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Roger news and articles

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lunahielo
03-24-2005, 12:31 AM
Originally posted by *M*~
Should we start referring to him as "Neo"?
I love this! The more cool nicknames the better! :)
*Ninja Neo*~~*The One*

Three awards!! Absolutely magnificent!! :worship:

SUKTUEN
03-24-2005, 02:25 AM
thanks :worship: :wavey:

fightclubber
03-24-2005, 09:54 PM
http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/180X250/federer_miami2.jpg
© Getty Images
Federer is going for back-to-back ATP Masters Series shields. http://www.atptennis.com/en/graphics/space.gif
Federer Sets Sights on Miami Crown
With his three trophies from the Stars for Stars night waiting to be wrapped up in his hotel room, current INDESIT ATP 2005 Race leader Roger Federer (http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/playerprofiles/default2.asp?playersearch=federer) has his sights fully set on winning his first NASDAQ-100 Open. "I have a good feeling about this tournament," said Federer in a press conference at the Tennis Center in Crandon Park. "The surface and everything suits me well here." More… (http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/miami_thursday1.asp)

Federer and fellow Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova each received three awards Tuesday night at the inaugural joint ATP and Sony Ericsson WTA Tour awards ceremony. Tennis’ finest players and tournaments were honored at Stars for Stars – A Celebration of Tennis Excellence, an event presented by the ATP, Mercedes-Benz and the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. More… (http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/awards_release2.asp) | ATP Award Winners (http://www.atptennis.com/en/insidetheatp/atpawards/default_2005.asp) | Gallery (http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/gallery/)

Federer, Roddick, Gustavo Kuerten, Anna Kournikova, John McEnroe and tennis’ biggest stars will be featured in the Spring 2005 issue of DEUCE, The Official Magazine of the ATP. Get an exclusive sneak preview (http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/deuce_exclusive_1.asp). To subscribe, call toll free 866-66-DEUCE or email deuce@skies.com (deuce@skies.com).

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NASDAQ-100 Open
Miami, Florida, U.S.A.


March 24, 2005
Federer Sets Sights on Miami Crown

© Getty Images
http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/200x150/federer_miami.jpg With his three trophies from the Stars for Stars night waiting to be wrapped up in his hotel room, current INDESIT ATP 2005 Race leader Roger Federer has his sights fully set on winning his first NASDAQ-100 Open.

The World No. 1 picked up the 2004 ATP Player of the Year, the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award and ATPtennis.com Fans' Favorite at the inaugural ATP and Sony Ericsson Awards Gala on Tuesday night in Miami, and the Swiss star now can focus on winning back-to-back ATP Masters Series shields after defending his Pacific Life Open title in Indian Wells last week.

"I have a good feeling about this tournament," said Federer in a press conference at the Tennis Center in Crandon Park. "The surface and everything suits me well here. I won the Juniors. Last year, I had the sun stroke, but I played Nadal who played great. I don't know what it was, but he just got me. I thought I was unlucky the year before, against Agassi [in the final]. It was already a breakthrough for me to get so far. I hope to win this tournament one time because it's a beautiful tournament."

Federer, who has a 97-point lead at the top of the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race having won four titles already this season in Doha, Rotterdam, Dubai and Indian Wells, will face Olivier Rochus in his opening match and the Swiss star isn't taking anything for granted.

"[Rochus] has had actually a good start to the season," said Federer. "Maybe people underestimate him because he's so small. But I'm looking forward to a tough match. I used to play doubles with him, so he's a good friend of mine as well, and in the Juniors. I've known him for a long time."

Federer is currently riding a 16-match winning streak, and enters Miami having made a personal-best 26-1 start to the season. Since winning the US Open last September, he has lost just one of his past 43 matches, that coming against Marat Safin in the semifinals of the Australian Open, and has won titles at seven of his last eight tournaments.

But, despite having won his last 17 finals on the ATP circuit - an Open Era record - and 26 of his last 27 matches against players in the Top 10, Federer knows there is no shortage of challengers.

"Maybe the difference is big in the rankings, but I feel they're right there to beat me when I'm maybe just a little bit off, if they're playing really well," said Federer. " But somehow I've always been able to win the important matches, the finals, against the Top 10 [players]. The record speaks for itself. I don't see myself that far away, I know that right now I'm winning those matches, but it can turn around very quickly."

Going for his sixth ATP Masters Series shield, Federer will be hoping to become just the sixth player to win the Indian Wells-Miami "double", joining Jim Courier (1991), Michael Chang (1992), Pete Sampras (1994), Marcelo Rios (1998) and Andre Agassi (2001).

The 23-year-old has been getting used to being put alongside some of the best names in tennis history, but he knows there's still plenty to do to be called a great himself. "Because I play the style I play, the one?handed backhand, I vary my game very much, I get a lot of attention also from the former players," said Federer. "So it's nice to hear [the compliments], but…we'll see maybe in 10 years how good I'm really going to be. So far it's been terrific, the career I've had so far. I hope I can keep it up this week."

reiko
03-24-2005, 10:32 PM
Hi Rogi fans :wavey:

Just drop by to post this article (in Spanish) over Roger:
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/deportiva/Nota.asp?nota_id=690197 (El imbatible)
Sorry if already posted.

Billabong
03-24-2005, 10:35 PM
Thanks for the article:hug:!

fightclubber
03-24-2005, 11:11 PM
24 march press conference


An interview with:


ROGER FEDERER



THE MODERATOR: Questions for Roger Federer in English first, please.

Q. What have you done with all the trophies?

ROGER FEDERER: They're standing in my hotel room so far, so... I have to wrap them up and take them home.

Q. What do you think it is that has separated you so much from the other Top 10? It seems sort of amazing to see one guy so much better than the other top players in the world. What do you think it is that has separated you from the rest?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, maybe the difference is big, you know, in the rankings, you know. But I feel they're right there to beat me when I'm maybe just a little bit off, if they're playing really well, you know.

But somehow I've always been able to win the important matches, you know ‑ the finals, against the Top 10ers. The record speaks for itself.

I don't see myself that far away, you know. I know that right now I'm winning those matches, but it can turn around very quickly.

Q. It seems the greats, McEnroe, Laver, are saying you're the best. Sampras is saying your biggest opponent is the record books. Most people are calling you a "tennis genius." What is it exactly do you think that puts you at this level?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think now the consistency, you know, over the last, I would say, two years really have proven to everybody, also especially to myself, that I can do it. The important moments, like I said, finals and against the other Top 10 players, this is the moment when I actually play my best. That's what usually the all‑time greats do, I guess. Because I play the style I play, the one‑handed backhand, I vary my game very much, I get a lot of attention also from the former players.

So it's nice to hear, you know, but like you also said, we'll see maybe in 10 years how good I'm really going to be. So far it's been terrific, the career I've had so far. I hope I can keep it up this week.

Q. Is that a motivation for you being among the greats? What keeps you motivated week after week?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's no problem. I'm enjoying myself, winning many matches. I'm always looking for the match where I'm playing great again in front of a full stadium against another great player. That's been happening for me over the last couple of years now. For me, there is no problem to maintain the motivation very high.

Q. Your encounters with Safin have been taken to a different level recently. Quite possibly you might be able to play him in the final in this tournament. Is that something you look forward to, to get your revenge?

ROGER FEDERER: No. We're too far apart in the draw, you know, to be honest, to think about that. He didn't play great last week. I think he's not focused on playing me in the finals. I think that would be a mistake of his and a mistake of mine, too, if he would be thinking so far. I go one match at a time.

I play Rochus, who has had actually a good start to the season. Maybe people underestimate him because he's so small, you know. But I'm looking forward to a tough match. I used to play doubles with him, so he's a good friend of mine as well, and in the Juniors. I've known him for a long time. That's what I'm concerned about, not the rivalry with Safin right now.

Q. It's been 11 years since a top seed has won here. Is there any more pressure on you?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't know that statistic. But at least a No. 1 seed has won here, so that's good (smiling).

Q. There was talk about you and Andy Roddick being 1 and 2, going back for the ages. What has happened to him, or is it that you were able to lift your game and he hasn't? Has his game dropped off?

ROGER FEDERER: I wouldn't say that. I just think he lost a couple of crucial matches, maybe, which maybe would have put him in a contention to really maybe, you know, maybe take the title in the end, you know. I think losses like Johansson at the US Open and the Hewitt matches at the Masters Cup and the Australian Open, you know, that kind of loss disappointed him, even though it's nothing to take away from Hewitt. I think that would have given him opportunities again to win the tournament. He missed those, and maybe before he was taking them. But that's also a reason why, maybe less players knew him, knew how to play him. Over the years it also gets tougher to always play the same game. He has had coaches change, and maybe that's had an influence on him as well.

But, again, he's still No. 3 in the world. It's not like he's No. 500. He's still right there. I don't see that he's been playing much worse. He just maybe hasn't won that big match.

Q. Do you think he'll have to add another dimension? Is his game too monodimensional to play someone like you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't think so. He's doing good. He's doing great. He's a very tough player. He beats lower‑ranked players very consistently. That is also something we forget sometimes. To play good against a great, that's something special. But you have to actually get the opportunity to play them and for this you need to beat the lower‑ranked players, and he does that quite comfortably. I expect him to be around for a long time at the top.

Q. Talking about coaching, you decided a while ago to coach yourself, and you got better and better by coaching yourself, and also keeping your staff all in the family and friends. You don't travel like other players, with such a big staff. You get better and better. Is that proof that you really don't need a coach once you reach a certain class of tennis?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I always answer the same way, so (smiling)...

Every player needs to know for themselves what they need, you know. For some, maybe a condition trainer or a physio or just a girlfriend or a friend is more important than actually the coach itself, you know. I think coaching is very important in the beginning of your career, anyway for myself, because this is when they teach you the technique, how to behave on court, how to get through the tennis life, you know, because it's not something you're really ready for at a young age.

So I was lucky to have great coaches then. But I felt like I needed a coach change with Peter. I didn't expect myself to be alone for a year. That just came about. After winning the Australian Open, you know, I got unbelievable confidence, and I just felt like I was not in a hurry at all. I played the whole season through without a coach. Now I'm with Tony Roche. That's very good. He gives me new advice. I'm really looking forward to see him again next time.

Q. Can you describe what you experience when you're playing your very best. Is it an experience of being relaxed and at ease, or is it intensity and focus? Is there an emotional experience when you're playing as good as you can play?

ROGER FEDERER: I'm very focused at this moment when I'm really playing well. Of course very confident, because you have the feeling on the important points, you know, you can ‑‑ you're always going to come out on top, you know. Just with that feeling inside of yourself, you actually become very relaxed but very focused. So it's a combination of a few things, yeah.

Q. When you look at Andre's career, what sticks out in your mind most?

ROGER FEDERER: To be honest, I don't remember much of his, you know, beginning. But, you know, I guess his dip, you know, out of the Top 100, and to come back and to become No. 1, that is what sticks out most. Plus his consistency, you know, just over the years. Because what is it, 20 years old, his career, now, because he started also very young; we shouldn't forget that. He's one of the few who's won four Grand Slams on all surfaces.

Q. When you were putting together your foundation, did you talk to him about his foundation? How much of an influence was his charitable work on your endeavors?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you hear much about it, of course. He does a terrific job at it, you know. I wish I could talk to him about it to get some advice and to hear what he has to say about this. I think if I would ask him and call him up, I think he would take time. That's maybe something I would like to do in the future. But, you know, we'll see. He's got many things also going on, so...

But he's definitely, I think, a role model for all tennis players in that aspect.

Q. Looking ahead a little bit to Roland Garros, which is a tournament that's conquered a lot of top players in the past ‑ some have had a chance like McEnroe and Edberg, whatever ‑ do you think you have to adjust your game? Do you worry a bit that maybe you might fall into that same trap?

ROGER FEDERER: I might, you know, but I'm not thinking about it too much, you know. It's more talk, you know, because you only get a chance once every year. So it's also not that many opportunities.

But I think why we talk about it is because I won the other three so quickly, you know. It seems like I'm almost in a ‑‑ pushed into something where I need to just perform because everybody expects me to. But I have to look at the long run and, you know, Agassi won his French Open also, you know, when he was getting older. Maybe that's going to happen for me, too, and maybe I'll never win it; we'll see.

I have the feeling I'm very natural on clay. I've grown up on the clay, even played in the wintertime on clay in a balloon. My feeling tells me that I'll have good shots at the French in the next few years.

I thought my preparations have been good every time, and I've played great in either Hamburg or Rome, then I arrived at the French the last couple years and never really felt comfortable. Maybe now, with Tony to my side, that may change. So I can't answer you now (smiling).

Q. Much is made of your lack of an entourage. How many people are here with you now?

ROGER FEDERER: Here now is my girlfriend, of course. She travels to all the tournaments. Then my physio, he travels to about 80%. A friend of mine is here, too. So we're four.

Q. When you come to a tournament that you haven't won, which becomes fewer and fewer, how do you approach it? Do you approach it differently than tournaments that you have had more success at?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've been in the finals here, so I've stayed, you know, till the very end. It's always nice when you can stay till the very end and you get a real feel for the tournament. It starts to get much more relaxed. In the beginning here now it's so many players here, so much going on, you can't really enjoy ‑‑ you run to the courts and run off. At the end when it's less and less matches, it's much more enjoyable.

So I've experienced that. But I don't know, same approach really. I have a good feeling about this tournament. The surface and everything suits me well here. I won the Juniors. Last year, I had the sun stroke, but I played Nadal who played great. I don't know what it was, but he just got me, you know. Yeah, I thought I was unlucky the year before, against Agassi. It was already a breakthrough for me to get so far.

I hope to win this tournament one time because it's a beautiful tournament.

Q. Do you think you can keep winning like this in tennis? Do you think it's possible, or that people will catch up to you, or do you think you can keep what's going?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, it's tough to back it up every week, you know, every day. Because you don't wake up and you're at 100% every single time. Doesn't need much until you're just a little off.

But I try, you know, my best to be well‑prepared and, you know, back‑to‑back Masters Series are tough. You're very happy to win one of the two, so it kind of takes a lot of pressure off me.

Q. Do you think you could approach playing professionally at 15 years of age?

ROGER FEDERER: No, never.

Q. There's a young guy here who they've been giving wildcards to the last few tournaments and he's losing matches. How much do you think that would affect him long‑term? If you were advising him, would you say, Go back and learn the trade rather than playing these events?

ROGER FEDERER: I have never seen him play. I don't know how he looks like. Let me think...

At 15, I was ‑ where was I? ‑ yeah, this is when I was actually just getting good, you know. I was growing. My game started to get more powerful. I had very quickly success suddenly. Within 15 to 16, I became a very different player. So I guess same for him, even though he probably got better earlier than me.

But I think it's an experience for him. I think as long as he copes well with it, you know, that's fine. If he gets pushed into everything too early, you know, and he's not really wanting to do It... But I guess every player's dream is to be able to play the best. He gets his opportunity. As long as he's okay with it, I think that's fine.

On the women's tour we see it all the time. One case on the men's tour, why not? It's a good story.

Q. You were at an event last night with James Lipton. You were describing a night you went out to Elaine's Restaurant. What celebrities did you see there? Who have you seen there? What do you like to order?

ROGER FEDERER: Okay (smiling)...

Q. None of the hard questions.

ROGER FEDERER: It's a little different.

He knew more people who were sitting there. To be honest, I didn't recognize anybody at Elaine's. It's more, you know, the movie business. I only know the famous actors, that's all I know.

(Inaudible) were great fans of mine, I was surprised. I also didn't know her, she came up to the table. That's what happens, you know.

We had a good time with James Lipton last night, you know. We did an event for my watch company. It's nice to be with him. We met at the US Open before, so...



FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

lunahielo
03-24-2005, 11:50 PM
Great interview, Silvy................Thanks.

mitalidas
03-24-2005, 11:51 PM
24 march press conference


[(Inaudible) were great fans of mine, I was surprised. I also didn't know her, she came up to the table. That's what happens, you know.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

would love to know who this woman is...

SUKTUEN
03-25-2005, 09:09 AM
Thankyou for the great interview~~

Thanks :worship: :worship:

moonlight
03-25-2005, 09:25 AM
HYDE: No room for ego at the top
Published March 25, 2005

KEY BISCAYNE -- Roger Federer should be embarrassed at being the No. 1 player in tennis. Just look at him. He has no agent, no publicist, no security guard, not even a coach for the TV cameras to focus on.

His entire entourage typically consists of two people -- his girlfriend and trainer. That's it. You call this the world's top tennis player?

And ego? Doesn't No. 1 come with a let-net full of that?

Well, earlier this week, at the Nasdaq-100's pro-am day, Federer didn't call a limo or even a golf cart to ferry him across the tournament grounds to his match in the way tennis heavyweights always do.

He walked. Alone. Amid gawking fans.

"Isn't that ...?"

"Why's he ...?

Mr. No. 1 In The World even stopped and autographed for whoever asked.

"I don't need special treatment," Federer explained.

You think Jimmy Connors ever said that? Or even Pete Sampras? You think John McEnbrat ever won the men's Player of the Year award and was voted by fellow competitors winner of the Stefan Edberg Sportsman of the Year trophy?

Don't winning and sportsmanship run crosscurrent to each other?

Well, Federer picked up both prizes earlier this week. The only other player to win both in the same year got the sportsmanship award named for him.

Of course, the way people talk in tennis, Federer might get his name on the Player of the Year trophy before he's through. He has lost one of 27 matches in 2005. He has won a record 17 finals dating to 2003. He won three of four Grand Slam events last year, the first player to accomplish that since Mats Wilander in 1988.

He's beaten No. 2 Lleyton Hewitt in seven straight matches and 12 consecutive sets.

Listen to how someone who knew how to role-play No. 1 with the big agent and entourage talks about Federer.

"There's probably not a department in his game that couldn't be considered the best in that department," Andre Agassi said. "You watch him play Hewitt and everybody marvels at Hewitt's speed, as well as myself. And you start to realize, `Is it possible Federer even moves better?'"

"Then you watch him play Andy [Roddick], and you go, `Andy has a big forehand. Is it possible Federer's forehand is the best in the game?' You watch him at the net, you watch him serve-volley somebody that doesn't return so well and you put him up there with the best in every department."

"You see him play from the ground against those that play from the ground for a living, and argue he does it better than anybody."

Agassi gives a dramatic pause.

"So he's good," he says.

Meanwhile, here's how Mr. Humblespeak explains his success.

"Maybe the difference is big in the rankings, but I feel they're all right there to beat me when I'm maybe just a little bit off," he said.

He talks that way in five languages, too. The Swiss native is fluent in German, French and English. He also speaks some Swedish and Italian. He can count to 10 in Turkish, too, thanks to a kid who immigrated to his elementary school. The kid was picked on by several Swiss boys, including Federer, whose mother suggested he hear about the Turkish kid's life instead.

Maybe this helps explain why Federer is a such an abnormal No. 1. His parents didn't shove him into the sport and then use him as a piggybank. Why, at 14, his mother actually took away his rackets until he promised to behave properly on the court.

Now he's winning the sportsmanship trophy on the court and acting even better off it. A few months ago, he suggested the top players do something to help tsunami victims and a charity tournament went off.

Two weeks ago, he was in South Africa (his mother is South African), where his new foundation educates children in the ghetto of New Brighton.

"Tennis is just part of life," he said.

He's 23, and he's got it figured out.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/columnists/sfl-hydecol25mar25,0,3292117.column?coll=sfla-sports-col

SUKTUEN
03-25-2005, 09:29 AM
Roger~~ You are so Great~!!! :worship:

Art&Soul
03-25-2005, 11:17 AM
Its such a nice article I've ever read so far. Yup Tennis is just a part of your life MrHumble but Keep it like the way you've done and more if you can. Fans are always behind you and proud of what you've achived in tennis and in doing for other people :) BTW you are a part of my life too from then and now, without you tennis is nothing in my world :p Thanks for posting it Moonlight :wavey:

Nocko
03-25-2005, 11:51 AM
Thanks moonlight, this is one of best articles about Rogi. :worship:
Yes, Rogi is an ordinery, well-bred young man. He is so kind, so pure. that's why we love him soooooo much. :hug: Look at his smile!! It's make us much happier, isn't it ? :angel:

RogiNie
03-25-2005, 01:41 PM
what a great article moonlight! so nice to read! Thanx :worship:

Stevens Point
03-25-2005, 02:51 PM
Because of this article, I am fond of Roger even more than ever!! Thanks, moonlight for introducing this wonderful article to us!!

fightclubber
03-25-2005, 08:07 PM
El hombre sin sombra



El actual número uno del mundo, Roger Federer, mantiene la motivación a pesar de que nadie en el circuito pueda con él



http://espndeportes.espn.go.com/2003/photos2005/0324/e_Federerhabla_h.jpg
Federer, en conferencia previa al debut en Miami (EFE)
Por SEBASTIAN MARTINEZ CHRISTENSEN

KEY BISCAYNE (ESPNdeportes.com) - Todos los flashes estaban preparados para el mejor jugador del mundo. ¿El mejor de todos los tiempos?

Es una pregunta obligada dada la gran diferencia que existe entre Roger Federer y el resto de sus competidores.

"Quizá la diferencia sea grande en los ránkings, pero en juego yo siento que la diferencia es mínima", señaló el tenista. "Creo que la consistencia es la que me depara los elogios. Le probé a todos y, sobre todo, a mó mismo que puedo hacerlo todos los días".

Vaya si puede hacerlo. Tiene un récord de 44-1 en sus últimos 45 partidos y lleva ganadas 17 finales consecutivas. Sin embargo, mantiene la devoción por el día a día. "Me divierto mucho jugando", dijo Federer. "Jugar en un estadio lleno no tiene precio", agregó.

El único que le ganó en los últimos cinco meses, fue el ruso Marat Safin en una épica semifinal a cinco sets en las semifinales del Abierto de Australia. Aquí en Miami, podría cruzarse con él en la final.

"No pienso tan adelante en el cuadro. Sería un error de mi parte hacerlo", explicó eñ número uno del mundo. "Ahora pienso en Rochus. Muchos lo subestiman porque es chiquito, pero es muy peligroso. Lo conozco desde chico, somos amigos y jugábamos dobles juntos".

El número dos del mundo, Lleyton Hewitt, perdió los últimos siete enfrentamientos con el suizo y el que los sigue en el ránking, Andy Roddick, tiene un récord de 8-1 contra Federer. ¿Acaso Roddick bajó su nivel de juego?

"Su juego no cayó", opinó Federer. "Le gana a los jugadores de bajo ránking consistentemente, que es algo muy importante. Es el número tres del mundo, no el 500º".

Muchos jugadores requieren de sus entrenadores para tener apoyo emocional. Ese no es el caso de Federer, que a pesar de algunos aportes de Tony Roche, está sin entrenador hace un año.

"Cada jugador sabe lo que necesita", dijo el europeo. "Algunos necesitan a sus novias y otros a sus amigos. Al principio de mi carrera, mis entrenadores fueron muy importantes. Esto no es algo que planeé. No me di cuenta y ya pasó un año".

El karma de muchos grandes jugadores fue Roland Garros, y la pregunta es inevitable en este caso, dado que a pesar de su corta edad, Federer ya ganó los otros tres Grand Slams.

"No pienso mucho en eso", admitió el suizo. "Hay sólo una oportunidad por año, por lo que puedo no llegar a ganarlo, pero me siento muy cómodo en polvo de ladrillo, y creo que lo ganaré algún día".

El Master Series de Miami, en el cual ningún primer preclasificado ganó en 11 años, es uno de los pocos torneos que Roger Federer todavía no logró.

"Tuve la suerte de llegar a la final hace dos años. Al principio, el torneo no se disfruta mucho porque hay demasiados jugadores y estamos todos corriendo por todos lados. Tengo muchas ganas de ganarlo, pero no me preparo diferente al resto de los torneos", contó.

Guillermo Coria dijo hace dos días que alguna vez tenía que dejar de ganar el suizo, que no podía ganar toda su vida. "Es difícil porque no siempre te despertás al ciento por ciento, pero por ahora las cosas vienen saliendo". Quién sabe que hará el número uno del mundo en sus ratos libres, pero seguro que al cine no va. "Ayer fui a comer a un restaurante llamado Elaine's. Muchos actores conocidos, según me dijeron, se acercaban a saludarme, pero la verdad que yo no conocía a ninguno".

bettywps
03-26-2005, 01:24 AM
OMG...Roger looks gorgeous in that pic :inlove: even though I couldn't understand a word from the article

onm684
03-26-2005, 02:44 AM
Great article! Thank you moonlight.:worship:
That's why we love Rogi!:inlove:

fightclubber
03-26-2005, 02:48 AM
OMG...Roger looks gorgeous in that pic :inlove: even though I couldn't understand a word from the article
Basically its a transcript of the press conference I put here last time. Nothing new
But I found the pic soooooo cool and thought someone would love to read it in spanish
The article's title:
the man without shadow....
:worship:

SUKTUEN
03-26-2005, 04:36 AM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH :banana: :banana:

Roger is so Great Handsome in theis photo~!!!! :hearts: :hearts:

Thankyou so much~!!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

Yoda
03-26-2005, 10:29 PM
Great articles guys\girls......keep on posting

And Federer YOU DA MAN...in more ways than one :worship:

fightclubber
03-26-2005, 10:41 PM
Miami roger press conference after def rochus

R. FEDERER/O. Rochus
6-3, 6-1 An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Please open it up for questions for Roger Federer.

