Next Move to Top 20, [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Next Move to Top 20,

jcempire
08-22-2007, 04:24 AM
By end of this year

May even better......

He got great energy...

Keep going, Sam

jcempire
10-13-2007, 11:36 PM
not this year..... Would see him at Top 20 next year

Albop
10-13-2007, 11:38 PM
:haha:

jcempire
11-21-2007, 08:21 PM
:haha:

Sound like you don't believe

I told you that will happen any time soon

Veronique
11-27-2007, 08:25 PM
If you're interested in supporting a D Young forum, please vote here http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?p=6306471#post6306471

tulsatea
12-16-2007, 02:53 PM
No questions over Querrey
By STEVE KILGALLON - Sunday Star Times | Sunday, 16 December 2007
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The Americans are good at identifying great white hopes in sport. In tennis, they think it might come in the unassuming yet hulking form of Sam Querrey, a 1.98m player with a thumping serve.

With only seven top-100 players, there's a touch of desperation in that search for the next marketable male tennis star in the US, and Querrey, seeded 22nd for his first visit to the Heineken Open in Auckland next month, had a "lucrative" deal with adidas before even turning professional.

In the two years since, the 20-year-old has climbed more than 600 places to 63 in the ATP rankings. Of his compatriots only Andy Roddick (six), James Blake (13) and Mardy Fish (39) are higher-placed.

Blake, his first top-10 victim in July this year, observed his opponent had "just been having fun". It's the unique selling point of a player who didn't focus on tennis until the relatively late age of 16 and hasn't contemplated burnout syndrome.

"You know, a big part of it is to go out there, give it a great effort, and have fun, and most of the time I am having fun," he told the Star-Times from his home in Thousand Oaks, California. "I definitely don't [get stressed]. Don't get me wrong, I take it very seriously and I think I come off a little more down to earth and lackadaisical than I really am."

He confesses he's "slowly" becoming like other professionals.

"When I first started I was the new guy out there, having fun and didn't care, but now it's my career, I am starting to take it a little more seriously, day by day becoming a bit more professional."

That more sober approach is the product of a year in which Querrey's rapid climb finally began to level out. He was the first to win a Challenger event on debut, picked up two more in his first season, leapt from 616 to 66 in 13 months. But this year he dipped 16 places after losing seven straight matches, including round one defeats at Wimbledon and the French Open.

It taught him a lesson.

"I had been a little bit complacent about where I was. I stepped back and realised I had to work hard to make that next step," he says. "There is not a big difference in the guys ranked above 100. The top 10 are amazing, but the guys at 10 to 100 are also really great players and there is not a huge difference there."

Following that realisation came the most significant match of his short career, beating Blake in the quarterfinal of the Indianapolis Classic, where Querrey thumped 10 aces in succession, 34 in total.

"I didn't feel any pressure," he says. "And that was a big part of the reason why I won. There was rarely a time when I felt worried."

His dad had been a decent baseballer who turned down a professional contract to study, and motivated partly by that, Querrey agonised over a scholarship to the University of Southern California before turning pro at 18.

"I went back and forth on that decision for about 18 months [but I] haven't looked back since."

The flattening of the rankings curve means Querrey delivers understated ambitions for a year that begins at Stanley Street: he'd like to be top 30, win one ATP event, be more consistent. He has worked with a fitness trainer during a six-week off-season, and says: "I feel I am right there, it's just one extra step away."

Many are waiting to see if he accomplishes that step, but the "great hope" talk is lightly dealt with. Like an all-American kid straight from a Wolfe novel, Querrey says: "It doesn't bother me. I am humbled that people think of me that way. I'm just working hard, doing the best I can and whatever happens, happens. I don't feel any pressure."

When we finish talking, he's off to hit some balls with friend Michael McClune, a 17-year-old novice professional. There are the last vestiges of the wide-eyed enthusiast: a key reason why he wants to come here is to see "some great lodge my friends told me about".

jcempire
01-02-2008, 01:53 AM
If Sam make it to 4RD in AO, He would make it to Top 20 before FO

DartMarcus
11-03-2008, 10:57 AM
Let`s wait for 2009. :)

Guille.
12-04-2008, 12:48 PM
Go samm :banana:

JeremyEli
12-30-2008, 12:37 PM
does sam have any schedule 2009??????

Guille.
12-30-2008, 02:33 PM
he will play firt in Brisbane and then Aukcland:)

tulsatea
01-04-2009, 01:41 PM
Sam lost 6-3and 6-3 to Sonderling. Had no break points and was broken 3 times. On to Auckland.

tulsatea
01-04-2009, 10:41 PM
Swedish fourth seed Robin Soderling secured his place in the second round with a comfortable 6-3, 6-3 victory over American Sam Querrey. Soderling dropped just four points behind his first serve and was effective on Querrey’s, closing out three of five break points in the 55-minute match.

tulsatea
01-06-2009, 11:34 PM
Carsten Ball and Chris Guccione, Australia, def. Mardy Fish and Sam Querrey, United States, 7-5, 7-5.

tulsatea
01-10-2009, 03:48 PM
Sam plays wild card Daniel King- Turner in the first round in Auckland. Good draw.

tulsatea
01-12-2009, 02:36 AM
Sam beats wild card Daniel King 6-4, 7-5. He plays the winner of Serra and Giles Mueller.

tulsatea
01-12-2009, 09:20 PM
Sixth-seeded American Sam Querrey diminished the title hopes of New Zealand tennis fans on Monday in Auckland as he opened the action at the Heineken Open, an ATP World Tour 250 tennis tournament, by defeating Kiwi wild card Daniel King-Turner (pictured) 6-4, 7-5.


The 22-year-old Californian, currently ranked a career-high No. 36, converted on three of his four break point opportunities in the 74-minute match to defeat the 463rd ranked King-Turner. It marked Querrey’s first win in Auckland, having lost in straight sets to Florian Mayer on his debut last season.

