How do you choose a tennis racquet? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

How do you choose a tennis racquet?

doddel
06-27-2007, 05:03 PM
I need a new tennis racquet, but I have absolutely no idea how to choose one, there are so many brands!

I am not very tall nor powerfull, so I might need an oversized racquet. Any suggestions (price not really an issue)?

How about grip size, is 2 or 3 good for 'normal-sized' hands?

Wallboy
06-27-2007, 06:56 PM
Here's are pretty good websites; the third one is especially good.

http://www.tennisnuts.com/ishop/677/shopscr531.html

http://www.racquetresearch.com/

http://www.racquetresearch.com/sevencri.htm

jazar
06-27-2007, 08:36 PM
it depends on what you want from a racket and what standard you are

gaz
06-28-2007, 12:04 AM
honestly the only way is to try them play with loads of different rackets before you decide

doddel
06-28-2007, 08:50 AM
honestly the only way is to try them play with loads of different rackets before you decide

and which shop would let you try different racquets? I know decathlon does on the continent, but here in the UK?

jazar
06-28-2007, 09:44 AM
and which shop would let you try different racquets? I know decathlon does on the continent, but here in the UK?

wigmore sports. its in wigmore street, london, just behind oxford street

doddel
06-28-2007, 03:30 PM
wigmore sports. its in wigmore street, london, just behind oxford street

I am in Liverpool...

jazar
06-28-2007, 09:26 PM
I am in Liverpool...

yeah but wigmore sports is the best

gaz
06-28-2007, 11:11 PM
wigmore do and so will PWP and united sports all the specialist shops that i have dealt with will let you and cerainlt the ones that are incorparated into tennis centres you tell me where you are and through my contacts i will try and source you one?

Burrow
07-24-2007, 04:30 PM
I look at the specs, head size, weight, what its made of, the company, players who use the company, user feedback...then ill decide. i use the prestige classic.

GlennMirnyi
07-24-2007, 06:42 PM
I'm demo-ing the n-code nsix-one 18x20 soon.

jazar
07-24-2007, 07:19 PM
I'm demo-ing the n-code nsix-one 18x20 soon.

thats a very nice racket

Burrow
07-24-2007, 10:51 PM
but nothing compared to the pro staff's.


































Or Prestige Classics :p

empressdiver
07-26-2007, 07:12 PM
I would suggest a "player's" racquet. This usually means a thin frame, standard size 95 sq.in., standard 27in length. Basically its the type of racquet most pros would use. Pros have enough power - what they want is consistency in the racquet. This type of racquet requires a long, fast swing for groundstrokes, a full swing on serves, and good technique for punching volleys to get sufficient ball speed. My own choice is the Wilson ncode six-one 95. Every manufacturer makes at least one model of player's racquet so you have some choice.

I am assuming you are not an A player. You probably won't even like a "player's" racquet as much as a lighter, more powerful recreational racquet that will give you good ball speed with just short strokes or the flick of your wrist. The player's racquet will simply not perform well if you use short strokes or flick your wrist for shots. But, because of its performance characteristics, it will encourage you, almost force you, to develop proper strokes, whereas the recreational racquet will encourage you to develop technically deficient strokes that will insidiously limit your development. So, for your longer term improvement, trust me on this, and buy a player's racquet and persevere with it so you will eventually make good shots with it.

Oh, and take some lessons as well, because practice does not make perfect...it only makes permanent. If you learn how to do it right, you will win tennis matches throughout your life that you never would have been able to otherwise.

Basically, I think the recreational racquets are produced as a marketing tool to give players almost instant gratification on the tennis court. A lot of people are just not prepared to put in the effort over the longer term to become good players, and tennis is a sport that demands it. So you have to decide what your goal is.

GlennMirnyi
07-26-2007, 07:47 PM
thats a very nice racket

Just did, and I'm falling in love with it. So much power, so much control. Gotta get used with it, for sure, but it will be soon I'm sure.

GlennMirnyi
07-26-2007, 07:48 PM
I would suggest a "player's" racquet. This usually means a thin frame, standard size 95 sq.in., standard 27in length. Basically its the type of racquet most pros would use. Pros have enough power - what they want is consistency in the racquet. This type of racquet requires a long, fast swing for groundstrokes, a full swing on serves, and good technique for punching volleys to get sufficient ball speed. My own choice is the Wilson ncode six-one 95. Every manufacturer makes at least one model of player's racquet so you have some choice.

I am assuming you are not an A player. You probably won't even like a "player's" racquet as much as a lighter, more powerful recreational racquet that will give you good ball speed with just short strokes or the flick of your wrist. The player's racquet will simply not perform well if you use short strokes or flick your wrist for shots. But, because of its performance characteristics, it will encourage you, almost force you, to develop proper strokes, whereas the recreational racquet will encourage you to develop technically deficient strokes that will insidiously limit your development. So, for your longer term improvement, trust me on this, and buy a player's racquet and persevere with it so you will eventually make good shots with it.

Oh, and take some lessons as well, because practice does not make perfect...it only makes permanent. If you learn how to do it right, you will win tennis matches throughout your life that you never would have been able to otherwise.

Basically, I think the recreational racquets are produced as a marketing tool to give players almost instant gratification on the tennis court. A lot of people are just not prepared to put in the effort over the longer term to become good players, and tennis is a sport that demands it. So you have to decide what your goal is.

Those light rackets are for old people/not serious players.

scarecrows
07-26-2007, 07:55 PM
but nothing compared to the pro staff's.


damn right

those were quality rackets

Burrow
07-26-2007, 09:52 PM
damn right

those were quality rackets

:yeah:

scarecrows
07-26-2007, 09:57 PM
I used to have the 5.0 http://images.ciao.com/ide/images/products/normal/087/Wilson_Hyper_Pro_Staff_5_0_Stretch__17087.jpg

and before that the classic one

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41QVY9Z40ZL._AA280_.jpg