Q. It's quite amazing to watch how you anticipate where the next ground stroke is coming at you. Is it truly instinctual or do you actually study your opponents, looking for tendencies or things that will tell you where the ball is probably going to go?

ROGER FEDERER: I do not study my opponents to where I know exactly where they're going to go, because players these days, I have the feeling that at the last moment they can just flick the wrist and the ball goes the other way.

I think you know maybe where they might go off your shot, you know, so you anticipate it. But you can always be wrong as well. But I think I just have a good feel for the sense where they might just go in this particular moment, and I think this is what I do well. I mix it up a lot with different, you know, spins, slice or topspin, and really try not to give them the same look twice in a row.

I think that makes it hard for my opponent to get rhythm, you know. But, again, things can change very quickly so...

Q. As opening matches go, how would you rate this one today?

ROGER FEDERER: It was good. I'm very happy. I'm happy I got used to the humidity because it is very different to Indian Wells. It's always hard, you know, to start a tournament. But I actually felt quite comfortable and quite confident also going into today's match, even though I have a lot of respect for the player he is and of course the person anyway, because I know him very well and he's a good friend of mine.

He's had a good start to the season. Especially on this type of surface he is very good. To beat him 3 and 1 is a good effort.

Q. What do you know about your next match against Mariano Zabaleta?

ROGER FEDERER: We played a few times ‑ one time here, where I lost; we played in Monte‑Carlo one time, where I won. I don't remember the other matches.

But he's been around since I'm around. He was also an excellent junior, like I was. Maybe he wasn't as good the last couple of years, because when I came he was very strong. But he is on his way back and playing great, you know, because beating Srichaphan here on hard court is a good effort. I'm looking forward to a tough match.

Q. How much extra incentive is there because this is a tournament you have not won?

ROGER FEDERER: For me it doesn't change very much. I've been in the finals before, so you've lived through the last day of the competition, which is nice. I played Agassi, which is an unbelievable experience for me. Of course it would be nice to win every tournament you haven't won.

But the motivation is there anyway to win back‑to‑back Masters Series, so I'll try to do that.

Q. Do you remember in 1998, when you were 18 years, playing Coria on that court?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I do. I thought about it today. I spoke to a friend today and I told him when I was watching Coria before my match, I said on this court I beat him in '98 for the Orange Bowl, yeah. It was fantastic because I think it was the first year at Crandon Park here. I remember. It was a good week, yeah. I remember (smiling).

Q. When you play in conditions like this, how much of it is mental, how much of it is physical for you to get through a match?

ROGER FEDERER: I would say it's 50/50. You know, everywhere you touch, it's wet, you know. It's a wet atmosphere out there. You know, it's just so different to Indian Wells, you know, I almost wish Miami was before so when you go to Indian Wells it's really no problem with the heat.

But the humidity is really a big factor here in Miami. Here you really can see who is fit and who is not fit, I have the feeling. I felt good out there today, so this is a good sign for the rest of the tournament.

Q. A match like today's that was so routine, does it still feel like fun, or is it more like work just to get through?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no, it felt like fun out there, especially against a player who you know well off the court. It's a very fair match. I had a lot of fun. I played well, you know, hit a couple of good shots, surprised myself. I really thought I really served well, which always put the pressure on him anyway.

I'm very happy to always come through the first‑round matches because those are the ones which are the most difficult, I have the feeling.

Q. With the conditions so different between Indian Wells and Miami, what do you have to adjust in your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, nothing, really. Just the big difference is the humidity, you know, so you have to make sure you got the practice sessions in and the feeling, you know, for, you know, that your hands are wet, whatever, is totally different to Indian Wells. Because the balls are the same, the surface is almost the same, you know. Just you have a little bit more wind here and you've got the humidity, so you have to really get used to that. If you don't, you know, it seems you're going to hit the wall.

I'm happy I didn't do that today. Now that I'm past the first round, I'm also not scared it's not going to happen throughout this tournament, which is good.

Q. You have so many service deliveries you can make from any side. Do you decide where you're going to serve the ball when you step to the baseline, or when you take the balls do you have in mind that you'll go up the T or go for the slice that time?

ROGER FEDERER: I think once you get the balls, you know, from the ball boy, you kind of make up your mind. Then you think quickly, you know, what has worked well the last couple of service games, you know, what is your best serve and which serve you would like to give him again, you know. Then all this combination makes you hit, let's say, down the T. And then you decide if you go 100% or an 80%. There's a lot of things happen very quickly, you know. You don't have much time.

But once you're in the rhythm, you know, you don't actually think about it when you actually take the decision; it just happens. Once you stand at the baseline, you have to take a decision, you know, so you just hit it in the box really.

Q. Are you the type of player that, let's say, if you're hitting a slice serve from the deuce court, it's very effective time after time, that you don't want to give him too many of those so he grooves into it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, depends. Depends how many he hit good, you know. If he didn't get one in, you just keep on serving until he puts one in, then you maybe change it up. If he starts to pick it up, you know, of course you maybe want to just change it up and hit one into the body, you know, just to give him a little bit of doubt just on this particular serve.

Yeah, and sometimes, it seems like this guy is just reading your serve perfectly, you know. Today wasn't the case. I think he was really struggling with my serve, and that made life easy for me today.

Q. How confident are you not just from match to match, but tournament to tournament because you've played so well for as long as you have?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's always a little bit of feeling in the back of my mind like, "I hope I get through this first round, and I hope I get another good week." Once I walk away as a winner, like in Indian Wells, I'm kind of surprised, you know, because I arrived there, there's so many great players, I look at the draw, it's tough. Suddenly, I'm there with the trophy. So it is quite amazing.

I just try to back it up and give myself the best preparation I can have, and it just seems like it's working at the moment. Really why, it's hard to tell for me.

Q. How often do you talk to Tony Roche?

ROGER FEDERER: Occasionally, you know, if I've got questions I can call him. Looking forward to see him, you know, during the clay court season. He's going to come a bit. He's going to come to the French as well. It's good, good to have him in my corner.

Q. Would you talk to him during this event at all or probably not?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, probably.

Q. When you were much younger did you have an exercise where a rope was placed and you had to topspin the ball with as much top as possible just over the rope, and the rope would go a little bit higher each time? Does that sound vaguely familiar?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, when I was 14, we had Sven Groenefeld as a coach for a little while. He used to put extra rope over the net, over the regular tennis net, you know, because we were making so many mistakes and the court was so quick. So by hitting it higher, of course the ball doesn't skid through as much, and we had to play more safe and it was very hard to hit winners. So we had to play with more spin, which actually now was a very good exercise because in wintertimes, you know, we would play on this lightning quick surface where you couldn't get any rhythm, you know, and like this you would. It was good exercise.

Q. Is that what helped you develop the great wrist snap that you have?

ROGER FEDERER: Who knows, I don't know. I don't know where it comes from.

Q. Yesterday, a player was disqualified or defaulted for swearing. Have you ever been in a situation like this, and what is your take on what happened yesterday?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I'm disappointed for him, you know, because you walk away and it's like you didn't even play the tournament, you know. You don't get no prize money, no points, no nothing. So it's tough for him.

But I guess he knows what happened. I just heard in the locker room a little bit, you know, so I cannot comment too much on it. But I know the player, and he's a good guy, you know. That it happens sometimes to these players is unfortunate, you know, but you just have to be able to control yourself. So that's what I can say.

Q. How much do you feel the players feel your presence right now according to your records lately?

ROGER FEDERER: You have to ask them. Don't ask me (smiling).

Q. You don't think about that?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't think about it, no.

Q. Jim Courier used to go in the locker room when he was at his best and he could feel people looking at him because they feared him.

ROGER FEDERER: Well... I feel they're looking at me, too, you know, but I don't know if it's fear (laughing).

Q. What else would it be?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. Ask them what it is (laughing).

Q. Are you going to South Beach tonight?

ROGER FEDERER: Who knows? Yeah, I might.

Q. Where are you going to go (laughter)?

ROGER FEDERER: What, are you sending the paparazzis by or what (laughing)? No, no, no, I might be there, but I might be somewhere else as well. Yeah, it's a good place to be.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...


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PaulieM
03-26-2005, 10:54 PM
aww rogi is so cute and funny:D

sol
03-26-2005, 10:59 PM
http://www.gotennis.com/news/headline.aspx?headlineID=6082

Federer on fire in Miami heat
2005-03-26 22:20:16 GMT (Reuters)

By Eleanor Preston

MIAMI, March 26 (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer shrugged off sweltering conditions to ease into the third round of the Nasdaq-100 Open on Saturday with a 6-3 6-1 win over Olivier Rochus.

Federer needed just 71 minutes to put the Belgian away and extend his winning streak to 17 matches.

The Swiss has now won 43 of his last 44 matches, stretching back to the beginning of last August's U.S. Open, and has been beaten only once this season. That defeat came against Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open in January.

Since then Federer has won consecutive titles in Rotterdam, Dubai and, last week, in Indian Wells.

Britain's Tim Henman is also through to round three after an efficient 6-3 7-5 win over Czech lucky loser Ivo Minar.

"It's really hot out there. Those are conditions where you don't want to be out there any longer than necessary," said Henman.

Last year's runner-up Guillermo Coria safely negotiated his opening match against Davide Sanguinetti, beating the Italian 6-1 6-4.

Argentina's Coria had to retire from last year's final against Andy Roddick with back pains caused by kidney stones. Roddick retired from the tournament on Friday with a wrist injury.

Women's top seed Amelie Mauresmo was given a scare by young Russian Maria Kirilenko before winning 4-6 6-4 6-1.

Mauresmo said she might have benefitted from the 10-minute break players are given before the third set under the WTA Tour's extreme heat rule.

"I was capable of coming back on court after the break and really being able to give 100 percent. Maybe it wasn't really the case for her," she said.

"She played really well (in) that first set especially. It took me a little time today and I finally got my game together."

http://www.gotennis.com/Photos/2005-03-26T205255Z_01_MIA04D_RTRIDSP_2_SPORT-TENNIS.jpg
Roger Federer of Switzerland hits a forehand against Olivier Rochus of Belgium during the second round at the NASDAQ-100 tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Florida, March 26, 2005. REUTERS/Jason Arnold

http://www.gotennis.com/Photos/2005-03-26T204724Z_01_MIA03D_RTRIDSP_2_SPORT-TENNIS.jpg
Roger Federer of Switzerland hits a backhand against Olivier Rochus of Belgium at the second round at the NASDAQ-100 tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Florida March 26, 2005. REUTERS/Jason Arnold

TenHound
03-26-2005, 11:35 PM
Posting Eleanor Preston is always great. I'm sad she's not w/the Guardian anymore. She wrote a wonderful art. after pre-AO interview w/Roger. Called him a fledgling legend - spot on..as the Brits would say.

Mrs. B
03-27-2005, 07:50 AM
thanks for all the interviews! :)

SUKTUEN
03-27-2005, 08:36 AM
Roger is so Cute and Happy boy~~~ :hug: :haha: :haha:

RogiNie
03-27-2005, 12:37 PM
Thanx for the articles! I love the red shirt! :worship:

Daniel
03-27-2005, 11:40 PM
thnaks for the articles :)

lunahielo
03-28-2005, 01:25 AM
Thanks moonlight and Sol for the articles...
And, Silvy, thank you for the Spanish one..........love the title and the pic.

Many :hug: :hug: :hug: to you...................

SUKTUEN
03-28-2005, 02:53 AM
take a look in Roger picture ~~ :wavey:

onm684
03-28-2005, 04:45 PM
NEWS


March 26, 2005
Facing Federer to be Shown on Four Airlines
http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/180X250/tmcdvd_cover2.jpg






Click here to order NOW! (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageATPTOUR-TMCDVD04.html?from=atp)


Watch the exclusive video preview (http://www.atptennis.com/en/tvshow/documentary_2005.asp)
The documentary, Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer, will be shown on in-flight entertainment programming on four airlines in coming months. British Airways and SAS will show Facing Federer during April and Cathay Pacific and Qatar Airways will air it during May.

The documentary, a TPL production for the ATP, aired on ESPN Classic thoughout the United States on March 26.

Facing Federer is available to order online at ATPtennis.com. The DVD features bonus footage including the thrilling ATP record-tying 20-18 tie-break between Roger Federer and Marat Safin, out-takes featuring all players, and an exclusive locker room interview with Federer immediately following his victory in the final of the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup Houston.

Presented by ATP premium partner Mercedes-Benz, the documentary has aired across the world on a broadcasters' list that includes ESPN International (Latin America and New Zealand), The Tennis Channel (USA), TSN (Canada), FoxSports (Australia), SkySports (Great Britain) and SportTV (Brazil).

"A cross between a conventional documentary and an elimination-style reality show, [Facing Federer] does a terrific job of humanizing the top players while showing how grueling tennis is," wrote Sports Illustrated 's Jon Wertheim.

Facing Federer not only features the eight elite ATP players who qualified for the prestigious season finale友ederer, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio傭ut also the fans, journalists, photographers, umpires, organizers and others at the tournament.

"Facing Federer is a fresh, intimate look inside the tennis world," said Jodi Markley, senior vice president international production, ESPN Classic and ESPNEWS. "It is an example of the kind of programming that ESPN Classic brings viewers ・programming that brings them close to sports and their biggest personalities, tells a compelling story and gives perspective and insight."


:yippee:

RonE
03-28-2005, 07:34 PM
DAMMIT why couldn't BA show it during May- I will be flying with them then :mad: :mad: :mad:

RogiFan88
03-28-2005, 08:59 PM
DAMMIT why couldn't BA show it during May- I will be flying with them then :mad: :mad: :mad:

yeah, or last november!

fightclubber
03-29-2005, 02:23 AM
R. FEDERER/M. Zabaleta
6‑2, 5‑7, 6‑3

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Roger.

Q. Sensational F'ing lob to set up the breakpoint. How did it feel?

ROGER FEDERER: It felt good, you know. It was against the wind, you know, which made it easier so you can actually hit it quite hard. It dropped in the corner like that, was perfect, you know.

But he got back, actually, in the point unbelievably. It's tough to smash in the night. Always the winds, gusty winds, it's always tough.

But, yeah, it was good to win that point. Especially the match, this is more important, because today was tough.

Q. How did you let it get away when you were serving for the match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I started to realize in the third that really the wind started to pick up. I didn't remember it being so windy in the beginning of the match, you know, so I guess that would have been something that might have bothered me maybe just for a couple of games, but then maybe didn't quite realize it early enough.

I thought he played a pretty good game to break me. Maybe I wasn't serving my best anymore, you know, at the end of that second set. But he did well, you know, to stay in the match and then to break me a second time. Obviously that's a good effort. But I was not playing very well at that point, but he took advantage of it and pushed me to three.

Q. You had a little bit of a struggle holding on to your serve in the third set.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, of course. Then you start to think about everything.

Yeah, so, you know, the wind comes into play. He's getting more pumped. The rallies are going his way, not your way anymore. You have the feeling you're forcing some issues. That's just the way I felt.

But still, you know, to be on top in the end, I'm really, really satisfied because, yeah, it wasn't easy tonight. But I'm happy.

Q. I looked in the record books. In fact you've played Zabaleta on this court in Miami in 2000, you lost that match 6‑4, 7‑6. I don't know if you remember that match. It was a second‑round match.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I do remember. It was on an outside court. It was quick as hell. You know, it was during the day, and the outside courts play much quicker just because they're much smaller.

Q. So that wasn't a factor coming into this match?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not today. It was more a factor, I think, thinking about the night session of last year, which I lost against Nadal. I think more knowing that, there I had the feeling I was also kind of trying, you know, but I couldn't really get it going. It sometimes felt like this tonight, you know.

But I thought the first part of the match was really good, you know. I pushed him hard. I played good. I served well. Then I let it slip. But I caught myself in time.

Q. Do you like tough matches going into the quarters?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I prefer it easy, you know, to save energy. Playing again tomorrow, you know, and I'm finishing very late. This would have been great to finish off in two. In the end you have to be happy to be through at all.

Q. Every time you win a close match that you're not playing your best at, like the Ljubicic match in Indian Wells, you come through and win and win another tough one like this, do they build upon each other in your mind emotionally, telling you that you can win even when you don't bring your best stuff to the match?

ROGER FEDERER: I think, you know, the last whatever matches I've played, I haven't played great, you know, 40 times in a row, let's say. I had my off days as well but maybe covered, you know, my fatigue or whatever it was, you know, by playing, just being consistent, you know. That's what I've been doing. This is my key to success, to be so consistent. In the past, it would show very quickly and very easily, you know, if I'm feeling good or not. Now these days, there's hardly an off day.

But today wasn't great always, you know, but I came through, fought hard and these are also important matches, you know. I lived through them, a few of them in Dubai, where I won 7‑6 in the third a couple of times. You're very relieved when you come through tough matches.

Q. Was it difficult to get any rhythm off of his serve because of the weird motion that he has in the beginning of the set?

ROGER FEDERER: No, he hits it quite hard, you know, so that makes it tough to return. He's got a good second serve as well, you know, which, yeah, which is tough, you know. So I thought I was returning well, you know, up until the point where it got really windy. I was just struggling a little bit with my backhand at one point. Yeah, I think that was tough.

Q. You did appear to shank a couple of backhands quite badly. Obviously, you weren't really aware that the wind was affecting your rhythm. That would explain why you were missing quite a lot.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think so. I think the problem was that I actually didn't realize it was so windy because I was so focused on the match, where in the past I would go, "Oh, my God, it's windy. I don't really like it too much." By now it really shows that I didn't even realize that it got so windy, and I also maybe I didn't adjust my game to it, and straightaway I lost two service games, and I was in the third struggling to hold, you know.

Q. Seventh game in your final set, you're up 15‑Love, miss a dropshot into the net, up 30‑15, you don't get a good half‑volley and pop it up, is that a wind factor or just a little bit of an off‑timing on your part?

ROGER FEDERER: Off timing, I think, really. Maybe trying to force it too much, you know. You know, I don't play many dropshots, you know, but I thought it was still the right shot to do, to play it. Because he gets very far behind the baseline, you know, and he doesn't like to come to the net. Occasionally you have to throw one in.

Unfortunately, I missed them. That kind of ‑‑ then you're like, "What are you doing? Just play it in." Of course after you're always smarter. But at the time I thought it was the right shot. I tried to stay positive even though I knew that was not the right shot right then.

Q. Looking forward to tomorrow's match against Mario, how much does it help your confidence that you played him a few weeks ago in Rotterdam?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I think it was good, you know, that I played him since the Wimbledon loss. I played really good in Rotterdam against him. It was a semifinal match. He's got a big game, you know. So I have to adapt again from night to day and, you know, don't have much recovery time. So it will be interesting how we play tomorrow, because it's going to be very different. He's playing very aggressive and he's a good player.

Q. Who would have thought with all the weapons in your arsenal, this match would ultimately turn on a topspin lob?

ROGER FEDERER: That's how it goes sometimes. It turns around very quickly. When the wind turns, the match turns.

Q. You're both former junior world No. 1s.

ROGER FEDERER: Who, Zabaleta?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. He was, yeah.

Q. Like yourself.

ROGER FEDERER: Uh‑hmm.

Q. Obviously, you have some history there. You're about the same age?

ROGER FEDERER: No, he's three years older, I think.

Q. You never played him in the Juniors?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no. But I remember, he had a great record in Juniors. I think he won like 10 out of 11 tournaments, so yeah...

TenHound
03-29-2005, 02:40 AM
A night match, followed by a day match... you don't suppose the Americans want to stack the odds for Andre do you??? Nahhhhhhh........Maybe a little??

RogiFan88
03-29-2005, 02:44 AM
This is what I was concerned about today's match:

No, I prefer it easy, you know, to save energy. Playing again tomorrow, you know, and I'm finishing very late. This would have been great to finish off in two. In the end you have to be happy to be through at all.

Naughty Rogi and tomorrow will be a big test for you... Mario's playing better than you are and you will have to be extremely focused in order to win... HE has good 1st AND 2nd serves...

RogiFan88
03-29-2005, 02:45 AM
hmm... stilll thinking about the loss to nadal last yr, eh, rogi? s put those things behind you...

lizfederer
03-29-2005, 03:00 AM
hey guys, do you think that if roger wins tomorrow he'll be playing on wednesday too? he did play 3 times in a row in california. Im asking because i have tickets for wednesday(to watch him close) and im hoping he plays on wednesday too.

RogiFan88
03-29-2005, 03:06 AM
no probably on thu cos he's in the half that plays 2nd...

Nocko
03-29-2005, 03:12 AM
Thanks Silvy! :worship: Rogi is exhausted.... sleep well, be fit tomorrow! Ancic is tough.

TenHound
03-29-2005, 03:41 AM
Can you switch tickets for tomorrow? They're deliberately screwing Roger to help get AA to the final...so I wouldn't count on him being around beyond tomorrow, unless an almost miracle happens....odds are against it.

Oh, and F***ESPN isn't even showing the match. Calls anyone????? I don't see how there's a chance w/goddamn Americans playing in both evening matches.Grrrrrrr

Roger-No.1
03-29-2005, 04:10 AM
A night match, followed by a day match... you don't suppose the Americans want to stack the odds for Andre do you??? Nahhhhhhh........Maybe a little??
:haha: True, very true.

RonE
03-29-2005, 08:51 AM
Can you switch tickets for tomorrow? They're deliberately screwing Roger to help get AA to the final...so I wouldn't count on him being around beyond tomorrow, unless an almost miracle happens....odds are against it.

Oh, and F***ESPN isn't even showing the match. Calls anyone????? I don't see how there's a chance w/goddamn Americans playing in both evening matches.Grrrrrrr

Such cosmic optimism. Have a little faith- Roger has played shit in matches and come back the next day and played superbly knowing he has a tough opponent to deal with (eg Roddick in Toronto).

He has also played his fair share of matches back to back in the same day and won tournaments doing that. Sure, Mario will be tough but I think Roger is aware of the dangers and the stinging memory of Wimbledon 2002 will push him to raise his game I feel. If Roger can beat Mario convincingly on fast indoor carpet there is no reason why he shouldn't be able to do it on outdoor hard.

SUKTUEN
03-29-2005, 08:55 AM
:D Oh Dear!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

I have to wake up in 6 :00 AM in my holiday!!!!!!!!! :eek: :eek:

Roger GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO :D

Puschkin
03-29-2005, 09:25 AM
:D Oh Dear!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

I have to wake up in 6 :00 AM in my holiday!!!!!!!!! :eek: :eek:



Don't complain ;) . At least you get to see it :p while I am cut off from everything :mad: . What became of the match report thread :confused:

SUKTUEN
03-29-2005, 10:03 AM
It is good to see Roger~~~ :worship:

babsi
03-29-2005, 10:52 AM
How I wish I could watch Roger play!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I don´t think Roger will have to many problems with Mario-super-Ancic - that´s the new and improved me speaking - when he loses I will be devestaded as allways, of course - nothing new there :(



__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
03-29-2005, 11:05 AM
:wavey:

babsi
03-29-2005, 02:24 PM
Hello,Puschkin :)
ops - I´m a blind bat :(

Hello,SUKTUEN :)


__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

Doris Loeffel
03-29-2005, 02:50 PM
Not sure if all you guys here are on rf.com too so I post it here as well....


Well guys I have a little easter treat for you...
...this article was in the march issue of "DAS BESTE" (Reader's Digest) - but I actually think it was first issued in the "Tagesanzeiger in November" and the follwing interview must be from the January issue from "FACTS".

I tried to translate it as good as i could - but there might still be some hickup parts and spelling mistakes - sorry for that.

and yeap all together it's quite long!!!

oh and the things written in red are just my two cents to it now enjoy!!

Master over balls and words

How Roger Federer controlls himself, his environment and his image

From René Stauffer


When Roger Federer was beeing asked on the day of the american election who he would prefere to see as the president of the USA – George W.Bush or John Kerry, he evaded.
He only follows the election from the far, for him the outcome isn’t that important he said. “The US-President may be the most important person of the world. But I don’t have a favorit and won’t say anything about it.” The conclusion was near: again one of these sports who don’t look bejond their competition area and won’t take a clear position.

The diplomantic answer fittet in the image, that may occure at a brief look at the “Swiss sport of the year”: an athlet without any rough edges who streamlined looks for the easiest way, not wanting to affront anybody and even less wants to polarise. That’s how the world no 1 also appears to many on the tennis court: filigree but like a robot doing his job.

Even a wrong decision at one of his matchpoints during the Masters against Marat Safin elicted only a denier movement with his hand. The photographers are already thanksful when he at least shows some emotions after his greatest wins.

But these pictures fool yourself. The self-control and diplomacy whit whom the holder of 11 titles last year usually shows up are essential poles in his foundament that allow him to put victory after victory. They are no expression of a missing personality but well choosen and worked out tactis to protect himself against the disagreeable consequences in the shark-basin of the profitennis, where everyone is looking for the weakness of the opponent and take advantage of it.