King-Turner, New Zealand’s No. 2 ranked tennis player behind Jose Statham, falls to an 0-4 record in Auckland. Statham was unable to beat American Robby Ginepri in the evening session Monday. Ginepri beat the wild card 6-2, 6-3 in 74 minutes

tulsatea
01-13-2009, 11:52 PM
Sam beat Mueller 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. He hit 9 aces.

Deboogle!.
01-13-2009, 11:55 PM
excellent win for sam :yeah:

Deboogle!.
01-14-2009, 11:19 PM
really good 6-3 6-2 win over almagro in the quarters, he didn't even face a break point!!

tulsatea
01-14-2009, 11:20 PM
Sam beat Almagro 6-3, 6-2. He hit 10 aces. He is now in the semis. He plays the winnwer of Kohlschreiber and Ferrer. Big win.

DartMarcus
01-15-2009, 06:02 PM
He can beat Ferrer.

tulsatea
01-16-2009, 12:38 AM
Tall at 1.98m and pretty well built at 94kg, Querrey is blessed with a physique that suited a lot of sports. As a teenager he enjoyed watching Sampras in his pomp but wasn't naturally draw towards tennis.

"I didn't watch a whole lot of tennis. I played all sports and I was just better at tennis than the other ones so I went with it.

"I was really good at baseball, pretty good at football and basketball and pretty much played everything. I enjoyed them all and I still enjoy playing baseball, football or volleyball. I guess now I enjoy tennis the most but back then I enjoyed everything equally," Querrey said.

His father, Mike, was a gifted high school baseballer who turned down an opportunity to join the Detroit Tigers' farm system in favour of a university education.

It was a decision Sam would also have to face, with his father's regrets tipping his decision towards passing up a full scholarship to premier college USC to instead try his hand as a tennis professional.


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Advertisement"A month before school started dad was drafted by the Tigers but he decided not to go. He kind of regretted it. He was in the same boat I was with college and pros, even though it was a different sport.

"I was always planning on going to college."

As a touring pro, Querrey often gets a chance to try his hand at interesting things. He spent yesterday afternoon trying to prise himself into an A1GP car. At a tournament in Miami last year he took batting practice before a Major League baseball game, hitting two home runs.

"I just wanted to make contact with the first pitch. Once that happened I kind of loosened up and hit two out, so that was kind of cool," he said.

On the tennis circuit, he picked up his first ATP title in Las Vegas, made the third round of the Australian Open and the fourth round at the US Open.

Those performances were good enough to ensure his steady climb up the rankings continued, but he knows he needs to raise his game several notches to compete with the likes of Federer and Nadal.

"I've still got a lot of things to work on, but I think one day [my game] can be at that level.

"My goal at the end of this year is to be in the top 20."

Deboogle!.
01-16-2009, 02:07 AM
Great win over Ferrer today. Sam's AO draw isn't great, though.

Bibberz
01-16-2009, 06:14 AM
:banana:

Sam's draw is tough, but Kohli shouldn't be 100% against him. I'd like to see Querrey face (and beat) Andy in R3. :D

Guille.
01-16-2009, 06:52 AM
Sam:banana:

get the title:woohoo:

good luck in Melbourne;)

tulsatea
01-16-2009, 06:21 PM
The 21-year-old Querrey is the first American to reach the Auckland final since Michael Chang (l. to M. Norman) in 2000. The last American to win the title was Scott Davis (d. Chesnokov) in 1990.

Querrey, who captured his first ATP World Tour title in Las Vegas last March, fired 10 aces in the two hour and nine minute match. It was the first meeting between the two. Ferrer, who captured the Auckland title two years ago, came into the match with a 12-3 career mark at the tournament.

After Ferrer won the opening set with a break in the eighth game, Querrey took a 3-1 lead with a break. Querrey lost serve in the seventh game but broke back and then served out the set to level the match. In the third set, Ferrer led 3-1 and served for the match at 5-4 but was broken at 15-40. The Spaniard held two match points when Querrey was serving at 5-6, 15-40 but the American hit two winners and came back to hold. In the tie-break, Querrey took early control with a 3-0 lead and raced out to a 5-1 advantage before Ferrer cut it to 5-4. But Querrey won the final two points to secure the victory.

tulsatea
01-18-2009, 03:13 PM
SAM Querrey knows just what he needs to do to take his game to the next level be more consistent.


Querrey was able to live with Juan Martin del Potro for most of yesterday's Heineken Open final in Auckland but in the crucial moments of the match it was the Argentine who delivered.

"I've got to be more consistent with my serve," lamented the world No 36 after his loss.

"Throughout the week, some days I'd serve 50 percent (of first serves in) and some days I'd serve 70 percent.

"It goes up and down so I've got to get that more consistent and I need to be more aggressive on second serve returns. I need to step up.

"He converted a lot of break points and it felt like he made every first serve, especially on the break points to me and that was the key to me.

"He hits the ball clean on both sides and it kind of comes at you harder than it appears so that took me a while to get used to."

Despite the loss, Querrey believes it's been a good week for him and has set him up nicely for the Australian Open, which starts tomorrow.

"Finals isn't too bad," he said.

"I'll move up in the rankings and I got to play five matches a good warm-up for the Australian Open.

"I'm playing well. I'm excited to go there.

"I play (Philipp) Kohlschreiber (who pulled out of the Heineken Open last week with a shoulder injury) in the first round if he plays. I'm confident and that's the key."

tulsatea
01-19-2009, 04:33 AM
Runner-up Sam Querrey enjoyed his week, graciously saying it was the best crowd he have ever played in front of and mentioning that it was great to have all those "hot Heineken (promotion) girls around"

Doubles winner Robert Lindstedt had the tournament sponsor smiling again when he said "Thanks to Heineken, actually I have so much to thank Heineken for on so many occasions throughout my life".

Bouncing on the 'Bassline'

The first-ever Heineken Open after party proved to be quite a hit on Saturday, with the "Bassline party" on the outside courts at the ASB Tennis Centre lookinh set to become a fixture in the Auckland social calendar.

