German as a 2nd language? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

German as a 2nd language?

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Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 09:53 PM
Of how much importance do you believe is speaking German as a 2nd language to people from English-speaking countries?
I've noticed most decide to take Spanish, followed by French. Basically I wanna know if people who are able to teach German would be needed. In general most of them can't be asked to learn another language at all but I'm speaking of that minority that might have some desire.

Andre♥
04-16-2007, 10:03 PM
I had english, french and spanish. Never wanted to have German. Don't tell me why.:confused:

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:07 PM
I had english, french and spanish. Never wanted to have German. Don't tell me why.:confused:

German isn't as hard as people say it would be. The grammar is just very detailed which is hard to explain without an illustrative example. I didn't grow up with it myself but I see the difference between English and German and I feel like the English grammar isn't complete.

justClaudia
04-16-2007, 10:09 PM
I had English, French, German and later Spanish.

Can't speak a word of German right now, to be honest. It's a rather complicated language imo. Not that I can use it as an excuse, because everyone seems to think Portuguese ( my mother language ) is also very complicated.

zicofirol
04-16-2007, 10:09 PM
I think German must be top 5 foreign languages learned in the US, that is just and opinion, but It seems to be up there after french, with portuguese and italian...

Andre♥
04-16-2007, 10:12 PM
I know german isn't hard. I have some friends that studied in the german college and they told me it isn't difficult. One of my aunts in actually a german teacher.

I want to start a new language this summer. It will be either dutch or italian. :p

justClaudia
04-16-2007, 10:15 PM
German isn't as hard as people say it would be. The grammar is just very detailed which is hard to explain without an illustrative example. I didn't grow up with it myself but I see the difference between English and German and I feel like the English grammar isn't complete.

Yes, the grammar. :unsure:

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:27 PM
I had English, French, German and later Spanish.

Can't speak a word of German right now, to be honest. It's a rather complicated language imo. Not that I can use it as an excuse, because everyone seems to think Portuguese ( my mother language ) is also very complicated.

What age did you start with German? Do you still speak all of the others? Did you learn them at the same time?
I just wonder how much of each is still remembered when somebody studied 4 languages

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:28 PM
I know german isn't hard. I have some friends that studied in the german college and they told me it isn't difficult. One of my aunts in actually a german teacher.

I want to start a new language this summer. It will be either dutch or italian. :p

Why Dutch? Pick German, it's similar!

Saumon
04-16-2007, 10:29 PM
I like the German grammar but I have zero vocabulary :help:

Andre♥
04-16-2007, 10:30 PM
Why Dutch? Pick German, it's similar!

I have family in Holland! :p

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:32 PM
I have family in Holland! :p

I'll let you get away with that. :)

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:36 PM
I like the German grammar but I have zero vocabulary :help:

:lol:
It's the exact opposite for most of the people I meet who ever tried learning it! They believe the words are difficult to remember as they appear to be long and weird because of Umlauten, so they take their time to learn the vocabulary more than the grammar.

shotgun
04-16-2007, 10:37 PM
To me, the hardest were the prepositions.

MisterQ
04-16-2007, 10:37 PM
As a classical musician I find German very valuable, and I know there are other fields (business, medicine, the sciences, for example) where it is useful.

When traveling/studying in Germany and Austria, it sometimes seemed to me that people there are too well educated. :lol: So many people spoke English better than I spoke German.

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:39 PM
To me, the hardest were the prepositions.

Yep! Most foreign people (even my Mum) who lived in Germany for over 10 years are still not able to use them the right way. :lol:
I've noticed that prepositions are also quite hard when you start with English. It's something you rather learn through conversation.

justClaudia
04-16-2007, 10:42 PM
What age did you start with German? Do you still speak all of the others? Did you learn them at the same time?
I just wonder how much of each is still remembered when somebody studied 4 languages

I had German in the 10th grade, when I was around 16 I think, so, ten years ago. I never got to speak or practise it after, so I believe that's why I lost it in the way.

English and Spanish I still speak, very frequently. about French, well sometimes I have to, for work. But I confess I'm not as fluent as I am on the others, I never really liked the language anyway.

I had English and French at the same time, from the 10th grade on dropped the French and started with German, and then, when I was already in college had Spanish.

MisterQ
04-16-2007, 10:43 PM
I've noticed that prepositions are also quite hard when you start with English. It's something you rather learn through conversation.

I think prepositions are tricky in most languages. There just isn't much of a rhyme or reason to their use!

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:46 PM
As a classical musician I find German very valuable, and I know there are other fields (business, medicine, the sciences, for example) where it is useful.

When traveling/studying in Germany and Austria, it sometimes seemed to me that people there are too well educated. :lol: So many people spoke English better than I spoke German.

English is a main subjects in schools in Germany along with Mathematics and German. So they work really hard on you until you're 19/20! And you start with it at the age of 10/11. I personally think that some speak horrible English over there even after studying it for so long.
But for an American... yeah- I guess you were quite impressed :lol:!

I'm doing Sciences and the only thing I came across that was in German so far was Aufbau principle :lol: ...

cobalt60
04-16-2007, 10:51 PM
Of how much importance do you believe is speaking German as a 2nd language to people from English-speaking countries?
I've noticed most decide to take Spanish, followed by French. Basically I wanna know if people who are able to teach German would be needed. In general most of them can't be asked to learn another language at all but I'm speaking of that minority that might have some desire.

In most high schools in the states French, English and Latin seem to be taught. Have you done any research on what might be offered in private schools or in universities here? Hello Olga btw;)

cobalt60
04-16-2007, 10:53 PM
Forget German in medicine;) Never needed it although I heard about it when I was originally thinkng of being a doctor.

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 10:53 PM
I think prepositions are tricky in most languages. There just isn't much of a rhyme or reason to their use!

Robin tricked from worm at cowboy disguise

savesthedizzle
04-16-2007, 10:53 PM
Of how much importance do you believe is speaking German as a 2nd language to people from English-speaking countries?
I've noticed most decide to take Spanish, followed by French. Basically I wanna know if people who are able to teach German would be needed. In general most of them can't be asked to learn another language at all but I'm speaking of that minority that might have some desire.

I took German in school :)

When we were in 7th grade our school gave us Spanish for 1/4 of a year, French for 1/4 of a year and German for 1/4 of a year and then computers the other 1/4. Then starting in 8th grade we got to choose whatever we wanted. I chose German and studied it for four years. In my town Spanish was by far the most popular, but then I believe German was more popular than French, but in high school we also had the option of Italian, so some people switched to that as well.

In America it would depend a lot on the area of America. I'd guess that in New Jersey/Pennsylvania and also the Midwest where a lot of people with German ancestry are located, it's probably more popular. In the south, Spanish is a lot more logical just because of being close to Mexico and Puerto Rico.

MisterQ
04-16-2007, 10:58 PM
Robin tricked from worm at cowboy disguise

:bowdown:

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 11:13 PM
In most high schools in the states French, English and Latin seem to be taught. Have you done any research on what might be offered in private schools or in universities here? Hello Olga btw;)

Hey Sue :)
I haven't made a lot of research on that yet. I believe it's still easier to teach German in UK than in America. The attitude is the same everywhere (not wanting LOL) but I get the impression it's getting better here because of the EU.
I'd love to know how many people there are wanting to teach German in the States or Canada. If there aren't too many, somebody for a minority could be always useful.

cobalt60
04-16-2007, 11:15 PM
My sister housed a friend of hers from Germany for a year. She was unable to find a job translating German into English and vice versa but I am sure she did not look into teaching German in schools.

Washa Koroleva
04-16-2007, 11:20 PM
Yeah! It's hard to find translation jobs. I have an account as an online translator German-English, English-German, Russian-German/English. I NEVER got a job for the 1st two options as there are thousands of people doing those!

psichogaucho
04-16-2007, 11:35 PM
I want to learn german
like several german writers
I almost attended at a german school when I was a kid and lived in Bariloche

Lee
04-17-2007, 12:28 AM
I don't see many demand in learning German in Western Canada or Western USA.

Louche
04-17-2007, 01:14 AM
I had a few years of German in school. It is useful for studying the classics, archaeology, art history, music, etc. Fields in which German speakers excelled - I was an art history major - had to learn a bit of several languages. German and Latin were the most difficult for me because of the 3 genders and the declensions. Awful time with word endings and prepositions.

Romance languages seem a bit easier to learn. Funny that English is a Germanic language.

Washa Koroleva
04-17-2007, 01:23 AM
I had a few years of German in school. It is useful for studying the classics, archaeology, art history, music, etc. Fields in which German speakers excelled - I was an art history major - had to learn a bit of several languages. German and Latin were the most difficult for me because of the 3 genders and the declensions. Awful time with word endings and prepositions.

Romance languages seem a bit easier to learn. Funny that English is a Germanic language.

I have always had more problems with romance languages. I've also done Latin for 2 years, I didn't find it hard and it helped a little bit with French in the future. To me the word endings bit was at its worst with French :lol:

Voo de Mar
04-17-2007, 01:48 AM
German is my second best foreign language behind English (of course my English isn't very good :o)
Deutsch ist eine schöne Sprache! ;)

MisterQ
04-17-2007, 02:32 AM
Romance languages seem a bit easier to learn. Funny that English is a Germanic language.