Few days after the US election Federer landet on the International George Bush airport in Houston, where he was personally received by the ex-president for lunch and smalltalk. Would he have said something against the re-election of his son in Basel – the problems at the year end final in the republican Texas would be garanteed.

Likewise calculated was the unemotion, whit which he put away the wrong decision at matchpoint. He told himself that it might not have been a wrong decision, even thoug he could see the mark. “otherwise I would have gotten crazy” he said. Only he would have payed the price of a defeat - that a reduction of the concentration could have lead to - and it would have been high. As just a semifinalist he would have left with over a million Dollar less of price money - $ 450 000 instead of $ 1.52 million.

The 23 year old baselbieter (born on the 8. August 1981) wasn’t always like this. Who saw him play eight nine years ago doesn’t recognis him anymore. Back then he often left a lamentable impression. He was swearing after every error, made destructive selfconservation, smashed his raquet on the floor (but still won most of the time).

Somewhen he realised that this “let himself go” doesn’t bring him any further in a sport where overboarding were a sign of weakness and may have heavy consequences, from fines over discualifications to beeing banned. Together with a mentaltrainer he worked out a selfcontrol – which shortly leat to lethargy. Today the 3 time grand slam winner of 2004 controlls not only himself but also his environment like he wishes.
The dominance, sovereignty and “weitsicht” who make him so strong as a player help him also off court and allow him to optimise his appearances and his decisions. With the same calmness and oversight with which he holds off breakpoints, he reacts in he biggest hype.

For tournament directors, fans and media he’s a conceivable reliable, obliging and respectively liked partner, whose word is reliance. Couse he still follows his maxim – now that he stands at the top of his sport – “it’s nice to be important but it’s more important to be nice.”

Still Federer knows very well what’s good for him and what’s not so good for him and he isn’t afraid to make rigoros actions. Already in his young profecionnal years he made sure, that Jakob Hlasek one of the big figures in swiss tennis, is replaced as the leader of the Davis-Cup Team as he didn’t get along with him too well. Even that he seperated with his coach almost over night a year ago many wouldn’t dare he would do.

The wimbledon champ is even able to find appreciation for unpopular decisions – like his abandonment for playing the first round of the Davis-Cup 2005. Couse he brings a high level of credibility and because the success concede the point.

Without big word he even set milestones off court in the profitennis. In 2004 he showed that it is possible to follow its way without a coach and a big agency in the back and broke two unwritten rules. He organised his environment according to his needs. With his girlfriend Miroslava (Mirka) Vavrinec as a coordinator, the parents as managers and two profecionals to reach the physical optimum, masseur Pavel Kovac and condition trainer Pierre Paganini.

Roger Federer found his position also outside the court. He’s a perfectionistic allrounder, who aims for the total controll and has reached it as far as possible. Who accuses him therefor for streamlineness and monotony he overlooks that sport only has it’s great moments thanks through rivalry and that one player alone can’t carry a sport.

What would Bjorn Borg have been without Jon McEnroe, Boris Becker without Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras without Andre Agassi, Ayrton Senne without Alain Prost, Cassius Clay without Joe Frazier? That Marat Safin the spirited russian, Lleyton Hewitt the fiery australian and Andy Roddick the american powerhouse weren’t able to put up an equal rivalry last year wasn’t his fault.



Interview:

“Tennisyears are”Hundejahre””

Jörg Allmeroth spoke with Roger Federer

Q: 3 grand Slams last year 13 titles in a row – Mr. Federer is there something that can upset you?
RF It was a year like in a beautifull dream, a crazy super year. But I never had the feeling to be unbeatable. That would be foolish. When such thoughts are creeping in you are in danger.

Q: How do you protect yourself against it?
RF: I need to be wide awake to be able to react to all the defiances I don’t let dazzle myself from headlines like “Tennis-dominator” or “The unbeatable”. Till the last match of the season I went with the attitude that there’s someone on the other side who would like to beat me and is also able to. (In January Marat Safin did so in Melbourne.) Nothing is given to me, cause despite all my victories no one on the tour is paralysed infront of me.

Q: At the years end you have been swamped with several awards like “European sports of the year” and with great compliments. How do you handle all this prise?
RF: I don’t expect those awards, but of course I’m aware that I reached something extraordinary. I am thanksful and enjoy the acknowlegement, especially the renewed award at home in Switherland for the best sport of the year. But at the same time I’m already prepearing mentally for the new tasks – they are hard enough.

Q: you are promoting together with UNO-general secretary Kofi Annan the year of sports you sit on the “Wetten, dass” sofa with Thomas Gottschalk are being titled as “tennisgod” in famous newspapers. Do you sometimes pinch yourself in the arm?
RF: It is wonderful to life such great moments like the one with the UNO. It’s wonderful also because it gives you the feeling beeing respected. And yet I force myself by all enthusiasm to stay normal and nice, to have a friendly word and a signature for the fans. I basically like to go up towards people, that’s no annoying duty for me.

Q: Are you sometimes scared to fall off the top in silent moments?
RF: There are always backdraws, that’s the everyday life in sport. I only had a few during the last season – besides the olympic games, but I know that I have to accept defeat again. But I don’t make me crazy and think about how I put away defeats in the future. I think positive and keep my calmness.

Q: For many opponent your looseness and your easy going appearance in the showdown parts of the game irritates them. Are you a perfect actor who can hide the nervousity? Or are you so cool?
RF: I feel much more secure and experienced than two three years ago. The selfdoubts if I can really become such a good tennisplayer are gone. Now I’ve proven my class under the most difficutl sircumstances often enough. For me it’s important that I beat the best players regularly – not only once in a while. Therefore the Masters-Cup 2004 was a perfect end: I was injured befor. Still I was able to win 5 times against the best in the world. Such experiences can’t be replaced with anything.

Q: Today you’re undoubtly the star in the tennis circus. Where and when came for you the development where you seperated yourself from the other players?
RF: Clearly at the Masters in 2003 in Houston. Back then I’ve beaten Andre Agassi n the first game (I always said that too – that this match was much more important for him in a way than winning Wimbledon) and after that I haven’t lost 24 times in a row against top 10 players. That’s been a milestone in my carrer even more as I’ve beaten Andy Roddick in the semis at this tournament and Agassi a second time in the final – in the middle of America.

Q: Since the beginning of 2004 your traveling without a permanent coach. Did you also became better because of that, as you had to take more responsibility?
RF: For me it was a huge experience. And I’m very proud about how I managed it with 23 years as a player, trainer and businessman – almost without any problem. I got to know myself better as I was asking myself: what does Roger Federer need to be able to play good. Which environment is esential, which people do I need on my side? For that I had to get much more profecional and organise myself better.
Earlier it was like that, that I run to the coach and told him: make this and that – and I could relax. Now it’s my own responsibility that everything works. And I look for such responsibility.

Q: Were you surprised that your biggest rival Andy Roddick separeted from his coach Brad Gilbert?
RF definitely. That came for me like from no where. There I needed to swallow twice and thought: Wow what’s that now? As one hears Brad Gilbert was pretty alienated. The seperation came also for him as a big surprise. I only can say: That was a brave stepp from Andy.

Q: In the foreword to Brad Gilberts new book Agassi writes: “A good coach can lead you to a place where you don’t need him anymore.”
RF: Guess there is some truth in it. In my case it was like I had to separate myself from my coach peter Lundgren to be able to develop. It was a decision against a good friend. But it was the right one, very professional. It sounds cold, bout one has to know where one wants to go in its carrer and what has to be done for it.

Q: An other unpopular decision you made is the abandonment for the fors Davis Cup round of the new Season. You’re follwing other top stars with it, who aren’t any longer playing on a regular basis for the national team.
RF: Also that was a very though decision thus I made it actually against my own will and my temper as a teamplayer. Lot of people say: This Federer looks only for his own carrer now and becomes an egoist.
That’s definitively false. I have to see the longterm perspectives and can’t born the candle at both ends with my body each year. These tennisyears just are “Hundejahre”. On the long run you can’t handle all these appointments, I could get broken at it.

Q: Especially for Davis-Cup you were mostly the lone point-supplier
RF These were ofter brutal exertions like last year when I was playing in Rumania on a heavy clay court after I won the Australian Open. After that I was pushed to make compromises and had to withdraw from some Master Tournaments as I just was to tired and worn out. This season now I can play every important tournament till Wimbledon without the Davis-Cup burden. But it was though to withdraw from the Nationsmatch.

Q: The only Grand Slam Tournament you haven’t won yet is the French Open. Is the win your big aim for 2005?
RF: No. On top of my prioritylist are to defend my Wimbledon title and to remain the no. 1. That’s also why I did withdraw from the first Davis-Cup round. I know that I can also play very good on clay, I have won twice in Hamburg after all. To put everything towards Paris would be a big mistake. I can’t and don’t want to force anything. I’m only 23 years old and still have a lot of chances to land the big coup there.

Q: What have you changed strategally for the planning of 2005 besides not playing the first Davis-Cup round?
RF: Earlier I alwas thought it’s enough to arrive two or three days prior to a tournament. But now I realised, that especially for the events in America I need a longer acclimation time to be successful then. Indian Wells, US Open, Masters-Coup Housten – last year it’s been working fine all the time. That’s why I want to keep it this way also for the price to play less tournaments in the end. But my motto is clear: If there’s any doubt Quality comes prior to quantity. I bundle my powers for the tournaments who really mean something to me.

Q: During the next month you have to defend big titles all over the world. What’s nicer: the first win or the secon triumph the confirmation of your class?
RF: You can’t compare that. The first win in Wimbledon released unbeliaveble emotions, that’s been pure joy. Absolutely undescribable. The second title then was a big relive, as I was able to witstand the pressure of the haunted as somebody who was chased by the mob from the very first minute of the tournament. Now I love these challenges. That’s why I’m looking forward to tournaments where I’m the defending Champion. Through this sircumstance I’m able to bring out the best of me.

Q: To be no 1 is it more joy than pressure?
RF: I like to be the frontrunner of the tennis an ambassador for the sport. I for sure don’t suffer from it.

Q: How important are the foundations you created for you? Are they just alibyexercises, who shall cement your image as an engaged sport?
RF: Not at all. One has to love to do it and stans fully behind the project. I fought with myself and asked me if I’m not too young and unexperienced for such a task. But I want at least give something back from what life has offered to me. And it’s already a big joy to support kids in Southafrica. And I’m also supporting the action “Kids Tennis” in Switzerland.

Q: You have already reached a lot in young years. Do you still have wishes they didn’t come true yet?
RF: I’m happy and satisfied – with Mirka, my parents and my friends. And I feel comfortable as a tennis professional. I only wish good health for everybody who I love and for myself. Nothing more. I only want to make the best of everyday. And I manage that pretty well.

Q: Are there any places where you can go and relax?
RF: Despite all the fame there are such vanishing points where I can find quietness and can relax. I like to fly to places where it’s warm, there I’m just together with Mirka and forget the world around me. These are moments of total privatness, away from the tennis business. Moments in which I can refuel power. I feel then how my body recowers in the warmth and how I realax and enjoy the easy live in the sun.

Q: As a tennisplayer you live the life of a nomad and to relax you fly to tropical places. Do you still have a homeland?
RF: That’s of course Switzerland even when I’m not often there. My friends life in Switzerland. There’s my home, the place, I still like to go best. I enjoy every minute in Switzerland.

Q Misleads the impression that a lot of your triumphs in Switzerland in the meantime are taken as granted? (Well I guess unfortunately it’s true – not only here in Switzerland but among his fans I feel that sometimes too – including me - even as much to the point that swiss TV isn’t anylonger showing all the finals he’s playing in as they still said so last year….)
RF: Sometimes I think that myself. But then at home a lot of people approach me and tell me it’s unbeliaveble what I’m doing for Switzerland. Maybe it’s like this in normal life: one learns to really appreciate something when you no longer have it.




www.dasbeste.ch and www.facts.ch and www.tagesanzeiger.ch

fightclubber
03-29-2005, 04:06 PM
Thanks Doris
I looove the interviews
Thanks for the efforts
:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

babsi
03-29-2005, 04:54 PM
Thanks a bunch,Doris :)
busy as a bee - as one should be and I´m not,shame on me :(




__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

RogiNie
03-29-2005, 05:30 PM
Great interview/article Doris!! thanx :D

fightclubber
03-30-2005, 01:44 AM
. FEDERER/M. Ancic
6‑3, 4‑6, 6‑4

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, Roger Federer. We'll open it up for questions.

Q. Two nights in a row you played, two nights it was pretty tough games.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, so, that's exactly what happened. Two tough matches in a row, so I deserve a break tomorrow (smiling).

Q. Are these the type of matches that you would have lost back in 2002, the beginning of 2003, now you're pulling them out because of more confidence?

ROGER FEDERER: Could have been, but it's always hard to say.

I'm definitely stronger mentally, you know, than in the past. Yeah, so I just have the feeling I can rely on many strengths in my game which carry me through sometimes, even though maybe I'm not playing great. Like it happened especially tonight. I never really felt I got the rhythm, but still came through, you know.

It was obvious it's going to be hard to find the rhythm against Ancic because he serves so big. But still I would have liked just to feel better from the baseline.

Q. Did his return of serve surprise you at all tonight? He seemed to be getting a lot of balls back in play.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, the conditions are very slow it seems. I wasn't surprised. You know, he's got a good backhand. That one had surprised me back in Wimbledon. I know about his serve, but maybe his second serve return is sometimes a little underrated.

No, I did well to come through tonight. I'm really happy.

Q. Did it surprise you, the strength of Nadal, so there will be no other final with you and Ljubicic?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I knew this was going to be an open match between the guys. They've been both playing well. You know, Nadal hasn't been having the chance really to show how good he really is. But I felt it here last year, so I'm not surprised at all. It's a good surface for him, you know. I'm favoring him for the finals on the other side of the draw.

Q. There was a moment of frustration out there. The second set seemed more laborious for you than the first one.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I started poorly, you know, the match by getting broken straightaway. Bounced back and, you know, started to really return okay, started dominating from the baseline. As the match went on, he start to serve better. I only got a couple of chances, and I missed those. I think I got a little irritated and, you know, threw my racquet a couple of times, which normally doesn't happen very often, you know.

But I was just really disappointed, you know, sometimes of my ‑‑ the way I chose my shots. But this is definitely something I can improve on for the next match. And in the end, you know, I'm always happy to come through, even though I didn't play great.

Q. Tim Henman is up a set right now. He'd be your opponent if he wins that match. You practiced with him last week. Any tips on how to play him?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we flew together here, you know, so we're good buddies. We get along well. He gives you a tough match because he keeps coming at you. But I think on the outdoors, you know, he's not as good as indoors. But still, you know, nothing to underrate. I've lost to him several times. I expect a tough match if it's him.

But also Stepanek can be tough, you know. But I really have to improve my game if I want to keep on winning.

Q. It's still very possible that you might win back‑to‑back Masters Series tournaments, having won in Indian Wells the week before last. Is this a really special goal for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've never done it, you know. I think if you want to do it somewhere, this is the best place to do it, you know, because you've got a couple of days between the two tournaments. This one is considered the biggest one of the nine, you know; points and prize money are the same, but it's just about prestige. It would be a nice thing to do because if you cannot win a Grand Slam, you know, at the Australian Open, that would be great to show, hey, you're still the best, even though I feel like I am because of my results and because I've lost so few matches, you know, the last couple of months.

So that would be a great thing to do but, really, I'm too focused on my own game right now because it could be better.

But looking forward to the next match, and hopefully with a day off, that's going to give me some time to maybe work on my game.

Q. Do you think you might get on a roll and win all nine this year?

ROGER FEDERER: All nine (smiling). It's a new goal, you know. Instead of winning the four Grand Slams, you win the nine Masters Series. I'll take that as well, you know (smiling).

Q. Did the wind bother you much today?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it was better today. It was better tonight. I had the feeling occasionally, you know, some breeze came up. But it wasn't bad, so it didn't affect the game too much.

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Rommella
03-30-2005, 08:52 AM
In the 2nd set, I actually thought Roger would revert to his tennis-bashing teenage years. After the second time that he flung his racket, however, he took a deep breath and visibly composed himself. Thank heaven, because when he calmed down he cleaned up his game.

Wish I could do that though. As Yoda might put it: "clear the mind you must".

RogiNie
03-30-2005, 01:28 PM
thanx for the interview Silvy! :D Nothing about an illness?!

Nocko
03-30-2005, 02:35 PM
Thanks Doris, great article&intervew. :worship: :worship: :worship:

Nocko
03-30-2005, 02:36 PM
And gracias Silvy :worship: :worship: :worship:

babsi
03-30-2005, 04:52 PM
Thank you,Silvy :)

Where does that illness rumor come from?

Roger isn´t ill,till he say´s so - basta!



__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

fightclubber
03-30-2005, 05:23 PM
Thank you,Silvy :)

Where does that illness rumor come from?

Roger isn´t ill,till he say´s so - basta!
Hi
and youre welcome.
No I havent heard or read a word on roger being ill.
Rumours, I guess.

Just sit and relax and hope he can give his best tennis onTimothy´s match!

SUKTUEN
03-31-2005, 02:58 AM
thankyo so much :worship:

crimson
03-31-2005, 02:56 PM
I read this on tennis-x.com today:

http://www.tennis-x.com/story/2005-03-31/d.php

From the Sport Telegraph: "World No. 1 Roger Federer has revealed a novel element to his preparations for the defence of his Wimbledon title in June; a visit to Hampton Court for his first taste of real tennis, the royal, ancient and utterly dignified forerunner of that Johnny-come-lately game played amid huge hype and razzamatazz on the lawns of the All England Club each summer. On June 15, just five days before the start of The Championships, while most of his rivals will be fine tuning their games on grass in Nottingham or Holland, Federer, with a little help from former world champion Chris Ronaldson, will be manhandling a heavy, asymmetric wooden racket, thrashing solid, handmade balls over a drooping net and off the walls and wooden porches called penthouses as he attempts to master the all-important cut stroke plus arcane specialities like the giraffe, the boomerang and the railroad serve. Once he has absorbed the rudiments, the Swiss, partnering BBC sports presenter John Inverdale, will take on Ronaldson, the Hampton Court head professional and jeweller Neil Duckworth, both experienced players, in a doubles."

SUKTUEN
03-31-2005, 03:20 PM
Thanks~~ but I not understand all the words~~ :scratch:

RogiNie
03-31-2005, 05:17 PM
Mm.. I wonder if this is good for his preparation for Wimbledon.. A wooden racket and handmade balls... that's so different than normal rackets... I think it's hard if you must play with 'normal' rackets and balls afterwards.. and especially Wimbledon; it's such an important tournament...

RogiFan88
03-31-2005, 08:52 PM
Interesting... I've been to Hampton Court and seen the olde tennis courte!

Nocko
03-31-2005, 09:17 PM
Well, I used to play tennis with wooden racket. :p But I don't have confidence to handle it now. Racket become easier to use these day, so, if you try to use wooden R you'll find you can play with new racket mmmuch easier. Maybe no problem for Rogi! :p

onm684
03-31-2005, 09:38 PM
Nocko-san, Thank you for your hopeful opinion:worship:

fightclubber
03-31-2005, 09:39 PM
R. FEDERER/T. Henman
6‑4, 6‑2

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How did you feel about the way you played?

ROGER FEDERER: It was definitely one of my best matches this week, very clearly. Still have the feeling I could serve better, you know, just to maybe get a few more free points. But from the baseline was really good today. I felt much better than the last few days. Also, I think, you know, moving, my movement was good, which is always a key to my success.

Q. You obviously had the benefit of having a day's rest after what looked like two very tough, tight matches for you. Is that something you needed, do you think, just to get yourself...

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think it helped, you know. You know at these events eventually you get your days off if you keep on winning. Even though I didn't feel that tired, the match against Ancic was quite short still for a three‑setter, and physically it's no problem, yeah. So I'm used to that.

Q. Did you at any stage feel particularly threatened today?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, middle through the first set I started to feel like I was not getting in the first serves I really wanted to, and he was keeping coming in, you know. I knew that, you know, maybe after some time I won't make all those passing shots anymore, and that's exactly what happened. I missed quite an easy one at 30‑All, he got his breakpoint and you start thinking about it.

I think the key to the match was the breakpoint. Served a good second serve to get out of it. Once I won the set, you know, actually went quite smooth. I started to feel great from the baseline. He was under pressure and he was trying to create something, then it's obviously tough, you know.

Q. That second serve, you had a couple straight into his body the game before that. Were you looking to go down the middle or thinking about the one into the body?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I like to mix it up against him because he's got a great backhand slice, you know. So sometimes you want to stay away from it because, you know, you're going to kick serve, and, you know, the next thing you're going to do is hit a passing shot. I'd rather let him do something with it, so I kick it into the body or just move it around. Easier said than done.

I hardly served any double‑faults, which also is important against him.

Q. Have you had blisters this week?

ROGER FEDERER: No, that's usual protection I do for every match on the tour. Tape was just wet and it came off. I didn't want it to be bothering me, you know, so I took it all off.

Q. You play either Agassi or Dent next. I know you've played Agassi a lot. You never played Dent. Can you talk about the prospect of playing each.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, what can I say? Dent, I've known him since junior times. I lost to him one time there on grass. I think that's the only time we really played.

Now, you know, I've seen him, the way he was been playing over the years, you know, so it's nice to see that he's really playing well and beating good players. I definitely give him a chance against Agassi tonight.

For me, Agassi is the favorite. He loves this tournament. He's won it many, many times. If I play Agassi, of course, that's also a tough match, just him ‑‑ playing him here, it's almost, maybe, probably his favorite tournament, the tournament he won the most. So it will be a tough match, but really looking forward to that, if it happens.

Q. Can you talk about your US Open match with him last year.

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, that was an awkward match. We had to play through two days in unbelievable winds, a lot of condition changes, you know. I played a good match; him, too. In the end, it was almost a thriller. It was important to get through that one, because you see what happened after that.

Q. You still have a losing record against Tim Henman.

ROGER FEDERER: Still (smiling)?

Q. Still. You played 10 times, you've only won four. What's the key now to your success compared to, you know, your losses in the early days?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I have the feeling, you know, I serve and return better. Just those two things make it harder for him now maybe to play his game against me.

You know, many, many things. Now of course confidence. Maybe it's in his head now that he has to turn things around whereas before I had to. I had a few close matches in the beginning. I remember having matchpoint in Vienna, I should have actually won that match but I ended up losing it. You know, he beat me a couple of tough ones back home in Basel, once in the finals, once in the quarters.

I think the first win against him, I got it here, where he gave up at 6‑2 up for me, where he could not move. So that was like my first win against Henman, you know, that's great.

But then I knew the next time I played him, I went, "Oh, no, he's fit again." But that I could turn it around was great. I enjoy playing against him because you always get good rallies going.

Q. 18 out of 21 at the net. Are you trying to show Tim you can play up there as well as he can?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't even know about the stats. Important is when I come to the net, I finish off the volleys, I don't put myself into such tough positions like he's in all the time, because he takes chances at the net. But he's also, for me, in my eyes, the best at the net. So he should do that.

I'd rather come in to really finish off the points, you know. This is the reason why I had such a good percentage from there.

Q. Is there a shot that you don't have that you'd like to have?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I see many players with different great shots which I would like to have but...

Q. Which one?

ROGER FEDERER: There's many. There's many, you know. There's enough shots I would like to have, but I'm the player I am and I can't change that. But I'm happy with the variety of shots I can pull off and I can do. It's just important to use them at the right time.

Q. There are a lot of players on this tour who like to inspect three, four balls, look for the right amount of fuzz on the ball, laying down on the ball. There's no fuss with you. You take two balls. Do you think all that's overrated, inspecting balls?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I kind of look at the balls as well, you know, just take the newest one so all the balls are being played the same, you know. Not that there's one very old one, very new one. You try to get them all the same.

But I don't know. I guess it's just a focus, you know, players have. They'd rather take the right ball. An extreme is when they ask for a ball they just served with, so they want it all the way from the other side, like Goran used to do. But that's funny, too, you know. But we don't see that too often happening anymore.

Q. From watching upstairs, it all looks slightly matter‑of‑fact, slightly routine, I know it isn't, but from the viewpoint in the box it does. Are you frankly amazed that you keep on playing so well and keep winning and keep going, keep playing at the level you're playing at?

ROGER FEDERER: In the end, you know, the last couple of games when I broke him, I really feel like now I'm really starting to pick up my game from the baseline, starting to really play well and everything is coming together, this is when I really start to feel well.

But, you know, I have to fight for being up 6‑4, 5‑2. From then on, you know, everything is easy.

But I am surprised, you know, to have, again, such a great start to the season after last year's season where I really thought, "Jesus, how in the world will I defend all those titles, and how will I maintain this level?" Because people expect so much. You have to feel well almost on every day, you know, to come through, because everybody wants to beat you out there.

That I could maintain such a high level, you know, is, for me, a little bit of a surprise. That's clear. Even though, you know, in the bottom, I know I can do it, you know. But then to really do it is a different thing again.