Liam Finn rocked the crowd in his own unique style, managing to play 17 instruments simultaneously while Recloose Live got people dancing in the large open-air informal setting.

It was nice to see the players enjoy the festivities too, as the norm at ATP tournaments is 'hit winner-make speech-talk to media-jump in taxi.'

Sam Querrey mixed and mingled with fans and tournament volunteers, while champion Juan Del Potro sat outside on a bench with a couple of friends eating his tournament dinner off a paper plate.

The humble champion

After working up the courage for few days, one female reporter decided to try a light hearted line of Spanish on Argentine Juan Martin Del Potro.

"Sos muy bueno, un Potro"

Loosely translated, this Argentine slang means "You are very handsome, a bit of a hottie".

"No, soy muy feo" he replied laughing.

There was a moment of confusion, but what the good natured Del Potro had said was "No, I'm very ugly".

Reaching for the sky

The 2009 Heineken Open singles final between Argentine Juan Martin Del Potro and American Sam Querrey featured a notable first on the ATP tour.

Since the Open Era started way back in 1969, there has never been two players quite so tall contesting a final.

The 6'6" (1.98m) Querrey matched up against the 6'6" (1.98m) Del Potro in a true clash of the titans.

tulsatea
02-12-2009, 03:58 AM
Great win over Marco.

Deboogle!.
02-12-2009, 04:18 AM
yeah, but he almost blew it and he was up a break in the 2nd.... so hopefully he can build off this

tulsatea
02-12-2009, 05:11 PM
He lost to Gremylmayer last year in the first round. He is a lefty. Sam has trouble with lefties.

tulsatea
02-13-2009, 01:07 AM
Sam won 6-3, 6-2 over Gremelmayr. He hit 12 aces. He will probably play Blake next.

Guille.
02-13-2009, 04:06 AM
Sam:worship:

good luck:D

tulsatea
02-14-2009, 12:29 AM
Head-to-head Analysis: No. 11 James Blake leads the head-to-head series 3-1. The last time their paths crossed was in 2007, so some time has passed and both players have matured and in Querrey’s case, improved. Aside from their first-ever meeting in 2006, which was a whitewash affair for the Querrey, their three successive meetings were highly competitive, the victory determined by a handful of points.

Tennis Betting Analysis:

James Blake -225: The veteran (so to speak) Blake is the favourite in this match. He has the edge in head-to-heads and he ranks well above Querrey. Home edge is cancelled out, giving us a level playing field. So it comes down to the game of both players. Blake is a great playmaker and returner. He has a tendency to be too cute sometimes and thus he outplays himself and loses matches he should have won. Blake arrived in San Jose 3-1 on the season, having contested the Australian Open only. This is his second event of the season and his first quarterfinal of the year.

Sam Querrey +175: No.34 Sam Querrey enters this matchup as the puppy. He has a losing record against Blake, but upon closer inspection, he could have won a few more matches against Blake. In 2007, Querrey was a different player and not quite as mature as he is today. He lost those matches because he did not convert on key points. It is safe to assume he will not err the same way today. Querrey arrived in San Jose 4-3 on the season; his best result was a runner-up finish in Auckland. He reaches his second quarterfinal of the year in San Jose.

Tennis Betting Verdict: This match should be another close affair. Blake has it on his racquet , as he is the favourite to win. It is his match to lose. Given his propensity to sometimes outplay himself, there is a chance –more than a slim one – he will lose today. That is not to say Querrey will not have a hand in beating Blake. Querrey has improved as a player and if he serves well and moves well, I think he has it in him to orchestrate the upset.

Tennis Free Picks Sam Querrey in three set +175 | -3 -115| 23 Over -125

Ivanatis
02-14-2009, 12:40 AM
Sam:worship:

good luck:D

some great taste you got, mate:cool:

Sam just lost the 1st set vs. Blake, hit a total of 14 aces, including two games with three aces each I think, not enough though as he couldn't close the set when he had setpoint on his serve in tiebreak:(