There's a lot of Old French and other Romance languages in English, though. It's one big mutt of a language... :lol:

Hendu
04-17-2007, 03:30 AM
I had a few years of German in school. It is useful for studying the classics, archaeology, art history, music, etc. Fields in which German speakers excelled - I was an art history major - had to learn a bit of several languages. German and Latin were the most difficult for me because of the 3 genders and the declensions. Awful time with word endings and prepositions.

Romance languages seem a bit easier to learn. Funny that English is a Germanic language.

I don't know about the other romance languages, but I always thought that Spanish is harder to learn than English. Specially because of verb conjugation.

jazar
04-17-2007, 06:53 AM
german is my second language after english

Action Jackson
04-17-2007, 06:59 AM
German, too much grammar.

JustJames
04-17-2007, 07:58 AM
German is my second language...
Granted the grammar is difficult at first but once you get a little understanding of the language it becomes a lot easier...

Saumon
04-17-2007, 08:12 AM
:lol:
It's the exact opposite for most of the people I meet who ever tried learning it! They believe the words are difficult to remember as they appear to be long and weird because of Umlauten, so they take their time to learn the vocabulary more than the grammar.
I love grammar! That's probably why it seemed logical to me. I hated the irregular verbs tho :tape:
German is supposed to be my first foreign language (before english!) but I can't speak it, mainly because of a lack of practice. I can understand it quite well though.
English is a main subjects in schools in Germany along with Mathematics and German. So they work really hard on you until you're 19/20! And you start with it at the age of 10/11. I personally think that some speak horrible English over there even after studying it for so long.
But for an American... yeah- I guess you were quite impressed :lol:!

I'm doing Sciences and the only thing I came across that was in German so far was Aufbau principle :lol: ...
I'm doing sciences too and I think one of the only times I came across German was this year (after 5 years post high school) in a very technical field. :lol:
Here in France we have to take English as a 1st or 2nd foreign language. We must have another language: German (that can be 1st or 2nd) or Spanish (mostly 2nd foreign language) or more rarely another language (Italian, Arabic, Portuguese, Russian... as a 2nd foreign language). Most people choose the English(that you start when you're 10yo)-Spanish(that you start when 2 years later) combo.

Suzi
04-17-2007, 10:06 AM
At school i learnt french german and then spanish as well as chinese and found german much fun than the others prob cos of the teacher but for me to be fluent ummm no :p

Jimnik
04-17-2007, 10:29 AM
German is my 2nd language, but only because of my mother. I lived for one year in Germany when I was 3 and I kept returning during the holidays so I speak it quite fluently. Reading is also not a problem but, for me, writing is a nightmare. It's not just the basic spelling but all the details too, like knowing when to start a noun with a capital letter. There are so many things you can get away with when you're speaking to someone, rather than writing.

Here in the UK, I had to start learning French when I was 7. I was never given the option of studying another lanuage until I turned 13, when I could choose between German and Italian as a 3rd language.

Ashie_87
04-17-2007, 11:46 AM
I'm learning German at uni but I did a couple of years of it at school. The grammar was confusing to start with but once you learn the rules it's not that hard. There's quite a few schools around Sydney that have German as an offered language (we get to pick which one we do) and it's pretty popular:shrug:

Neely
04-17-2007, 11:58 AM
I don't think at all that German has a high importance on international level. The amount of German speakers is quite limited, French sounds much better than German and has the history on its side, Spanish reaches more people anyway.

But for some studies or for special parts of certain occupations, German could be useful and it could be a key value some special positions in the economy. It depends upon what you want to do. For me, French for example is 99% useless in regards of my studies. Somebody who studies literature, history, art or music would embrace the French language.

Washa Koroleva
04-17-2007, 03:36 PM
I'm learning German at uni but I did a couple of years of it at school. The grammar was confusing to start with but once you learn the rules it's not that hard. There's quite a few schools around Sydney that have German as an offered language (we get to pick which one we do) and it's pretty popular:shrug:

I never expected it to be popular at an Aussie school. What do those who pick it down there aim for mainly? How common is German in Australia?

Suzi
04-17-2007, 05:14 PM
I don't think at all that German has a high importance on international level. The amount of German speakers is quite limited, French sounds much better than German and has the history on its side, Spanish reaches more people anyway.

Totally agree, on a global scale it is prob best for someone to learn spanish or/and english as they are widely spoken but also mandarin if has a large proporation of people speaking it as well as in the business world

But for some studies or for special parts of certain occupations, German could be useful and it could be a key value some special positions in the economy. It depends upon what you want to do. For me, French for example is 99% useless in regards of my studies. Somebody who studies literature, history, art or music would embrace the French language.

German would be useful for business purposes if your company has departments or work with companies in germany, austria etc... also if u have to work or want to live there obviously its important!

Castafiore
04-17-2007, 05:53 PM
I'm not an English native speaker but when I had to pick a 4th language at school, the choice was between Spanish and German. I selected German because I have family in Germany and because from an economic point of view, Germany is quite an important country for our country (thinking about job prospects).

The choice has been excellent for me:
1. I love the grammar. French grammar is complicated to me (I love the language but I HATE French grammar) since every rule seems to have so many exceptions. Why have rules anyway? The German grammar has a nice structure and you can depend on the rules because the exceptions are easy enough to remember.
2. Tourism: I found it useful in countries like Greece and Italy. Many of the Greek people I met found it easier to talk in German than in any other foreign language, even English. That was a surprise to me. (although many of the Greeks I met would only talk to me in German once they found out I was not actually from Germany. To use a line from Fawlty Towers "don't mention the war". :rolleyes: I had a date there with a German boy when I was on holiday and a couple of Greek boys who found out had this HUGE argument with me why I would ever pick a German boy over a Greek boy. )
In Northern Italy, I tried speaking French and English to the locals (I can't speak Italian) but the most useful language there was German.
3. Work related: in every job I had, my knowledge of German was one of the key factors in getting the job.
4. Business: in my experience, German is still an important language in Eastern Europe, more important than English but that's going to change or is already changing, I think.

MisterQ
04-17-2007, 07:36 PM
We lost many students of the German language in the Virginia shootings yesterday, as well as a professor. :sad:

marti_228
04-17-2007, 10:43 PM
German seems to difficult for me, especially because Spanish is a Romance language. I've been learning English for more than 10 years (I'm 17) and two years ago I started to learn French and I really like and I don't find it difficult because is a Romance language. My paternal grandparents are Italian and italian is quite similar to Spanish so I practically understand everything and speak a little.

I'm going to study Economy at university, what language do you think is the best to learn for me being an Argentinean? or is enough with English and French?

Hendu
04-17-2007, 11:15 PM
I'm going to study Economy at university, what language do you think is the best to learn for me being an Argentinean? or is enough with English and French?

Chinese.

good luck with that... ;)

Washa Koroleva
04-17-2007, 11:29 PM
Chinese.

good luck with that... ;)

:lol: That is true. I wish I had the time and patience to learn Chinese although I don't do anything with Economics.

marti_228
04-18-2007, 12:44 AM
I was thinking about that since China is becoming a very powerful country and essential to the world's economy. I see that I wasn't wrong about my thoughts.
I doubt I'll study Chinese in the near future, first, I want to be able to speak French fluently. I don't know think it's so useful but I love the language, the French guys, Paris, and other French things.

Johnny Groove
04-18-2007, 01:22 AM
Here, learning Spanish is kind of like a rite of passage, as is French and/or Creole, as soooo many people use those languages in my school as thie first language.

German isnt really thought of :rolls: I guess its a South Florida thing :lol:

bokehlicious
04-19-2007, 08:15 AM
German is my second language, the 3 different genders aren't easy to learn, as well as some grammar things (dativ, akusativ, genitiv...)...

RonE
04-19-2007, 08:51 AM
I personally learned French in high school but I had the option to do German when I was in Australia.

I was in Germany briefly and did a crash course but I somewhat regret the fact that I don't know German better since it is a very powerful means to boost your career especially in Europe.

Washa Koroleva
04-20-2007, 12:26 PM
We lost many students of the German language in the Virginia shootings yesterday, as well as a professor. :sad:

Oh dear :sad: How many of them were students of German language?

Washa Koroleva
04-20-2007, 12:27 PM
German isnt really thought of :rolls: I guess its a South Florida thing :lol:

It better be :ras:

MisterQ
04-20-2007, 05:13 PM
Oh dear :sad: How many of them were students of German language?

I tried investigating this quickly but didn't find a reliable answer. But a German class was one of the ones where many people were shot, including their professor. :sad:

Eden
10-07-2009, 08:14 PM
As it seems popular at the moment to discuss foreign languages I thought to dust this thread :angel:

Jōris
10-07-2009, 08:22 PM
Did you know that the German word for cool means horny in Dutch. I learned this after some confusion during a high school excursion to Berlin.

Ivanatis
10-07-2009, 08:27 PM
which one?

Jōris
10-07-2009, 08:29 PM
which one?

Geil.

bokehlicious
10-07-2009, 08:30 PM
Hoi Doris

Gutes Bump :yeah: :D das ist schade das ich nicht besser Deutsch kann, die meisten von die Wörter ich kenne sind nur für meine Arbeit nützlich... :sad: :( :awww:

Ivanatis
10-07-2009, 08:33 PM
Geil.

yeah I was thinking of that too

actually it means horny in German as well, depends on the context it is used

Jelena
10-07-2009, 08:36 PM
Geil.
in the original meaning - before it was invented as "cool" of the youth in the mid 80s - it also here has the meaning of "horny".

