This mono disease??? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

This mono disease???

Himura
03-24-2008, 01:22 AM
Sorry guys...I know that there is theads about roger and mono, bash me if ya want but I need to know.

I understand what kind of disease it is and know that it`s quite serious thanks to you guys but there is one think that I don`t understand.
Can this mono destroy let`s say Federers physical health forever or is it something that vanishes after a period. I mean even if Federer has reovered from it can it have an affection on him anyway, or will he be fine afterward`s. Maybe sounds crazy but I don`t know so much about it.

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 01:27 AM
Can this mono destroy let`s say Federers physical health forever or is it something that vanishes after a period. I mean even if Federer has reovered from it can it have an affection on him anyway, or will he be fine afterward`s. Maybe sounds crazy but I don`t know so much about it.

'Forever' is quite a long time. ;)
For your info, read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infectious_mononucleosis.

Generally spoken, it's hard to tell how long one may suffer from mono infection, and also, how much. It's a very versatile virus, and may pop up again even if you think you've recovered from it. No bueno, that's for sure.

MyPrecious
03-24-2008, 01:33 AM
I had mono years ago and the first week I thought I was gonna die!

My throat swelled up and my nose was stuffed up so it was very hard for me to breathe :eek:

No meds helped, it just had to run it's course.

After all of these years, my neck lymph nodes are still somewhat swollen.

Snowwy
03-24-2008, 01:34 AM
It goes away after a while.

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 01:36 AM
It goes away after a while.

Not entirely. Once infected, you'll always be a carrier of the Epstein-Barr virus, meaning that while you might not feel any of the effects anymore, it might come back if you are really unlucky... :eek:

Himura
03-24-2008, 01:41 AM
Not entirely. Once infected, you'll always be a carrier of the Epstein-Barr virus, meaning that while you might not feel any of the effects anymore, it might come back if you are really unlucky... :eek:

But while having that Epstein virus will it affect one physical even if it`s not coming back

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 01:45 AM
But while having that Epstein virus will it affect one physical even if it`s not coming back

No, as long as it's in its 'sleeping' mode, it won't be affecting one. Problem is that it might reappear in full force as soon as one is fatigued, having less natural resistance and the like.
So it's pretty hard to tell when it's in fact 'over'. It may last two months, it may last six months, it may last a couple of years without any signs of it being active - and then suddenly it can pop out of the basket again.
Not unlike the herpes virus which, as far as I know, is related to EBV.

Nasty buggers those viruses are. :mad:

FedFan_2007
03-24-2008, 01:46 AM
To think we demand world class tennis from a guy stricken with mono. Talk about ridiculous.

Aloimeh
03-24-2008, 01:48 AM
BS.

Infectious mononucleosis is the a *possible* initial clinical phase of EBV infection. After the immune system fights the virus, the virus becomes latent in the B lymphocytes. It cannot "come back" whenever. It can "come back" if the patient is immunosupressed, e.g. AIDS, chemotherapy, radiation, etc. There is also a possibility that it may be a trigger in the flares of certain autoimmune diseases, e.g. lupus. But I've never heard of it "coming back" randomly in a person with a healthy immune system.

Just to let you guys all know, about 90-95% of the human population has this virus dormant in their bodies! Most got it as a "flu"/"cold" when they were children and it never took the form of mono. Those who get it in adolesence and adulthood tend to present with mono.

Himura
03-24-2008, 01:49 AM
No, as long as it's in its 'sleeping' mode, it won't be affecting one. Problem is that it might reappear in full force as soon as one is fatigued, having less natural resistance and the like.
So it's pretty hard to tell when it's in fact 'over'. It may last two months, it may last six months, it may last a couple of years without any signs of it being active - and then suddenly it can pop out of the basket again.
Not unlike the herpes virus which, as far as I know, is related to EBV.

Nasty buggers those viruses are. :mad:

Okey thanks for the help...really nice of ya. Good to know that mono wont affect roger, ancic and henin in there career if it does not pop up again

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 01:51 AM
Okey thanks for the help...really nice of ya. Good to know that mono wont affect roger, ancic and henin in there career if it does not pop up again

Main problem of that Nasty Bugger is that you never really know for sure 1) when it's 'gone' (i.e., not affecting your physical and mental state anymore), and 2) when it returns (if you are one of the unlucky people to whom that happens...).

