg, Wilander, McEnroe up to 85 where the big guns then, all of them great players at the same time. He had a 4 year window before the back problems set in. He had the game, the ability, but not the mental strength.

Nalbandian has had a lot of injuries during his career as well, probably helped by him being too careless about his profession. Even with that he has made semis in all 4 Slams as well, just one final in Wimbledon but he had very good chances to reach the finals in every Grand Slam (for instance how close he was against Roddick in USO or Baghdatis in AO and the back problem that hampered him while schooling Federer in that SF at RG). Mecir faced a bigger group of the best players in history but if I´m not wrong Federer has also kicked David out in several QF´s at GS, thing which also should be considered when making a recap of his weight in tennis history. I´m completely sure after a few years he has retired he will be considered by many people the most talented player ever not to win a Slam, it´s just too soon for many of them to recognize it.

When Murray does that, then you will have a case. .

By the way you talk about Murray, looks like he will be lucky to reach a Slam final. I prefer to be more cautelous about the chances of a terribly gifted player at the age of 21 (not even considering the injury layoffs he´s faced so far). I´m convinced he will get big results (Slams included) and I find funny to scratch his chances or underrate his potential like this.

If you can't see the game has the changed, then you are just having a laugh. The difference in court surface speed has shrunk, the composition of the balls are different, lighter balls for clay, heavier for grass, the game is more physical than before, technological advances have impacted and changed the way it's played, this is very clear.


I have not talked one thing about that, it´s pretty obvious, so I can´t see your point going again through this

Kolya
07-22-2008, 08:52 AM
People love wankfests about retired players, and many people think saying past things were better than current ones makes you look smart, I was not interested in tennis when Mecir was at his peak, but having seen footage of him I don´t think Mecir can match the talent Nalbandian has, sorry

One main difference between Mecir and Nalbandian IMO is that Nalbandian at his peak is mentally stronger and has the mind to win a GS than Mecir.

Talent is subjective, so I don't really care.

Eden
07-30-2008, 06:42 PM
Pleasure Players: Stylists We Love

By Raymond Lee and Stavo Craft
Monday, July 28, 2008


http://picsrv.fashionweekdaily.com/?fif=/tennisweek/img_696_175374_37.jpg&obj=iip,1.0&hei=268&wid=422

It began, as so many ideas do, during a discussion with friends. At a time when much of the debate among tennis fans on courts and in chat rooms around the world centers around "Who is the best player?" we began to reflect on our favorites who exuded a pleasure for playing.
As the game goes on there's often a tendency to proclaim the latest champions as the greatest players, but what about the players who have reserved a special place in the minds of life-long tennis fans for their style, grace and mesmerizing skills?
Tennis history is filled with standouts and stylists who have either been underrated or overlooked by fans who follow the sport today. These are players ranging from former champions who may have been overshadowed by more accomplished rivals, competitors whose careers were cut short due to injury or those who simply slipped through the cracks of public consciousness playing in an era when there was scarce coverage of the sport.
Here are three of our all-time favorite players who are connected by their graceful style and gracious sportsmanship.
One of our favorite players of the recent past is the brilliant Czech Miloslav Mecir, the 1986 U.S. Open finalist. Very rarely have we seen a player with a great combination of skills and smoothness. Mecir had such wonderful footwork and speed. He seemed to cover the court in just a few steps where he could make use of his remarkable groundstrokes. Because he was able to get to reach the ball so early he had the ability to wait a fraction of a second and disguise his shots.
Mecir had amazing touch and the ability to change pace in a way rarely seen before or since. To quote Herbert Warren Wind, writing for The New Yorker, in the late 1980s: "He plays points differently than anyone else today. He is like no one I’ve ever seen when changing pace. He really knows how to change pace on an opponent’s serve and his serve, which is something else I haven’t seen. He can also play pretty hard-hitting tennis. You really have to be hitting as well as Lendl did in that U.S. Open final to beat him because Mecir is out there thinking all the time."
Mecir, like Andre Agassi a bit later, often stood on top of the baseline and took the ball on the rise and also like Agassi he had perhaps the best return in the game. Unlike Agassi he seemed so often to be able to hit one shot and turn a rally in which he was on the defensive into a rally in which he was in control. Mecir had an excellent volley and his approach shots were very controlled and hard to read because of his short backswing. One of his few vulnerabilities was that his second serve could have been a bit better to take advantage of his 6-foot-3 height. It wasn’t a bad serve by any means, but it could have been used more effectively to get some a few additional free points.
I’ve basically given all of you a brief description of Mecir’s style of play but I can’t adequately describe to you the how truly mesmerizing he was. At his best, Mecir was such a smooth operator, it was sometimes difficult to watch his oppponent because Mecir commanded your attention on court.
I remember one rally that he was in involved in with Boris Becker in which Becker hit what I thought was a winning volley. Mecir seemed light years away from the ball, but all of a sudden he was there with time to spare and hit the ball sharply crosscourt passed a stunned Becker. I couldn’t believe it and I don’t think Becker did either!
At the risk of sounding like someone quoting Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid I thought to myself, "Who is this guy? How can anyone do this to Boris Becker?" At this point he immediately became one of my favorites. I enjoyed his unique play in so many matches over the next few years but unfortunately due to a back problem he was unable to continue what I thought would be a Hall of Fame career. Because of his premature retirement from the tennis scene, I felt robbed that I couldn’t enjoy his play anymore.
You always wonder what might have been and while he has continued a career in tennis as a Davis Cup captain for the Slovak Republic, I will always remember him as one of the best-moving big men I've seen.