Jōris
10-07-2009, 08:49 PM
in the original meaning - before it was invented as "cool" of the youth in the mid 80s - it also here has the meaning of "horny".

yeah I was thinking of that too

actually it means horny in German as well, depends on the context it is used

So they do mean the same. We were having a conversation on a Die Fantastischen Vier song that was on the radio and someone freaked out and said it meant cool.

Ivanatis
10-07-2009, 09:01 PM
well, it means horny usually when it is used together with any form of sein (to be), in pretty much every other context it means cool

bokehlicious
10-07-2009, 09:05 PM
It seems the word "geil" is often used in German porn's dialogues... :angel: :p

Ilovetheblues_86
10-08-2009, 12:41 AM
Ich musse deutsch sprechen lernen.
Hilfe mich!

Henry Chinaski
10-08-2009, 03:05 AM
meine (meinen?) lieblingsgrupe ist rage against the machine.

I think that's the only line I remember from 5 years compulsory german at school.

spanish is the globe's second language and it's presence is growing every year, mainly due to its presence in california, films, pop music etce. the world's prdominant power is gradually heading towards bilingualism. and spanish just sounds a lot better than the ugly fuck of a language that is german. it's natural that english-speakers would prefer to learn it as a second language.

Ilovetheblues_86
10-08-2009, 03:15 AM
Meine mutter is deutschlehrerin.
Sie hat mich gesagt du bist eine sau, Henry Chinaski.

Arkulari
10-08-2009, 04:18 AM
As a classical musician I find German very valuable, and I know there are other fields (business, medicine, the sciences, for example) where it is useful.

When traveling/studying in Germany and Austria, it sometimes seemed to me that people there are too well educated. :lol: So many people spoke English better than I spoke German.

Very true :)

I'm in the chemistry field and a lot of very technical stuff on very specific areas is in german and a lot of the research and stuff is top notch in Germany ;)

the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research is the absolute best in the world, their stuff in solid-state chemistry (specially the work they have done to improve the techniques of thermal analysis like DSC) and heterocyclic chemistry is just unbelievable, when everything else fails you go and check their stuff and the answer is usually there :yeah: :)

Of course you find most of the stuff in english, but there are things that are deeply technical and obscure and can only be found in german :o

bokehlicious
10-08-2009, 06:30 AM
meine (meinen?) lieblingsgrupe ist rage against the machine.

I think that's the only line I remember from 5 years compulsory german at school.

spanish is the globe's second language and it's presence is growing every year, mainly due to its presence in california, films, pop music etce. the world's prdominant power is gradually heading towards bilingualism. and spanish just sounds a lot better than the ugly fuck of a language that is german. it's natural that english-speakers would prefer to learn it as a second language.

What's the first one? Mandarin? Hindi? :scratch: :p

Jōris
10-08-2009, 08:48 AM
Ich musse deutsch sprechen lernen.
Hilfe mich!

Nau gut, ich werde dir deine erste lektion geben. In dieser lektion geht es um das wort geil, dieser hat zwei bedeutungen in der deutschen sprache: heiss (ein scharfes s zeichen kann ich nicht finden auf meiner tastatur) und toll.

Kuck mal an:

Wustest du schon das ich ihre schwester ins arsch ficke? Das finde ich geil.

Kannst du sagen welche bedeutung ich meine? Heiss oder toll.

Har-Tru
10-08-2009, 08:50 AM
Hoffentlich gibt es ein Paar Deutsche die regelmäßig hier posten und hilfsbereit sind. Die Idee ist auf jeden Fall toll. :D Das Problem ist, deutsche Grammatik ist so v*****t kompliziert dass die meisten Muttersprachler die Regeln nicht erklären können. :o

Jelena
10-08-2009, 08:54 AM
Hast du irgendwelche Fragen, José?

Har-Tru
10-08-2009, 08:58 AM
Bin gerade aufgestanden... nein noch keine Frage. :lol: NOCH nicht. :p

Action Jackson
10-08-2009, 09:08 AM
German grammar is evil.

Action Jackson
10-08-2009, 09:11 AM
Sexy dialect.

_zBtVfNPEQE

Ilovetheblues_86
10-08-2009, 11:27 PM
Nau gut, ich werde dir deine erste lektion geben. In dieser lektion geht es um das wort geil, dieser hat zwei bedeutungen in der deutschen sprache: heiss (ein scharfes s zeichen kann ich nicht finden auf meiner tastatur) und toll.

Kuck mal an:

Wustest du schon das ich ihre schwester ins arsch ficke? Das finde ich geil.

Kannst du sagen welche bedeutung ich meine? Heiss oder toll.

Meine Schwester hat gestorben. Vielleicht hast du diesen Anschlag verursacht???
Kannst du dich das vorstellen? Wie schrecklich ist das?
Vieleicht deine Seele wird gehen in die Hölle?? Grüss Dämon dich. :scared:

Jelena
10-09-2009, 08:07 AM
Meine Schwester hat gestorben. Vielleicht hast du diesen Anschlag verursacht???
Kannst du dich das vorstellen? Wie schrecklich ist das?
Vieleicht deine Seele wird gehen in die Hölle?? Grüss Dämon dich. :scared:
Meine Schwester ist gestorben. (The word "Anschlag" is used mainly connected with bombs. For example: "Bei einem Bombenanschlag in der afghanischen Stadt Kundus sind wieder zwei Bundeswehrsoldaten verletzt worden.")
Kannst du dir das vorstellen?
Vielleicht wird deine Seele in die Hölle gehen?? (How do you mean that now? Demon greets you would be: "Der Dämon grüßt dich", even better would be "Der Dämon begrüßt dich").

Jōris
10-09-2009, 10:03 AM
Meine Schwester hat gestorben. Vielleicht hast du diesen Anschlag verursacht???
Kannst du dich das vorstellen? Wie schrecklich ist das?
Vieleicht deine Seele wird gehen in die Hölle?? Grüss Dämon dich. :scared:

I see those online translation sites still have a long way to go.

Jelena
10-09-2009, 10:15 AM
Those online translation sites will never become as good as a human translator. :) They can give you a rough idea of what is written in the text, but to know it really well you have to give the text to a human translator.

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 10:53 AM
I see those online translation sites still have a long way to go.

Your post sucked too. :shrug: :smooch:

Stensland
10-09-2009, 12:31 PM
you don't need to speak actual german in order to get your points across:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIV4FUwLi7g

still one of the funniest bits in german-speaking history. ;)

Jelena
10-09-2009, 12:59 PM
:haha: I heard it sooooooooo many times but still it's worth a :lol:

Jōris
10-09-2009, 01:01 PM
Your post sucked too. :shrug: :smooch:

Deinen post saugt auch.

My post was more coherent than Ronaldo's at least. I can't help it German grammar is one of the most messed up things in the world.

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 01:45 PM
you don't need to speak actual german in order to get your points across:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIV4FUwLi7g

still one of the funniest bits in german-speaking history. ;)

I was about to ask if anyone had posted this yet. It's without a shadow of a doubt the best video in the history of mankind. :worship:

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 01:49 PM
hahaha "ein Trenner is nisch ein Idiot, ein Trenner seh... sah was passieren im Platz!!" :rolls:

Ilovetheblues_86
10-09-2009, 01:52 PM
Meine Schwester ist gestorben. (The word "Anschlag" is used mainly connected with bombs. For example: "Bei einem Bombenanschlag in der afghanischen Stadt Kundus sind wieder zwei Bundeswehrsoldaten verletzt worden.")
Kannst du dir das vorstellen?
Vielleicht wird deine Seele in die Hölle gehen?? (How do you mean that now? Demon greets you would be: "Der Dämon grüßt dich", even better would be "Der Dämon begrüßt dich").

I didnty used the translator, I was trying to remind myself of the correct use. So the past is used with the present verb tense, thanks, now I remind that. Dich is personal pronoun. Dir and mir are the correct ones... The verb always come in the second position in the phrase...and I just put Dämon in the very used expression: Grüss Gott dich. :worship:

Thanks for the help.

Jelena
10-09-2009, 01:52 PM
Oh Mann, lass den armen Trap in Ruhe. Er hat absolutes Italo-Deutsch gesprochen. Und wenn man sich aufregt, vergisst man in der Fremdsprache gern die Grammatik. Geht meiner Mutter heute noch so.

Ilovetheblues_86
10-09-2009, 01:54 PM
I see those online translation sites still have a long way to go.

Lass mich in Ruhe, Clown. :sad:
Du bist narr.
Nicht geil. :cry2:
=(((

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:00 PM
OMG I can't stop laughing!

"es gibbi spieler spieler swei o drei den diese spieler waren swack wie eine flasche leer!"

"Strunz! Was erlaube Strunz!?!"

"ik bin mude jez de erwate diese spieler e de vertadege diese spieler! ik habe immer die schulde uber diese spieler!"

and last but not least...