I can only hope that Roger, in his (to me) obvious attempt to defend his #1 position wherever he can, doesn't make a mistake in dealing with this infection - playing tournaments while being ill may well mean that it takes a lot longer to fully recover. :sad:

Himura
03-24-2008, 01:55 AM
Main problem of that Nasty Bugger is that you never really know for sure 1) when it's 'gone' (i.e., not affecting your physical and mental state anymore), and 2) when it returns (if you are one of the unlucky people to whom that happens...).

I can only hope that Roger, in his (to me) obvious attempt to defend his #1 position wherever he can, doesn't make a mistake in dealing with this infection - playing tournaments while being ill may well mean that it takes a lot longer to fully recover. :sad:

Yeah hope so to...he`s in a strange position. I hope that mono is not affecting hin anymore.... but I don`t know.

Aloimeh
03-24-2008, 01:57 AM
Main problem of that Nasty Bugger is that you never really know for sure 1) when it's 'gone' (i.e., not affecting your physical and mental state anymore), and 2) when it returns (if you are one of the unlucky people to whom that happens...).

I can only hope that Roger, in his (to me) obvious attempt to defend his #1 position wherever he can, doesn't make a mistake in dealing with this infection - playing tournaments while being ill may well mean that it takes a lot longer to fully recover. :sad:

Not joking here, but the mono shouldn't "return" unless Roger has cancer/chemotherapy, was blasted with radiation, is taking immunosupressive steroids such as prednisone, has some sort of autoimmune disease that's wrecking his immune system, AIDS, etc. These are awful things, but they're rare and really only immunosupression can lead to EBV "coming out" once it has gone latent.

FedFan_2007
03-24-2008, 01:57 AM
I hope Roger pulls out of Miami to protect his health.

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 01:58 AM
Yeah hope so to...he`s in a strange position. I hope that mono is not affecting hin anymore.... but I don`t know.

I'm afraid nobody knows for sure, not even Roger himself and/or his doctors/entourage. It can be pretty difficult to diagnose this disease in the first place, as white blood cells-count isn't always immediately telling at the first tests being done. Remember Roger first thought it was food poisoning and that he had several tests done over time in the hospital?
So asking whether it will continue affecting him... a Big Question Mark.

For how long it takes to fully recover - ask Henin, ask Ancic... it can take quite a while that's for sure. :mad: :sad:

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 02:05 AM
Not joking here, but the mono shouldn't "return" unless Roger has cancer/chemotherapy, was blasted with radiation, is taking immunosupressive steroids such as prednisone, has some sort of autoimmune disease that's wrecking his immune system, AIDS, etc. These are awful things, but they're rare and really only immunosupression can lead to EBV "coming out" once it has gone latent.

Now THAT is the biggest bunch of :bs: I have ever read on this.

Anyone who knows just a little bit about this matter should know that the virus can come back as soon as one's natural resistance is diminished. That may involve the things you said, but that's not ALL of them.

You are becoming a doctor you said? Good Help I pity your patients.

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 02:10 AM
I hope Roger pulls out of Miami to protect his health.

That all depends on how he feels, and on how much risk he's willing to take to defend his points. As I said, the EBV infection doesn't always/necessarily means that you're completely grounded - the intensity of its effects varies a lot from person to person.

In Roger's case he still seems able to do pretty well. A semifinal at the AO and in IW is no little feat indeed.

*Viva Chile*
03-24-2008, 03:59 AM
No, as long as it's in its 'sleeping' mode, it won't be affecting one. Problem is that it might reappear in full force as soon as one is fatigued, having less natural resistance and the like.
So it's pretty hard to tell when it's in fact 'over'. It may last two months, it may last six months, it may last a couple of years without any signs of it being active - and then suddenly it can pop out of the basket again.
Not unlike the herpes virus which, as far as I know, is related to EBV.

Nasty buggers those viruses are. :mad:

EBV is indeed an herpes virus. And can reside on the nerves for the entire life on a sleep mode.
You're right.

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 04:06 AM
EBV is indeed an herpes virus. And can reside on the nerves for the entire life on a sleep mode.
You're right.

Thanks. That's just what I tried to explain. :D

Aloimeh
03-24-2008, 04:13 AM
Thanks. That's just what I tried to explain. :D

OK, let me clear this up for you guys. EBV does not go into the nerves. It infects the B cells of your immune system, causes their massive proliferation, and this accounts the enlarged lymph nodes ("glands") that characterize mononucleosis. It's called mononucleosis because B cells are mononuclear cells in a blood smear.