win in 3, Sammy

tulsatea
02-16-2009, 02:00 AM
��am Querrey is driving his
Range Rover en route to the
Home Depot Center, an enormous
training facility in Carson, Calif. It’s where you might
find that other sports superstar, David Beckham, bending
it on the soccer fields. Today, it’s all about Sam's practice.
“I just got off a little while to go get breakfast. I have to
practice from 11 to 12:30 p.m. and then again from probably
1:30 to 3:00 p.m., and then I’m going to work out with
a trainer from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m., and I’ve got to pick up
some new ankle bracelets,” he says.
It’s another day in the life of the fourth-ranked American
men’s tennis player. In the last year, he won his first
title at the Tennis Channel Open in Las Vegas, put up a
fight against Rafael Nadal at the US Open and went to the
2008 Beijing Olympics. Not bad for a guy who “didn’t even
know that tennis was in the Olympics until a few years ago.”
Right now, Querrey’s main focus is adjusting to life on
his own. For his new Santa Monica home, there wasn’t a
single interior designer or personal assistant involved. His
aunt and mother Chris decorated the condo, with his family
members serving as the moving men. The best part, he
says, is having a hot tub.
“It’s cool to have my own place and accomplish that at a
����������������
BY KRYSTLE RUSSIN * PHOTO BY PHOTOSPORT
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young age, and I feel good about myself,” he
says. In California, where the average home
buyer age is 33, Querrey has already established
himself at 21.
Since October he has trained with new coach
David Nainkin, the former South African ATP
player, whom he says was always in the picture.
“I had a coach for about four years,
but David was always in LA helping me
out. We just get along. We have similar
personalities, and it’s a good fit. Some
days, I’m working on my forehand. Some days, I’m not using
my legs on my serve. One message I use every day is to
have a good attitude. I’m not sure how other guys go about
their matches. I just try to use what I can.”
At the end of a hard day booked full with practice sessions
and appointments, he doesn’t retreat to absorbing tenFeb./
March 2009 | Play Tennis Florida | 55
nis scores on the ESPN ticker. He prefers eating out with
his friend Claire and cousin Colby, both of whom live with
him at his new condo, and their friends.
“Last night I went to this cool steakhouse, Boa, right by
the ocean. Good restaurants and fine dining is like a hobby
almost.”
Querrey frequents Hollywood hotspots Nobu and Katsu
just as easily as he enjoys fast food and homemade meals.
“Most of the time, my cousin Colby will cook, and I’ll eat
it. I’ll kind of pretend like I’m helping. If we [he and Claire]
want to cook, we’re actually pretty good cooks. We’ll do
steak, steamed vegetables, bread, pasta. If you name it, we’ll
make it,” he says.
“In the morning, I’ll usually just stop by New York
Bagel Co. or stay home and make eggs and pancakes.
I’ve gotta switch it up each morning. For lunch, I’ll
stop at Quiznos after practice.”
There is a reason why Querrey’s mentality seems
different compared to other boldface sports
names. He is a normal guy who spent his youth
being a regular teenager.
“My freshman and sophomore year, I was a
regular student with six classes playing on the
high school tennis team, hanging out with my
buddies. Junior and senior year, I still went to
Thousand Oaks High School. I was playing a
little more. I was playing a few international
tournaments and missed a little more
school, but I was never training three to
four hours a day. It was something casual
I did for fun. I just took clinics
and did a lot of stuff at the gym,” he
says.
“I loved going to high school. I
wasn’t gonna not go. I’m still best
friends with all my high school
friends.”
He recalls what that time was
like. “My mom and I, in high
school, used to always fight about
cleaning my room, or my dad about
homework. But the last couple
years, I moved out of my parent’s
house. We never have fights. They’re
my biggest supporters.”
A few aspects of his life haven’t changed
since high school. He still sometimes drives the vintage
Volkswagen van he bought at 15, a refurbished hippie-mobile
that could quickly be mistaken for Scooby Doo’s Mystery
Machine — “I found it from this guy across from my
grandma and grandpa. It was like a junker,” he says — and
brings his old friends along with him to games as a support
group, nicknamed the Samurais.
“The Samurais are all my best friends from high school,
and it started at the LA Open a few years ago. They paint
their chests and go crazy and wear fun outfits and bring
instruments into the stadium. They’re the ultimate fan support
group. They’re all in school, so they can’t really come
to all the tournaments. There are 10 original guys, the real
Samurais. There’s a bunch of others that come. On the
Facebook group page, there’s about 900 people.”
Considered the next hope for American tennis by fans
and experts alike, everything looked set for him to make
his mark in 2009. Coming off a strong performance at the
Heineken Open in Auckland, New Zealand, where he eliminated
Top 10-ranked David Ferrer to arrive at the finals,
expectations were high for him at the Australian Open. He
lost in the first round to German Philipp Kohlschreiber.
“I played well the whole week, but it’s tough. In the future,
I might not play the week before Grand Slams,”
Querrey says, explaining he played immediately after his
long flight from New Zealand with little practice time.
“I got to Australia on Sunday and got to hit on the court
for 30 minutes on Monday. It’s kind of give or take. But at
the same time, I was happy with how I played,” he says,
pulling into the Home Depot Center. He politely asks if we
can continue the interview after practice. He has some long
hours ahead of him. His manners are obvious on and off
the court, the laid back, California persona. It is what one
would expect from a 21-year old who enjoys playing Frisbee,
bicycle rides with his roommates and texting friends.
The amount of pressure placed on athletes is enough to
scare anyone. After a match, the newswires begin posting
results, fans take to the internet to rate someone’s performance
and ESPN begins deciphering what went wrong. Now
imagine that multiplied several times over — tennis is different
from American football in that its coverage is worldwide.
Querrey says he never pays attention to any of it. The
farthest anyone in his family goes is reading the local newspaper.
“I don’t even think about it. I just go out there and play
for myself. I try hard, and I could really care less what people
write about.”
Nor does he feel intimidated by any of his opponents.
For Querrey, facing off against Roger Federer and the
world’s leading tennis players is like another practice session,
just under a media spotlight. No. 33 in the world, he
doesn’t worry about his rankings.
“I haven’t really set tennis goals for the future,” he says.
He doesn’t worry about anything at all. He only began
watching televised tennis matches at 16 anyway, as tennis