"ich habe fertig"

:rolls: :worship:

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:00 PM
I didnty used the translator, I was trying to remind myself of the correct use. So the past is used with the present verb tense, thanks, now I remind that. Dich is personal pronoun. Dir and mir are the correct ones... The verb always come in the second position in the phrase...and I just put Dämon in the very used expression: Grüss Gott dich. :worship:

Thanks for the help.
Grüß dich Gott is actually only used in Bavaria. If you greet someone that way everybody will think you learned your German in München. :)

Ilovetheblues_86
10-09-2009, 02:04 PM
Grüß dich Gott is actually only used in Bavaria. If you greet someone that way everybody will think you learned your German in München. :)

But thats what probably happened to me since I went to München with 7 Jahre alt. :lol:
What about "Grüss dich" ?

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:07 PM
I didnty used the translator, I was trying to remind myself of the correct use. So the past is used with the present verb tense, thanks, now I remind that. Dich is personal pronoun. Dir and mir are the correct ones... The verb always come in the second position in the phrase...and I just put Dämon in the very used expression: Grüss Gott dich. :worship:

Thanks for the help.

Mich is first person reflexive pronoun in ACCUSATIVE

Mir is the same in DATIVE

This verb is interesting: Ich stelle mich vor: I introduce myself/Ich stelle mir vor: I imagine.

Oder? :o

Oh Mann, lass den armen Trap in Ruhe. Er hat absolutes Italo-Deutsch gesprochen. Und wenn man sich aufregt, vergisst man in der Fremdsprache gern die Grammatik. Geht meiner Mutter heute noch so.

Ja... ich muss sagen ich bewundere die Menschen die auf einer Fremdsprache versuchen zu sprechen, auch wenn sie sie nicht so gut beherrscht haben.

Und ja, wenn ich mich ärgere schmeiße ich die Grammatik weg. :o

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:08 PM
Grüß dich Gott is actually only used in Bavaria. If you greet someone that way everybody will think you learned your German in München. :)

Munich. :nerner:

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:12 PM
"Grüß dich" is not so determined as is "Grüß (dich) Gott", though I think (my personal feeling now, I don't have a statistical proof for it) that it isn't anymore used as much as it was earlier.

when you went to München im Alter von 7 Jahren or when you went to "...München, als ich 7 Jahre alt war."

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:15 PM
Munich. :nerner:
I know I know. ;)

Ivanatis
10-09-2009, 02:15 PM
I never heard "Grüß dich Gott". "Grüß Gott" and "Grüß dich" is way more common I think. Or you just say "Servus".:p

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:18 PM
I never heard "Grüß dich Gott". "Grüß Gott" and "Grüß dich" is way more common I think. Or you just say "Servus".:p
Or "Hi" or "Hallo"

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:21 PM
Or "na" if you're sick and tired of meeting that person. :lol:

Oh needless to say leute, please correct my mistakes will ya? :awww:

Ivanatis
10-09-2009, 02:23 PM
Or "na" if you're sick and tired of meeting that person. :lol:

In that particular situation I say "Tach."

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:28 PM
Or "na" if you're sick and tired of meeting that person. :lol:

Oh needless to say leute, please correct my mistakes will ya? :awww:
Ja... ich muss sagen ich bewundere die Menschen die auf einer Fremdsprache versuchen zu sprechen, auch wenn sie sie nicht so gut beherrscht haben.

Und ja, wenn ich mich ärgere schmeiße ich die Grammatik weg. :o
"...wenn sie sie nicht so gut beherrschen" ist in diesem Fall besser, weil das ja allgemein für alle Menschen gilt.

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:31 PM
In that particular situation I say "Tach."

Westphalians usually say "na" or "na du".

Never heard "tach"... is that from Berlin?

"...wenn sie sie nicht so gut beherrschen" ist in diesem Fall besser, weil das ja allgemein für alle Menschen gilt.

OK... aber ich verstehe nicht warum "beherrscht haben" falsch ist. Gilt das nicht für alle Menschen auch? :confused:

Jelena
10-09-2009, 02:33 PM
Leute, kennt ihr die Antrittspressekonferenz von Trap als irischer Nationaltrainer? Die ist auch :spit: :lol: :haha:

sQ_dQfBhJ0I

Ivanatis
10-09-2009, 02:34 PM
But "na du" is not really negative, I'd use this for a friend.

Not sure if "Tach." is Berlin only or North Germany. Pretty sure, it's not common in the South.

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:40 PM
But "na du" is not really negative, I'd use this for a friend.

Not sure if "Tach." is Berlin only or North Germany. Pretty sure, it's not common in the South.

Oh I see, there was a misunderstanding... I mean if you meet someone very often, a friend for instance, then you'll more likely greet him with a "na" or "na du" rather than always "hallo" or "hi". No negative connotation intended.

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 02:43 PM
Leute, kennt ihr die Antrittspressekonferenz von Trap als irischer Nationaltrainer? Die ist auch :spit: :lol: :haha:

sQ_dQfBhJ0I

:haha:

Stensland
10-09-2009, 02:51 PM
i say "tach" all the time btw. it stems from "guten tag", you just drop the "guten" and pronounce the ending of "tag" like the "doch"-ch.

i'm fairly sure it comes from some westfalian part, like the sauerland, münsterland or the ruhr valley. are you sure you've never heard that, har-tru?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7V8-sU-w98

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 03:18 PM
i say "tach" all the time btw. it stems from "guten tag", you just drop the "guten" and pronounce the ending of "tag" like the "doch"-ch.

i'm fairly sure it comes from some westfalian part, like the sauerland, münsterland or the ruhr valley. are you sure you've never heard that, har-tru?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7V8-sU-w98

Yeah sure I have, I just hadn't made the connection with "Guten Tag" spoken quickly with a northern accent (when I lived in the south, people didn't say "tach" but "tack").

Stensland
10-09-2009, 04:24 PM
the berliner accent is probably one of the worst for starters: they don't even care about grammar that much.

"ick will dir ma wat erzähln von mir, ick kenn dir ja nich"...

http://www.myvideo.de/watch/6962091/Sido_Hey_Du

Har-Tru
10-09-2009, 04:50 PM
Schwäbisch is the worst...

Jelena
10-09-2009, 04:57 PM
When I worked in a callcenter I had a call to do once in a village near Regensburg. The secretary really wasn't able to speak at least a "bayrisches Hochdeutsch", to call that way Hochdeutsch with a bavarian accent. And I wasn't able to understand her. :o

Ivanatis
10-09-2009, 04:58 PM
When I worked in a callcenter

Mein Beileid.

Jelena
10-09-2009, 05:01 PM
Zum Glück mache ich das nicht mehr. :)

Ivanatis
10-09-2009, 05:04 PM
ohja, es gibt wenig schlimmere Jobs

naja, vielleicht Sicherheitsdienst alleine 12 Stunden am Stück nachts irgendwo

Stensland
10-09-2009, 05:29 PM
oder entbeiner im schlachthof.

nachtschicht, wochenende.

3.50 € pro stunde schwarz. aua. :D

Jōris
10-10-2009, 11:54 AM
Is there any logic to the genders in German? Why is 'auto' neuter and 'wagen' masculine for instance.


Lass mich in Ruhe, Clown. :sad:
Du bist narr.
Nicht geil. :cry2:
=(((

Dummkopf!

Har-Tru
10-10-2009, 12:03 PM
Is there any logic to the genders in German? Why is 'auto' neuter and 'wagen' masculine for instance.

There's 10% logic and 90% you're-on-your-own.

-ung, -heit- -keit, -schaft are all feminine, except Sprung and derivates.

-chen, -lein are neuter, most -us too.

Usually, but not always, words that had a gender in a foreign language keep it in German.

Jelena
10-10-2009, 12:03 PM
I don't think there is any logic to the genders. :shrug: I can explain you why "Mädchen" is neuter, although it's a girl. But I don't know if there is any logic. Maybe José learned something logical about the genders, when he learned German. :unsure:

"Mädchen" is the diminutive form of "Magd" - maidservant. And diminutives are neuters.
Another rule is: when there is a word composed of two nouns, the article is the one of the second noun.

Action Jackson
10-10-2009, 12:07 PM
Schwäbisch is the worst...

Rubbish.

NDf0p4MgFmw

vh09JM9mZNY

Jōris
10-10-2009, 12:34 PM
There's 10% logic and 90% you're-on-your-own.

-ung, -heit- -keit, -schaft are all feminine, except Sprung and derivates.

-chen, -lein are neuter, most -us too.

Usually, but not always, words that had a gender in a foreign language keep it in German.

Thanks. I remember that from high school, but like you said it leaves a huge room for guessing. I regret dropping German in high school, but the genders took too much time and frustration back then and the French teacher was really hot.

I don't think there is any logic to the genders. :shrug: I can explain you why "Mädchen" is neuter, although it's a girl. But I don't know if there is any logic. Maybe José learned something logical about the genders, when he learned German. :unsure:

"Mädchen" is the diminutive form of "Magd" - maidservant. And diminutives are neuters.
Another rule is: when there is a word composed of two nouns, the article is the one of the second noun.

The last rule is helpful, I forgot about it. Danke.

Googling a bit, apparently 'auto' as a loan word is neuter.

Aaric
10-10-2009, 12:40 PM
Spanish is the second more spoken language in the world, and French is spoken in Canada, France, Switzerland, and other important countries while not so many people speak german :shrug:

Jōris
10-10-2009, 12:41 PM
Spanish is the second more spoken language in the world, and French is spoken in Canada, France, Switzerland, and other important countries while not so many people speak german :shrug:

eh ok.