It is part of the herpesviridae family of viruses, but it doesn't attack the nerves. Two other herpesviridae family viruses infect the nerves - herpes simplex virus (HSV), which causes oral or genital herpes; and varicella zoster virus (VZV), which causes shingles and chickenpox.

Muzza: weren't you saying how Fed was in good shape before he lost to Fish? Now he's having mono again. Well, which is it?

StevoTG
03-24-2008, 04:20 AM
I haven't read all the previous posts but I do have a bit of insight.
My Dad heard the commentators talking about Feds mono and he told me that 16 years ago he got mono and that he has never been the same since, he said that ever since his bout he has been a touch slower and never regained all of his energy and even said that he is mentally not as sharp as he was previously (mainly when it comes to answering questions that he does know the answer to or with maths, he still takes a few seconds longer to get himself to answer).

I had never known about this as I was 2 or 3 at the time and always thought that he was a touch lazy :lol:

Sunset of Age
03-24-2008, 04:24 AM
Muzza: weren't you saying how Fed was in good shape before he lost to Fish? Now he's having mono again. Well, which is it?

As you MIGHT have understood from my earlier posts, if you weren't as blunt headed as you obviously are, I explained that this disease is different for everyone that gets hit by it.

I really, REALLY pity your future patients, as you only seem to be able to read text books, but have NO EYE at all for all the various ways a disease might come to expression in various patients. Not only that - I sincerely doubt your ability to actually LISTEN to your patients, as that might well be a very big failure for anyone claiming to become - let alone be - a doctor.

I'm done with you. :wavey:

FedFan_2007
03-24-2008, 04:51 AM
Muzza - I agree the best trait of any practical doctor is to listen to his patient. Compassion.

Chiseller
03-24-2008, 09:56 AM
Just to underline Aloimeh's bullshit:

http://www.glandularfever.me.uk/

Most of the acute glandular fever/ infectious mononucleosis symptoms disappear after a few weeks.
Rest for at least a month is ideal.
Symptoms can continue, on an off, for a few months, but in some cases much longer.
In a number of cases, 100% health and energy levels are not regained afterwards. This may happen when the body is pushed too early or is constantly under stress through recovery. Often there are more on-going glandular fever tiredness problems and bad bouts of ill health in cases where the liver was affected in some way during the acute illness
The level of energy can fluctuates so that a few good days and weeks may be followed by energy slumps, fatigue, and bad bouts of glandular fever symptoms. Delayed reaction fatigue is very common in these cases where exercise, excitement and/or stress brings on the extreme fatigue a few days after the event.


[...]he got mono and that he has never been the same since, he said that ever since his bout he has been a touch slower and never regained all of his energy and even said that he is mentally not as sharp as he was previously [...]


Chronic and on-going glandular fever symptoms / problems:
# brain fag - not being able to find the right words.

:devil:


I had mono myself and was lucky that it only lasted 1-2 weeks, had fever up to 41 degrees though.

Jelena
03-24-2008, 09:59 AM
Just to put my two cents in here :)

I know of a professional football/soccer player who had to quit his career because of Chronical Fatigue Syndrome. And as far as I remember (it's about 10 years ago) all that stuff started with a MONONUCLEOSIS.

martine2
03-24-2008, 10:18 AM
I had mono years ago and the first week I thought I was gonna die!

My throat swelled up and my nose was stuffed up so it was very hard for me to breathe :eek:

No meds helped, it just had to run it's course.

After all of these years, my neck lymph nodes are still somewhat swollen.

Same here. I was in hospital for 2 weeks and it took about 6 months before I felt more or less ok again, 1 year to feel fully recovered.

HeretiC
03-24-2008, 10:27 AM
No, as long as it's in its 'sleeping' mode, it won't be affecting one. Problem is that it might reappear in full force as soon as one is fatigued, having less natural resistance and the like.
So it's pretty hard to tell when it's in fact 'over'. It may last two months, it may last six months, it may last a couple of years without any signs of it being active - and then suddenly it can pop out of the basket again.
Not unlike the herpes virus which, as far as I know, is related to EBV.

Nasty buggers those viruses are. :mad:

Yeah, from 2008 until the end whenever Federer losses it will be due to a mono.;)
There is a good side of this, fans won't have to came up with various ridiculous excuses no more.