Source: http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6614829

NYCtennisfan
07-30-2008, 06:53 PM
Pleasure Players: Stylists We Love

By Raymond Lee and Stavo Craft
Monday, July 28, 2008


http://picsrv.fashionweekdaily.com/?fif=/tennisweek/img_696_175374_37.jpg&obj=iip,1.0&hei=268&wid=422

It began, as so many ideas do, during a discussion with friends. At a time when much of the debate among tennis fans on courts and in chat rooms around the world centers around "Who is the best player?" we began to reflect on our favorites who exuded a pleasure for playing.
As the game goes on there's often a tendency to proclaim the latest champions as the greatest players, but what about the players who have reserved a special place in the minds of life-long tennis fans for their style, grace and mesmerizing skills?
Tennis history is filled with standouts and stylists who have either been underrated or overlooked by fans who follow the sport today. These are players ranging from former champions who may have been overshadowed by more accomplished rivals, competitors whose careers were cut short due to injury or those who simply slipped through the cracks of public consciousness playing in an era when there was scarce coverage of the sport.
Here are three of our all-time favorite players who are connected by their graceful style and gracious sportsmanship.
One of our favorite players of the recent past is the brilliant Czech Miloslav Mecir, the 1986 U.S. Open finalist. Very rarely have we seen a player with a great combination of skills and smoothness. Mecir had such wonderful footwork and speed. He seemed to cover the court in just a few steps where he could make use of his remarkable groundstrokes. Because he was able to get to reach the ball so early he had the ability to wait a fraction of a second and disguise his shots.
Mecir had amazing touch and the ability to change pace in a way rarely seen before or since. To quote Herbert Warren Wind, writing for The New Yorker, in the late 1980s: "He plays points differently than anyone else today. He is like no one I’ve ever seen when changing pace. He really knows how to change pace on an opponent’s serve and his serve, which is something else I haven’t seen. He can also play pretty hard-hitting tennis. You really have to be hitting as well as Lendl did in that U.S. Open final to beat him because Mecir is out there thinking all the time."
Mecir, like Andre Agassi a bit later, often stood on top of the baseline and took the ball on the rise and also like Agassi he had perhaps the best return in the game. Unlike Agassi he seemed so often to be able to hit one shot and turn a rally in which he was on the defensive into a rally in which he was in control. Mecir had an excellent volley and his approach shots were very controlled and hard to read because of his short backswing. One of his few vulnerabilities was that his second serve could have been a bit better to take advantage of his 6-foot-3 height. It wasn’t a bad serve by any means, but it could have been used more effectively to get some a few additional free points.
I’ve basically given all of you a brief description of Mecir’s style of play but I can’t adequately describe to you the how truly mesmerizing he was. At his best, Mecir was such a smooth operator, it was sometimes difficult to watch his oppponent because Mecir commanded your attention on court.
I remember one rally that he was in involved in with Boris Becker in which Becker hit what I thought was a winning volley. Mecir seemed light years away from the ball, but all of a sudden he was there with time to spare and hit the ball sharply crosscourt passed a stunned Becker. I couldn’t believe it and I don’t think Becker did either!
At the risk of sounding like someone quoting Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid I thought to myself, "Who is this guy? How can anyone do this to Boris Becker?" At this point he immediately became one of my favorites. I enjoyed his unique play in so many matches over the next few years but unfortunately due to a back problem he was unable to continue what I thought would be a Hall of Fame career. Because of his premature retirement from the tennis scene, I felt robbed that I couldn’t enjoy his play anymore.
You always wonder what might have been and while he has continued a career in tennis as a Davis Cup captain for the Slovak Republic, I will always remember him as one of the best-moving big men I've seen.