was something he stumbled onto.
“I’ve just kind of always been like that, mellow and low
— Continued next page
Feature
������������������(�� cont.)
key. When it comes to tennis, it’s just a game. The more I’m
having fun and enjoying myself, the better I’m playing.
That’s the key. I try to look at the best of things and have a
good time. When I walk down on the court, have fun today.”
Does he ever think about what if life had gone the other
way?
“If I did play tennis but wasn’t as good, I would be at
USC right now. I’d be on the tennis team majoring in business.
I honestly don’t know what I would be doing.”
What Querrey is alluding to is what he calls “one of the
toughest decisions of my life.”
Without knowing what would happen, Querrey scratched
plans to attend the University of Southern California on a
scholarship and turned pro in 2006. It is a similar crossroads
his father Mike faced decades ago when he chose the
University of Arizona over the Detroit Tigers.
“We talk about it all the time. I think he wished he
would’ve taken a chance and gone pro in baseball and taken
that opportunity. I think he wishes he would’ve given himself
a shot.”
For months, his destiny was uncertain as he found mixed
results on the courts before reaching his decision.
“I’d play a match and want to go pro. I’d lose and want to
go to college. I didn’t know what was going on. It was really
tough. I didn’t know I was going to be successful.”
But underneath the easygoing personality lies a man willing
to take risks to achieve his dreams. He stuck it out,
turned pro and immediately started winning.
“Right after I turned pro, I won three tournaments in a
row. I was doing really well. It kind of assured myself that I
made the right decision.”
It is now late afternoon in the second half of the phone
conversation. Querrey apologizes for placing me on hold
momentarily. He was dropping off his coach on his return
home. “Sorry about that,” he says.
Querrey begins speaking about the changes in his life.
He plays alongside men he once read about — James Blake
and Mardy Fish, for example — and has gotten to know
tennis greats Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.
“I’ve probably hit with Sampras 25 times and played exhibitions
with him. The biggest part of that was he lived in
California, right near me. We’ll occasionally send each other
text messages. Andre, I haven’t hung out with as many
times. But I’ve hit with him and been around him a lot. We’re
still friends,” Querrey says. Yes, he adds, you can tell the
Bryan brothers apart. Bob is taller and Mike has a girlfriend.
“With the tennis guys, they’re all just regular guys. At
first, you’re sort of a little bit in awe, but now they’re just
another guy. If I started hanging out with movie stars, I’d
be a little bit in awe.”
Speaking of movie stars, if he could ask any of
Hollywood’s leading ladies out to a premiere, he has his
top three narrowed down.
56 | Play Tennis Florida | Feb./March 2009
Age: 21
Height: 6’6”
Weight: 200 lbs.
Birthplace: San Francisco, Calif.
Residence: Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Plays: Right-handed
Turned Pro: 2006
Career-high Rank: 33 (Jan. 13, ‘09)
Titles: 1 (2008 Las Vagas)
Runner-up: 1 (2009 Auckland)
Photo: Revanta
“Megan Fox would definitely be in my top three actresses
to take out on a date. Adriana Lima? I’d probably want to
meet and hang out with her.”
Obviously, because Lima seems like a nice person. Who’s
the third?
“I’ve got a little thing for Taylor Swift right now.”
The only snag standing in the way between Querrey and
his picks is his reputation as a homebody. More comfortable
shopping and eating at the Third Street Promenade in
Santa Monica than bar hopping in Beverly Hills, he could
be too boring to hit the town with a Maxim hottie.
“I’m mellow. I don’t go to nightclubs. I’m not big on going
out at night or drinking and dancing. Every now and
then, I’ll drink, but rarely ever. I’ve never really drank in
my life, and it’s not because I don’t want to. It’s just because
I don’t like the taste.”
Meanwhile, Querrey hasn’t let the Australian Open loss
get to him. In the time leading up to the French Open, he
plans to play in 10 tournaments.
“I need to work on my backhand. I need to work on getting
to the net a lot more. I’m a big tall guy, and it would
help me to get closer.”
He begins speaking about his intentions to one day have
his own charity. The inspiration comes from his previous
involvement with charities and being a good role model for
young fans. He has played in exhibitions benefiting causes
like the Boys and Girls Club and has an upcoming Cleveland
match called Victory Gallop, fundraising therapeutic
horseback riding for sick children.
“I haven’t really thought about what I would do, but I
can really start thinking about it, whether it’s underprivileged
kids, breast cancer, Alzheimer’s.”
During his time at the Indianapolis Tennis Championships
last summer, he enjoyed speaking to elementary students
about healthy living.
“I talked to kids out in Ft. Wayne promoting Healthy and
Active Lifestyle (HAL). It was talking to kids at different
elementary schools and assemblies about eating, exercising
and staying healthy rather than sitting at home and playing
Nintendo. I’ve never been into video games, played them
or anything. Ever since I was 5 or 6, I was playing baseball,
football, soccer, running around, riding bikes.”
The subject changed to where he expected he could be
by the end of 2009.
“I’d like to be in the Top 20 if I can, and after that I’d like
to be in the Top 10 and win a Grand Slam, and if I can be
No. 1 in the world, that would be incredible.”
When the day comes that he is married with a family, he
doesn’t know if he wants to transition from player to coach,
as former pros like Jimmy Connors have.
“I don’t know if I’ll want to coach and travel and keep
doing this.”
He isn’t joking about the importance he places on family.
He often visits his old Thousand Oaks home, where he
hangs out with his parents and plays with Maggie, the family
dog. Over Christmas, he vacationed with his parents, sister
Ellen and handfuls of friends in Puerta Vallerta, Mexico,
where they rented a house with a personal chef. In a few
days, Ellen, who plans to support him at the French Open this
May, will turn 18. Querrey doesn’t know her plans, whether
she is having a party or not celebrating much at all, but it doesn’t
matter. Like his tennis style, he goes with the flow.
“If she’s gonna have a party, yeah, I’ll go.”
He thanks me for the interview. After he ends the phone
conversation, he says, he will go right to the kitchen to find
“something to eat,” watch television and get ready for bed
— he considers staying up until midnight a wild moment —
only to begin another day like this all over again. Only to
him, no matter how many practices and forehands he works
on, it won’t feel like Groundhog Day.
“It’s different every day. That’s tennis.”
Krystle Russin is a freelance writer living in New York City.
She has covered business and politics for online and print
publications, including PurePolitics.com. She also blogs
for��am Querrey is driving his