Bilbo
03-24-2008, 11:21 AM
The fatigue of infectious mononucleosis often lasts from 1-2 months.

This means Fed should be health by now.

Bibberz
03-24-2008, 11:22 AM
Just to put my two cents in here :)

I know of a professional football/soccer player who had to quit his career because of Chronical Fatigue Syndrome. And as far as I remember (it's about 10 years ago) all that stuff started with a MONONUCLEOSIS.

Who was this footballer? I'm just wondering whether the mono was an actual cause, or whether unrelated factors contributed to his downfall.

Stefwhit
03-24-2008, 12:17 PM
It's funny that when a player cites injury 'we' look at it as just a convenient excuse.

and

When a player says they're fine, we fall back on the injury to make sense of a loss?

Fed says he's physically feeling fine, so we can't keep jumping to the 'mono' excuse everytime he has a bad loss. What about all the matches that he was able to win- if was feeling as bad as some of you would like us to believe how was able to win those matches with seemingly ease?

The good thing about it is that excuses don't go into the books, it's only results that matter and results that are remembered. There's still a lot of time to go, so no need to panic, but we really have to let the excuses go cuz they really don't matter anyway.

DDrago2
03-24-2008, 12:17 PM
Yeah, from 2008 until the end whenever Federer losses it will be due to a mono.;)
There is a good side of this, fans won't have to came up with various ridiculous excuses no more.

excuses for what? He almost didn't lose for years

Now it seems a virus rather than opponents taking him down - like in that H.g.Wells "War Of The Worlds" novel, he is an alien no doubt

Eden
03-24-2008, 12:18 PM
Who was this footballer? I'm just wondering whether the mono was an actual cause, or whether unrelated factors contributed to his downfall.

I think Jelena spoke about Olaf Bodden from the German Bundesliga:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_Bodden

*Ljubica*
03-24-2008, 12:58 PM
I haven't read all the previous posts but I do have a bit of insight.
My Dad heard the commentators talking about Feds mono and he told me that 16 years ago he got mono and that he has never been the same since, he said that ever since his bout he has been a touch slower and never regained all of his energy and even said that he is mentally not as sharp as he was previously (mainly when it comes to answering questions that he does know the answer to or with maths, he still takes a few seconds longer to get himself to answer).

I had never known about this as I was 2 or 3 at the time and always thought that he was a touch lazy :lol:

I understand what your Dad is saying here. I had glandular fever almost 20 years ago - I was hospitalised and had to take some considerable time off College. It took almost a year before I felt anywhere near "back to normal", and during that year I would sometimes get bouts of such complete exhaustion that I couldn't even walk 5 minutes down the road without stopping half way :shrug: Even now I get tired very easily, and as soon as I get particularly tired, my throat starts to hurt and the glands in my neck tend to swell up :shrug: For an ordinary person in a sedentary job it is easily manageable, and I certainly don't need time off work or anything for it now - but I imagine for a professional athlete who is naturally pushing their bodies beyond the limits of "normal" people, it may always cause a problem.

I wish Roger well, and hope he makes a complete and full recovery, and takes all the time and rest that he needs to do so.

cobalt60
03-24-2008, 02:29 PM
Where does one start? Like most viral infections it is more complicated than I have time to post or explain. And don't attack Alomeih- he was right about lots of it: shrug:

Some facts:
We are all most likely infected with the Epstein Barr Virus ( yes it is in the family of Herpes virus). It does not reside in the nerve cells- that is most commonly the virus that causes Chicken Pox; remains dormant for most of our lives and in a few pops back up to cause Herpes Zoster or shingles.

Ok about 95% of the world's population is infected with EBV. But most don't get mono. About 50% of us have it by the age of 5 but the infection is mild as kids. That is why mono tends to occur in teens-young adults as a full blown infection. And the syndrome itself can be all over the map with mild cases up to severe cases that may require hospitalizations. Nowadays we prefer to keep folks isolated at home and not in the hospital so many of you who were hospitalized before would not be now.

Most syndromes last 2-6 months and the slowest symptom to resolve is the fatigue. There have been concerns that in a very small percentage of folks it can become the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome but that's impossible really to predict nor diagnose epidemiologically.

EBV may also be linked to certain types of lymphomas ( cancer of the immune system) and even Multiple Sclerosis.