Source: http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6614829

Thanks for that. It's amazing what he could do with a wooden racket early on especially since he picked up the game late.

Action Jackson
08-15-2008, 08:47 PM
He's an Olympic gold medallist, perfect time to bump this thread.

Showing his wit here against Lendl.

-1zkNyxSrzE

Henry Kaspar
08-15-2008, 08:54 PM
I loved see Mecir in the 1980s. Noone could work the angles at him. Unforutnately he remnained a bit of an underachiever, compared to his talent.

fast_clay
03-13-2009, 11:09 PM
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm182/patma2003/Image003.jpg
The Big Cat - Wall Of Champions - AHOY Convention Centre - Rotterdam

JolánGagó
03-13-2009, 11:20 PM
Pure class. Huge fan since the first time I saw him playing :worship:

Action Jackson
03-30-2009, 10:22 AM
Will upload some more clips on youtube at some point soon.

Har-Tru
03-30-2009, 12:35 PM
I loved see Mecir in the 1980s. Noone could work the angles at him. Unforutnately he remnained a bit of an underachiever, compared to his talent.

It appears I'm not the only one after all AJ. :D

Kolya
03-30-2009, 12:37 PM
Will upload some more clips on youtube at some point soon.

Can't wait mate.

Youtube needs more Mecir clips.

Action Jackson
07-07-2009, 05:17 PM
It appears I'm not the only one after all AJ. :D

Kaspar tried to convince me that Monte Carlo was slower than Hamburg, therefore it's a grain of salt I take that endorsement.

How was he better mentally than Lendl, Becker, Edberg, Wilander or McEnroe? That's right, he wasn't.

Action Jackson
07-07-2009, 05:20 PM
Even though Johnny Wilkinson spelt Milo's first name wrong, interesting choice for a favourite player from him.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/columnists/jonny_wilkinson/article6540633.ece

Miloslav Mecir was always such a masterful presence

Here’s a name to remember: Miroslav Mecir. I remember him, anyway. I remember him well. And with huge admiration. Slovakian, or Czechoslovakian, as he would have been in the late Eighties when he was at his peak, he had an amazing run that took him to the Wimbledon semi-finals in 1988. Beautiful player. But what I loved about him was his humility. I mention Mecir because, in a strange way, he is important to me — like a lot of tennis players are.

I am a Wimbledon buff, I love the fortnight. When I was younger, I used to do queue early in the morning to get a ticket to rove around the outside courts.

And after the fortnight was over, I’d always buy the Wimbledon highlights video and watch it again and again. Yes — this may sound familiar — I got obsessive about it. I’d watch it and then, on holiday, drag my brother out on to the court to try to copy what I’d seen. You could see the look on his face sometimes: Jonny, this isn’t fun any more. And at that stage I’d set up a court next to the pool using sun loungers. I guess there were limits to how much fun that was for everyone else.

But why tennis is important to me is because of the impression that those players of the late Eighties and early Nineties made upon me. I think tennis is a great sport because it can showcase true athletes at their hard-working, talented best. I could learn a little bit from them, from people such as Mecir: players who bring their own, particular sporting qualities to the courts.

I’ve said before that Boris Becker is one of my all-time heroes. I loved him because he was a great player — that’s the obvious bit — but what I really liked was how he seemed to live every point, he so visibly made so much effort. He symbolised a never-say-die spirit. That’s why I liked Jimmy Connors, too: all that “never-die” courage, never consider losing a possibility, always fight on when you are two sets down and staring at defeat. When you are a 10 or 11-year-old and your dream is to become a professional sportsman, this is the sort of thing that can make a real impression on you.

Other favourites from that era included Henri Leconte and Michael Chang. But I’ll return to Mecir; him and Stefan Edberg, because there were strong elements of Mecir in Edberg, too.

What impressed me about them was the understated grace with which they went about their game. There was no sense of “look at me”. You felt they were good people who cared. This was especially true of Mecir, even down to the way he played. He could absolutely skin someone, yet never rub that opponent’s nose in the dust. It seemed you could be at the wrong end of a Mecir thrashing and yet proud of it.