Har-Tru
10-10-2009, 01:16 PM
Thanks. I remember that from high school, but like you said it leaves a huge room for guessing. I regret dropping German in high school, but the genders took too much time and frustration back then and the French teacher was really hot.



The last rule is helpful, I forgot about it. Danke.

Googling a bit, apparently 'auto' as a loan word is neuter.

Yeah, most "Fremdwörter" are neuter, but there are so many exceptions that I don't even consider that a rule. From what I've seen, the shorter the word, the higher the chances that it is indeed neuter.

Spanish is the second more spoken language in the world, and French is spoken in Canada, France, Switzerland, and other important countries while not so many people speak german :shrug:

That's what I call an off-topic. :lol:

Jelena
10-10-2009, 01:21 PM
That's what I call an off-topic. :lol:
And I call it someone who only read the opening post and not the rest of the thread. :)

Har-Tru
10-10-2009, 01:26 PM
And I call it someone who only read the opening post and not the rest of the thread. :)

lol yeah :lol: I didn't read it myself... :o

Jōris
10-10-2009, 01:35 PM
And I call it someone who only read the opening post and not the rest of the thread. :)

In German that would be a nurdenerstenpostleser

Jelena
10-10-2009, 01:36 PM
nur-den-ersten-post-Leser ;)

Jelena
10-10-2009, 01:51 PM
another rule I just remember: When you build a sentence with an Akkusativ-object and a Dativ-object, it's normal that the Dativ is before the Akkusativ.

Ich gebe dir mein Brot.

Har-Tru
10-10-2009, 02:03 PM
In German that would be a nurdenerstenpostleser

:haha:

Jōris
10-11-2009, 09:14 PM
What's everyone's favourite German word (other than fahrvergnügen of course)? Everyone has one.

I always liked abwechslungsreich.

Har-Tru
10-11-2009, 09:33 PM
Friedhof is my fave. Think about it. Vorfreude is cool and Handschuh and überfahren made me lol cause they're so graphic. There are tons of other words that I love but I can't remember.

Jōris
10-11-2009, 09:50 PM
Friedhof is my fave. Think about it. Vorfreude is cool and Handschuh and überfahren made me lol cause they're so graphic. There are tons of other words that I love but I can't remember.

Must have a religious origin. I like Scheißfreundlich for similar reason.

Tischtuch.

Ivanatis
10-12-2009, 07:14 AM
haha keep going guys

Ilovetheblues_86
10-12-2009, 07:40 AM
Is there any logic to the genders in German? Why is 'auto' neuter and 'wagen' masculine for instance.




Dummkopf!

Eulescheissekopf

Jelena
10-12-2009, 09:31 AM
Eulescheissekopf
I never heard that one :lol:

Jōris
10-12-2009, 10:00 AM
I like genau too.

Some German words that are common usage in Dutch:

ach so
Aha-Erlebnis
Angstgegner
Einzelgänger
im Frage
Krimi
och du Liebe
Quatsch
Schadenfreude
Sowieso
Übergeil
Überhaupt
tschüß

Jelena
10-12-2009, 10:05 AM
Obergeil is more correct :)

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 10:10 AM
I like genau too.

Some German words that are common usage in Dutch:

och du Liebe


:haha:

Jōris
10-12-2009, 10:11 AM
Obergeil is more correct :)

I don't think I've come across that spelling, is it pronounced the same as ubergeil? A German student who lives here says "ubergeil" a lot. Ober is new to me.

Jōris
10-12-2009, 10:13 AM
:haha:

Why are you laughing? It's not exactly a word, but you should know what I mean.

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 10:16 AM
Why are you laughing? It's not exactly a word, but you should know what I mean.

I found it hilarious. :shrug: :smooch:

Here is the list of German words that are common use in Spanish:

Jelena
10-12-2009, 10:17 AM
I don't think I've come across that spelling, is it pronounced the same as ubergeil? A German student who lives here says "ubergeil" a lot. Ober is new to me.
I know it as obergeil. :shrug:

Jōris
10-12-2009, 10:33 AM
I know it as obergeil. :shrug:

Maybe it's a regional thing.

I found it hilarious. :shrug: :smooch:

It's not that common, my mother sometimes said it when I did something bad. Could be a family thing.

Here is the list of German words that are common use in Spanish:

We don't have any Portuguese words either.

I can't think of many Spanish loan words in Dutch other than macho (which could be Italian). There should be more but Spanish is too foreign for me to recognise them.

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 10:36 AM
macho is Spanish. I use it a lot in situations where Germans use "Mann..." or "Mensch...".

Jelena
10-12-2009, 10:40 AM
the German word "lecker" is not as universal as in Dutch. It's nearly only used for the taste of food. In Dutch even the weather can be "lekker". I'm quite sure it isn't today though.

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 10:47 AM
The sun shines in Westphalia Jelena. :D

Dini
10-12-2009, 10:50 AM
Michael Schumacher.

Jōris
10-12-2009, 10:53 AM
the German word "lecker" is not as universal as in Dutch. It's nearly only used for the taste of food. In Dutch even the weather can be "lekker". I'm quite sure it isn't today though.

lol yes "lekker" is used to denote anything positive: tasty, delicious, everything's cool, nice, fantastic, good looking, sexy, hot. I only use it for food and women (lekker ding = hot thing)

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 10:53 AM
Michael Schumacher.

:lol:

You know what it means rite?

Dini
10-12-2009, 11:12 AM
:lol:

You know what it means rite?

GOAT?

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 11:22 AM
:lol:

The same as the name of Spain's Prime Minister. :p

Dini
10-12-2009, 11:29 AM
I can't be bothered to look it up. :lol:

Jelena
10-12-2009, 11:31 AM
The sun shines in Westphalia Jelena. :D
hier im Rhein-Main-Gebiet ist es wolkig.
:lol:

The same as the name of Spain's Prime Minister. :p
Stimmt, habe ich noch nie drüber nachgedacht. :)

Jelena
10-12-2009, 11:35 AM
I can't be bothered to look it up. :lol:
José Luis Rodriguez Zapatero :)

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 11:36 AM
Hier hat es unheimlich viel geregnet in den letzten Tagen... :o

Da Shoemaker Nadine! Almost like Djou's username...

Jōris
10-12-2009, 11:39 AM
Schumacher is an undisputed goat.

Jōris
10-12-2009, 11:46 AM
Don't you just hate it when people talk about the weather? I sure do.

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 11:48 AM
:lol:

I hate it but I do it myself, mostly in Aufzügen...

Jelena
10-12-2009, 11:51 AM
Don't you just hate it when people talk about the weather? I sure do.
Usually it's a good start for a conversation, especially when you don't have much time or don't know the other person so well. ;)

:yippee: the sun is shining! For the first time since Friday or so. :o

Dini
10-12-2009, 11:52 AM
:rolls:

Jōris
10-12-2009, 11:53 AM
I also hate it when someone starts a sentence with, "Don't you just hate it...?"

Jōris
10-12-2009, 12:03 PM
Sehnsucht

Jelena
10-12-2009, 12:05 PM
Regenbogen

Jōris
10-12-2009, 12:13 PM
Regenbogen

Oh ha ha, very funny.

Spaßvogel.

Jelena
10-12-2009, 12:25 PM
Witzbold

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 02:16 PM
Rechtsbehelfsbelehrung

Jelena
10-12-2009, 03:16 PM
Du hast offensichtlich juristische Texte übersetzt ;)

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 03:17 PM
Du hast offensichtlich juristische Texte übersetzt ;)

:awww: :banghead:

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 03:20 PM
Arend, ich fahre morgen nach Holland. :D

Jelena
10-12-2009, 03:33 PM
:awww: :banghead:
Was war daran so :banghead:?

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 03:57 PM
Was war daran so :banghead:?

Alles. :shrug: Ich hasse Recht und Gesetze und all das, in alle Sprachen. Und es war ziemlich schwierig zu übersetzen weil die Begriffe einfach so total anders sind. :sad:

Action Jackson
10-12-2009, 04:02 PM
Klugscheisser is a favourite German word, but then there is chuchichäschtli, that is special.

Jelena
10-12-2009, 04:51 PM
Alles. :shrug: Ich hasse Recht und Gesetze und all das, in alle Sprachen. Und es war ziemlich schwierig zu übersetzen weil die Begriffe einfach so total anders sind. :sad:
in alleN Sprachen ;) Musstest du Rechtsübersetzungen machen? Ich mache Wirtschaft. :)

Har-Tru
10-12-2009, 08:55 PM
Dativ Mehrzahl ja das wusste ich. :o Ja ich musste Rechtsübersetzung machen aber zum Glück nur für ein Semester. :D Wirtschaft... meh. :p

Jelena
10-12-2009, 09:31 PM
Wirtschaft ist :cool:

Jōris
10-13-2009, 07:30 PM
Arend, ich fahre morgen nach Holland. :D

Immer gerade aus und viel spaß!

Har-Tru
10-13-2009, 07:46 PM
Immer gerade aus und viel spaß!

How you people can talk without fracturing a vocal chord is beyond me. But Emschede is a cute city.

Jōris
10-13-2009, 08:21 PM
How you people can talk without fracturing a vocal chord is beyond me. But Emschede is a cute city.