And it cannot re-infect someone with a repeat syndrome if you're having radiation or chemotherapy. Theoretically maybe but impossible to say because there are way too many variables with cancer patients.

Ok sorry for the boredom.;) There is lots more of course related to the disease.

Stefwhit
03-24-2008, 03:10 PM
I wish Roger well, and hope he makes a complete and full recovery, and takes all the time and rest that he needs to do so.

Most people wish Roger well, the problem that's going to continue is whether or not he lost a match because he was simply outplayed or if he lost due to effects of mono.

For Federer fans, having 'mono' handy as an excuse to pull out to wash away losses is convenient. We're already seeing that happen and I'm sure if the loses continue we'll see more of it. I'm not one of those who doesn't believe that he ever had mono, I actually take people at the word. So if Roger says he's fine, we should all take him at his word, and if he says he isn't feeling good, he probably isn't.

With players coming back from injuries and surgeries, and players dealing with hurt ligaments, respitory problems, aches, and pains, it's all par for the course. To some extent, all players are dealing with some sort of problem- so excuses be damned.

Results! Results! Results! ...nothing else means much.

Jelena
03-24-2008, 03:41 PM
Who was this footballer? I'm just wondering whether the mono was an actual cause, or whether unrelated factors contributed to his downfall.

I think Jelena spoke about Olaf Bodden from the German Bundesliga:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_Bodden
yes I did. :)

gnaz
03-24-2008, 03:55 PM
Mononucleosis is a really serious illness. I got it when I was 7 through the water fountain in elementary school and I remember I lost a lot of weight, had fever for many days and was weak and could only eat certain foods: apples, bananas and cereals. I can't even imagine how awful it must be getting this illness when you are almost 27 like Roger! Imagine how weak he must feel. The older you are when you get viruses like chickenpox, shingles, smallpox, mononucleosis, etc. the worst it is.... you can even die from some of these viruses if you are an adult.....

DDrago2
03-24-2008, 04:01 PM
Most people wish Roger well, the problem that's going to continue is whether or not he lost a match because he was simply outplayed or if he lost due to effects of mono.

For Federer fans, having 'mono' handy as an excuse to pull out to wash away losses is convenient. We're already seeing that happen and I'm sure if the loses continue we'll see more of it. I'm not one of those who doesn't believe that he ever had mono, I actually take people at the word. So if Roger says he's fine, we should all take him at his word, and if he says he isn't feeling good, he probably isn't.

With players coming back from injuries and surgeries, and players dealing with hurt ligaments, respitory problems, aches, and pains, it's all par for the course. To some extent, all players are dealing with some sort of problem- so excuses be damned.

Results! Results! Results! ...nothing else means much.

The essence is, a sportsman shouldn't take the court in the first place if he feels he is unable to mount at least a decent level of play. Fed looked much worse against Fish than on AO, which means he probably played ill and that he shouldn't do in future

gnaz
03-24-2008, 04:04 PM
The essence is, a sportsman shouldn't take the court in the first place if he feels he is unable to mount at least a decent level of play. Fed looked much worse against Fish than on AO, which means he probably played ill and that he shouldn't do in future

Agree.

Stefwhit
03-24-2008, 07:10 PM
The essence is, a sportsman shouldn't take the court in the first place if he feels he is unable to mount at least a decent level of play. Fed looked much worse against Fish than on AO, which means he probably played ill and that he shouldn't do in futureMaybe he did play ill, maybe he didn't- your guess is nothing more than speculation. The fact that he took the court lets me know that he thought he was well enough to beat Fish. I do agree, however, that if he's not feeling well then he shouldn't play. Fed strikes me as the kind of guy who has no problem saying he isn't feeling well, in the absence of him saying otherwise I assume he's feeling just fine, physically. His pride might be a little bruised though....

Himura
03-24-2008, 07:45 PM
I didn`t start this thread as an excuse why federer losses no no... I started this thread to get som info about the disease and to know if this mono CAN affect Roger Mario or Justin all their career? And never be the same player again.

moon language
03-24-2008, 09:34 PM
I think it's safe to say that he could be dealing with lingering effects from the mono. I had a bad case of the flu a couple years ago and even from that I didn't feel like I had 100% of my energy back for almost two months so I can imagine that mono could linger longer.

Best to just wait and see how it goes for him and hope for the best for him. Maybe it's not the physical aspect of the mono as much as the feeling of vulnerability it left him with. Only time will tell.