Mecir could play beautiful tennis but would never make a big deal out of it. That’s the humility in him and it was that characteristic that I took away from watching him. That’s what your heroes are for, isn’t it? To admire and copy. So I said to myself back then, that if I am going to play sport, I want to behave like Mecir.

JolánGagó
07-07-2009, 05:27 PM
what's up with youtube?

Action Jackson
07-07-2009, 05:29 PM
I am still going through the clips and editing, there are a few of them.

JolánGagó
07-07-2009, 05:36 PM
i could've written this myself:

I’ve said before that Boris Becker is one of my all-time heroes. I loved him because he was a great player — that’s the obvious bit — but what I really liked was how he seemed to live every point, he so visibly made so much effort. He symbolised a never-say-die spirit. That’s why I liked Jimmy Connors, too: all that “never-die” courage, never consider losing a possibility, always fight on when you are two sets down and staring at defeat. When you are a 10 or 11-year-old and your dream is to become a professional sportsman, this is the sort of thing that can make a real impression on you.

Action Jackson
07-07-2009, 05:39 PM
Becker, Connors and Mecir, got all of the bases covered there.

Raquel
07-07-2009, 06:53 PM
What impressed me about them was the understated grace with which they went about their game. There was no sense of “look at me”. You felt they were good people who cared. This was especially true of Mecir, even down to the way he played. He could absolutely skin someone, yet never rub that opponent’s nose in the dust. It seemed you could be at the wrong end of a Mecir thrashing and yet proud of it.

Mecir could play beautiful tennis but would never make a big deal out of it. That’s the humility in him and it was that characteristic that I took away from watching him. That’s what your heroes are for, isn’t it? To admire and copy. So I said to myself back then, that if I am going to play sport, I want to behave like Mecir.

Great article, especially this part. I hope Miloslav gets to read it.

Action Jackson
07-16-2009, 05:59 PM
Here is some of the legendary Cat's English.

SY8811dwNNM

Kolya
07-17-2009, 03:46 AM
Fantastic tribute video to Miloslav Mecir - Il Gattone

Some highlights of Nystrom, Edberg, Becker, Lendl and Wilander.

Part 1
UBvo0gWZREY

Part 2
yCjJziDmfjk

Action Jackson
07-26-2009, 08:17 PM
Good link Kolya, it was fun watching the cat like movement.

Action Jackson
08-11-2009, 03:03 PM
ae7lyHnuOdw

qZX9OloLbiY

Qlb5Py25DPM

25q7Z0RGMYY

You can go to youtube and watch the clips in HQ.

Kolya
01-05-2010, 01:54 AM
Bahrami and Leconte vs. Mecir and Kucera - Exhibition in Bratislava, 2009

anIK4I-_mMs

Kolya
03-06-2010, 06:04 AM
1hzBqPBhjG0

Mecir...

It includes the infamous underarm serve against Connors.

A pity the sound is very poor.

Eden
04-14-2010, 02:40 PM
The 1986 US Open final against Lendl can be found on youtube.

Here is the first part:

P3VV2wEzaho

marcRD
04-14-2010, 04:07 PM
The 1986 US Open final against Lendl can be found on youtube.

Here is the first part:

P3VV2wEzaho

That is horrendous tennis for a slam final, I am sure Mecir would be known as a clown if mtf would be around in those days, getting beatdowns in slam finals playing awful tennis and having that godawful forehand. I think I prefer even Andy Murray, I certanly cant see any reason for this revival of Mecir in the memory of tennis fans in this site, even if I do see some qualities in his game (like the backhand, touch and tactical mind)in my book he is far below players that today are belittled like Andy Roddick.

Oh well, maybe he was an enjoyable character but his tennis really doesnt turn me on.

Kolya
04-14-2010, 04:10 PM
Though it may not be Mecir's finest moment, his unique style of play should still be respected.

Action Jackson
11-30-2010, 09:03 AM
http://sportsthenandnow.com/2010/05/07/miloslav-mecir-the-man-who-could-have-been-king-of-tennis/

Miloslav Mecir: The Man Who Could Have Been King of Tennis

You have to admit that there is a huge difference between sultry singing in the shower and performing live at the Met to a packed house filled with critics.

This has implications beyond being able to carry a tune…and being fully clothed.

Besides the necessity of possessing outstanding vocal abilities, you would also need to overcome performance anxieties as you stood in front of an impressive audience thinking it knows exactly what you should be doing—never hesitating to point out your perceived flaws.