You should know, Spanish sounds like something run through a grater. The harsh sounds must be the Spanish influence before we kicked you out.

Har-Tru
10-13-2009, 08:25 PM
You should know, Spanish sounds like something run through a grater. The harsh sounds must be the Spanish influence before we kicked you out.

Spanish is considered one of the most beautiful languages you gegegege. :nerner: Yeah how was it like to be ruled by US, you VASSALS. :p

Jōris
10-13-2009, 08:37 PM
Spanish is considered one of the most beautiful languages you gegegege. :nerner: Yeah how was it like to be ruled by US, you VASSALS. :p

Too much garlic all the time. That was probably what it was like.

Har-Tru
10-13-2009, 09:05 PM
lol garlic is a Spanish stereotype? :scratch: :lol: you just loved it... we taught you everything you know. :bolt: :nerner:

Ivanatis
10-13-2009, 09:30 PM
you guys should check lyrics from Thomas D.'s songs Liebesbrief and Gebet an den Planet
one of the greatest poets in German music
if you understand those completely, your German is really good

Bashak
10-13-2009, 09:43 PM
i was told german had a third gender, plus the words are unbelievably long. so i figured it must be insanely difficult. i was wondering if there is a thread for swiss german on the board. could somebody post the link if there is? thank you.

Jelena
10-13-2009, 09:56 PM
i was told german had a third gender, plus the words are unbelievably long. so i figured it must be insanely difficult. i was wondering if there is a thread for swiss german on the board. could somebody post the link if there is? thank you.
As far as I know there is no Swiss German thread. BUUUUUT, Swiss German is completely different of German, if you talk Swiss German in Germany you won't be understood. I know it from own experience, I needed a translator when I heard a friend of mine talking Swiss German to a Swiss player. But with German German you will be understood in Switzerland too.

Joolz
10-13-2009, 11:25 PM
As far as I know there is no Swiss German thread. BUUUUUT, Swiss German is completely different of German, if you talk Swiss German in Germany you won't be understood. I know it from own experience, I needed a translator when I heard a friend of mine talking Swiss German to a Swiss player. But with German German you will be understood in Switzerland too.

I'd say it depends on the kind of Swiss German. Federer for example I can understand when he speaks Swiss German. As he's from Basel, on ther German border. But other varieties of Swiss German - no chance... :shrug:

Jelena
10-14-2009, 07:01 AM
I heard my friend of Zürich talk to Micha Kratochvil... Oh well, there was a moment when I thought: "I need an interpreter!"

Action Jackson
10-14-2009, 07:23 AM
Here are a few examples of different Swiss German dialects.

Federer

ETYTVZ6ete4

The ad
_zBtVfNPEQE

From Wallis.

y1rzAjmxob8

Then this.

JeRAZUorLlg

Action Jackson
10-14-2009, 07:26 AM
i was told german had a third gender, plus the words are unbelievably long. so i figured it must be insanely difficult. i was wondering if there is a thread for swiss german on the board. could somebody post the link if there is? thank you.

There is one in the Federer forum.

Bashak
10-14-2009, 07:28 AM
yeah, the swiss understand high german without trouble because that's what they use in school apparently. but german speakers are usually clueless when it comes to swiis german. all I know is they say merci for thanks, "gruezi" for hello and maybe hoy (??) for hi. anybody care to teach more expressions? :) but everybody pretty much understands english, so there we go.

Action Jackson
10-14-2009, 07:49 AM
Just cause they understand High German, doesn't mean they want to use it, when they speak.

Jōris
10-14-2009, 08:10 AM
you guys should check lyrics from Thomas D.'s songs Liebesbrief and Gebet an den Planet
one of the greatest poets in German music
if you understand those completely, your German is really good

Fanta 4 split up?

Most people with a high school diploma could comprehend these I hope. I'm not sure I would call him a great poet based on these two songs, he's definitely a good rhymer.

Jelena
10-14-2009, 10:56 AM
Fanta 4 split up?

Most people with a high school diploma could comprehend these I hope. I'm not sure I would call him a great poet based on these two songs, he's definitely a good rhymer.
They didn't split up, but for a time they made their own projects.

Ivanatis
10-14-2009, 07:58 PM
Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland

Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland,
Ein Birnbaum in seinem Garten stand,
Und kam die goldene Herbsteszeit
Und die Birnen leuchteten weit und breit,
Da stopfte, wenn's Mittag vom Turme scholl,
Der von Ribbeck sich beide Taschen voll.
Und kam in Pantinen ein Junge daher,
So rief er: »Junge, wiste 'ne Beer?«
Und kam ein Mädel, so rief er: »Lütt Dirn,
Kumm man röwer, ick hebb 'ne Birn.«
So ging es viel Jahre, bis lobesam
Der von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck zu sterben kam.
Er fühlte sein Ende. 's war Herbsteszeit,
Wieder lachten die Birnen weit und breit;
Da sagte von Ribbeck: »Ich scheide nun ab.
Legt mir eine Birne mit ins Grab.«
Und drei Tage drauf, aus dem Doppeldachhaus,
Trugen von Ribbeck sie hinaus,
Alle Bauern und Büdner mit Feiergesicht
Sangen »Jesus meine Zuversicht«,
Und die Kinder klagten, das Herze schwer:
»He is dod nu. Wer giwt uns nu 'ne Beer?«

So klagten die Kinder. Das war nicht recht -
Ach, sie kannten den alten Ribbeck schlecht;
Der neue freilich, der knausert und spart,
Hält Park und Birnbaum strenge verwahrt.
Aber der alte, vorahnend schon
Und voll Mißtrauen gegen den eigenen Sohn,
Der wußte genau, was er damals tat,
Als um eine Birn' ins Grab er bat,
Und im dritten Jahr aus dem stillen Haus
Ein Birnbaumsprößling sproßt heraus.

Und die Jahre gehen wohl auf und ab,
Längst wölbt sich ein Birnbaum über dem Grab,
Und in der goldenen Herbsteszeit
Leuchtet's wieder weit und breit.
Und kommt ein Jung' übern Kirchhof her,
So flüstert's im Baume: »Wiste 'ne Beer?«
Und kommt ein Mädel, so flüstert's: »Lütt Dirn,
Kumm man röwer, ick gew' di 'ne Birn.«

So spendet Segen noch immer die Hand
Des von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland.

Jōris
10-16-2009, 07:22 PM
Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland


A little more difficult to comprehend because I don't know the meaning to all words, but I still get what it is about.

Two things I don't understand. The last line of the first paragraph appears to be made of three different languages. Beer in this poem either means pear juice or the poem has to be situated in Bayern.

Jelena
10-16-2009, 08:05 PM
A little more difficult to comprehend because I don't know the meaning to all words, but I still get what it is about.

Two things I don't understand. The last line of the first paragraph appears to be made of three different languages. Beer in this poem either means pear juice or the poem has to be situated in Bayern.

This last line should be in Hochdeutsch: "Er (? not really sure about that) ist nun tot. Wer gibt uns nun eine Beere?"

Har-Tru
10-16-2009, 08:09 PM
Ha! I knew it was a regional variation of Beere! (but wasn't sure enough to say it :o)

Jelena
10-16-2009, 09:00 PM
alte Sprache.... ;)

Har-Tru
10-16-2009, 09:21 PM
whatever, same shit. :p

Har-Tru
10-16-2009, 09:27 PM
Unser täglich Deutsch

Politiker von der CDU und FDP wollen unsere Sprache im Grundgesetz verankern. Welches Deutsch meinen sie eigentlich?

© photocase.de/ommi
Wer bestimmt, was Deutsch ist?

Wer bestimmt, was Deutsch ist?

Bevor wir jetzt fragen, wann der Service-Point am Flughafen wieder Auskunftsschalter heißt, wann statt der Bibel ein aktueller Duden auf dem Hotelnachttisch liegt und eine Parfümeriekette auf richterliches Geheiß ihren Werbespruch in "Komm rein und find’s raus" ändern muss, sollte man erzählen, was hier eigentlich los ist. Es ist nämlich so: Vertreter der CDU und FDP wollen unser Deutsch ins Grundgesetz bringen.
Anzeige

Den Verfall der deutschen Sprache beklagen längst nicht mehr nur Heimatschutzverbände und Hobbysprachpfleger. Selbst Politiker erklären sie inzwischen zum Sanierungsfall, sehen sie überflutet von Anglizismen, vom sogenannten Denglisch malträtiert, gegen das sie geschützt werden muss. Ein so gefährdetes Gut schafft es bisweilen in die Verfassung. Wie die Menschenwürde. Wie die Pressefreiheit. Ist die Sprache unserer Dichter und Denker nicht ebenso ein absoluter Wert?

Fragen wir Goethe und seinen Faust! Dessen "geliebtes Deutsch" brachte ihn einst in arge Not. Ihn drängt’s, die Bibel zu übersetzen, aber er stolpert gleich über den ersten Satz: "Geschrieben steht: 'Im Anfang war das Wort'! / Hier stock ich schon! Wer hilft mir weiter fort?/ Ich kann das Wort so hoch unmöglich schätzen." Das ist nicht nur eines der schönsten Bekenntnisse zur deutschen Sprache, sondern zugleich die Frage nach deren Wesen und Einheit.