Range Rover en route to the
Home Depot Center, an enormous
training facility in Carson, Calif. It’s where you might
find that other sports superstar, David Beckham, bending
it on the soccer fields. Today, it’s all about Sam's practice.
“I just got off a little while to go get breakfast. I have to
practice from 11 to 12:30 p.m. and then again from probably
1:30 to 3:00 p.m., and then I’m going to work out with
a trainer from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m., and I’ve got to pick up
some new ankle bracelets,” he says.
It’s another day in the life of the fourth-ranked American
men’s tennis player. In the last year, he won his first
title at the Tennis Channel Open in Las Vegas, put up a
fight against Rafael Nadal at the US Open and went to the
2008 Beijing Olympics. Not bad for a guy who “didn’t even
know that tennis was in the Olympics until a few years ago.”
Right now, Querrey’s main focus is adjusting to life on
his own. For his new Santa Monica home, there wasn’t a
single interior designer or personal assistant involved. His
aunt and mother Chris decorated the condo, with his family
members serving as the moving men. The best part, he
says, is having a hot tub.
“It’s cool to have my own place and accomplish that at a
����������������
BY KRYSTLE RUSSIN * PHOTO BY PHOTOSPORT
�������������������������������������������� ����
�������� -���������� ���� ””��������������������
��������������������������”��
young age, and I feel good about myself,” he
says. In California, where the average home
buyer age is 33, Querrey has already established
himself at 21.
Since October he has trained with new coach
David Nainkin, the former South African ATP
player, whom he says was always in the picture.
“I had a coach for about four years,
but David was always in LA helping me
out. We just get along. We have similar
personalities, and it’s a good fit. Some
days, I’m working on my forehand. Some days, I’m not using
my legs on my serve. One message I use every day is to
have a good attitude. I’m not sure how other guys go about
their matches. I just try to use what I can.”
At the end of a hard day booked full with practice sessions
and appointments, he doesn’t retreat to absorbing tenFeb./
March 2009 | Play Tennis Florida | 55
nis scores on the ESPN ticker. He prefers eating out with
his friend Claire and cousin Colby, both of whom live with
him at his new condo, and their friends.
“Last night I went to this cool steakhouse, Boa, right by
the ocean. Good restaurants and fine dining is like a hobby
almost.”
Querrey frequents Hollywood hotspots Nobu and Katsu
just as easily as he enjoys fast food and homemade meals.
“Most of the time, my cousin Colby will cook, and I’ll eat
it. I’ll kind of pretend like I’m helping. If we [he and Claire]
want to cook, we’re actually pretty good cooks. We’ll do
steak, steamed vegetables, bread, pasta. If you name it, we’ll
make it,” he says.
“In the morning, I’ll usually just stop by New York
Bagel Co. or stay home and make eggs and pancakes.
I’ve gotta switch it up each morning. For lunch, I’ll
stop at Quiznos after practice.”
There is a reason why Querrey’s mentality seems
different compared to other boldface sports
names. He is a normal guy who spent his youth
being a regular teenager.
“My freshman and sophomore year, I was a
regular student with six classes playing on the
high school tennis team, hanging out with my
buddies. Junior and senior year, I still went to
Thousand Oaks High School. I was playing a
little more. I was playing a few international
tournaments and missed a little more
school, but I was never training three to
four hours a day. It was something casual
I did for fun. I just took clinics
and did a lot of stuff at the gym,” he
says.
“I loved going to high school. I
wasn’t gonna not go. I’m still best
friends with all my high school
friends.”
He recalls what that time was
like. “My mom and I, in high
school, used to always fight about
cleaning my room, or my dad about
homework. But the last couple
years, I moved out of my parent’s
house. We never have fights. They’re
my biggest supporters.”
A few aspects of his life haven’t changed
since high school. He still sometimes drives the vintage
Volkswagen van he bought at 15, a refurbished hippie-mobile
that could quickly be mistaken for Scooby Doo’s Mystery
Machine — “I found it from this guy across from my
grandma and grandpa. It was like a junker,” he says — and
brings his old friends along with him to games as a support
group, nicknamed the Samurais.
“The Samurais are all my best friends from high school,
and it started at the LA Open a few years ago. They paint
their chests and go crazy and wear fun outfits and bring
instruments into the stadium. They’re the ultimate fan support
group. They’re all in school, so they can’t really come
to all the tournaments. There are 10 original guys, the real
Samurais. There’s a bunch of others that come. On the
Facebook group page, there’s about 900 people.”
Considered the next hope for American tennis by fans
and experts alike, everything looked set for him to make
his mark in 2009. Coming off a strong performance at the
Heineken Open in Auckland, New Zealand, where he eliminated
Top 10-ranked David Ferrer to arrive at the finals,
expectations were high for him at the Australian Open. He
lost in the first round to German Philipp Kohlschreiber.
“I played well the whole week, but it’s tough. In the future,
I might not play the week before Grand Slams,”
Querrey says, explaining he played immediately after his
long flight from New Zealand with little practice time.
“I got to Australia on Sunday and got to hit on the court
for 30 minutes on Monday. It’s kind of give or take. But at
the same time, I was happy with how I played,” he says,
pulling into the Home Depot Center. He politely asks if we
can continue the interview after practice. He has some long
hours ahead of him. His manners are obvious on and off
the court, the laid back, California persona. It is what one
would expect from a 21-year old who enjoys playing Frisbee,
bicycle rides with his roommates and texting friends.
The amount of pressure placed on athletes is enough to
scare anyone. After a match, the newswires begin posting
results, fans take to the internet to rate someone’s performance
and ESPN begins deciphering what went wrong. Now
imagine that multiplied several times over — tennis is different
from American football in that its coverage is worldwide.
Querrey says he never pays attention to any of it. The
farthest anyone in his family goes is reading the local newspaper.
“I don’t even think about it. I just go out there and play
for myself. I try hard, and I could really care less what people
write about.”
Nor does he feel intimidated by any of his opponents.
For Querrey, facing off against Roger Federer and the
world’s leading tennis players is like another practice session,
just under a media spotlight. No. 33 in the world, he
doesn’t worry about his rankings.
“I haven’t really set tennis goals for the future,” he says.
He doesn’t worry about anything at all. He only began
watching televised tennis matches at 16 anyway, as tennis