The same is doubly true on the playing field.

Monday-morning quarterbacks exist in all fields of endeavor. For example, the tennis player who exhibits all the talent and ability in the world must still overcome his or her own internal jitters in order to win.

This series will highlight tennis players who should have made it to the top of the game but who failed in big moments to win the most critical matches because of (1) nerves, (2) belief, (3) prolonged injury, or (4) the special category belonging to those who won a major but could never repeat the feat.

Miloslav Mecir

The “second-best” player who stands out most in my book is the Big Cat, Miloslav Mecir. The Slovak had an uncanny ability to annoy players from all corners of the globe during the 1980s, but he never made it all the way to the top.

Known as the Swede Killer, Mecir chiefly tormented Swedes, especially the renowned Mats Wilander.

Mecir interrupted Wilander’s reign in 1988, the year the Swede won three out of four of the majors and knocked Ivan Lendl off his No. 1 perch. The only Grand Slam Wilander did not win, was Wimbledon, because Mecir defeated him in the quarterfinals in straight sets 6-3, 6-1, 6-3 to Wilander’s utter dismay.

Mecir forever denied the Swede not only an opportunity to seize a Wimbledon crown, but a chance at a calender-year Slam—much like Rafael Nadal did to Roger Federer in 2004, 2006, and 2007.

You have to understand that in the 1980s Sweden was a major force in tennis, led to the summit by Bjorn Borg. Mecir faced Wilander, Stefan Edberg, Anders Jarryd, Joachim Nystrom, Henrik Sundstrom, as well as Kent Carlsson and Jonas Bjorkman during his tenure as a tennis professional.

Mecir confounded opponents with his enigmatic approach to the game. He had no coach, and that disturbed his peers from the outset. They could not understand why the Slovak chose not to retain an adviser and professional teacher.

Mecir also had a poor grasp of English and was pretty much a loner on tour. But he possessed in innate love for the game and respected his opponents in victory or in defeat never calling attention to himself on court, which he considered vain and inappropriate.

The only time I recall that Mecir did retaliate against what he considered bad behavior was during a match in Key Biscayne, Fla., against Lendl. Watch it here.

The Slovak felt honor-bound to behave on court as his parents expected him to behave in public at all times.

Mecir stood a lean 6’3”, and possessed a wicked two-handed backhand that he often unleashed for winners against those serve-and-volley guys who hugged the net. He utilized speed and carefully disguised angles as he glided over the surface of the court.

Mecir always appeared at ease, unruffled—his style characterized as sedate by many commentators. His pace frequently riled opponents who hated to see the Big Cat stalking them across the net because Mecir had an answer for almost everything they threw at him.

The Slovak possessed touch, finesse, and accuracy. Although he was definitely not a “serve and volleyer,” Mecir frequently approached the net utilizing amazing volleying skills. His soft hands could lay the ball down on a dime on the other side of the net wherever there was an unreachable opening.

This quote from Canadian tennis pro Glenn Michibata after he lost to Mecir in Auckland in 1987, sums up how many players felt about playing against Mecir: “Playing him is like bleeding to death.”

He engaged his opponents in long, seemingly free-flowing rallies, lulling them into a false sense of security. Then Mecir would rifle a shot up the line, backhand or forehand, for a winner to end the point, making the player wonder what had happened.

In addition to moving well, while maintaining classic tennis form, Mecir was also excellent on the return of serve. He had the game and the mental acumen to be a winner, but he never captured a major, although Mecir did win an Olympic Gold Medal in men’s singles in 1988, which remained his proudest moment.

Mecir straddled two eras more dramatically than others in the 1980s, when racket technology began to make his beloved wooden racket obsolete as the tennis world gravitated toward graphite. Mecir was the last man standing with a wooden racket as he faced Lendl in the 1986 U.S. Open. No one ever used a wooden racket again in a major final.

Born in 1964, Mecir turned pro in 1982 at the age of 18, making a name for himself by advancing to two ATP finals in 1984. In 1985, he won his first ATP final in Rotterdam, defeating Jakok Hlasek of Switzerland in the final. At the end of 1985, Mecir was ranked just outside the top 10.

In 1986 at Wimbledon, Mecir caught the attention of the tennis world when he took out up-and-coming Stefan Edberg in straight sets. Subsequently, the Slovak lost to Boris Becker in the quarterfinals. But the pinnacle came at the 1986 U.S. Open, when Mecir made the finals to face fellow Czech, world No. 1 Lendl.