Wer die Sprache liebt, kann oft nicht umhin, sie als Einheit zu sehen. Im Faust erregt das Sprachskepsis und Zweifel. Die liebeskranken Sprachschützer indes verfallen dem Glauben, Sprache sei kartierbar, einzuzäunen innerhalb bestehender Grenzen. Doch wo will man die ziehen? Hinter allem, was nicht Englisch ist? Wo endet die Sprachgeschichte, die von grammatischen Überformungen und einverleibten fremden Wörtern nur so wimmelt?

Seit Jahrhunderten ist unsere Sprache ein Hybrid, eine wuchernde Wildnis, von der niemand behaupten kann, er habe sämtliche Trampelpfade schon betreten. Dialekte, Soziolekte, Idiolekte, herrje, was gibt’s nicht alles! Wer vom Verlust einer sprachlichen Einheit klagt, sollte sich ernsthaft fragen, welches Gespenst er verfassungsrechtlich adeln will. Denn er jagt der Vorstellung von einer reinen Sprache nach, die es so nie gegeben hat.
Mehr zum Thema

* Deutsche Sprache im Grundgesetz Say it künftig auf Deutsch, please

Welche Gefahr überdies von dieser gefühlten sprachlichen Einheit ausgehen kann, zeigt sich, wenn man ihren vorgeblichen Verfall mit dem der nationalen Identität verbindet. Auf ein treffliches Beispiel wies der Literaturwissenschaftler Peter von Matt hin: So zeigte der Dichter Hugo von Hofmannsthal, wozu die Gleichsetzung von Sprache und Geist führen kann. In Das Schrifttum als geistiger Raum der Nation dröhnte er: "In einer Sprache finden wir uns zueinander, die völlig etwas anderes ist als das bloße natürliche Verständigungsmittel (...), wir ahnen dahinter ein Etwas waltend, das wir den Geist der Nation zu nennen uns getrauen." Derlei Sprachmystik hat in der Vergangenheit unzählige nationalistische Verirrungen dekoriert, in der Beschwörung eines Volksgeists, der sich in der Sprache spiegele.

Die heutige Politik ist davon zum Glück weit entfernt. Doch sollte sie sich darüber im Klaren sein, welchen finster gesinnten Gestalten sie mit ihrer Forderung das Wort redet. Freilich steht es jedem zu, über gegenwärtige Simplifizierungen unserer Sprache ("Ich bin grad Training Alexanderplatz") den Kopf zu schütteln. Doch das Gerede von einer Verankerung in der Verfassung klingt selbstbewusster, als es sein kann. Das Gesetz kann nicht das übernehmen, was den Sprechern obliegt. Denn es ist die Aufgabe jedes Einzelnen, die Zukunft der Sprache lebendig zu gestalten.

http://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2009-10/sprache-im-grundgesetz

Ivanatis
10-16-2009, 09:37 PM
This last line should be in Hochdeutsch: "Er (? not really sure about that) ist nun tot. Wer gibt uns nun eine Beere?"

"er" should be right. "Beer", in this context, seems to me like pear. I guess "beer" is a synonyme for "Frucht" here, maybe common in Northern German dialect. "Beere" wouldn't make much sense imo.

Jelena
10-16-2009, 09:44 PM
"er" should be right. "Beer", in this context, seems to me like pear. I guess "beer" is a synonyme for "Frucht" here, maybe common in Northern German dialect. "Beere" wouldn't make much sense imo.
So the last half sentence is: "wer gibt uns nun eine Birne?"

Joolz
10-17-2009, 12:30 AM
Beer in this poem either means pear juice or the poem has to be situated in Bayern.

It means pear. "Beer" is Plattdeutsch or "Low German". A regional dialect spoken (in various different forms) in Northern Germany. Same goes for the reported speech in that text.

Unglaublich, erkennt hier niemand außer mir Plattdeutsch?

Har-Tru
10-17-2009, 09:33 AM
So ich hatte Recht. :banana:

Truc
10-17-2009, 10:00 AM
What's everyone's favourite German word (other than fahrvergnügen of course)? Everyone has one.

I always liked abwechslungsreich.I really love all the composed words in German because we don't have them in French and it makes things so much easier. But there are too many of them then.

So I'd say my favourite word is "Quatsch". No idea why, but when somebody is talking rubbish, I often think "Ach Quatsch!". I usually don't think in German, far from that, I always think in French. But "Quatsch" feels so much better.

Jōris
10-17-2009, 10:34 AM
This last line should be in Hochdeutsch: "Er (? not really sure about that) ist nun tot. Wer gibt uns nun eine Beere?"

Thanks, Deck, for letting us know the poem is Niederdeutsch. :rolleyes: I assumed the grammar was just an obsolete thing from the 19th century.

Is "he" in Platdeutsch prounounced as "hé"?

It means pear. "Beer" is Plattdeutsch or "Low German". A regional dialect spoken (in various different forms) in Northern Germany. Same goes for the reported speech in that text.

Unglaublich, erkennt hier niemand außer mir Plattdeutsch?

Plattdeutsch and Dutch are connected languages. In the poem though, only "nu" (nun) is used in Dutch.

Ivanatis
10-17-2009, 05:07 PM
Thanks, Deck, for letting us know the poem is Niederdeutsch. :rolleyes:

:confused:

Har-Tru
10-17-2009, 05:12 PM
I like how "look/gaze" has become "moment".

Jōris
10-17-2009, 06:35 PM
:confused:

It's not? Joolz and Jelena's posts made me assume it is. Also sentences such as "Wiste 'ne Beer" and "ick gew' di 'ne Birn" aren't the modern German I was taught.

Ivanatis
10-17-2009, 06:40 PM
of course parts of it are, but I didn't write anything like that
I referred to the correct "translation" of "Beer"

Jōris
10-17-2009, 06:50 PM
of course parts of it are, but I didn't write anything like that
I referred to the correct "translation" of "Beer"

I realise that. I meant to say it would be less confusing to understand the poem if I knew it includes an older form of German.

Ivanatis
10-17-2009, 06:59 PM
oh I understand:o

Har-Tru
10-18-2009, 09:25 AM
I think "Muskelkater" deserves a mention in the awesome words category.

Jōris
10-18-2009, 12:10 PM
I think "Muskelkater" deserves a mention in the awesome words category.

Have you bedded any frauleins yet How is your social life going?

Stensland
10-18-2009, 12:15 PM
my favorite word would be either einfaltspinsel, lichtspielhaus or stahlgewitter. the last one sounds so amazingly drastic.

i also love some of the more regional words, like knülle (being knülle is being drunk), össelig, pinöppel, pömpel or nöckelig. an "ö" somehow makes every word sound fun. :D maybe har-tru has heard of them, they're westphalian.

Jōris
10-18-2009, 12:31 PM
Don't know why but I associate the o-umlaut with Schweizerdeutsch.

Bumsen is a word I use sometimes. As in so far I've bumst with one of the almost 380,000 Germans that live here.

Har-Tru
10-18-2009, 01:11 PM
Have you bedded any frauleins yet How is your social life going?

Well I just came back from a date. I'll pass... she's cute and nice but talks too much for my liking. Thanks for asking. :lol:

my favorite word would be either einfaltspinsel, lichtspielhaus or stahlgewitter. the last one sounds so amazingly drastic.

i also love some of the more regional words, like knülle (being knülle is being drunk), össelig, pinöppel, pömpel or nöckelig. an "ö" somehow makes every word sound fun. :D maybe har-tru has heard of them, they're westphalian.

Only heard pömpel... but I'm not even three weeks here. ;)

Stensland
10-18-2009, 03:22 PM
Bumsen is a word I use sometimes. As in so far I've bumst with one of the almost 380,000 Germans that live here.

yeah bumsen sounds funny as well, that's true. good on ya to bums a german, arend. :D

btw you should open a dutch thread, buddy. for german ears there are TONS of great words in dutch, given its basically the older brother of hochdeutsch. ;) like brummfietse (?) or "et is net gestaatet de tischtennisplaaten zo verplatzen" etc. that's some sign at a camping park in zandvoort, sound hilarious.

@ har-tru

do you know what all these ö-words mean? like a pömpel or a pinöppel?

Har-Tru
10-18-2009, 03:34 PM
yeah bumsen sounds funny as well, that's true. good on ya to bums a german, arend. :D

btw you should open a dutch thread, buddy. for german ears there are TONS of great words in dutch, given its basically the older brother of hochdeutsch. ;) like brummfietse (?) or "et is net gestaatet de tischtennisplaaten zo verplatzen" etc. that's some sign at a camping park in zandvoort, sound hilarious.

@ har-tru

do you know what all these ö-words mean? like a pömpel or a pinöppel?

I know what pömpel means but not the rest. Please instruct me. Also, why do people say "berch" instead of "berg" here?

I found the word Angstschweiß in an article the other day for the first time. It's a very interesting article about a German guy who passed himself as a black man for a year and travelled around Germany. Very interesting indeed. http://www.zeit.de/2009/43/Wallraff-43?page=1

Also, Dutch is just dodgy German.

Stensland
10-18-2009, 03:49 PM
I know what pömpel means but not the rest. Please instruct me. Also, why do people say "berch" instead of "berg" here?

a pinöppel ist some small button or small thing in general, the phrase mostly used when you don't know what it (the pinöppel) does. like when you're in front of a recording desk with all the technical stuff in front of you, tons of stuff to press and pull, you go "what does this pinöppel do? and what does that pinöppel do? what happens to the track when i push the pinöppel over here?"