was something he stumbled onto.
“I’ve just kind of always been like that, mellow and low
— Continued next page
Feature
������������������(�� cont.)
key. When it comes to tennis, it’s just a game. The more I’m
having fun and enjoying myself, the better I’m playing.
That’s the key. I try to look at the best of things and have a
good time. When I walk down on the court, have fun today.”
Does he ever think about what if life had gone the other
way?
“If I did play tennis but wasn’t as good, I would be at
USC right now. I’d be on the tennis team majoring in business.
I honestly don’t know what I would be doing.”
What Querrey is alluding to is what he calls “one of the
toughest decisions of my life.”
Without knowing what would happen, Querrey scratched
plans to attend the University of Southern California on a
scholarship and turned pro in 2006. It is a similar crossroads
his father Mike faced decades ago when he chose the
University of Arizona over the Detroit Tigers.
“We talk about it all the time. I think he wished he
would’ve taken a chance and gone pro in baseball and taken
that opportunity. I think he wishes he would’ve given himself
a shot.”
For months, his destiny was uncertain as he found mixed
results on the courts before reaching his decision.
“I’d play a match and want to go pro. I’d lose and want to
go to college. I didn’t know what was going on. It was really
tough. I didn’t know I was going to be successful.”
But underneath the easygoing personality lies a man willing
to take risks to achieve his dreams. He stuck it out,
turned pro and immediately started winning.
“Right after I turned pro, I won three tournaments in a
row. I was doing really well. It kind of assured myself that I
made the right decision.”
It is now late afternoon in the second half of the phone
conversation. Querrey apologizes for placing me on hold
momentarily. He was dropping off his coach on his return
home. “Sorry about that,” he says.
Querrey begins speaking about the changes in his life.
He plays alongside men he once read about — James Blake
and Mardy Fish, for example — and has gotten to know
tennis greats Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.
“I’ve probably hit with Sampras 25 times and played exhibitions
with him. The biggest part of that was he lived in
California, right near me. We’ll occasionally send each other
text messages. Andre, I haven’t hung out with as many
times. But I’ve hit with him and been around him a lot. We’re
still friends,” Querrey says. Yes, he adds, you can tell the
Bryan brothers apart. Bob is taller and Mike has a girlfriend.
“With the tennis guys, they’re all just regular guys. At
first, you’re sort of a little bit in awe, but now they’re just
another guy. If I started hanging out with movie stars, I’d
be a little bit in awe.”
Speaking of movie stars, if he could ask any of
Hollywood’s leading ladies out to a premiere, he has his
top three narrowed down.
56 | Play Tennis Florida | Feb./March 2009
Age: 21
Height: 6’6”
Weight: 200 lbs.
Birthplace: San Francisco, Calif.
Residence: Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Plays: Right-handed
Turned Pro: 2006
Career-high Rank: 33 (Jan. 13, ‘09)
Titles: 1 (2008 Las Vagas)
Runner-up: 1 (2009 Auckland)
Photo: Revanta
“Megan Fox would definitely be in my top three actresses
to take out on a date. Adriana Lima? I’d probably want to
meet and hang out with her.”
Obviously, because Lima seems like a nice person. Who’s
the third?
“I’ve got a little thing for Taylor Swift right now.”
The only snag standing in the way between Querrey and
his picks is his reputation as a homebody. More comfortable
shopping and eating at the Third Street Promenade in
Santa Monica than bar hopping in Beverly Hills, he could
be too boring to hit the town with a Maxim hottie.
“I’m mellow. I don’t go to nightclubs. I’m not big on going
out at night or drinking and dancing. Every now and
then, I’ll drink, but rarely ever. I’ve never really drank in
my life, and it’s not because I don’t want to. It’s just because
I don’t like the taste.”
Meanwhile, Querrey hasn’t let the Australian Open loss
get to him. In the time leading up to the French Open, he
plans to play in 10 tournaments.
“I need to work on my backhand. I need to work on getting
to the net a lot more. I’m a big tall guy, and it would
help me to get closer.”
He begins speaking about his intentions to one day have
his own charity. The inspiration comes from his previous
involvement with charities and being a good role model for
young fans. He has played in exhibitions benefiting causes
like the Boys and Girls Club and has an upcoming Cleveland
match called Victory Gallop, fundraising therapeutic
horseback riding for sick children.
“I haven’t really thought about what I would do, but I
can really start thinking about it, whether it’s underprivileged
kids, breast cancer, Alzheimer’s.”
During his time at the Indianapolis Tennis Championships
last summer, he enjoyed speaking to elementary students
about healthy living.
“I talked to kids out in Ft. Wayne promoting Healthy and
Active Lifestyle (HAL). It was talking to kids at different
elementary schools and assemblies about eating, exercising
and staying healthy rather than sitting at home and playing
Nintendo. I’ve never been into video games, played them
or anything. Ever since I was 5 or 6, I was playing baseball,
football, soccer, running around, riding bikes.”
The subject changed to where he expected he could be
by the end of 2009.
“I’d like to be in the Top 20 if I can, and after that I’d like
to be in the Top 10 and win a Grand Slam, and if I can be
No. 1 in the world, that would be incredible.”
When the day comes that he is married with a family, he
doesn’t know if he wants to transition from player to coach,
as former pros like Jimmy Connors have.
“I don’t know if I’ll want to coach and travel and keep
doing this.”
He isn’t joking about the importance he places on family.
He often visits his old Thousand Oaks home, where he
hangs out with his parents and plays with Maggie, the family
dog. Over Christmas, he vacationed with his parents, sister
Ellen and handfuls of friends in Puerta Vallerta, Mexico,
where they rented a house with a personal chef. In a few
days, Ellen, who plans to support him at the French Open this
May, will turn 18. Querrey doesn’t know her plans, whether
she is having a party or not celebrating much at all, but it doesn’t
matter. Like his tennis style, he goes with the flow.
“If she’s gonna have a party, yeah, I’ll go.”
He thanks me for the interview. After he ends the phone
conversation, he says, he will go right to the kitchen to find
“something to eat,” watch television and get ready for bed
— he considers staying up until midnight a wild moment —
only to begin another day like this all over again. Only to
him, no matter how many practices and forehands he works
on, it won’t feel like Groundhog Day.
“It’s different every day. That’s tennis.”
Krystle Russin is a freelance writer living in New York City.
She has covered business and politics for online and print
publications, including PurePolitics.com. She also blogs
for