Q. Can it ever get tough to stay focused? Or because everyone wants to beat you, it makes it easy?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, as the No. 1 in the world, you just don't want to give away victories to other guys. Then they can say, "Yeah, I beat the No. 1 player in the world." At least you want to make it tough for them. I think this is the motivation I have and found. It makes me a better player, a tougher player especially. I'm happy I live through this.

Q. How old were you when you played Dent? Do you remember?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, must have been almost 17.

Q. You said it was on grass, was it Wimbledon or Eastbourne?

ROGER FEDERER: No, the week before. Lost in three sets.

Q. Have you spoken on the phone at all with Tony?

ROGER FEDERER: Haven't, no.

Q. Nothing, nothing you need to discuss?

ROGER FEDERER: Nothing I can tell you, no, as we didn't speak.

Q. Still special if you meet Andre?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, no, I would look forward for sure, you know. He's done so much for the game. He's got a great story here in Miami. We played the finals here a couple of years ago, which was for me one of my breakthrough results in a way. Helped me to kind of get my game going. Was a great experience.

Now, you know, I'm the No. 1 in the world. But to still play Andre, who just picks a few events a year, you know, you always know you're going to play him when he's at his best. Especially in the semifinals, you know, there's no more kidding around. Would really look forward to a match with him. If it's Dent, that's okay, too. I think also that would be quite interesting.

Q. Do you ever get off days, when you wake up in the morning when things don't feel too right?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I consider myself quite lucky, you know, to be very little sick, you know. Because I remember in the past, you know, when I came on tour, I got sometimes little fever, little cold here and there, but just now it seems like I've come through that, you know.

Q. I don't mean illness.

ROGER FEDERER: But this is one thing, you know, which really puts you off. You think about that and not about the game. With injuries, you know, I'm also very lucky.

But of course I wake up on days and I'm hurt, I'm like, "Oh, again?" But very seldom, because I know my exact plan for the day, you know, when I wake up in the morning. I know what I have to do, so you're ready for it. I think if you go to bed and you think you got vacation tomorrow and you got to play a five‑setter, this is when it's not good. But that never happens, so...

Q. After that final with Andre a few years ago, he spoke with such high regard for you. At that time in your career, he felt he could exploit high backhands. Was that once a problem you had to iron out?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. My backhand was definitely my weaker shot; it still is, you know, for some.

I've definitely improved it because everybody's been going to it, you know. Of course serving is the easiest thing to do, just to go to the backhand. I had to improve it, you know. I think footwork was also a thing I was not doing well on my backhand side. Since I got that right, my backhand's been a much better shot. Especially on the passing shot, I can really rely on it.

Q. Was it just a matter of hitting a million backhands?

ROGER FEDERER: I guess so, yeah.

Q. Do you feel the crowd support here? Do you even think about it when you're out there?

ROGER FEDERER: I feel there is a buzz out there, you know, when I come on court. It seems like they enjoy coming out to watch me, you know. Also at the practice sessions, there's always many, many people watching.

So I feel like, yeah, here in America I'm well‑liked. So that's nice.

Q. Is there someone you consider who taught you how to play, someone whose game you modeled yours after?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I used to play much more aggressive, you know, when I was younger. When I came on tour, you know, I took many more risks on every part of my game. You know, I came to the net much more often.

But, you know, I think I figured out myself how to play. Of course you get tips and tactics, everything from your coaches. But I think in the end, you know, I'm playing the way, now, the way I'm comfortable. That's the winning game.

Q. You mentioned all the tournaments you have to defend this year. Does that feel like pressure or more like an opportunity?

ROGER FEDERER: More pressure, I would say, yeah. Because, I mean, on the big, big tournaments, like the Grand Slams, you really feel it, you know. Because you're like there, you're like, "Oh, my God, if I lose this, you lose so many points." I don't know, you don't want to lose your reigning Wimbledon champion or reigning Australian Open champ.

I feel pressure, you know, but it's almost a weird situation I'm in this week, I have hardly any points to defend. Suddenly I'm in the semis. Yeah, I got some points so (smiling).

Really looking forward to the clay season as well. I really hope I can play well there, especially at the French, of course. Yeah, I think the tough times will come after Wimbledon, you know, when I really haven't lost a match, you know. So we'll see.

Q. John McEnroe once only lost three matches in an entire season.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I know.

Q. Is that conceivable for you?

ROGER FEDERER: No (smiling). I'm happy the way it is right now. Last year was good.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Yasmine
04-01-2005, 05:39 AM
here is an article on the BBC website ;)

Federer class too much for Henman

World number one Roger Federer eased past Britain's Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of the Nasdaq-100 Open in Miami on Thursday.
The Swiss top seed broke in the fifth game of a closely-fought opening set, and saved a break point in game eight with a magnificent second serve.

From then on Henman was unable to threaten Federer and he broke twice in the second set for a 6-4 6-2 victory.

Federer faces Andre Agassi, who beat Taylor Dent 7-5 6-0, in the last four.

Henman put in a solid performance but was made to pay for every lapse of concentration, with Federer capitalising ruthlessly.

The world number one largely controlled the match from the baseline and fired several unstoppable forehands as Henman tried to take charge at the net.

And despite some wonderful volleys from the Briton, Federer was more often than not able to find the winning pass.

"He's one of the guys I've got a bad record against, so it's always good to beat him," said Federer, who now trails Henman 6-4 in career meetings.

"It was easier than I expected. I thought he missed his one chance when he had break point.

"I hit a great second serve and from then on it seemed easier. In the second set I started to play better and then it was tough for him."

Henman, who still leads 6-4 in head-to-heads with Federer, tried to remain upbeat about his performance.

The 30-year-old said: "I feel somewhat disappointed with the way I played but in the context of the way I played the last couple of weeks, it's been positive.

"It was okay but I think you're only allowed to play to a certain level because of the standard that he's playing so consistently.

"There were parts where I felt pretty comfortable, but it only takes your level to drop for a point or two points and that can be a break of serve, and he just keeps rolling from there."

SUKTUEN
04-01-2005, 05:42 AM
thanks

Stevens Point
04-01-2005, 12:10 PM
This article is from ESPN.com. The first sentence struck me really hard. :haha:

ESPN.com news services

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- Roger Federer is so good he can transform a six-time champion into an underdog.

That will be the rare role for Andre Agassi on Friday night when he takes on the world No. 1 in the semifinals of the Nasdaq-100 Open. He's seeking his seventh Key Biscayne title, but will need an upset over Federer to reach the final.

Andre Agassi
Andre Agassi capitalized on a rattled Taylor Dent, cruising in the second set to win the match.

Federer has beaten Agassi six times in a row and eliminated him at the past two Grand Slam events.

"Seeing his form over the last year and a half, I'd say I'd have to be doing a lot of things well, no question about it," Agassi said. "I'll have to really step it up Friday, that's for sure."

Federer, bidding for his first Key Biscayne title, advanced to the semifinals by beating No. 6 Tim Henman 6-4, 6-2. Agassi, seeded ninth, won the final eight games to defeat Taylor Dent 7-5, 6-0.

"Agassi learns every time he plays guys," Dent said. "He's going to try and impose his game on Roger, maybe try some new things we haven't seen him do before. If anybody can beat Roger, Andre can."

Agassi is playing for the 19th year in a row at Key Biscayne, where the climate brings out the best in his game. He likes the unpredictable breezes because of his big hitting zone, and likes the heat and humidity because he's in great shape.

He hopes for a windy, muggy night Friday.

"I would prefer to be in extreme conditions," he said. "You know -- 142 degrees."

Agassi won his first title on the island in 1990 and his most recent in 2003, and his record in the tournament is 61-12. In short, there's nowhere he'd rather take on the world's top player.

"You can't hand-pick it better," Agassi said.

"He loves this tournament," Federer said. "It's almost, maybe, probably his favorite tournament, the tournament he won the most. So it will be a tough match, but I'm really looking forward to that."

While Agassi has been terrific in South Florida, Federer has been terrific everywhere. He's 46-1 since the start of last year's U.S. Open and is trying for his fourth tournament title in a row.

"As the No. 1 in the world, you just don't want to give away victories to the other guys," Federer said. "Then they can say, 'I beat the No. 1 player in the world.' At least you want to make it tough for them. This is the motivation I have."

On Sunday, Federer or Agassi will play the winner of the other semifinal, an all-Spanish matchup Friday between unseeded David Ferrer and No. 29 Rafael Nadal.

babsi
04-01-2005, 12:46 PM
A general thanks to everyone,who posted articles - I´m in a hurry to catch up,because my internetexcess is so unstable :(



__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-01-2005, 01:32 PM
Thanks ~~ For help the lazy girl like me~~~ :devil:

RogiNie
04-01-2005, 02:35 PM
thanx for all the articles!! :)

SUKTUEN
04-01-2005, 02:37 PM
:rolleyes: I must improve my English~~~

fightclubber
04-02-2005, 01:50 AM
GOOD THING TO READ, ANDRE PRESS CONFERENCE.

LOVE THE PART HE IS FROM VEGAS ANS HO HE BETS TO WIN!



R. FEDERER/A. Agassi
6‑4, 6‑3 An interview with:

ANDRE AGASSI

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.Q. How did you feel you played?

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, everything pretty well. First serve let me down in the second set, and couldn't buy one there for a while. Just giving him way too many, way too many ‑‑ I needed some free points on my first serve today, and didn't quite get that in the second.Q. To have five breakpoints and a chance to get into this second set, the guy keeps coming up with the goods in every critical situation. Was that a testimony to what a great player he is?

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah. So three of them he hit unreturnable serves. One of them I had a look at a backhand up the line that I took, would have beat him by like eight feet, but I just hit it long.Q. Half‑volley from the baseline?

ANDRE AGASSI: Then I hit a stretch to the forehand, he hit it with spin back to the middle of the court, and I played a redirectional backhand back up the line that I hit in the net. Had that gone over, it was probably the worst shot I could have played.

So, you know, you get one or two chances to make the right decisions and execute, and I didn't make the right decision on that shot for sure. Q. Ever since you were under the tutelage of BG, once you won the toss, you put your opponent to serve first because you thought you could get the break straight off. Against Federer, is that a good tactic?

ANDRE AGASSI: It doesn't matter. I mean, if you serve first in the first set, you're going to serve second in the second set. I mean, if you do your job right, I never did it because I thought I was going to break the first game, that was never my reason.

I feel like I treat my serve a lot more urgently when I'm down Love‑1 versus serving 0‑0.

When I start a match, when I'm down Love‑1, I feel like I'm into it right away. There's no chance to get careless.Q. The business end of the set, like you're 4‑5 down, you're serving, you're under more pressure?

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, but had I lived up to the pressure, the second set would have been the same thing. He would have been serving 3‑4, Love‑40 instead of 3‑All. So whatever happens in the first set is going to be opposite in the second anyhow, if you take care of your business.Q. Is it too soon to judge what a brilliant match that was?

ANDRE AGASSI: Wrong person to ask. Q. Did you feel you were part of a brilliant match?

ANDRE AGASSI: I know nothing about the game. I only had him pegged to go to the semis. He's in the finals now (smiling). Q. We liked it.

ANDRE AGASSI: Good. I'm glad. I aim to please (smiling).Q. Can you talk about the crowd here. They obviously love you here.

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I love them. It's been an incredible 19 years for me. They've seen me through a lot. There was a stage here when I wasn't losing first round, I was winning it. That's a lot of ups and downs, peaks and valleys that we've lived through together. They were certainly electric tonight, giving me so much support. You know, just disappointed I couldn't deliver a little bit more.Q. On the final point of the first set, long rally, you had that final forehand, crosscourt, bang, there he was sitting there waiting for it. Did you have a choice of going up the line on that one?

ANDRE AGASSI: What happened, I hit it crosscourt? Q. Short angle crosscourt. He was sitting there, camped on it. I don't know if you remember it at all.

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, I mean, I didn't make too many bad decisions out there. I made one crucial bad decision on breakpoint when I tried to hit a redirection backhand up the line against the wind, of all times. That particular one, you know, when you get a little late on it, you know, that's not a high percentage one for me to take up the line. I was just trying to play it thick to the court and make him hit a special shot up the line, give me some time to get back.

But, yeah, just missed it. I mean, that's the thing, you know. You can play quality match, quality match, but he has the ability at any given moment (snapping) to play spectacular tennis and break something open, break a set open. That's what happened at 4‑5, and when I didn't convert on any chances at 3‑All in the second, you know. He did the same thing in the next game. I missed some first serves and, boom, he took advantage of it. Q. Back on that final point in the first set, how many players have the intuition to read where that ball is going? It looks like a winner to just about anybody else on this tour.

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, there's a number of departments of his game that is arguably better than anybody. I mean, that's an incredible thing to say when you realize that most players count on one thing to be special. And if they have one thing that's special, it makes them hard to deal with. He has a few things.

I mean, you got to give him his credit, the guy moves incredibly well. His forehand is dangerous from anywhere on the court. When you think you're in good position, you're not. He changes the whole perspective of the dynamics out there because you think you have daylight, you think you have a hole, and you just can't be tempted because you really don't, and you have to be very disciplined and execute perfectly. You know, that's a sign of somebody playing a level above. Q. Andre, are you slightly less disappointed tonight than you were, say, in Dubai or Melbourne?

ANDRE AGASSI: No, that's not accurate. That's not accurate. It's disappointing.Q. Is the disappointment as great even though the match was closer than those two?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I mean, arguably more. When you play a match where you don't have any chance, regardless who it's against, it's useless to spend much time thinking about it, you know. Here you have times where you just replay it and you wish you could have done a few things differently so...

Probably more disappointing.Q. Looking back on the game, did anything in particular catch you off guard at all tonight?

ANDRE AGASSI: No. No. He came up with some great shots on big points, pretty much expected that. No, he's still playing well. Q. In that 4‑5 game, were you disappointed with anything aside from missing the first serves?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I made a couple errors. You know, you walk a fine line out there 'cause you can't get tempted into pressing against the guy because then he uses his speed and his ability to handle pace and uses it against you. You end up living on the edge and he ends up more comfortable as a result of it.

So you try to sort of resist playing too aggressive. But at the same time, you don't want to leave anything hanging, and there's just a couple swings I put on a couple balls there that hit the tape ‑ one backhand I missed, one forehand hit the tape ‑ and all of a sudden I'm down a few set points and he plays a great point and there you have it.Q. Andre, is there anything about your stage of maturity that makes you either more capable or less capable of (inaudible)?

ANDRE AGASSI: I don't know. I can't be objective about myself like that. I mean, for me, every day's a challenge; it really is. I've been asked for years how am I playing now versus before, and I don't know. I know that I have no excuses tonight, so you can assess it from there.Q. Once you get this put behind you, you look forward to the next Grand Slam. That's always a difficult thing, to decide, "Okay, how much preparation do I need without overplaying so that I go into Paris as fresh as possible."

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah. Q. What is your outlook on Paris right now?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, exactly that. I have to make some good decisions here and understand what the big picture holds for me and then sort of work backwards. I don't know what that is right now; I really don't. I was leaving a lot open to just when I finish the hard court season, and to sort of assess everything, see where I'm going to go from here. I'll need to put some good thought behind it, and hopefully make some good decisions.Q. Did you feel comfortable with the way you approached the French last year?

ANDRE AGASSI: No, no, it was a terrible call I made. I mean, I was beside myself. I'm not the kind of person that does well without matches. I can do well without practice; I can't do well without matches. I need to get relaxed out there and remind myself how hard I work to make it seem easy at times. It's not easy for me to remember that when I've been away for six weeks.Q. That difficult thing of being 34, knowing that you have to have your legs fresh...

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, my legs are treating me well right now. I don't have an issue with that. My back is better. My hip, as a result of the nerve that they found, it's better, I got it treated, and I'm able to lunge, I'm able to sprint to balls and recover and force myself to play to the standard. That's a good sign. So I'm not worried about my legs. Be more worried about, you know, what I need mentally right now just to feel prepared. Q. You said before that you replay, when it's such a close match and there's only a couple mistakes, you replay it in your mind, "If I only did this, that," how long will that go on? Will you lay in bed tonight and think about it, or will you be able to sleep fine?

ANDRE AGASSI: I'll tell you that tomorrow (smiling). Q. Are you the type who does, when you lay in bed after a match like this, do you think about it?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, it sort of depends, but those are personal sort of parameters that we probably shouldn't discuss. Q. Has it become more difficult to play today because of young players, the density of good players is bigger today than a few years ago? Like taking Nadal, an 18‑year‑old player who made the final.

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, I think the quality of tennis has improved. I think every sport does. I mean, every five years it seems to make enough of a difference that you notice it. You see the evolution of the athletes, getting bigger, stronger, more powerful, faster and explosive and hit the ball harder. I mean, you know, me at 18, looking at Nadal at 18, from the neck down you would think one person was 26 and another person was 12. It's true, but...

Everybody gets stronger, and it gets harder. But, you know, I don't know, you know. I get asked all the time about assessing everything from now versus 20 years ago, but I just, I just don't know. I know that it's harder for me. Q. Coming into this match, did you take a look at the tape of Safin defeating Federer at the Australian Open to pick up some tips, maybe see how he hit his backhand down the line to take Federer out of his comfort zone?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, no matter how much I watch that tape, I won't be able to wake up 6'5", serving 140 miles an hour, and crushing backhands that, you know, would be above my head up the line.

So the answer is no, I did not watch the tape. Q. Can you talk a little bit about the season that Roger has had. It's a pretty remarkable season. Of course he's No. 1 in the world. Is he playing that much better than everybody else out there, or is it on any given day he could possibly lose to No. 15 in the world?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I think both those statements are accurate. They're both true. I mean, he's playing levels above everybody else; he's proved that for a while now. I don't know how long, 46‑1 since the Open. It's crazy. Before then it was probably just as good of a record.

So he's playing levels above, but he has to show up every day and do it. And if he doesn't, he's going to have problems like everybody else.

But he does have more to fall back on, which is why his upside is so good. So it does help to have a number of weapons. I mean, if he doesn't like the way he's hitting his backhand, he serve‑volleys. If he doesn't like the way he's hitting his slice, he doesn't hit a slice. If he doesn't like topspin, he doesn't hit topspin. That's good options.

Q. Do you have a favorite for the final on Sunday?

ANDRE AGASSI: Let's see...

You know, I'm from Vegas so I don't mind taking some chances. I'm going to go on a limb and I'm going to say the person who's 46‑1, 47‑1 over the last six, seven months, is the favorite.

Q. In the ways that Roger can get out of a Love‑40 hold, like Pete did, seems like he's even got more tactical options than Pete ever did. I mean now you've had to play two of these geniuses.

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah.

Q. Do you almost feel that Roger gives you less options because he can make the kind of adjustments not even Pete could make?

ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I think the biggest distinction inside the lines that I feel playing Roger versus playing Pete is there were a lot of lapses with Pete. You could play a bad set and, you know, possibly get into a breaker with him. With Roger, there's just no relief, you know. In every department, you have to be concentrating and ready to go because he'll take advantage of you on any part of the court.

That's not to say that Pete's upside wasn't just as spectacular, because Pete's ‑‑ when Pete missed a first serve, I still thought to myself, "God, just get this thing in play so you have a chance." With Roger, he misses a first serve, I'm thinking, "Okay, here we go."

Q. It seems like Roger always wants to break. Pete wasn't necessarily breaking.

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, I think Roger has a better return than Pete. I think Pete volleys better. I think Roger moves better, is better from the baseline. But Pete's serve was probably better.

So, you know, you got ‑‑ I mean, I'm just assessing it inside the lines playing them. They pose different problems entirely, but Roger makes you do it from start to finish, and Pete made you do something incredibly special at a lot of given times.

Q. On a lighter note, you've made a lot of fashion statements in your time. What do you think of the clam‑diggers?

ANDRE AGASSI: What is that?

Q. The pants Nadal is wearing.

ANDRE AGASSI: The not‑pants, not‑shorts look (smiling)?

I like them on some people, I just won't say who.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