össelig is some sort of dirty, i think, i'm not even sure. and when you're nöckelig you're bitching about every single thing, like when you're having a bad day, not enough sleep, things aren't going your way whatsoever etc.


I found the word Angstschweiß in an article the other day for the first time. It's a very interesting article about a German guy who passed himself as a black man for a year and travelled around Germany. Very interesting indeed. http://www.zeit.de/2009/43/Wallraff-43?page=1


wallraff is well-known over here, he's been doing that for ages. he started doing this kind of undercover work when he applied for an internship at the bild-zeitung, trying to find out more about their "agenda".

Har-Tru
10-18-2009, 04:07 PM
Thanks. :D

What does this expression mean? "einen grossen Bogen um jemanden/etwas zu machen"

Stensland
10-18-2009, 04:09 PM
you know what a bogen is, right? you can basically take the expression literally. it means ~ to avoid someone/something times 5, like really avoid someone/something as if its poison.

*edit: re the "berch" thing: it's just an accent thing, i guess. some say berrrg, some say beak (german pronunciation), some say berch, some say berch with a doch-ch and so on...

Jelena
10-18-2009, 04:10 PM
wallraff is well-known over here, he's been doing that for ages. he started doing this kind of undercover work when he applied for an internship at the bild-zeitung, trying to find out more about their "agenda".
He also worked undercover in a McDonalds, or as the turk Ali, that was mentioned in the article.

Jōris
10-19-2009, 11:52 AM
yeah bumsen sounds funny as well, that's true. good on ya to bums a german, arend. :D

If you don't mind too much information, the encounter was almost two years ago and it was a fun and, with the versatility of German fetish porn, a surprisingly conventional encounter.

btw you should open a dutch thread, buddy.

Too much effort, kumpel.

"et is net gestaatet de tischtennisplaaten zo verplatzen"

I understand what it means though it looks like 15th century Middle Dutch. Did you actually read this in Zandvoort?

Also, Dutch is just dodgy German.

German is just pretentious Dutch.

Spanish is just Italian spoken twice as fast and with a lisp.

MariaV
10-19-2009, 12:02 PM
Well I just came back from a date. I'll pass... she's cute and nice but talks too much for my liking. Thanks for asking. :lol:


So you'd prefer action without much talk? :aplot: :p You macho you. ;)

Har-Tru
10-19-2009, 12:36 PM
If you don't mind too much information, the encounter was almost two years ago and it was a fun and, with the versatility of German fetish porn, a surprisingly conventional encounter.



Too much effort, kumpel.



I understand what it means though it looks like 15th century Middle Dutch. Did you actually read this in Zandvoort?



German is just pretentious Dutch.

Spanish is just Italian spoken twice as fast and with a lisp.

Only Thpaniardth talk with a lithp though, Latin Americanth don't.

LOL at German being pretentious Dutch. :lol:

So you'd prefer action without much talk? :aplot: :p You macho you. ;)

:o

Trust me, she talked A LOT. ;)

MariaV
10-19-2009, 12:39 PM
:o

Trust me, she talked A LOT. ;)

LOL OK I take your word for it. ;)

Har-Tru
10-19-2009, 01:04 PM
LOL OK I take your word for it. ;)

Mitä vittua!

:p

Stensland
10-19-2009, 04:17 PM
I understand what it means though it looks like 15th century Middle Dutch. Did you actually read this in Zandvoort?


well, i'm not sure about the spelling anymore, but it's pretty much what it said, yeah. apparently i didn't get it right, but i remember the essence and the words "gestaatet", "verplatzen" and "plaaten" - sounds fun. and most of all: you really get the idea of the language's origin as you can "feel" the german touch in it.

btw "brummfietse" is one of my all-time faves in ANY language. :D

@ har-tru, i found some more brilliant german words during this morning's vorlesung (yes, i had nothing to do): i like firlefanz, fuchsteufelswild, bauchpinseln, korinthenkacker, wolkenkuckucksheim and i absolute looooove geistesgegenwart (or geistesgegenwärtig), mainly because it's so literal.

Har-Tru
10-19-2009, 04:29 PM
what does geistesgegenwart mean? :scratch:

sich gebauchpinselt fühlen is great.

Jelena
10-19-2009, 04:40 PM
what does geistesgegenwart mean? :scratch:

sich gebauchpinselt fühlen is great.
wieder aus dem Duden:

Fähigkeit, in unvorhergesehenen Situationen schnell zu reagieren und das Richtige zu tun.

Stensland
10-19-2009, 04:54 PM
like i said, take it literally: you can act "geistesgegenwärtig" when your mind (geist) is present (gegenwart) at that particular time. when you drop a glass or something and catch it while it's falling, you act geistesgegenwärtig. when you teach your kid how to ride a bike and catch it (the kid) while it's falling down, you act geistesgegenwärtig. when some guy throws a snowball at you out of nowhere and you notice it in the glimpse of an eye and move your head accordingly, you act geistesgegenwärtig.

the dictionary says it's "being alert" or "quick-witted", i guess that covers it pretty much.

Har-Tru
10-19-2009, 05:25 PM
The Spanish dictionary gave a completely different definition, using the other main sense of the word Geist (spirit, "soul"). Thank God I checked. :D

Action Jackson
10-20-2009, 01:42 PM
The Viennese accent.

SwmXG0q61No

Har-Tru
10-20-2009, 01:59 PM
Falco is DA MANN! :worship:

Jelena
10-20-2009, 02:16 PM
José, bist du eigentlich jetzt das erste Mal in Deutschland?

Joolz
10-20-2009, 10:59 PM
The Viennese accent.

Tja, das erwartet mich dann nächste Woche in Wien.
Zusammen mit all den Begriffen, die in Österreich dann eben doch einfach mal anders sind.

(But I used to really like Falco, once upon a time...)

Har-Tru
10-20-2009, 11:05 PM
José, bist du eigentlich jetzt das erste Mal in Deutschland?

Nee hab schon ein Jahr in Heidelberg gelebt (vor zwei Jahren). Und jetzt bin ich ein b. betrunken... na ja, das deutsche Bier ist einfach zu gut... :lol:

Har-Tru
10-20-2009, 11:08 PM
Tja, das erwartet mich dann nächste Woche in Wien.
Zusammen mit all den Begriffen, die in Österreich dann eben doch einfach mal anders sind.

(But I used to really like Falco, once upon a time...)

A perfect example of the so-called "idiomatic particles" in German. I like to call them just unnecessary. ;) The sentence would be complete and would make perfect sense without those five (!) words.

Joolz
10-20-2009, 11:17 PM
A perfect example of the so-called "idiomatic particles" in German. I like to call them just unnecessary. ;) The sentence would be complete and would make perfect sense without those five (!) words.

But they do make a difference. Not a big, striking one perhaps. And yeah, the sentence would be complete and it would make sense without them. Just not the exactly the sense I want it to make. ;)

Har-Tru
10-21-2009, 10:26 AM
But they do make a difference. Not a big, striking one perhaps. And yeah, the sentence would be complete and it would make sense without them. Just not the exactly the sense I want it to make. ;)

I know, I know... still, it's a peculiarity of the German language. :cool:

Am I right in thinking that the "einfach" is the one that carries more significance there? See the sentence with the einfach but without the other four particles. And now with all of them. Isn't the difference almost marginal?

Jelena
10-21-2009, 10:43 AM
I'd say, the "einfach" is the one that takes the most significance there. But the others also take significance because they show this "give-up-attitude:" "you have to deal with those Austrian expressions, if you like it or not, if you want it or not, it's nonsense to try to change their lexic."

Har-Tru
10-21-2009, 12:23 PM
I know, I know people don't use them just for the sake of it (even if I admit I don't get some of the connotations). But these buggers are just everywhere in German, you can't almost say a sentence without using a "mal" or a "doch" or a "dann" or a "halt" or a "einfach"...

Jelena
10-21-2009, 12:46 PM
Da könntest du dann doch mal recht haben. ;) :lol:

Har-Tru
10-21-2009, 01:50 PM
Siehste??? :lol:

Action Jackson
10-21-2009, 01:56 PM
Jose, you know German grammar is difficult. So what did you think of those Swiss dialects?

Har-Tru
10-21-2009, 02:41 PM
Jose, you know German grammar is difficult. So what did you think of those Swiss dialects?

I don't know about their grammar... I bet it's easier though. "Historical" spoken dialects tend to have less cases or even genders for instance.

Schwiizer Dütch sounds funny but I only get bits and pieces...

Jelena
10-21-2009, 03:06 PM
José, you're not the only one hardly getting something of Schwiizer Düütsch.

Ivanatis
10-22-2009, 10:27 AM
Siehste??? :lol:

Siehste:worship:

another favourite of me:
Wenns dich juckt, dann kratz dich.

Stensland
10-23-2009, 12:58 PM
har-tru, what do you make of the hundreds of thousands of germans relocating to southern spain due to the nice weather? how are they behaving over there and what do you think of their "communities"? (brits, dtuch and scandinavians come as well, that's true)

there have been some reports about those people over here: they don't speak spanish, don't care about spain, don't want anything to do with the actual people and create some sort of a "second world". is that something you guys are okay with?