tulsatea
02-17-2009, 01:32 AM
First-Round Upset Alert: Tommy Haas over Sam Querrey. Haas and Querrey both reached the quarterfinals in San Jose last week; Haas went down to Roddick and Querrey fell to Blake. The 6’6’’ American, seeded eighth in Memphis, opened his season with a runner-up finish in Auckland but he lost in the first round of his next two tournaments. Haas is returning from a long layoff at the end of 2008 but he is already in solid form this season. Unless Querrey is serving huge, Haas should be able to pull off what would only be an extremely minor upset.

tulsatea
02-19-2009, 12:33 AM
Sam was serving big. Took out Haas. Baghdatis is next. Tough draws for Sam. Good thing he is playing a lot better.

tulsatea
02-19-2009, 03:28 PM
Eighth-seeded American Sam Querrey defeated three-time Memphis champion Tommy Haas 7-6(4), 6-4 in his opening match. The 21-year-old Californian beat the German for the first time in four meetings as he fired 11 aces and won 94 per cent (31 of 33) of first serve points. He will next meet wild card Marcos Baghdatis for the second straight week. Last week at the SAP Open in San Jose Querrey prevailed in a third set tie-break.

Querrey, who improved to 7-4 on the season, said: "I thought I played really well, trying to be more aggressive. This is the best I've ever felt."

Querrey broke for a 3-2 lead and he lost serve at 5-4. In the tie-break, Haas jumped out to a 3-1 lead but Querrey rallied to win six of the last seven points to win the 50-minute set. In the second set, Querrey went up 2-0 with an early break but then was broken in the fifth game. In the 10th game, Haas double faulted three times (five in the match) as he lost in the opening round in his 11th Memphis appearance. Haas has a 27-8 record in Memphis, winning titles in 1999, 2006-07.

tulsatea
02-20-2009, 01:48 AM
‘‘I’m an excellent Ping-Pong player. I would be surprised if anyone on tour could beat me in Ping-Pong.” — American Sam Querrey, when asked to describe something about himself few would know shortly after his first-round win over Tommy Haas.

tulsatea
02-20-2009, 02:51 AM
Sam beat Baghdatis 6-1, 6-2. Next is Rodddick. Lots of big serves.

Ivanatis
02-20-2009, 01:32 PM
good win Sammy:sad:

please beat Roddick now

tulsatea
02-24-2009, 02:43 AM
Sam beats Canas 7-6, 6-4.
Draw Analysis: With two ATP 500 events going on elsewhere, the Dubai field is not as strong as the previous U.S. events in San Jose and Memphis. Two Americans headline the draw—Mardy Fish, the No. 1 seed, and No. 2 Sam Querrey. After that there is a significant dropoff to third-seeded Ernests Gulbis and No. 4 Igor Kunitsyn.

Fish is in a much tougher top half of the draw, but it's really the second quarter that is most brutal as opposed to his top quarter. Gulbis leads the way in the second quarter, but he has to play Marcos Baghdatis in the first round. The other seed in that section, No. 7 Jeremy Chardy, goes up against a similarly tough opponent in Tommy Haas. Fish, meanwhile, should be able to navigate his way through a section that includes Jarkko Nieminen and Mischa Zverev.

At the bottom of the draw, Querrey should be fine for two rounds, but he will most likely face Memphis semifinalist Lleyton Hewitt in the quarterfinals. The third quarter of the draw presents a huge opportunity for all participants. The seeded players there are Kunitsyn and Steve Darcis; both are slumping. Gilles Muller, or perhaps even a qualifier, could be able to take advantage of a favorable draw.

First-Round Upset Alert: Marcos Baghdatis over Ernests Gulbis. I'd actually be surprised if this didn't happen, and it would only be an upset according to the seeds (Baghdatis is unseeded and Gulbis is third). The Cypriot, however, should be back up into the seeded ranks as long as he is able to stay healthy for any stretch of time. Baghdatis lost to Querrey each of the past two weeks, but he showed signs of a comeback from injury with a fourth-round appearance at the Australian Open. Gulbis, meanwhile, is enduring a dismal stretch of tennis in which he has lost in the first round of 10 straight tournaments. The streak is probably going to end in Delray Beach, but not the way Gulbis wanted.

Also count on Hewitt defeating eighth-seeded Yen-Hsun Lu. For obvious reasons, of course, that is also only an "upset" according to the seeds. Same goes for Haas against Chardy, although that is the least likely of the three to happen since Chardy is playing very well this season.

Momentum Builders (Players looking to continue recent good form): Sam Querrey, Jeremy Chardy

Slump Busters (Players hoping to resurrect their games): Ernests Gulbis, Steve Darcis, Guillermo Canas, Vince Spadea, Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Stefan Koubek, Robert Kendrick, Paul Capdeville, Tommy Haas

Semifinal Predictions: Mardy Fish over Marcos Baghdatis and Sam Querrey over Steve Darcis

Final Prediction: Querrey over Fish

DartMarcus
02-24-2009, 07:25 AM
Sam plays Rochus next. There are a lot of dangerous undeeded players in the draw: Baghdatis, Dancevic, Dent, Hewitt, Koubek, Muller, Haas, Sela, in-form Sweeting... so it gonna be very difficult to win the whole thing

tulsatea
02-27-2009, 06:49 PM
Sam Querrey was battered out of the Delray Beach tournament by Belgium’s Christophe Rochus.

Christophe Rochus shocked Sam Querrey with a straight-set beatdown on Wednesday. The American served at a dismal 49%, but it was not only Querrey’s serve that let him down. Querrey managed just one break point (though he converted) in the entire match, particularly troubling since Rochus is not known for a booming first serve.

Querrey’s serving woes began almost immediately. His first-serve percentage in the opening set languished below 40% and he was broken twice by Rochus. Querrey’s movement got worse as the set progressed; Rochus was solid enough to take advantage of the flagging form of his opponent.

The second set was no better for the American. Querrey’s form continued to fall apart – he did not earn a single break point on the Belgian’s serve. Rochus was able to chip away at Querrey’s serve throughout the set. Three breaks of serve gave Rochus the convincing match win.

Rochus will play Stefan Koubek in the quarterfinals.

Baghdatis#1
03-14-2009, 04:39 PM
Sam now in IW R2:woohoo:

Bibberz
03-16-2009, 04:38 AM
I've never seen Sam move that well. Incredible stuff. :worship: I like his chances against Wawa. :D