fightclubber
04-02-2005, 02:27 AM
AND HERE IS ROGER ONE

ROGER POST MATCH INTERVIEW
R. FEDERER/A. Agassi
6‑4, 6‑3
An interview with:
ROGER FEDERER
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.
Q. How did you think you played?
ROGER FEDERER: I'm extremely happy, of course. I played great off the baseline, great focus. You know, didn't only play against him, but against the fans tonight. They were really backing him up. I remember it was very similar to the year when I played the finals against him. Maybe not as extreme because this time he was losing and then he was winning, you know.
So it was a tough match tonight. I'm extremely happy with the level of play.
Q. Final point of the first set, a long rally, sets up has a choice between going up the line with a forehand or going crosscourt, he goes crosscourt and you're right there as if you knew exactly where the ball was going to be. How do you do that?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it was a long, long rally. Going up the line at the end of a point, you know, is always risky. Maybe I'm just kind of guessing ‑ guessing right, of course.
But I think if he would have hit it up the line, he would have had to hit it extremely hard to make a winner out of it. So the simple shot is to go crosscourt and, yeah, so I kind of was waiting there.
But I think, you know, to go on that long rally and to win it in the end was really good, and set the tone also for the second set.
Q. No matter how long the rally, your mind is still telling you, "Okay, you need to be here on this particular shot"?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, the longer the rally, you know, the more the pulse goes up and the slower you get, and the more sweat is involved and, you know, the afterburn of the point as well is in there, you know, and you know that. So there's many things going through your head. And then sometimes of course you want it to be over and done with, you know, so you take your chance.
But long rallies are always kind of interesting because it's like a boxing match, you know ‑ the tough one gets through.
Q. What is the emotion when you force the error off your return?
ROGER FEDERER: Off a long rally, yeah, it's great, it's great. Because I was always famous to win quick points, and people were saying, you know, "You just need to get the ball over three or four times and then he's going to lose his mind, go for a winner or an error."
Now you know that I'm coming through those tough rallies, also showing me that on the clay court it's really not a problem. I'm really looking forward to that challenge as well.
Q. You're getting better in this tournament. In my opinion, every game you played got better. Do you feel confident it won't be three in a row against Nadal, one single and one double you lost?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah, well, doubles you cannot really count, you know. That was last year in Indian Wells.
I'm looking forward to that match. It's going to be so different, you know, because he plays with much more spin than Andre, moves kind of different, of course, you know. He's a lefty, which totally changes everything. You have to get used to that.
I'm happy I got a day in between to, again, think about it. I'm used to these big occasions, so I hope that that's going to, of course, carry me through.
Also, again, once more, I'll play a great finals. But I know the tough opponent is waiting for me. He's got a great future. It's going to be a tough one.
Q. When you play with someone like Andre, his resume, his record, you get into a tight situation, do you feel there's an extra need to win that game or keep the genie in the bottle, or is it like playing someone else?
ROGER FEDERER: You feel like you're playing Andre, because he's one of the best returners in the game. You really want to make sure that you get that first serve in, you know. That's what I did, you know, on the big points today.
But you always feel like when you're let's say in a long game, on your own serve, you always feel like you have an advantage because you're serving; you should never forget about that. It's not you under pressure, it's him, because he already maybe missed a few chances. You always have the first serve, all you want to do is just don't double‑fault.
So you really have to stay very focused. And, of course, you know, when you got all those tough rallies and tough situations, you've got to stay calm. This is what I've been doing really well over the last few years now.
Q. Were you surprised that he went for such a big backhand on that Love‑40 moment?
ROGER FEDERER: No, it was the right shot to play. He missed it by just a little bit. He would have beaten me. After he missed that, then I hoped hopefully I'll get a couple good serves here, and back in the game and it's going to haunt him to have gone for so much. So maybe next time I play him, he will think twice, you know.
Q. You're not the sort of guy to dwell on defeats, but can you look back to what happened against Nadal here last year and say what happened then and what's going to happen Sunday?
ROGER FEDERER: What can I say? I was already struggling extremely hard, you know, in the first round against Davydenko here last year. It was the sunstroke I had from Indian Wells. I came through, and I think we should have played the one night and it got postponed, did it, I think because of rain.
I came back the following night, which actually gave me an extra day's rest, so I was happy about that. I actually felt pretty all right, you know, for the Nadal match, but maybe now I felt my legs weren't moving as they maybe usually do.
But, again, he played a terrific match and I never really got into the match. I think I never had a breakpoint. So that really shows you how tough he was playing on that night. I really had the feeling it was tough for me to hit winners against him because he moves so well. Against a lefty, maybe, you know, the adjustments were tough.
I hope that, of course, on Sunday it's going to be different for me. Because I got the matches, you know, under my belt now, I really like this court, you know, I don't mind slow hard courts, I give myself a much better chance than last year.
Q. One of the underrated things about Roger Federer is you played something like 49 matches since the US Open without any serious injury, going deep into the draw week after week. What is the key? How do you manage to stay almost virtually injury‑free all this time?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, to be honest, you know, I had a problem with my ‑ what was it? ‑ my thigh, you know, my leg, quadriceps after Madrid. I didn't play Madrid because I was exhausted from the trips I made. I came back to Europe, started preparing, and just before my hometown tournament in Basel, I felt my leg wasn't right. I went to do an MRI the day I was supposed to play, and I just realized I could play, you know, the match, but I couldn't win the tournament, so I decided not to play. Of course, you know, if I play there, you know, of course I'm going to lose a match, but I decided not to play.
Paris was impossible as well. So I was actually in the end hoping that I could play the Masters, and it actually worked.
So, you know, you got to, of course, now in my situation also, decide when you can play and when you cannot play. But once I step out on court, you know, I won't give up any matches. You're not going to see any walkovers from my side. Once I'm out there, I'm there 100%. That's what I've been doing, and since I'm No. 1 in the world, I figured that out.
Q. You've had an incredible season so far with your record. You're No. 1 in the world. You're in another finals. I don't know if there's a way for you to quantify this, but are you the most confident that you've ever been in your career right now?
ROGER FEDERER: I've felt better. I've felt better, to be honest. I'm playing great, you know. But, again, you know, I've had times where I felt fantastic maybe, probably even better. But today is very good as well. Had a great end to the season, start to the season now, and I'm back into a final after winning Indian Wells last week. I definitely feel great and I'm looking forward to this match.
Q. When did you feel more confident?
ROGER FEDERER: I don't remember, but I've had good times before (smiling).
Q. Wimbledon?
ROGER FEDERER: Maybe Wimbledon, yeah.
Q. Do you see Agassi playing for much longer, because he's 35 now and he's still playing some great tennis. Do you see him playing on for a couple more years at least?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, a couple more years, it's tough to say. Because he doesn't play every, let's say, every second week. He makes very wise and good choices, I would say, for his age. I think that this is the reason why we are going to see him more longer. If he would play a full schedule with 20 tournaments, then he would burn out and say, What am I doing, you know.
But he's got family and he's got all he wants in his life. All he wants to do is just play a little more longer. So I think it's great he's still playing. As long as he can challenge the best and needs the best players in the world to beat him, I think especially then, he's going to keep playing.
Q. Looking ahead to the next Grand Slam, at Roland Garros you've won three Grand Slams thus far, how important is it to you to win that fourth Grand Slam in terms of your entire career and making a mark?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I felt like I made my mark last year. So of course three out of four last year was great. Now of course everybody says, Well, what more can he do, all he needs now is the French and then he's fine.
Wimbledon will always stay more special for me, no matter how badly I want to win the French. If I can win Wimbledon, I'm a more happy person. I know if I could win the French and kind of make it a whole, you know, to win the four, that would be fantastic; I know that.
But I have Tony in my corner this year, so I'm looking forward to that challenge, to attack the clay court season with him in my corner. He's going to come to the French Open, so I'm really looking forward to that. I know I can play well on clay, so there's no question about that.
Q. As aggressive as you are, with Rafael, who just refuses to miss a ball, are you going to have to be even more aggressive than you've been in this tournament?
ROGER FEDERER: I think the way I'm playing right now is okay, you know. Of course I have to think about it because, like I said, it's going to be very different. He's one of the guys on tour with the most spins on his forehands; it's crazy, you know. So it's going to be tough to control. I have to adjust to that and think about how I want to play him. So right now I can't really tell you.
Q. Have you been working, on the off days, a little bit more on your serve?
ROGER FEDERER: Haven't. I wish I had more time to work on my game, but...
Q. In preparation for Roland Garros, will you play first Monte‑Carlo, Hamburg, Rome, all of them?
ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I will. That's the plan. If I'm not playing one or the other, it's a bad sign (smiling).
Q. Against Zabaleta and against Ancic, you had some difficulty; you made some unforced errors. Today you played much better. How much better do you think you have to play in the final to win it?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think if I play the level of today, there's a great chance, obviously. Because I really had the feeling this was, I mean, near to as good as I can play tonight. Because from the baseline I was hanging tough with him, I was serving well under pressure. So there's not much more I can do really.
Like I said, it's going to be a totally different match. We'll see totally different points against Nadal than against Andre tonight. Already this will change.
But the way I'm playing right now, of course, you know, leaves me very confident. I'm really looking ahead to that final.
Q. When you get down Love‑40, you consciously get a little bit more risky on your serve, hoping to grab a free point and come back?
ROGER FEDERER: If I take chances?
Q. Yes.
ROGER FEDERER: I took chances against Ancic, I double‑faulted on breakpoint, you know. So sometimes it also happens to me, you know.
Of course I hope for a good serve, and I just maybe focus an extra bit to really get that first serve in and to get off a good start to the point. Like I served at 15‑40, you know, the two aces; that was exactly what I needed. Probably going to need the same performance against Nadal.
Q. Do you rate the match you played against Agassi tonight as the one of the best you played this year?
ROGER FEDERER: I mean, it's definitely up there. I can't recall all the matches I played, I already played so many. This was definitely one of the best of this year, I think.
Q. You took pains to mention, when you began speaking tonight, about how you had to play against the audience out there. How does the audience affect you psychologically?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it doesn't really affect you, you just feel like they're so much behind Agassi or behind their man, which they are supposed to be. Every close call gets commentated by them, and they're not happy if it goes against him. All this, the tougher the situation for you, they get into it more and more. So that makes it tough.
Q. Does it motivate you?
ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I'm motivated anyway when I'm playing Andre in front of no crowd or hundreds of thousands. The motivation is there.
I had a great time out there, you know. I wish they were all on my side, but we're in America against Agassi so I can't expect that (smiling).
But looking forward for also great crowds coming on Sunday.
Q. Do you have a relationship with Andre?
ROGER FEDERER: What kind of relationship (smiling)? He's got family. He's gone (laughing).
No, we joke around sometimes and talk, you know. Like I don't think you could do stuff like on the helipad in Dubai if you don't get along well off the court; otherwise, I would just refuse to do it if I will have to do it with a player I don't like.
Andre is a good guy. I really respect him over the years now, so... I enjoy playing against him, with him maybe in practice, even though we never do. I like to talk to him in the locker room, so it's okay.
FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

TenHound
04-02-2005, 07:47 AM
From the Miami Herald:
"Federer now turns his championship sights on Rafael Nadal, which is something akin to a shark focusing in on a guppy.


Nadal is 18, which means he is the youngest man to reach the final on Crandon Park. It also means he was still in diapers when Agassi won his first professional title in 1987.


So what chance does this baby have vs. Federer when the veteran Agassi wilted?


Well, none.


Not now.


You see, just as Agassi has a great history, Nadal has potential for a great future.


ROGER THAT


But Federer remains the man of the hour. Now belongs to him while the other two must look to other times.


Nadal actually won a match against Federer last year, but blind squirrels occasionally find nuts, too.


''He was a different player then,'' Nadal said. ``He's playing much better now.''


And that's why Nadal speaks about his upcoming match against Federer, in part, like someone who sets low personal standards, then fails to achieve them.


''I hope he doesn't play one of his best matches, and if I play very, very well, I think I have a little bit of a chance,'' Nadal said. ``If he plays very good and I play very good, see ya.''


Nadal said he planned to hit a few balls today, relax around his hotel and get a good meal before Sunday's five-set final.


The way Roger Federer is playing, that meal tonight will be something of a last supper."

babsi
04-02-2005, 07:55 AM
Thanks for the interview,Silvy :)
Thanks for the article,TenHound :) - I think they are right at the Miami Herald :)



__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

RonE
04-02-2005, 10:45 AM
"A shark focusing in on a guppy" :haha:

I just hope whoever wrote that article will not be made to eat his/her words :tape:

Skyward
04-02-2005, 12:56 PM
GOOD THING TO READ, ANDRE PRESS CONFERENCE.

LOVE THE PART HE IS FROM VEGAS ANS HO HE BETS TO WIN!




That's not to say that Pete's upside wasn't just as spectacular, because Pete's ‑‑ when Pete missed a first serve, I still thought to myself, "God, just get this thing in play so you have a chance." With Roger, he misses a first serve, I'm thinking, "Okay, here we go."



FastScripts by ASAP Sports...


Thanks for the interview. I understand what Agassi is talking about. But Roger did very well with second serves yesterday- he won 67% of them.

SUKTUEN
04-02-2005, 02:50 PM
:worship: Thankyou for the articles~~

Roger become more and more Great and important in Tennis :worship:

Daniel
04-02-2005, 11:52 PM
Thanks for the articles :)

lunahielo
04-03-2005, 12:59 AM
Thanks... :)

casillas_girl
04-03-2005, 09:46 AM
Someone probably already post it, but this is really a great webite of Roger with a lot of pictures!!!!

http://federer.unixserverhosting.com/

lsy
04-03-2005, 01:27 PM
Q. Looking ahead to the next Grand Slam, at Roland Garros you've won three Grand Slams thus far, how important is it to you to win that fourth Grand Slam in terms of your entire career and making a mark?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I felt like I made my mark last year. So of course three out of four last year was great. Now of course everybody says, Well, what more can he do, all he needs now is the French and then he's fine.
Wimbledon will always stay more special for me, no matter how badly I want to win the French. If I can win Wimbledon, I'm a more happy person. I know if I could win the French and kind of make it a whole, you know, to win the four, that would be fantastic; I know that.
But I have Tony in my corner this year, so I'm looking forward to that challenge, to attack the clay court season with him in my corner. He's going to come to the French Open, so I'm really looking forward to that. I know I can play well on clay, so there's no question about that.

Is it me or has Rogi been talking about Tony just about everytime when he's asked about FO lately? Guess no matter how much he's comfortable without having a coach with him all the time, he's still drawing lots of comfort having someone experienced beside him for advice, especially in that one big tournament he hasn't got to win.

I really hope that's going to make a different for Rogi this year.


Q. Do you have a relationship with Andre?
ROGER FEDERER: What kind of relationship (smiling)? He's got family. He's gone (laughing).
No, we joke around sometimes and talk, you know. Like I don't think you could do stuff like on the helipad in Dubai if you don't get along well off the court; otherwise, I would just refuse to do it if I will have to do it with a player I don't like.
Andre is a good guy. I really respect him over the years now, so... I enjoy playing against him, with him maybe in practice, even though we never do. I like to talk to him in the locker room, so it's okay.
FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

:haha: Crazy Rogi :cuckoo:

SUKTUEN
04-03-2005, 03:20 PM
Yes~~ Roger is funny~~ :devil:

I think Andy Roddick will happy ~ :cool:

If he hear Roger want to has this Kind of "relationship " with him~~~ :haha:

crimson
04-03-2005, 05:14 PM
Article from http://www.nasdaq-100open.com/news/pr/news21673.html

Federer vs. Nadal - The Rematch

Look at the two men's finalists for the NASDAQ-100 Open and you can't help but believe that tennis is in a very healthy state as far as the players are concerned. There is an incredible product out there and to prove that point this wonderful tournament, with its superb location has more than attracted record numbers of fans this year.

There has been a buzz in the air and an element of excitement with the action that has been seen on the courts of the Crandon Park Tennis Center.

Now the world's best tennis player by a country mile and a true gentleman in every sense of the word, Roger Federer, takes on one of the most enthralling prospects the sport has and himself a future world number one, 18-year-old Rafael Nadal. A flamboyant character with a sort of swashbuckling style of tennis this is accentuated by his on-court attire.

This is their second career meeting. The last one was in the third round of the 2004 NASDAQ-100 Open and Nadal won that 6-3, 6-3. Federer had been suffering a bout of heatstroke in the days leading up to that match. Nadal acknowledges the Swiss was not at his best on that occasion.

"I think every match is different (but now) I have another year. I have

18," said Nadal, laughing and feeling a bit innocently embarrassed as he tries to speak English, which he is doing very well at. "I really think I play one of my best matches. I think I improve in my shots and my serve.

"But the last year against Federer, I play one of my best matches in my career. I play unbelievable, and I really hope I play the same match this year, but also with improvements.

"Federer won all matches. I hope Federer doesn't play one of his best matches. And if he doesn't play very, very well, and I play one of my best matches, I think I have a little bit of a chance. And if he plays very good, and I play very good, he wins."

The world No. 1 is looking forward to playing Nadal again. Last year's loss is not expected to be a factor. It's in the past and there were circumstances for the result. Federer says it will be very different than the matches he has played up to now and in particular the match against Andre Agassi, whom be defeated 6-4, 6-3 in the semifinals.

Nadal plays with more spins, he moves differently and most of all he is a lefty, which changes everything. It makes it handy for Federer having a lefty for a coach in Tony Roche, one of Australia's great players and another true gentleman.

Federer is happy to have had a day between the semifinal and the final to think about what he will do, but if anyone is used to these big occasions, it is Federer. After all, he has won 17 consecutive finals going back to October 2003. Just think about that, Roger Federer has not been beaten in a final for 18 months. That is an Open-era record and that sort of experience can't be bought.

"I hope that will carry me through and once more, I'll play a great final," said Federer. "But I know a tough opponent is waiting for me. He's got a great future. It's going to be a tough one.

"He played a terrific match last year and I never got into the match. I think I never had a break point. So that really shows you how tough he was playing on that night. I really had the feeling it was tough for me to hit winners against him because he moves so well.

"I hope that, of course, on Sunday it's going to be different for me.

Because I got the matches under my belt now, I really like this court, I don't mind slow hard courts, I give myself a much better chance than last year."

Both players obviously have the form going. Federer is on a 21-match win streak with four titles while Nadal, the third Spaniard (Sergi Bruguera 1997 and Carlos Moya 2003) to reach the NASDAQ-100 Open final, dumped his countryman David Ferrer in the semis 6-4, 6-3, is on a 15-match win streak with two titles.

"I played very good in South America. Winning the last tournament was important for my confidence," said Nadal. "Here, I began the tournament a little nervous against (Rainer) Schuettler. The second match is not easy against (Fernando) Verdasco. He played very well the first match against (Andy) Roddick. I only try to play my best tennis and fight every match.

"I am very happy with my tennis because I improve every day. Today wasn’t my best match, but against (Ivan) Ljubicic and (Thomas) Johansson, especially, I played very, very well."

The winner's check is worth $533,350. Federer is attempting to become the first top seed since the great Pete Sampras in 1994 to win here while Nadal, exactly two months shy of his 19th birthday, would be the youngest titlist and only the third lefty to win.

From the start of last year's US Open Federer has lost just one match, the Australian Open semifinals to Marat Safin - he is 47-1 since 30 August. If Federer does win the best of five set final he will be only the sixth man to have won the "American Double" - Indian Wells and Miami - the last to do it was Agassi in 2001.

"I'm playing great but I've had times where I felt fantastic maybe, probably even better," said Federer. "Had a great end to the season, start to the season now, and I'm back into a final after winning Indian Wells last week. I definitely feel great and I'm looking forward to this match."

But let's give the last word to Andre Agassi when he was asked in his post-match media conference after losing to Federer if he had a favorite for the final: "Let's see. I'm from Vegas so I don't mind taking some chances. I'm going to go on a limb and I'm going to say the person who's 47-1 over the last seven months is the favorite."

SUKTUEN
04-03-2005, 05:19 PM
I am nervious~~ :eek:

sla
04-03-2005, 10:11 PM
R. FEDERER/R. Nadal
2‑6, 6‑7, 7‑6, 6‑3, 6‑1
An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Roger came back from a two‑set‑to‑love deficit for the third time in his career. This is his sixth career ATP Masters Series title, and his fifth ATP title of the year.

Questions for Roger.

Q. You're two sets to love down, 1‑4 down in the third set, how are you feeling at that moment? What's going through your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm hoping it's not going to be over in two games. That's really how I felt, because I had the feeling, you know, I was really missing my opportunities to actually get back in the match, especially in the second set.

In the third, you know, it's tough being down two sets to love. You know he is confident, has got nothing more to lose anyway already before the match.

I really was hoping just to, you know, stay with him, at least maybe just one break between us. But then I got back, you know, played a few really good games. I pushed him to the tiebreaker.

This is when I was in trouble again. You know, that I came through that set, I think, was crucial in the end, of course.

Q. Another state‑of‑mind question for you. The final point, after all the misery you had gone through in this match, the unforced errors, blown volleys, the crazy overhead off the frame of your racquet, there you were at 15‑40, a chance to put the match away, had you cleared all that stuff out of your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: By then, of course, yeah. By then I'm the most happiest person because I know I'm in the situation that I want to be in. You know, it's one thing to come back from two sets to love and then start the fifth and then in the end losing, you know.

So I'm really happy that I came back, because, you know, like you said, I've hardly ever done it in my career. This is a big moment in my career. Especially in the finals against a player of this caliber, you know, to really come back, this is not the normal thing I'm doing usually.

Q. Early on you were obviously having some problems with your feet. You took off the strapping. Would you tell us a little bit about that.

ROGER FEDERER: No, that is just a regular foot protection I have for each and every match. So this is nothing extraordinary.

Q. Too tight?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it was just, you know, because I sweat so much in the feet maybe, I just wanted to take it off because it was moving. I didn't want it to move in the wrong place and then I have a problem maybe after the match.

I just wanted it off. Of course the feet burn out in the hard court against Nadal. But I wasn't playing with pain like at the Australian Open, so that's good.

Q. We don't often see you throwing your racquet. I understand in your junior days you were better at that. What was going through your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was so happy. I was really so happy because... no other reason (smiling).

Oh, you mean..? The other way around (laughing).

I was happy it looked good on TV, you know, the first throw. The second throw, I was really angry, you know, so I threw it out (laughing).

My God, where are we going here (smiling)?

No, I was very disappointed, you know. I was missing one opportunity after the other. I really felt like I'm climbing uphill all the time, and I had an opportunity and I missed it again and just had enough, you know.

So I threw it hard and, I don't know, maybe ‑ who knows ‑ it did me good and I kind of woke up maybe. Who knows?

But, yeah...

Q. Was it broken?

ROGER FEDERER: I checked. No, it wasn't broken. But the strings were used, so that was why I changed racquets. Not because of the frame, really.

Q. At that time did you have a doubt that you could win the match?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I was very worried today. Especially the first set, I don't lose sets very often 6‑2, you know, so this really shows you that I was struggling.

But I think it's got a lot to do with his game, you know. He's left‑handed, I had to get used to, and couldn't quite do that. Maybe played a little bit too aggressive in the beginning, you know. So until I maybe got to actually understand how to play him, I was down a set and a break.

Then the reaction was good, you know, but in that set I missed so many opportunities to actually level it, you know, at one set all.

But, you know, to come through in the end is unbelievable, so I'm very, very happy.

Q. What was the thing about his game that impressed you the most and gave you the most trouble?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's an outstanding athlete, you know. Of course he moves totally different to most of the players, you know. Of course he's fast, you know. But because he's a lefty, you know, it kind of changes so many things, you know. His forehand is huge, you know. Even on the run, you know, can hit it with the spins, you know, backhand to the court, make you hit another tough shot, you know ‑ anyway for me.

His backhand, hits very close to his body, but he still kind of gets it back well, you know, and hard when he's under pressure. So I mean, that's the thing that he does well. Especially he's a good defense player as well, you know, not only does he have a great forehand.

We'll see, of course, very much from him in the future. So for me this was a big match because I know what a great player he will be one day.

Q. Do you think you did anything different this year than last year when you lost to him on the same court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it didn't look like it in the beginning (smiling).

But then I started to actually maybe understand little bit how to play him and it kind of relaxed me that I could break him back twice in a row. And I think that gave me belief that I could actually turn this match around because, like I said, I don't lose sets very often 6‑2.

But I had a similar feeling out there in the first set, like last year. So maybe it was, being best‑of‑five, gave me a little bit more time to get used to his game.

Q. Were you surprised at how well he played in the first game?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I wasn't surprised, you know. I know how good a player he is. Of course, you know, every match I go into, I'm this huge favorite, you know. When I lose sets, it's like crazy, you know.

So I knew the danger of Nadal today. Yeah, that was till the very end.

Q. From a distance it looks like there's a curious spin to the ball. How does it look on the court? Is it different?

ROGER FEDERER: It bounces very high, you know. He doesn't play it very long, but short so it bounces high. Until you actually realize that you can actually attack the ball, it's too late and it gets up high on you. From then on, it's actually a very risky shot to go for something.

But I really had the feeling my forehand started to work extremely well, once I got back into the match. Yeah, it's just the whole game changes, you know.

We don't have many great lefties in the game right now, so it's good we have one again.

Q. When do you think the smoke went out of his strokes?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, middle through the second, you know, I already had the feeling he wasn't hitting the ball as hard anymore.

But anyway he ended up winning it. Couple of points, you know, he can put unbelievable pace on the ball.

Of course, you know, in the fifth set I started to feel like, you know, maybe his legs were getting a little bit tired and he couldn't quite use the game like he wanted to. But you always have to watch out with him because he can hit winners off every forehand.

Q. Was his lack of experience playing best out of five, Nadal's nonexperience, you had an advantage because you had played so many?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, my record, I think, in best‑of‑five matches is, in the fifth set, is not the best. I wasn't worried or concerned, but I was just really hoping that I would maybe get it this time, you know. This is why I fought so hard today.

But if it's experience, it's tough to say, you know. This will give him an unbelievable experience, so he'll draw definitely something positive out of this match today.

Q. Did you speak to Tony before the match about playing a lefty?

ROGER FEDERER: I did speak to him, yes.

Q. What did he say?

ROGER FEDERER: Ah, you would like to know that (laughing).

No, he told me a couple of things, you know, because I didn't see him play much, you know, the last few ‑ ever almost. Because he was injured and he plays different tournaments sometimes.

He saw the match against Roddick in Davis Cup where I didn't get to see anything, so I just asked him if he knew anything about him. He just told me what he knew, so...

It worked great in the first two sets (laughing). No, no...

Q. Is there a special satisfaction having to win this final the way you did, and also the fact that you beat Agassi in the semi to come into this?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, and Henman before, as well. I actually didn't think about that right now. But, yeah, I'm very happy and extremely proud, you know, to beat all these guys back‑to‑back, because they're one of the most dangerous players out there right now. That I could actually beat Henman and Agassi the way I did, playing really great, and coming back from two sets to love, this is one of the tournaments I'll remember probably most throughout my career.

Q. In preparation for the only Slam you haven't won, is there a special training regimen because the French Open relies so much more on endurance?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, the points are just maybe little longer than on other surfaces. So exactly like you say, you know, it's more endurance. I'll definitely work, you know, my physical part as well, you know, again.

But there's only so much you can do before, before the French. You always have to watch out, as a tennis player, I think, to have everything. My potential relies also very much on my explosiveness; I've got to use that on clay as well.

But I know I got the game, and I know I can hang tough now for five sets without a problem, where in the past maybe that wasn't always the case.

So I'm looking forward to the challenge. It's very clear. But to be honest, I haven't thought too much about the clay yet, you know. So we'll see what happens.

But we'll have tough players waiting there as well so...

Q. You said you realized at a certain point how you should change your game to play against him. What exactly did you change during the match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I just relaxed more off the baseline, you know, because I had the feeling I was under so much pressure every ball he played, and I kind of muscled it over all the time. I just started to relax, took a freer swing at it. It started to work. I was like, "What the hell was I doing in the beginning, you know, trying to force the issue too much?"

Yeah, so somehow the points turned out differently, and I started to actually serve better as well maybe, especially from the third on, because the sun was really in my eye for quite some time, you know. So that was important, too, of course, to serve well ‑ especially in the end, I served great so...

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

SUKTUEN
04-04-2005, 10:18 AM
thanks the interview~!!!! :wavey:

crimson
04-04-2005, 03:32 PM
From the Miami website: http://www.nasdaq-100open.com/news/pr/news21689.html

Federer in Five - Roger Wins the Championship

Only once in the 20 previous finals played at the NASDAQ-100 Open had there been a five set final. It was the very first one in 1985. Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal played the second and like that first one the eventual champion came back from two sets to love down.

On Sunday, Roger Federer became the 2005 champion of the NASDAQ-100 Open. The Swiss great won his 18th consecutive final and has claimed his fifth title of the year which includes the "American Double", Indian Wells and Miami, just as Kim Clijsters did the day before with the women.

The scene could not have been any more appropriate for the main event. Not a cloud in the sky, bright sunshine with mild temperatures. A full house was on hand to watch the world's best tennis player, Federer, do battle with one of the most exciting teenagers in the sport today, Nadal who is exactly two months short of his 19 birthday. He is a player destined for Grand Slam glory and the world number one ranking himself and that was certainly made more than evident in the final.

"It was extremely close and I consider myself lucky to get through," said Federer. "All my praises go to him. He is a great guy and a great player." Federer came back from two sets to love down and 1-4 in the third set to score a stunning victory, 2-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3, 6-1 in three hours, 42 minutes. Federer truly epitomized that saying - "when the going gets tough, the tough get going".

"I was very worried today," said the world number one. "Especially the first set, I don't lose sets very often 6-2 so this really shows you that I was struggling. But I think it's got a lot to do with his game. He's left handed, I had to get used to, and couldn't quite do that. Maybe played a little bit too aggressive in the beginning.


"So until I maybe got to actually understand how to play him, I was down a set and a break. Then the reaction was good, you know, but in that set I missed so many opportunities to actually level it,, at one set all. But, you know, to come through in the end is unbelievable, so I'm very, very happy."

The Spaniard went on the attack from the outset. He was being aggressive with everything he played and was putting the pressure on Federer who was coming in on pretty much every point. Nadal broke Federer in the first game when the Swiss sent a backhand long. The Spaniard had Federer facing another two break points in the fifth game before those were saved.