The Big Cat, however, yawned that day, losing in a listless effort 6-4, 6-2, 6-0, overcome by the moment.

In 1987 Mecir won six singles and six doubles titles. Lendl and Mecir battled each other frequently, as they advanced through tennis tournaments. They met three times in 1987 with Lendl winning two, including the 1987 French Open semifinals.

Here is another miraculous point of Mecir getting the best of Lendl.

In 1988, after dispatching Mats Wilander in the quarterfinals of Wimbledon with pinpoint accuracy, Mecir was well on his way to dismissing Edberg in similar fashion in the semifinals. Ahead with a two-set lead and even a break of serve in the final set, Mecir could not hold on, as Edberg broke back and took the match.

After winning his Olympic Gold in 1988, Mecir achieved his highest ATP ranking of No. 4 in both singles and doubles.

In 1989, Mecir again made it to a slam final, this one in Australia where he once again faced Lendl. Mecir lost in straight sets, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Lendl later explained that he was able to defeat Mecir by hitting deep into the center of the court, robbing the Big Cat of his ability to create his well-disguised sharp angles, which often won matches for Mecir.

Suffering with a back injury and unable to play any longer, Mecir retired in 1990 at the age of 26.

That Mecir never won a major, of course, does nothing to lessen his impact on the game during the eight years he played. Players accorded him high marks on his originality, his creative use of the court, and on the beauty of his game. That he was a frustrating player to meet on court went without saying.

What he could not do, and what many today cannot do, is sustain the high level of his play throughout a tournament. Mecir became a spoiler. He was able to beat anybody on any given day, and that made him dangerous.

But your chances of winning increased significantly if Mecir had won a tough match a day or two before. He did win tournaments, but he never succeeded to win a major.

He lost both his finals to Lendl, who could do exactly what Mecir could not—sustain his high level of play. Lendl expected to win majors and he played to win them, using whatever methods it took to get to the finish line.

No one possessed a finer game than Mecir. If you have not watched him play, take some time to study him because there is much of Mecir in the modern game. He is worth the time to get to know—even if he remains among the best of the second-bests.

[Quote from SI Vault, April 20, 1987—"Miloslav Mecir preys on the game's top players."]

ariel2
11-30-2010, 07:12 PM
Great article. Thanks. I didn't remember that he retired at 26. He used to lull his opponents to sleep before unloading a bomb down the line. Master at changing the pace. Beautiful player to watch.

jonas
11-30-2010, 10:12 PM
http://sportsthenandnow.com/2010/05/07/miloslav-mecir-the-man-who-could-have-been-king-of-tennis/

Miloslav Mecir: The Man Who Could Have Been King of Tennis

You have to understand that in the 1980s Sweden was a major force in tennis, led to the summit by Bjorn Borg. Mecir faced Wilander, Stefan Edberg, Anders Jarryd, Joachim Nystrom, Henrik Sundstrom, as well as Kent Carlsson and Jonas Bjorkman during his tenure as a tennis professional.

[Quote from SI Vault, April 20, 1987—"Miloslav Mecir preys on the game's top players."]

:confused: The cat didn't really face Bjorkman, did he?

Action Jackson
11-30-2010, 11:08 PM
:confused: The cat didn't really face Bjorkman, did he?

No.

Plus Mecir's English wasn't poor, it was just like him quirky.

Action Jackson
06-05-2011, 10:26 AM
Mecir played an exho at Prostejov with Novotna, Lendl and Mandlikova.

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/MecirFH.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/Mecirracquet.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/Mecir.jpg

Action Jackson
06-12-2011, 11:58 AM
The wooden Snauwert.

BBbcXfkPh3M

JolánGagó
06-12-2011, 03:03 PM
orgasmical :drool:

Kolya
03-10-2012, 11:14 AM
Mecir's last career title and a great match itself too! Enjoy.

ZLjRB8DsDkE

BBfan1985
03-10-2012, 12:51 PM
Miloslav Mecir Ramanathan Krishnan match made in the heavens.

Kolya
06-23-2012, 11:35 AM
LCNSSL3TDhs

TUZf4hATHyM

Miloslav "The Cat" Mecir.

Kolya
01-19-2013, 06:10 AM
Miloslav Mecir vs. Andrei Chesnonov (For you Action Jackson).

b6VjHPMGhV8

Tu3o6m_u4o4

FQQK5oq6rHw

V6nF2t-2tuQ