In the seventh game the pressure was on the top seed again and he served two double faults, the second one on break point to give Nadal a stranglehold on the set which he served out.

The situation started to look concerning when Nadal broke Federer in the first game of the second set, but Federer rallied back to level the set when he sent a glorious forehand down the line for a winner, clipping the back of the baseline as it skidded away from Nadal. Federer created a 5-3 lead and was playing shots that were expected from him.

But that changed quickly as he slipped back into uncharacteristically missing returns that he would normally strike with his eyes closed. He could however be excused on one smash that he "aired" as the ball lined up exactly with the sun and Federer was momentarily blinded.

Federer then lost his serve in the ninth game as the Spaniard kept pressing and with a break point on his racquet, he pushed Federer into sending a forehand long down the line. In the next game the Swiss did manage to reach two set points on Nadal's serve but again some rudimentary shots from Federer were messed up by the net.

They eventually went to a tiebreak and Nadal was awesome as drilled the ball from side to side. The spring in his step had become a bounce as he lead two sets to love by winning the breaker 7-4.

It was sensational stuff from Nadal. Everything was running with him. Even when Nadal just stuck his racquet out to reach the ball it was rebounding as a winner. He was outplaying Federer which hasn't really been done since Gustavo Kuerten beat him in the fourth round of last year's French Open.

Federer couldn't take a trick and at times he was shaking his head. He was getting a taste of what he normally hands out to his opponents.

In the third Federer lost his serve in the fourth game when Nadal cracked a forehand cross court winner to break and then lead 4-1 but the Swiss brought it back on serve in the seventh game when Nadal netted a forehand as Federer pumped his fist and then served an ace to hold and make it 4-4.

In the ninth game Nadal faced a break point but he produced a second service ace to save it and when Federer shanked what should have been a straightforward overhead his fury and frustration took over as he slammed his racquet into the court.

Once again the set went to a tiebreak. Nadal was now two points away from the biggest win of his career. He had 5-3 but Federer got the mini-break back when Nadal sent a backhand into the net and eventually Federer clawed back making no mistake on his first set point as he forced the Spaniard into sending a backhand long. Federer punched the air. He was still alive in the final.

"My record, I think, in best of five matches is, in the fifth set, is not the best," said Federer, "(but) I wasn't worried or concerned, I was just really hoping that I would maybe get it this time, you know. This is why I fought so hard today.

"But if it's experience, it's tough to say, you know. This will give him an unbelievable experience, so he'll draw definitely something positive out of this match today."

The momentum Federer gained by winning the set saw him through the fourth. He broke in the fourth game when Nadal netted a backhand and eventually levelled the final with forehand volley at shoulder height. In the fifth set it was obvious that Nadal was running out of gas. He had played a fantastic match but the genius of Federer had scratched is way back and his confidence was on the ascendancy. Federer broke in the third, fifth and seventh games to claim his crown, the final point being a netted forehand by Nadal.

"I lost little bit power in the fourth and five" said Nadal. "But in the third I felt good. I was playing good tennis and I was confident I could win the match. But he played good at the important moments, but I feel good. I think I played a good match. But in the fifth set when he broke my serve, I lost."

So Federer continues to rewite the record books and tucks away into the memory bank his first title at the NASDAQ-100 Open.

"I'm very happy and extremely proud, you know, to beat all these guys back to back, because they're one of the most dangerous players out there right now," said the new Champion. "That I could actually beat Henman and Agassi the way I did, playing really great, and coming back from two sets to love, this is one of the tournaments I'll remember probably most throughout my career."

Stevens Point
04-04-2005, 04:17 PM
It may be interesting for us to read. This is what Nadal had to say of the match on Sunday...

R. FEDERER/R. Nadal
2‑6, 6‑7, 7‑6, 6‑3, 6‑1

An interview with:

RAFAEL NADAL

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. I'm sure you're unhappy that you lost this, being so close to winning it. Are you still happy with the tournament, how it went from today?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, I am happy for my tennis. I am improving. I am playing good.

But today I won two sets to Love, 4‑1 in the third, 4‑3, Love‑30, and the ball, the forehand of Federer, is out, should. The referee say good.

But 5‑3 in the tiebreak, he play one forehand on the line. But he is the No. 1, no? He won this matches and I am happy with my tennis and not too happy for the result final, no?

Q. After you were unable to win the third set, his momentum began to build and you seemed to lose a little power off your ground strokes that you had in the first two sets. Did you have a sense that it was slipping away from you in the fourth set?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yeah, I lost little bit power in the fourth and five, I think. But in the third I have a good sensation, no, good feelings. I was playing good tennis and I am with confidence for win the match, no?

But he play good the important moments, and I feel good. I think I play good match all time. But in the fifth set when he break me, the serve, I lost.

Q. Were you tired?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He said at 4‑3, he was still fighting.

Q. In the third set, when Federer throws his racquet, what was your reaction? Is that a point where you think "I've got him now"? How did you react when you saw he was so upset and frustrated?

RAFAEL NADAL: He broke the racquet I think in the 5‑4, no, in the 5‑4 in the third. So I...

(Through translation). He says that there was a ball that they called in and that he was told it was, even on TV, that they saw it called out. It became 0‑40, and he had to serve.

Q. My question was about your reaction to Federer throwing his racquet.

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He's played with a lot of players that throw their racquets. Of course it's surprising to see Federer throw his racquet, but it makes you think you're closer to victory because he's frustrated and throwing his racquet.

Q. What does that say about Federer, that even with 73 errors he's able to come back and win?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) Federer is a player who makes mistakes, and that's not his strength. His strength is the way he can surprise you, and that usually in those important moments he doesn't make mistakes.

Q. Rafael, except for a brief period in the second set when Federer began to hit the ball very, very well, he was having a very difficult time handling the extreme spin that you put on the ball. Near the end of the second set did you feel very confident that, "I can win this match. He's not handling my ground strokes"?

RAFAEL NADAL: No, I don't think I can won for the spin, no, I think I can won because I won two sets to Love and I am playing good, I have good feelings. I only think about the next points, no. I hope break the next game and think about the next set, no.

(Through translation) He says that he played a very close game and he could have had it, and it wasn't because of the topspin that he could have won the game. It was because he was playing at his level and Federer had more pressure than he did.

Q. In the fifth set, was it experience that gave Federer the edge, or were you tired?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) In the fifth set, once you get to that point, it's not really about experience. Federer hasn't lost in a very long time, and at that point he doesn't think...

Q. After the break of serve.

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) Yeah, after the break.

Q. What are your plans for the future?

RAFAEL NADAL: I gonna play Valencia now. I play against Ferrero first round (smiling). Good draw (laughing)?

I play Valencia, is the first tournament for prepare Monte‑Carlo. Monte‑Carlo, Barcelona, I stop one week, and I play the next two Masters Series in Rome, Hamburg. I stop one week for play the French Open if I don't have injury for the first time.

Q. You came very close. I know it's disappointing. But this match was watched in 200 countries around the world. Were you having a good time out there, the way you were playing?

RAFAEL NADAL: Yes.

(Through translation) Any time he plays well and then he plays matches like these, he has fun. But as soon as you lose the last point, the fun stops.

Q. Before the tournament started I sat on Stadium Court and watched you practice for an hour with your good friend Feliciano Lopez. You seemed to struggle with that practice session. Did you ever in your wildest imagination think about the fact that you might get to the final and be within two points of taking the title?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He said he had been playing on clay before coming here and he had just gotten here. Of course at that point you're not thinking about the final unless, you know, you're playing against a Federer or Safin. In the first round, and he played Schuettler.

Q. Is he surprised that he made it to the final?

RAFAEL NADAL: Is my first final of Masters Series, no? I am little bit surprised. But I am playing good and I only hope not the last, no.

Q. It certainly looked like at the end you ran out of energy. Were you more tired physically or more tired emotionally at the end of the match?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He says it was a little bit of both. When you get to that point and you're playing against the best player in the world, he thinks he was prepared mentally, but at that point when you're playing against the best player in the world it's tough mentally as well.

Q. There's still seven weeks before you play your first French Open. Are you prepared to think that you are one of the favorites in that tournament, even though it could be your first try?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He says he's never played the French Open. He has a lot of other tournaments before then that he's concentrating on, three Masters Series tournaments that are just as important in his points for his ranking that he needs to concentrate on and is very intent on doing well in.

Q. What do you feel you did well today and what mistakes did you make?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) He says he thinks he did a lot well. One of the biggest improvements was his serve.

He says that if he can improve his serve and get points off his serve, that's one of the things he needs to improve on. And the control of his shots, control more the direction of his shots as well is something he needs to improve on, the placement of his shots.

Q. At what point did you realize that you weren't going to be able to win this match?

RAFAEL NADAL: (Through translation) In the fifth set, when I was losing 4‑1, that's when I lost hope, in the second break.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

babsi
04-04-2005, 04:59 PM
Thank you,sla,crimson and Stevens Piont :) :) :)



__________________________________________________ _____
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

RonE
04-04-2005, 11:41 PM
I don't know if this has been posted yet but I think it brings a few interesting points with it. Enjoy.
================================================== =========
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2005/04/03/stagas03.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/04/03/ixtenn.html

Agassi picks nemesis Federer over Sampras
By Clive White
(Filed: 03/04/2005)



Comparing a champion of one era to a champion of another is an invidious task at the best of times, unless the one doing the comparing has first-hand knowledge of both and is able to articulate that knowledge. That's why Andre Agassi's views on the merits of Pete Sampras and Roger Federer deserve respect.

The career of Grand Slam tennis's elder statesman has straddled that of both players, and when he left the stadium court here at Crandon Park on Friday night after losing to Federer in the semi-finals of the Nasdaq-100 Open he will have recognised the frustration that consumed him.

He had played as good a game of tennis as any man had a right to expect, never mind one with a body almost 35 years old - and it hadn't been enough.

Nowhere near enough. And it was invariably similar whenever he played Sampras.

The game is fast running out of credible challengers to the peerless Swiss, whose victory by 6-4, 6-3 took his record to 47 wins and one defeat since the start of the US Open last August.

On a good day and - this is the blue moon bit - in the right mood, Marat Safin might beat him again. Otherwise, Agassi, in a tournament he has won six times, with a court and conditions he relishes and before a crowd who worship him, was reckoned to have as good a chance as any. But it was all immaterial once Federer had got into his elegant stride and Agassi, for the first time in a career spanning 1097 matches, duly suffered his seventh consecutive defeat to the same player.

Agassi's one and only chance of stopping the rot came in the seventh game of the second set when he had five break points, including a triple one, but Federer just dug a little deeper and extricated himself, as he has done throughout this tournament.

Britain's Tim Henman, whom Federer beat in the quarter-finals, could empathise with Agassi. The American may have played a more cagey game than Henman, but the result was the same.

And according to Agassi, the great Sampras might not have fared any better. After all, he lost to the emerging Federer in their only meeting at Wimbledon in 2001.

"The biggest distinction inside the lines that I feel playing Roger, versus playing Pete, is there were a lot of lapses with Pete," said Agassi. "You could play a bad set and possibly get into a breaker with him. With Roger, there's just no relief. In every department you have to be concentrating and ready to go because he'll take advantage of you on any part of the court.

"That's not to say that Pete's up-side wasn't just as spectacular because when Pete missed a first serve, I still thought to myself, 'God, just get this thing in play so you have a chance'. With Roger, he misses a first serve, I'm thinking, 'Okay, here we go'. I think Roger has a better return than Pete. I think Pete volleys better. I think Roger moves better, is better from the baseline. But Pete's serve was probably better … they pose different problems entirely, but Roger makes you do it from start to finish, and Pete made you do something incredibly special at a lot of given times."

The fact that Agassi had played his part in an outstanding match was no consolation. "I know nothing about the game," said Agassi, distancing himself from glory by association. "I only had him pegged to go to the semis - he's in the final now."

There, today, Federer will be confronted by a player at the opposite end of the spectrum from Agassi, but only in terms of age. It would be easy to dismiss the chances of the 18-year-old Rafael Nadal - the youngest player ever to reach the final here - if it were not for the fact that the clay-court specialist is on an impressive run of his own - 15 matches without defeat.

Nor has he any respect for reputations, as the world No 3 Andy Roddick would testify after losing to him in last year's Davis Cup final.

He has even beaten Federer here before; in straight sets in the third round last year, although the world No 1 may have been suffering from sunstroke at the time.

Agassi, asked by a Spanish journalist who his favourite for the final was, couldn't resist an ironic response.

"Let's see. You know I'm from Vegas so I don't mind taking some chances," he said "I'm going to go out on a limb and say the person who's 47-1 over the last six, seven months is the favourite."

Who he thought would win would probably have received a similar answer, but he would have been well advised to talk up the outsider's chances just a little. As Federer noted, the lefty will pose him a different set of problems with his "crazy" topspin forehands.

Nadal, who has never won a hard-court title, ran his fellow countryman David Ferrer ragged at times in his semi-final and his inside-out forehand is a lethal weapon.

Mentally as well as physically he is already stronger than many players in the top 20. As Agassi said: "Me at 18, looking at Nadal at 18, from the neck down you would think one person was 26 and the other was 12."

With his Andalucian looks, the young man from Mallorca will not want for support from Miami's large Hispanic community, which means Federer, as popular as he is, will again be up against the crowd. Not that it proved much of a handicap for him last time.

TenHound
04-05-2005, 03:43 AM
Another interesting article. Mats on Fed:

A short journey into the mind of Federer


Roger Federer is a bare-knuckle fighter dressed in a Hugo Boss suit. His prettiness conceals his merciless nature, his elegance disguises his grit, his flair masks his fury.

In Sunday's Nasdaq Open final, he was two sets down and 3-5 in the third-set tie-breaker to the stirring Rafael Nadal but refused to succumb. He littered the court with 74 errors but stayed faithful to his attacking philosophy. He even lost his composure but not his way. As Marat Safin recently said: "I'm not like Roger, he's way too high. Even when he's not playing well, he has enough talent."

Sunday was Federer's eighth tournament win in his last nine events; since last year's U.S. Open he has won 48 of 49 matches; in his last 18 finals, he is yet to lose. He has beaten Agassi the last seven times, Roddick the last four times, Hewitt the last seven times, and hiccupped once against Safin in the last four meetings. Nothing lasts forever, but his reign is assuming the point of the ridiculous.

But for all this, do we truly comprehend Federer, the strength of his intimidation, the confidence that sustains a No.1 player? Earlier this year I asked Mats Wilander, winner of seven major titles and world No.1 in 1988, these questions and received a short sermon on greatness.

"I think the No.1 ranking is totally irrelevant to someone who is No.1 in the world," said Wilander. "Obviously the ranking is irrelevant to Roger Federer — he is playing to win these tournaments.

His advantage



"I think that the advantage Federer has is that he's not worried about how he's playing. When you're No.1, when you feel like you're the best player in the world, you are not worried about how you are playing. It doesn't boil down to the tennis anyway, it boils down to the mental side — that's why you're No.1. It's not suddenly that your serve is much better or your forehand is much better, I think it's just that your whole game raises because your mind is so much stronger.

"Mentally you're there all the time, you're focused every shot, every moment, every second, and there's no doubt in your mind that you're doing the right thing. Even if you're losing there's no doubt you are doing the right thing."

At this moment of such complete command, a No.1, says the Swede, feels as close to omnipotence as a player can. No doubt, no fear, not even a need for encouragement.

As Wilander said: "You can feel the other guy is worried more about me, than he is about himself, and I am not worried about myself whatsoever. I am focused on him and I am going to make him play terrible and I am going to raise my game. There's no fear when you are playing that well, there are no options but to win.

"When you're playing that well, very little clouds your head. It's not important what other people think, you're strong enough yourself, you don't need anyone to root for you, you need nobody in your box, you need nothing. I say Roger wears it (the No.1 ranking) better than anyone I've seen in a long time."

An aberration



Although Safin would interrupt Federer's domination in Australia, it has since seemed like an aberration, and what bewilders Wilander is the refusal of Federer's peers to psychologically disturb him.

"I think right now Roger is so mentally strong that he intimidates guys once they get on court", said Wilander. "The other guys are actually not that sorry to lose to him, which I kind of miss a little bit. They're not doing everything within the rules to disturb him, like talk to him, or nudge him, or get in his head. Can you imagine John McEnroe not getting into Roger's head? No. Jimmy Connors? No. Boris Becker? No.

"I think there's fire in players to beat him because he's a great player, but there's no fire to beat him because they don't like him. I've played a lot of matches where I didn't care if (the opponent) was a great player, I just didn't like (him). I didn't dislike (him personally), but I could find something in (him) that I didn't like to fuel me. And I think maybe you've got to find something to fuel you against Roger Federer, because it ain't enough to just play tennis."

Bad news for tour players only gets worse. For all his raging beauty, Federer is not yet, said Wilander, the finished product. "I think with Roger, as good as he is, it looks like there's room for improvement, he does sometimes hit a few loose shots. He's so talented that he knows there are shots he should be able to handle that we can't even relate to."

babsi
04-05-2005, 07:32 AM
Thanks Ron and thanks TenHouns :) :)

both articles are very good - allways good to hear an assesment from other Players.

Credit to Marat - he is right Roger is better then him,because he is able to win,when not playing well - Marat never has been.Great from him not to only know it,but also say it :)



______________________________________________
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-05-2005, 03:36 PM
Thanks

Teemuh
04-05-2005, 11:55 PM
Hi. Here's tennis writer Peter Bodo on Roger and Nadal:

Tuesday, April 5, 10 AM

Monday Tuesday Morning Quarterback: Will the Real Heir to Bjorn Borg Please Stand Up?

I have a confession to make. Halfway through yesterday’s NASDAQ-100 final (you can read the blow-by-blow here, with pirate-boy Rafael ripping forehands left and right, I got to thinking heretical thoughts. Maybe, I thought, Federer isn’t quite the towering genius he’s made out to be.



After all, his challengers for No. 1 are, in different ways, grievously flawed: Safin is a knucklehead, Hewitt is underpowered, Roddick lacks diversity. Ferrero is MIA, and Moya too pleased with himself—Gaudio, Nalbandian, Coria, et al.? Suitable stand-ins for the Seven Dwarfs to Federer’s Snow White. Andre Agassi? What do those “great matches” against Federer say beyond this: Agassi’s game plays right into the strengths of Fed’s.



It was easy to think those thoughts.



The way Nadal was playing, it looked like he might be another Bjorn Borg—a formidable combination of mental focus, topspin, foot speed, consistency, and impregnable defense. That would make him the new master of negative tennis, a player who uses his dark powers to demolish any creative player unfortunate enough to wander into his domain. For all the great baseliners out there, we haven’t seen this degree of negative genius since the heyday, on clay, of Sergi Bruguera.



But you know what happened next.



Federer eked out a tiebreaker in which he was, at one juncture, just two points from losing the match in three straight sets, and from there it was all downhill for the swashbuckling lad from Mallorca; down came the Jolly Roger, up went the white flag (no, it wasn’t his pristine clam-diggers) of surrender. Fed won 12 of the next 16 games going away.



I’m not sure I ever changed my mind so completely about two players in the course of a single match as I did yesterday.



Let’s take Nadal first: This tournament was my first chance to get a good close look at Nadal in a big match against a top player. As strong as he looked for the better part of three sets, it seems that Federer inadvertently but successfully pursued a rope-a-dope strategy, hanging in there while Nadal punched himself out—mentally even more than physically, perhaps.



Granted, Nadal is just 18 and inexperienced at pacing himself for long matches. But the one thing you can’t do if you play negative tennis is lose concentration because, as Borg demonstrated, the first requirement of successful negative tennis is consistency. Nadal, who speaks through a translator in what might be called Universal Caveman, acknowledged after the final that he experienced late-match brain-lock.



It may seem like I’m denying Nadal the credit he deserves; after all, he did get within two points of beating Federer in straight sets. But one other thing about Nadal’s collapse nags me. Federer said it took him a set-and-a-break to figure out how to cope with Nadal’s southpaw game and spins. That’s a lot to spot a guy, and it’s only a one-time deal. Federer will be better prepared to play Nadal next time.



Nadal clearly has a lot of game, but then, a lot of it is really ugly. Not long ago, Pete Sampras famously told me that Federer is “easy on the eyes” in addition to having a style that’s easy on his body and energy-efficient. Nadal, by contrast, is hard on the eyes—and prone to exhausting himself. This isn’t merely a style-of-play issue. It has technical underpinnings.



Take that serve. Nadal looks like he’s trying to climb into a small cardboard box, preparing for some Houdini-like escape stunt, when he hits it. From beginning to end, it’s a cramped shot (reminiscent of Jimmy Connors’ mediocre delivery) that robs Nadal of the major serving advantage that lefties often enjoy.



How about that atomic forehand? At times Nadal seems to hit it like he’s holding a hammer, the racquet at a right angle to his arm. That’s really ugly—it could compare to the worst of Yevgeny Kafelnikov. But there’s no doubt that Nadal’s forehand is a potent weapon, and it will remain that as long as his incredibly quick feet continue to compensate for any technical glitches.



By contrast, Nadal’s backhand is a less dangerous but more grooved shot. He gets down to it beautifully, plays it close to his body, and really uncoils as he hits it. Sure he tries to run around it, but so many players will get to it that, over time, it’ll probably develop into more of a weapon.



You can forget the volley—Nadal doesn’t have one.



Conclusion: Nadal is going to win a lot of matches on clay. But, when you compare his technique to that of, say, Borg, the soft spots in his game are glaring. Nadal may generate more power than Borg ever did, especially on the forehand side, but he’s not as grooved and his serve is weak. His speed counts for a lot, but right now he’s still more Alberto Berasategui than Ice-Borg.



Now Fed: Roger’s strokes speak for themselves—he’s silky smooth, easy on the eyes. We’ve all seen plenty of him by now, so I’m going to focus on the most underrated weapon in his arsenal: his mind, specifically that part of the brain that issues self-control commands.



And self-control, you’ll remember, was generally hailed as Borg’s greatest gift; the ultimate complement to his fail-safe groundies. Sangfroid. Restraint. That’s what Borg was all about—living up to Ernest Hemingway’s definition of “courage” as showing grace under fire.



Oddly, you don’t hear much about how utterly Federer has been transformed from a highly gifted but somewhat soft competitor into a player whose game seems to rise in direct proportion to the threat it faces. It’s probably because, as such things go, the transformation was rapid (the turning point probably was his unexpected second straight first-round loss at Roland Garros in 2003; after that, he won his first major at Wimbledon—and the rest is history).



Fed remembers what the buzz was about as little as two years ago. This is what he said, after he beat Nadal, in response to a question about the satisfaction he gets out of forcing an error:



Yeah, it’s great, because I was always famous to win quick points, and people were saying, you know, “You just need to get the ball over three or four times and then he’s going to lose his mind, go for a winner or an error.” Now, you know, I’m coming through those tough rallies, also showing me that on the clay court it’s really not a problem. I’m really looking forward to that challenge as well.



I’ve seen a lot of Federer this past month, as he ran off Masters Series wins at Indian Wells and Key Biscayne, and I’ve had lots of chances to observe and even question him on pretty much anything that seemed worth pursuing. The most striking thing about the mature Federer is his aplomb—the unflappable conviction that, all other things being equal, he’s got the game to beat anybody, anytime, on any surface. This is something that even Borg, haunted throughout his career by the prospect of having to play night matches at the U.S. Open, never developed.



Back at Indian Wells, I asked Federer if the sheer ease and grace of his game, and the attention paid to it, leads people to overlook his mental qualities. He replied:



If you don’t talk about [a hidden virtue], it’s always a good sign for me. It’s the same with footwork, or the mental part of the game. We don’t talk about that much but the players I face, they know that they don’t just have to watch out for my forehand, or my serve, on big points.



I think in the end you’ve got to feel comfortable with yourself. I have a strong belief that I’m doing the things right, you know, working the right way. And this itself makes me a better player. I can rely on so many strengths, you know, because if something doesn’t go right, maybe a shot, I can compensate with different strengths in my game.



That wasn’t exactly what I was looking for, so I pressed the issue the following day. After Roger beat Ivan Ljubicic, I asked Federer if he senses that he turned a corner somewhere, mentally, as a competitor. He said:



Very clearly, yes. And I think the [fans and press] who followed me for enough time, they see the difference, and when it happened and how it came along. I just have that feeling that I dig much deeper than I used to, especially when I’m down. Being a set down, you know, it doesn’t bother me anymore.



Before, I would get frustrated and totally change my game if I was down. Everything would be in kind of panic mode. You know, that doesn’t happen anymore. It really [takes] very much to make me lose concentration, and that’s a very good thing.



Granted, Federer didn’t have that road-to-Damascus experience that Sampras had in 1992 at the U.S. Open after losing the final to Stefan Eberg; his evolution into a player who’ll do whatever it takes to win, every time he sets foot on the court, was incremental. And it fed off itself more than it fed off crushing disappointments or missed opportunities.



Conclusion: Federer has arrived at the high ground occupied by champions like Borg and Sampras. Federer’s most outstanding quality is his pride; this late-developing but completely organic and unapologetic love of winning.



In the big picture, it’s never about the X’s and O’s.



TennisWorld won’t see Federer up close and personal until the French Open, so I’ll leave you to ponder some words he spoke last week on staying focused and hungry.



Well, you know, as the No. 1 in the world, you just don’t want to give away victories to other guys. Then they can say, “Yeah, I beat the No. 1 player in the world.” At least you want to make it tough for them. I think that is the motivation I found and now have. It makes me a better player, a tougher player especially. I’m happy to live through this.

lunahielo
04-06-2005, 12:08 AM
Wow! What an article!
Sangfroid? ?? I've never associated this word with Roger..but, yes~~~it fits the master on the court that he has developed into.. and it is a necessity to holding on to his rank. Oh yes.

Thanks, Teemuh

jayhas
04-06-2005, 01:47 AM
Great article. Thanks Teemuh.

I mentioned to Isy on the express thread -- watch out for Roger version 2.

Yes lunahielo, he is on to being a grandmaster.

Nocko
04-06-2005, 02:36 AM
Thanks Teemuh, great article!!!! exactlly!!! Unfortunatery I 've never seen Rogi before Wimby 2003, so I don't know before the turning point.But since Wimby 2004 F , I felt his strong will. But you know, it is not easy even for him. That why I cheer him so much. ( not only for his beautiful , artistic tennis.) I proud to be Rogi fan!!!And I also like to see his emotions behind his porker face occationery, :p that remind me he is just 23 years old young man. He is cute!! :hug:

avocadoe
04-06-2005, 01:25 PM
Thanks Teemah for the Bodo article. I do think he makes lighter of Nadal than called for, but love the parts about Roger.

Puschkin
04-06-2005, 01:30 PM
Thanks for posting this interesting article, even if I don't agree with every single line of it ;) :wavey:

SUKTUEN
04-06-2005, 04:02 PM
very long article~~~

I will read it all next day~`Thankyou :worship:

Yoda
04-07-2005, 01:06 AM
Thanx Teemuh for that great article

RogiFan88
04-07-2005, 02:26 AM
"Nadal clearly has a lot of game, but then, a lot of it is really ugly. Not long ago, Pete Sampras famously told me that Federer is “easy on the eyes” in addition to having a style that’s easy on his body and energy-efficient. Nadal, by contrast, is hard on the eyes—and prone to exhausting himself. This isn’t merely a style-of-play issue. It has technical underpinnings.

...

How about that atomic forehand? At times Nadal seems to hit it like he’s holding a hammer, the racquet at a right angle to his arm. That’s really ugly—it could compare to the worst of Yevgeny Kafelnikov. But there’s no doubt that Nadal’s forehand is a potent weapon, and it will remain that as long as his incredibly quick feet continue to compensate for any technical glitches.

By contrast, Nadal’s backhand is a less dangerous but more grooved shot. He gets down to it beautifully, plays it close to his body, and really uncoils as he hits it. Sure he tries to run around it, but so many players will get to it that, over time, it’ll probably develop into more of a weapon.

You can forget the volley—Nadal doesn’t have one."

Overstatements... as if other players do not have an ugly game... as for the volley, Rafa was doing well enough v. Ferrer up at the net...

Remember Rafa is only 18! He has plenty of time to hone his game, conserve his energy to go the distance [and he's already started in that area or he w not have made the final] and he's not a one-note player. He doesn't rely on a big boring serve yet he is improving it; he can change the pace using a deft touch at the net and fr where I was sitting, he was painting those lines like nobody's biz esp in the 1st-2nd sets... not until the very end did he finally tire out and make more UEs [or Es, forced by Rogi].

I am anticipating some great stuff fr Rafa -- he's finally "almost" lived up to the hype!

RogiFan88
04-07-2005, 02:29 AM
Wow! What an article!
Sangfroid? ?? I've never associated this word with Roger..but, yes~~~it fits the master on the court that he has developed into.. and it is a necessity to holding on to his rank. Oh yes.

Thanks, Teemuh

I agree -- sangfroid to describe Pete not Rogi -- Rogi shows more emotion than that and he is a "warmer" person anyway.

Enough of the Rogi/Pete comparisons... useless... and why compare Rafa to Borg?? :rolleyes:

Can't these people stand out for themselves?

RogiFan88
04-07-2005, 02:32 AM
actually, one of Rafa's biggest weapons is his mental strength... for someone so young, he puts the older more experienced guys to shame [i.e. Pandy, Carlos... ]. ;)

TenHound
04-07-2005, 02:48 AM
"one of Nadal's biggest weapons is his mental strength."

I agree - he seems like a really nasty little cur who I will watch as little as humanly possible. W/luck he'll constantly tear up his shoulder & disappear quickly from the scene, lest his ugly brutish tennis & general boorishness define the state of the art & attract more of the wrong sort. Sad he's not more in the Moya mold of power w/grace on and off the court.

jtipson
04-07-2005, 09:40 AM
"one of Nadal's biggest weapons is his mental strength."

I agree - he seems like a really nasty little cur who I will watch as little as humanly possible. W/luck he'll constantly tear up his shoulder & disappear quickly from the scene, lest his ugly brutish tennis & general boorishness define the state of the art & attract more of the wrong sort. Sad he's not more in the Moya mold of power w/grace on and off the court.

His game might not be the prettiest but I think you've gone too far there, TenHound.

babsi
04-07-2005, 01:54 PM
Great article,TenHound - thanks so much :)

One thing Nadal is certainly not a menatal weakling - on the other hand,there isn´t much he has to lose at this moment in time and if you can´t bring yourself to get out there and play the nr.1 in the world without any fear - who else would that person be.
It´s harder to beat the direct competion,than the far away one - at least if you have some game to do it - he has,no doubt (I think it´s ugly too,like many:()
The more he wins and the closer he will come to Roger ranking´s wise - the tougher it will be for him.


______________________________________________
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life
(BIllie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-07-2005, 02:42 PM
I love Sampras and Love Roger too ~~~

They are all Great Tennis King!! :bounce:

RogiFan88
04-07-2005, 03:49 PM
"one of Nadal's biggest weapons is his mental strength."

I agree - he seems like a really nasty little cur who I will watch as little as humanly possible. W/luck he'll constantly tear up his shoulder & disappear quickly from the scene, lest his ugly brutish tennis & general boorishness define the state of the art & attract more of the wrong sort. Sad he's not more in the Moya mold of power w/grace on and off the court.

Why do you hate Rafa so much? He's not as "ugly" and "nasty" as you perceive him to be. He is definitely NOT boorish [I can think of other players who are]. But yes, his tennis is not as nice-looking as his big bro Carlos altho Carlos isn't always so graceful off the court but he seems to be taking some credit for Rafa's sudden success! ;) :p

Rogi playing Rafa in a final sure makes a welcome relief fr the usual Lleyt, Pandy or Ivan!

SUKTUEN
04-07-2005, 04:15 PM
I not hate Nadal~~~ but I just do not like to watch his match~ :p

yanchr
04-07-2005, 04:15 PM
"one of Nadal's biggest weapons is his mental strength."

I agree - he seems like a really nasty little cur who I will watch as little as humanly possible. W/luck he'll constantly tear up his shoulder & disappear quickly from the scene, lest his ugly brutish tennis & general boorishness define the state of the art & attract more of the wrong sort. Sad he's not more in the Moya mold of power w/grace on and off the court.
You are being a little bit too harsh on Nadal, but I have to agree with you on most words here ;) His game is ugly, well compared with Roger's :p I won't like to watch him unless he is playing Roger or he is on some really big stages.

And wondering the same... Moya is far more likeable on court...I like Moya

SUKTUEN
04-07-2005, 04:18 PM
小鳳凰~~~ 抱抱~~~~ :smooch: :hug: :hug: :hug:

Daniel
04-07-2005, 10:37 PM
"one of Nadal's biggest weapons is his mental strength."

I agree - he seems like a really nasty little cur who I will watch as little as humanly possible. W/luck he'll constantly tear up his shoulder & disappear quickly from the scene, lest his ugly brutish tennis & general boorishness define the state of the art & attract more of the wrong sort. Sad he's not more in the Moya mold of power w/grace on and off the court.

:lol: he is still a teengaer and trying to impress everyone. he is good but i donrt think he will go that far if he doesnt stop his attitude. ottherwise there goes another Roddick.

TenHound
04-08-2005, 04:24 AM
Didn't anyone read that fascinating article I posted from India in which Mat discussed the Mind of a Champion? Should I have posted it on the what other players say? I didn't 'cuz Mats is retired, but maybe that was a mistake.

I thought it was fascinating. But a little concerned w/last paragraph in which he says other players should declare psychological war on Roger to break down his focus, undermine him on the court, etc. I can sure see that happening, esp. @Wimby, esp, by AR, though he's so dumb that he might not be able to pull it off.

In light of that article, one can see Roger's graciousness that his Mother obviously bred into his bones, as a useful weapon on the court in helping disarm his opponents a bit - as Mats talks about how you have to find something to hate about a player to really be able to attack them. Roger makes that hard... puts his arm around Raffy after the match, flatters the vastly inferior AR into thinking he's a rival.........

I completely agree w/people who said they're tired of Roger-Hewitt/AR finals. I just don't enjoy seeing him crushed by pure power - showing off his biceps.....I know it'll happen someday, but I can't stand it. To me Raffy looked like a little Nazi going into Picasso's studio & attacking his canvas w/a can of spray paint. That's over-stated, to be sure, but I hope you get my point. But I definitely agree that Raffy is a young champion...just a little too close to earning the nickname "Ruffian" for my taste. If Roger were to be defeated by a better player - down the road of course - I'd rather it were Baggy. (Marcos Baghdatis). Remember that great 2nd set he played against him in NYC & the last part of the AO match where Baggy out-forehanded Roger on the most amazing tailing away forehand I've ever seen...leaving Roger flailing in vain. It looked like it was going into the corner & Rog was ready, then @service-box line it took off & tailed sideways way out of reach. That's out-Rogering Roger - I can appreciate that. Plus he had beautiful soft hands, galloped gracefully up to the net. Had great joy rather than Raffy's nastiness on the court. (On the strength of NYC & AO he moved from #240 to #90.) Rog. was #1 jr. in ~'98; Baggy in '03. That's a contest I look forward to, but that's my taste in men's tennis. I prefer artistry, one-handed backhands, graceful movement & vaguely likeable guys at the highest level. After all, matches are longggg.

World Beater
04-08-2005, 05:26 AM
Nadal plays effective tennis and can be fun to watch...his tennis is not aesthetically pleasing like federer, but almost everyone is a baseline basher when compared to roger with the exception of henman

World Beater
04-08-2005, 05:28 AM
i would love to seed roger against the big boyz on clay...if he loses to some great players on clay, i will be fine with that. But i dont want roger to lose against some grinder, so that he wont be able to show his beautiful tennis. Roger always plays well in the big matches against the best. I feel he will do this on clay, and that is why i am hoping for a tough draw, so that we can see the best of roger! And he can prove to everyone he is the best even on clay!

Daniel
04-08-2005, 05:31 AM
NEWS
March 26, 2005
Facing Federer to be Shown on Four Airlines

Click here to order NOW!

Watch the exclusive video preview



The documentary, Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer, will be shown on in-flight entertainment programming on four airlines in coming months. British Airways and SAS will show Facing Federer during April and Cathay Pacific and Qatar Airways will air it during May.

The documentary, a TPL production for the ATP, aired on ESPN Classic thoughout the United States on March 26.

Facing Federer is available to order online at ATPtennis.com. The DVD features bonus footage including the thrilling ATP record-tying 20-18 tie-break between Roger Federer and Marat Safin, out-takes featuring all players, and an exclusive locker room interview with Federer immediately following his victory in the final of the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup Houston.

Presented by ATP premium partner Mercedes-Benz, the documentary has aired across the world on a broadcasters' list that includes ESPN International (Latin America and New Zealand), The Tennis Channel (USA), TSN (Canada), FoxSports (Australia), SkySports (Great Britain) and SportTV (Brazil).

"A cross between a conventional documentary and an elimination-style reality show, [Facing Federer] does a terrific job of humanizing the top players while showing how grueling tennis is," wrote Sports Illustrated 's Jon Wertheim.

Facing Federer not only features the eight elite ATP players who qualified for the prestigious season finale—Federer, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio—but also the fans, journalists, photographers, umpires, organizers and others at the tournament.

"Facing Federer is a fresh, intimate look inside the tennis world," said Jodi Markley, senior vice president international production, ESPN Classic and ESPNEWS. "It is an example of the kind of programming that ESPN Classic brings viewers – programming that brings them close to sports and their biggest personalities, tells a compelling story and gives perspective and insight."

babsi
04-08-2005, 09:24 AM
Thank you,Daniel :)

There´s no flyed on the horizion for me, sadly :(



__________________________________________________ _
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-08-2005, 04:15 PM
Daniel thankyou :wavey:

*M*
04-10-2005, 09:05 PM
For those who can't obtain a copy, here's a nice article from the Spring issue of Deuce magazine (the one with Roger on the cover). There are other good articles and profiles in the magazine as well, so I encourage you to pick up a copy if you can!

ROGER FEDERER, already one of the most talented tennis players to ever grace this planet, wants to change the world...one child at a time.

By MARK MATHABANE

There’s little doubt that Roger Federer, blessed with one of the most complete games in tennis history and possessing a mental toughness so demoralizing to his opponents that it enables him to effortlessly, so it seems, snatch victory from the jaws of defeat, has the potential to become the best player of all-time. It’s a potental certified by the keen eyes of such legends as Rod Laver and John McEnroe. More important, it’s a potential that has already yielded a remarkable harvest. Since turning professional in 1998, the 24-year-old superstar from Oberwil, Switzerland, has achieved and solidified the ATP World No. 1 ranking, bagged four Grand Slam titles, captured 25 singles titles and garnered an astonishing 15 consecutive finals wins on all surfaces on which the game is played.

But little is known about Roger’s other important potential. It’s one that, if cultivated with as much passion as he’s done his near flawless shot-making, is capable of transforming him into one of the game’s most effective global ambassadors. This potential in Roger is best illustrated by revealing the human being behind the superstar. That’s what I sought to do when, shortly before the beginning of the Pacific Life Open, I asked him to talk about why he’s inspired by the different cultures of the world, and why he feels compelled to use his fame to make a difference in the lives of the poor and less fortunate. He eagerly obliged. “I always enjoy talking this way,” he said, flashing a smile that illumined his playful brown eyes, “instead of always about my tennis.’’

Roger began talking fervently about a trip he’d recently made to South Africa, a country where I, and his mother Lynette, were born and raised, incredibly, only about a mile or so apart. But because of apartheid, a political system that mandated the strict segregation of the races, we grew up in circumstances so vastly different we might as well have been denizens of separate planets. Apartheid led Lynette to Ieave South Africa in 1973 for Switzerland, where Roger was born in Basel on August 8, 1981; it also drove me in 1978, at age 18, to search for freedom and opportunity in America, when Stan Smith, the 1971 Wimbledon champion, helped me get a tennis scholarship.

Roger pointed out that he’d visited South Africa with his parents many times as a child during the apartheid era: to see relatives, to go on safari, and to visit Cape Town, one of the loveliest cities in the world. But he admitted that he’d never been to ghettos like the one I grew up in. Yes, he’d seen the teeming and squalid shacks without running water or electricity from a distance, and he wondered what kind of people lived in such awful places, what their lives were really like, and how they survived.

On his latest visit he found out. Through the 1-year-old Roger Federer Foundation, which has partnered with Imbewu (a Xhosa word for “seed”), an organization of Swiss and South African volunteers, he journeyed to New Brighton, Port Elizabeth. It is one of the most impoverished and overcrowded ghettos in South Africa, where violence, disease and AIDS are maiming and killing countless lives, and where it’s not uncommon to see children scavenging for food at garbage dumps to stay alive, like I used to do growing up in a shack in Alexandra, a one-square-mile Johannesburg ghetto which now has a population of more than 500,000 people. The partnership provides 30 children in three schools with uniforms, stationery and two meals a day. In addition, Roger’s foundation pays the salaries of three full-time social workers at the local Imbewu.

Though New Brighton, like Alexandra, is a no-go zone to most whites, who stay away in part because of unreasonable fears of being mugged or killed, Roger had no such trepidation. Nor did Cliff Drysdale, a fellow South African, TV commentator, and one of the game’s most respected elder statesmen, who went to school in Port Elizabeth, and would occasionally venture into New Brighton for a beer. “I believe Federer genuinely feels empathy for people,” Cliff recently said. “His visit was definitely no publicity stunt.”

“I wasn’t afraid at all,” Roger said about the day-long trip that included a visit to an AIDS hospital, to three schools, and to the shack of a student his foundation supports. “Even though it was odd being the only white person. I wanted to see things for myself, to feel what it’s like to live like that. I also wanted to find out how much difference my foundation was making in the lives of the people there.”

This willingness to make oneself uncomfortable, this solidarity with those who are different from us—be it through color, race, religion, nationality, or sexual orientation— isn’t innate in people. We are born selfish, self-centered and tribal, and are likely to continue that way unless we learn otherwise, According to his mother, Roger learned about the importance of being unselfish, tolerant and empathetic in childhood, and often by making mistakes.

“He was just like other children, naughty and not always obedient,” Lynette said from her home in Switzerland, “He had to be exposed to situations that challenged him to change, to see the world differently, and to take responsibility for his actions.”

She recalled the story of a Turkish girl who was new to Roger’s primary school. She couldn’t speak German, so the teacher spent more time with her. Roger and his classmates were furious: They felt it was unfair because they too wanted the teacher’s attention. Roger complained to his mom.

Lynette was too wise a mother to condone her son’s insensitivity, which could have easily ripened into prejudice. Having come of age under apartheid, she was lucky to have had parents who were liberal enough to teach her to treat everyone the same. Lynette asked Roger to put himself in the Turkish girl’s shoes, to imagine how he’d feel, alone among strangers who didn’t understand him, and who didn’t have the kindness to help him adjust. Roger’s teacher reinforced that simple lesson in empathy. She began teaching the class about Turkey, its long history, rich culture, and diverse peoples. She even had Roger and his classmates learn to speak Turkish.

“Just learning to count to 10 was very hard,” Roger said with an embarrassed grin. “When that happened to me, I finally understood what the girl must have felt.”

Empathy became a gateway to friendships in a broader world. Roger, whose other passion is playing soccer—his favorite professional team is FC Basel—soon found himself on a team that was 50 percent Turkish and Spanish. Lynette, a strong believer in team sports, is glad that her son played soccer before settling on tennis because it taught him the importance of “working together for a common goal.” Roger readily concedes that to be successful in tennis, one often has to be intensely individualistic. “But there are times when we should put ego and competition aside and work together as a team,” he said, reaching for a glass of water on the marbled coffee table in his hotel room. To that effect, he was spearheading, with the help of the ATP Foundation, an all-star exhibition featuring 10 of the top men’s players in the world. The goal was to raise funds for UNICEF and other worldwide relief efforts.

In South Africa, this willingness to strive together toward a common goal, to subsume self in universal selfhood, to walk in other people’s shoes, and to feel their pain and want to do something to alleviate it, is called having “Ubuntu.” Black South Africans believe that because humanity is indivisible, and its survival collective, one cannot be fully human until one affirms the humanity of others, including that of one’s enemies. That’s one reason why Nelson Mandela, despite having spent 27 years of the prime of his life in jail for the crime of fighting for his people’s dignity, emerged in 1990 not bent on revenge, but ready to reconcile with his former jailers. This magnanimous gesture gave birth to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which not only prevented civil war, but also freed future generations of blacks and whites from the vicious and self-destructive cycle of an eye for an eye.

Ubuntu is not unique to South Africa and can be learned by anyone. But to learn its vital lessons one must have good teachers. Among the best teachers are our parents’ example, and the characters of those we admire and seek to emulate. Life, nature, good books, the judicious use of television, and travel are also excellent teachers.

But as Roger astutely pointed out, “One cannot learn if one is not willing.” He was willing to learn, often the hard way, summoning the courage to venture beyond his comfort zone. When he was 14 he left home to join the Swiss National Tennis Center, in the French-speaking part of the country. It meant being separated from his close-knit family, having to live among strangers, and having to struggle to learn a different language. It was tough. For almost six months he was homesick and depressed, and his tennis suffered. He could have given up but he didn’t because he loved tennis, madly. So he turned adversity into strength. He learned French and made friends.

Among his best friends from his days at the National Tennis center is Yves Allegro, an occasional doubles partner and Davis Cup teammate. This is the guy that Roger plays cards, listens to music, and horses around with, I thought as he introduced me to the tennis journeyman with a scruffy beard and guileless face, who, since turning pro in 1997, has won just one doubles title and earned a little more than $300,000, compared to Roger’s 25 titles and more than $15 million in prize money (not including income from endorsing products by Nike, Wilson, Emmi, Maurice Lacroix and Swiss Airlines).

It is revealing that Roger surrounds himself by friends and family instead of bodyguards and publicists. It connotes someone who is self-reliant, independent, comfortable in his own skin, and bent on shaping his own destiny. His phenomenal 2004 season of playing without a coach, during which he compiled an 18-0 record against Top 10 players, reveals a prodigy of such confidence in his own abilities that his opponents will have a hard time thwarting his ambition to become the best player ever.

Listening to Roger talk about his resolve to become a professional tennis player reminded me of my own determination, when I was still trapped in the ghetto, to become the first member of my family to be educated, to learn English, my sixth language. And to use as unlikely a sport as tennis to escape from apartheid, to find a way to make it to America and acquire opportunities to help my six siblings and parents, and to make my contribution in the struggle to abolish apartheid.

I’ve been able to achieve most of those seemingly impossible dreams thanks to Stan Smith, who provided me with an opportunity my own country had cruelly denied me because of the color of my skin. Because of his generosity, I’ve traveled the world, graduated from college with honors, written bestsellers which have inspired the likes of Oprah Winfrey and President Clinton. Most important, I’ve been able to give back by paying for the school needs of hundreds of students in my hometown through a scholarship fund I set up in honor of my mother who, though illiterate, dragged me, bound and gagged, to school when I was 6, in order to save me from the dead-end life of street gangs to which I was enamored.

Roger is seeking to engender these same opportunities and his empathy is obvious, often revealing itself in refreshing ways. Shortly after sitting down, he asked if I was thirsty. When I replied I was, he didn’t snap a finger at some fawning minion. Rather, he rose from the sofa where we were sitting, fetched me a glass of cranberry juice, and, though visibly exhausted, sat down again and summoned the energy to talk feelingly about his first acquaintance with a world I knew so well that the hopes, fears, passions, and agonies of its inhabitants were an inseparable part of my soul.

Throughout our interview, I never detected a false note, or a desire to impress with a fake solidarity intended to prop up an image. Though still very young, he gets it in a way similar to how Arthur Ashe got it when he had the courage to defy militant black anger and visit South Africa in 1973. Ashe’s visit forever changed my life. After scrounging up pennies in fare for a nightmarish train ride to the teeming township of Soweto to see him (during which several people were electrocuted while dangling outside windows because the train was so overcrowded), I was finally able to confirm that the black phenomenon I’d heard so much about was indeed real.

Ashe was literally the first free black man I’d ever seen. I remember telling him, years later, after I had made it to America, that his visit in 1973 taught me to believe in myself, to always have hope, to never allow discrimination to define my humanity, to never, out of fear, defer my dreams, lest they shrivel like raisins in the sun, and to never sacrifice my Ubuntu on the altar of hatred. Tears came to Federer’s eyes when he heard this.

I told Roger I was glad he had visited New Brighton, wrenching as he admitted the trip was. I told him that there may have been a boy or girl among the hundreds he met with that day, who would have hung on his every word, appreciated that someone famous cared about their plight, and was willing to keep alive in them the hope they badly need if they are to have a realistic chance of making it out. I told Roger that one of those kids might find his character worthy of emulation, just as I had done Ashe’s. If that happened, I said, then the children who were dying of HIV-AIDS at the hospital that he visited would not have died in vain. One of the students the Roger Federer Foundation supports will remember them, I said, and will use their deaths as inspiration to defy the odds and make it. And perhaps upon making it, he or she will say, “Thanks Roger, for paying for my school needs, for now I, too, am famous, but in a different way. I’ve discovered the cure for AIDS.”

After a stunned silence, Roger said, in accented, mellifluous English, which he speaks fluently, along with German and French: “It would be a great honor to have done so little and have something so great happen.”

Tennis players, I believe, are uniquely positioned to raise consciousness about exigencies of our common humanity. After all, the world is their playground. All they have to do is to also make it their neighborhood. Some have chosen to do just that, sustaining hope in places as disparate as Las Vegas, where the Andre Agassi Foundation is working to educate inner city children, or the poor townships of South Africa, where the Roger Federer Foundation is helping save a country’s future, or rural Texas, where the Andy Roddick Foundation is focusing on children’s health, literacy and abuse issues.

The potential of tennis to help bridge the economic and social gaps and divisions that sometimes makes people strangers to, or enemies of each other, is limitless, provided, as Roger has said, players are willing to connect with the real world beyond tennis, to use their fame and fortune to make a difference in the lives of the poor and less fortunate. Ubuntu tells us that humanity is indivisible and its survival is collective. In all parts of the world there live people just like us. They cry, they laugh, they dream, they fear, they hope, they pray, and they die. The only difference is that they are over there, and we are lucky, extremely lucky, to be over here, and to have, as Andre Agassi so well put it, “an amazing life.”

But with that luck comes responsibility. Players like Federer, Agassi, Roddick, despite the impossible demands on their limited time, and the need to nurture their careers, have chosen to listen to the umpire conscience saying, “Are you ready to serve?” And then, using racquets manufactured by a company called Ubuntu, they are unleashing blistering aces in the early stages of a grueling five-set match on whose outcome hinges the survival of our common humanity. Arthur Ashe, the best global ambassador tennis ever had, whose myriad causes included education, apartheid, racism, poverty, disease and AIDS, put it best when he said: “I could never live with myself if I elected to live without a humane purpose, without trying to help the poor and unfortunate, without recognizing that perhaps the purest joy in life comes with trying to help others.”

Roger still has a long way before he can fill Ashe’s giant humanitarian shoes, and he knows that one swallow doesn’t make a summer. But he also knows that a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. He took that important first step by visiting New Brighton, then a week later took another by organizing the ATP All-Star Rally for Relief exhibition at Indian Wells. Who knows how many such steps this young ambassador will take on behalf of our common humanity, given the fact that his dazzling career has only just begun?

Responding to a comment I made about the devastation being wreaked in Africa by AIDS, which claimed Ashe’s life in 1992 after he contracted the virus from a blood transfusion following heart surgery, Roger nodded solemnly. “It’s like tsunamis happening every day and no one notices.” He couldn’t be more right. AIDS is threatening to wipe out an entire continent while much of the world looks on with surreal indifference. But Roger has noticed. Prior to the conclusion of the all-star exhibition, which raised more than $30,000 for UNICEF, Roger said, “It is for a good cause and it should even go beyond tonight.” To ensure it did, an event borne of Roger’s Ubuntu resulted in an ongoing global partnership between the ATP and UNICEF. Fittingly, the partnership is called ACE — Assisting Children Everywhere.

Fedex
04-11-2005, 02:46 AM
Excellent article :)

onm684
04-11-2005, 01:06 PM
For those who can't obtain a copy, here's a nice article from the Spring issue of Deuce magazine (the one with Roger on the cover).

Great article!
*M*, Did you type all this?
How kind you are! Thank you soooooo much:worship: :worship: :worship:

avocadoe
04-11-2005, 01:18 PM
vvv moving article, thanks

babsi
04-11-2005, 02:28 PM
Thank you so much, *M* for typing the whole article - it´s a great and moving read (youa´are right,avocadoe) :)
You are aloud to draw "a bee" into your weekly record folder :)



_______________________________________________
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learnd in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-11-2005, 02:33 PM
Thankyou so much!!! :worship:

Nocko
04-12-2005, 12:00 AM
Yeah, Thank you *M*, great article!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

Daniel
04-12-2005, 02:07 AM
Thanks *M*

Puschkin
04-12-2005, 06:28 AM
http://stade2.france2.fr/video/stade2c_20050410.asx

For all of you you speak French: an Interview from Monte Carlo. The link was posted originally by kuntznicholas on the German thread of rf.com

Daniel
04-12-2005, 06:57 AM
thanks Puschkin :D

Coria writes off Federer dream

Mon Apr 11, 8:38 PM ET World Sports - AFP



MONACO (AFP) - Defending Monte Carlo Masters champion and 2004 French Open runner-up Guillermo Coria believes Roger Federer could endure another shattering Roland Garros heartbreaker this season.


AFP Photo



The world number one Swiss won three of the four Grand Slams last year but came up dreadfully short at Roland Garros when he was knocked out in the third round by triple champion Gustavo Kuerten.


Argentinian Coria, one of the tour's most accomplished clay court exponents, believes Spanish teenage sensation Rafael Nadal and reigning French Open champion Gaston Gaudio will sweep all before them at the top European clay tournaments this year.


"I believe Nadal and Gaudio are favourites to win all of the clay court tournaments," said Coria.


"They have the better game on clay. Federer can be dangerous on clay but he has to be more patient and if he plays either of them it will very difficult for him."


To prove his point, Nadal won the battle of the 18-year-olds, easing past French world junior champion Gael Monfils 6-3, 6-2, while fourth-seeded Gaudio beat Christophe Rochus of Belgium 7-6 (7/3), 6-2 to stay on course for a third clay court title of 2005.


"It is kind of Coria to say what he did," said Nadal. "It's important to win each match but there are other players like Moya, Ferrero, Gaudio, Coria and even Federer who are all favourites."


Coria, the sixth seed, saw off French wildcard Paul-Henri Mathieu 6-2, 7-5 on a rain-hit opening day at the Monte Carlo Masters and he admitted that he is still feeling his way back after undergoing shoulder surgery last year.


The 23-year-old took his overall record in the principality to 16 wins against three defeats but it was a far from convincing display.


He lost serve three times in the second set but fortunately for him, Mathieu was even more brittle being broken four times and the Argentinian eventually wrapped up the tie on his fourth match point.


"I have put on three kilos and improved physically but I need more wins to reach the level I was at last year," said Coria who now meets French qualifier Thierry Ascione in the next round.


Also going through was 2002 and 2003 winner, and former French Open champion, Juan Carlos Ferrero who edged Croatia's Ivo Karlovic 6-4, 6-1.


The 25-year-old Spaniard, who next meets Jiri Novak, the 16th-seeded Czech, needed a wildcard to gain entry into this year's event after his ranking sank to 68 following a 2004 dogged by chicken pox and a rib injury.


He managed to finish his first round encounter before the rain caused three stoppages which added to the gloom in the principality caused by last week's death of Prince Rainier.


"It's difficult to play against Karlovic, he doesn't give you any rhythm but I am happy to have got through," said Ferrero.


Sweden's Joachim Johansson became the first seeded player to be beaten as the number seven seed lost 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 to Spanish veteran Felix Mantilla.


The rain eventually returned leaving Britain's Tim Henman, the third seed, trailing Argentina's Mariano Zabaleta 6-4, 2-1.





Top seed and world number one Federer, who hasn't played here for three years, begins his tournament on Tuesday against Britain's Greg Rusedski.

Daniel
04-12-2005, 07:00 AM
Road to Roland: Federer's big test

World number one Roger Federer starts his clay campaign this week at the Monte-Carlo Masters. While it's no secret that the 23-year old Swiss is tennis' best bet to become the first grand slam winner since Rod Laver, now comes his most demanding sufrace, writes Gregory Lanzenberg.



INDIAN WELLS: Who else but Federer

Pete Sampras said he'd do everything to win the French and failed, John McEnroe claimed playing on clay was like gardening on a potato field, Stefan Edberg lost in the final in Paris to a 17-year old Michael Chang. All these greats had one thing in common, a serve-and-volley game which is powerless on clay.

But Roger Federer is different.

He has won the Hamburg Masters twice and might win many more tournaments on clay. Unlike Sampras, Federer shows patience and a complete game that's suited to resisting the temptation to charge the net.

His 14-2 won/loss record on clay in the past year ranks him only second behind Guillermo Coria (18-2) and ahead of French Open champion Gaston Gaudio (37-9).

But it was Gaudio, slugging it out in five-setters who won Roland-Garros.

To play seven best-of-five matches in two weeks against the world's best is not the same as winning Hamburg. Come the second week of Roland, every Argentine and Spaniards will be fighting for every ball on their favorite surface.

If Federer had so much trouble against Rafael Nadal in his five-set final on the hardcourt surface of the Miami Masters, it's because the 18-year old Mallorcan played like he was on clay, chopping the rythmn of play by lifting every volley. When Federer put a volley or groundstroke too short, Nadal would blast the ball for a winner. On clay there's wide range of players like Nadal who are ready to rally for hours before hiting a winner and the Swiss might find it hard to beat seven of them.

Top players at Monte-Carlo Masters:

Workhorse Nadal, who's gone from Miami to Valencia to the French Riviera, could meet Federer in the semi-finals. The man everyone will watch is Monaco resident Marat Safin. When you speak of complete game, the Russian - like Federer - has the means to win on clay and shouldn't be forgotten despite his second round exit in Miami. Defending champion Guillermo Coria will be delighted to come back to his favourite surface along with Gaston Gaudio, David Nalbandian, Carlos Moya and, more intriguing, 2003 Roland Garros winner Juan-Carlos Ferrero. Ferrero lost in a hurry to a jet-lagged Nadal 6/1 6/2 last week in his home tournament in Valencia. An early exit in Monte Carlo would trigger serious doubts about his ability to return to his past form.

Daniel
04-12-2005, 07:03 AM
Federer blocks Rusedski's path
By Mark Hodgkinson in Monte Carlo
(Filed: 11/04/2005)


The roar of displeasure was probably heard all the way along the Côte d'Azur. Greg Rusedski had thought about skipping the European clay-court season in its entirety and avoiding a surface that has never done him any favours, but after gamely changing his mind and deciding to play in Monte Carlo, his reward was a first-round meeting with Roger Federer.

Rusedski may wonder why he bothered. It is approaching four years since he last won a Tour match on clay, he has never reached the second round here and he will not exactly have a force-field of confidence for his match against the world No 1, a man apart in tennis who has 48 victories from his past 49 matches.

Rusedski has been unable to conquer clay-court tennis because his natural game, and especially the brutish power of his service arm, is deadened by the slow, high bounce. His groundstrokes have never been his weapons, and as soon as he and Federer settle into a baseline rally, the Swiss is likely to be in the ascendancy. Federer will be relieved to have avoided a dirt-court specialist.

The Monte Carlo Country Club is in sombre mood after the death last week of Prince Rainier of Monaco. All extra festivities have been cancelled at the Masters Series event, the first major European tournament of the season. "I remember how much Prince Rainier embraced this tournament. It will be difficult to play tennis at this time," Federer said.

Tim Henman, a semi-finalist at the French Open last year, has an intriguing return to clay. Mariano Zabaleta has won all three of their meetings on the dirt, and the Argentine will be playing in his fifth clay-court tournament of the season, after four events in South America. It is a tough start for Henman, who reached the quarter-finals in Monte Carlo last year and has a doubles title to defend here.

Daniel
04-12-2005, 07:06 AM
Federer braced for clay-court backlash
Star would like to prove he can excel on surface
Updated: 1:28 p.m. ET April 9, 2005MONTE CARLO - Roger Federer rolls into Monte Carlo next week looking to continue his dominance of men’s tennis with a fourth consecutive Masters Series victory.


After winning the Masters Cup in Houston to cap a breathtaking 2004, the Swiss phenomenon has been virtually unbeatable this year and claimed back-to-back Masters Series titles in Indian Wells and Miami.

With just one defeat, in the semifinal of the Australian Open, since last year’s Olympics, Federer has established an aura of invincibility not seen since Pete Sampras was at his peak.

The start of the European clay-court season, however, could level the playing field, with a long list of baseline grinders lining up for a shot at the quadruple grand slam winner.

The 23-year-old Federer already has two Wimbledons under his belt, along with an Australian and a U.S. Open title, although he will be well aware that clay has proved a sticky surface for some of the game’s greatest players.

Federer, though, beat Argentina’s Guillermo Coria to win the Hamburg Masters last year and, unlike Sampras, has the all-court game to claim a French Open title.

The glitzy surrounds of the Monte Carlo Country Club will provide an early clue as to Federer’s chances at Roland Garros.

He took a week off after beating Spain’s Rafael Nadal in the final of the Nasdaq-100 and will need his batteries fully charged to come through a draw loaded with Argentines and Spaniards.

Coria, the 2004 champion, leads the Argentine challenge along with French Open champion Gaston Gaudio, while the 19-year-old Spaniard Nadal, who led Federer two sets to love in Miami, will be a formidable obstacle.

World No. 3 Andy Roddick, Australian Open champion Marat Safin and Briton Tim Henman add weight to a high-quality draw, although Safin’s upbringing on Spanish claycourts makes him the better bet of that trio.

Brazil’s Gustavo Kuerten and Spaniard Juan Carlos-Ferrero will arrive at Monte Carlo with fond memories, having both won the title twice.

However Kuerten, winner in 1999 and 2001, was thrashed on his return from a hip injury in Valencia last week and Ferrero, winner in 2002 and 2003, was humbled by Nadal at the same tournament.

babsi
04-12-2005, 07:49 AM
Thank you,Daniel :)
for taking the time to post all the articles - that´s alot too read :) - love it!




__________________________________________________ ____
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unprediclable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

avocadoe
04-12-2005, 12:39 PM
Andy's not in Monte Carlo except under an assumed name :)

avocadoe
04-12-2005, 12:45 PM
thanks Daniel for the articles...is a kilo 2.2 pounds?

Nocko
04-12-2005, 12:56 PM
Thanks Daniel, intresting articles!! :worship:

Yasmine
04-12-2005, 01:18 PM
thanks Daniel for the articles...is a kilo 2.2 pounds?
yes ;) a pound is about 450g if I'm right:p

SUKTUEN
04-12-2005, 04:57 PM
thanks Daniel~

RogiNie
04-12-2005, 06:43 PM
thanx for the articles :D

and Yasmine.. nice avatar!! ;)

SUKTUEN
04-13-2005, 05:27 PM
I change my avarat too

avocadoe
04-13-2005, 06:25 PM
nice new avatar, Suketan...so handsome :)

RogiNie
04-14-2005, 01:57 PM
R. FEDERER /A. Montanes

6‑3, 6‑4

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Spanish player on clay, it's always a good test?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think so. Yeah, you're right. Yeah, you could see the difference between today's and yesterday's match. It's obvious. He plays much further back. The rallies are played very differently. Of course now I've played two lefties in a row, you know, so it was a change again to play against a right‑hander even though I practice a lot with them. In the match, again, the rallies are very different.

But, no, I thought it was a solid performance and what I needed today, so...

Q. Suddenly, you're playing all these left‑handers. We were saying there were so few on the tour. Now you've been playing one after the other.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, so for this reason, you know, it's good to play a righty again. Those are almost the classic matchups, lefties against righties. You always have the feeling that the rallies are very different.

Yeah, so today was good, you know. He's got a very simple kick serve, actually, but it takes off and you have to get used to it to return it, especially on the ad side. I was struggling at the beginning but started to play better. I'm happy with today's performance.

Q. You're not looking as convincing on your serve as you usually do. Is this a worry for you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no. Not really.

Q. Roger , is it a kind of distraction not to close it out when you're two breaks up and serving 5‑2?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, not a huge concern, you know, because you got the cushion of two breaks. But, yeah, you want to have a good start on your last service game, you know. He messed up with the one dropshot he wanted to hit at 0‑0, you know, 5‑4. That would have put him in a good position, you know, if he would have won that point. But from then on, it was over.

But, yeah, I'm happy to in the end come through. I've had some matches in the past over the years, you know, where you're up a break and you lose the game and you lose the set and, in the end, you know, could end up losing the match. So it kind of makes you a little nervous.

But today I felt good on my serve. I think for this reason I wasn't really in a panic reaction. So it was good.

Q. Can you just talk a little bit about the next match, whether it would be Fernando or Mario ?

ROGER FEDERER: They haven't played yet?

Q. No.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, so it's going to be quite different, I think. They play with much more power than Montanes today. Of course, Mario , I've played him now over the last couple months twice, so I know how he plays. Gonzalez is always good on clay. I beat him in Hamburg last year, I think in the third round it was. On any given day he can beat anybody on clay.

So it's a dangerous matchup, you know, either way. Because you know Mario has got the big serve and puts pressure on you to hold your own serve. On clay he might be playing very different; I don't know. But he beat Kuerten , so it shows he's playing well.

Looking forward to a tough match, of course. Now the tough opponents are really coming, so I'd rather make sure I'm playing well.

Q. Is it much quicker here when there's a sunny day like today?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I had the feeling, you know, it was more difficult to return but also easier to serve, you know. So those are the reasons.

Yeah, it was quite a big difference to yesterday, yeah.

Q. You've made no secret of the fact that your chief aim this year is to retain your Wimbledon title. Is it about records? I mean, is it the four of Sampras , the five of Borg that you're after, or is it something else?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no, not really. It's just it's my favorite tournament. It's the one I've always looked up to. My idols, Becker and Edberg , this is where they played well. This is where I remember it was the most coverage on TV. Always wanted to, you know, maybe play myself there or be just like them. That was the obvious court, Wimbledon Centre Court . For this reason it will always stay my number one dream tournament to win.

It doesn't mean for me the French is not important. In my mind, in the back of my mind, I know I've got the French , you know, and not Wimbledon . So I think that is also a good sign. It really shows the importance of the upcoming clay court season and the French Open , yeah.

Q. Are you going to reconsider your position in Davis Cup ? Are you going to play this year or...?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I'm waiting for the draw, you know, in a way. I think it's on the 3rd of May, is it, and see what happens. But I'm planning to play, so this is the plan for the moment.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

SUKTUEN
04-14-2005, 02:59 PM
thanks :worship: :wavey:

babsi
04-14-2005, 03:37 PM
Thanks,RogiNie :)



___________________________________________
So make the best of this test and don´t ask why.
It´s not a question,but a lesson learned in time.
It´s something unpredictable,but in the end it´s right.
I hope you had the time of your life.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Stevens Point
04-14-2005, 05:03 PM
For Chinese people, other Asian people, and other people in the world :) (well, for everybody). From ATP.com April 14th 2005

Chinese Fans Vote Federer 'Most Popular Player'

World No. 1 Roger Federer has been voted ‘Most Popular Player’ by Chinese Tennis Magazine. Federer finished ahead of Marat Safin and Andy Roddick in the poll that attracted more than 50,000 votes, cast via the internet and magazine and newspaper polls.

Federer thanked Asian fans for their support through a video message at the China Tennis Summit and Tennis Billboard Awards Ceremony. "Thank you very much for this award. It’s a big honor for me to receive this award from all the Chinese people. I’m looking forward to coming to China later this year."

Federer, who earlier in the year also won the ATPtennis.com Fans’ Favorite Award presented by RICOH, has endeared himself to Asian fans. Last year he devoted a day to media interviews in Hong Kong en route to the Thailand Open, where he ultimately claimed his 10th title of the 2004 season. Federer reached the semifinals of Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai in 2002 and, as the leader of the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race, looks likely to return to Shanghai in November for the 2005 Tennis Masters Cup.

The ATP has awarded the prestigious Tennis Masters Cup to Shanghai for the next three years and sees Asia as a growth engine for the sport of tennis. Brad Drewett, ATP Managing Director, International Group, attended the awards ceremony and also took in a site visit to the new state-of-the-art Qi Zhong (pronounced Chi-Jong) Tennis Center. The tennis facility, which will become Asia’s biggest, is being built on 80 acres in the Minghang district, 27 kilometers southwest of the city.

Construction at the site is on schedule and phase one, to be completed in July 2005, will include a unique 15,000-seat stadium with a striking magnolia-shaped roof and 10 indoor and 10 outdoor courts. When phase two is completed in 2006, the facility will boast 40 courts including a second indoor/outdoor stadium with an 8,000-seat capacity.

mitalidas
04-14-2005, 05:27 PM
SUKTUEN -- I am sure you voted a million times yourself on the above :)

yanchr
04-14-2005, 05:36 PM
:eek: Why I don't know it :eek:
Guess I was so wrong to think Roger surely wouldn't top JC or Safin in the number of fans here :p How could I underestimate Roger's charm :p I'm so happy for Roger :bounce:

Thanks Stevens :D

Daniel
04-15-2005, 02:58 AM
Federer struggles as Safin crashes in Monte Carlo

Thu Apr 14, 5:03 PM ET World Sports - AFP



MONACO (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer struggled to subdue battling Chilean Fernando Gonzalez to reach the Monte Carlo Masters quarter-finals and take his winning streak to 25 matches this year.


AFP Photo



The top seed won 6-2, 6-7 (3/7), 6-4 in 2hr 21min of topsy-turvy centre court action and will face French teenager Richard Gasquet for a place in the semi-finals.


Federer, who now boasts a 35-1 winning record in 2005, is chasing a sixth title of the year and is hoping to become the first player to win three Masters in a row.

Daniel
04-15-2005, 02:59 AM
Federer sympathy as Monaco prepares for Rainier funeral

Thu Apr 14, 2:12 PM ET Entertainment - AFP



MONACO (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer said Thursday that the people of Monaco will be in his thoughts when the funeral of Prince Rainier takes place.


AFP/File Photo



The Swiss star, who is due to take on French teenager Richard Gasquet in the quarter-finals on Friday, said that he believes the royal family would have wanted the tournament to carry on as normal despite being in mourning.


"We are only a few kilometres away so it touches you more. You feel for the people," said the 23-year-old.


"I'm happy not to be playing first on Friday. The atmosphere here will still be alright because I think the family, they love the sport, and I think that maybe they want the tournament to take place.


"So I hope we will have an enjoyable tennis day, but of course it's in the shadow of the funeral, that's very clear."


Friday's schedule here has been put back to 1430 local time (1230GMT) as a mark of respect for the funeral service of Monaco's long time ruler who died last week at the age of 81.

Daniel
04-15-2005, 03:02 AM
R. FEDERER /F. Gonzalez

6‑2, 6‑7, 6‑4

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Roger , you seemed to lose your way a bit there. How did you get it back?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm used to it now, you know. It's happened a few times.

But, no, seriously, I thought, you know, I played all right again, but just couldn't close it out. So of course it is worrying, you know. But as long as I could still end up winning the match, everything is all right, you know.

So I had the feeling the conditions were getting really quick in the end, you know. I had the feeling for him it was better, you know, the shorter the rallies were.

So, you know, in the third it was different again because they put water on the court. I think that was, again, better for my game. But that was just the feeling I had.

Q. What bothered you about his game the most?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, he's very up and down. Because he hits the ball very hard, you know, he's got sometimes a little bit less margin. It's sometimes tough to get the rhythm against him because he uses a lot of spin as well.

But, you know, he's got these times where he's not serving well, you know, then suddenly when he needs it, he puts in a few big serves. When he really wants, his forehand is terrific.

He's a dangerous player, you know, but I had the feeling I was controlling that in the beginning. Maybe midway through the second I started to lose it a little bit.

Q. You did a very gentlemanly thing. You played a let on matchpoint.

ROGER FEDERER: Matchpoint?

Q. Yeah, at 6‑5, advantage to you.

ROGER FEDERER: I think that was Love‑15 maybe. 30‑All. That would have been for matchpoint.

I don't remember.

But it was clearly in, you know. It was not even a moment of doubt to actually walk up to the line, because I heard the line (smiling).

I don't know. On clay it's easy to give each other points. If you can call it fair play, I don't know, because the umpire will come down anyway so...

Q. So another up‑and‑coming 18‑year‑old to play now...

ROGER FEDERER: Getting old, geez (smiling).

Q. You're a veteran. Gasquet was saying you're one of the few players he's never practiced with even.

ROGER FEDERER: It's not easy to get to practice with me (laughing).

Q. Have you seen much of him at all, Gasquet ?

ROGER FEDERER: Saw him a little bit this week but because he plays mostly on the challenger tour, I don't get to see him much. Of course the tournaments where he gets wildcards, where he gets in, especially the French tournaments, then I get to see him always.

What I've seen, he likes the clay and he's a good player on it, you know. Maybe people expected for sure too much too soon. I mean, similar with me, you know; so I know exactly what he was going through.

I hope for him that he's had his ‑ I don't know ‑ maybe good times off court also. Maybe now it's all tennis business for him. He's showing this week and also the last couple of weeks, from what I've heard, that he wants to get to the top. That is a good sign for him.

Q. It's almost an eerie day tomorrow, strange day tomorrow.

ROGER FEDERER: Hmm.

Q. You're here, No. 1 player in the world, playing tennis, and there's a massive funeral going on. It's a very odd situation, the sort of thing that you would not expect normally, you know, because it's something you don't have to cope with.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's not much people see about it. I think we'll follow it on TV, as well; same with the Pope, you know. It's very similar. Now we're a few kilometers away basically, so of course it touches you more. You know, you feel for those people.

I'm happy I'm not playing at 2:30 tomorrow straightaway, first on. I'm happy the people will get used to it. The atmosphere will still be all right because I think the family, they also love the sport, and I think maybe they want the tournament to take place.

So I hope, you know, we'll still have an enjoyable tennis day. But of course it will be in the shadow of the funeral, that's very clear.

Q. Gasquet was saying you're one of his idols and it will be hard to concentrate. Do you remember a similar situation when you were maybe around his age and were going to play one of your idols?

ROGER FEDERER: I remember a couple years ago he said Safin was his idol so (laughing)...

Q. Not anymore.

ROGER FEDERER: Not anymore, I guess, yeah (smiling).

He played him here first round or second round, didn't he, after he beat Squillari . That was the last time I was here. I remember him saying that, too.

I don't know what to answer on this one. He'll concentrate well enough, I'm sure about that.

Q. After the tour moved from the hard courts to the clay court, it seems that you didn't want to change your way of playing or your tactics; you're still using a lot of topspin and playing serve‑volley, coming to the net. How is it possible? What's the reason you are playing like normal?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think to change your whole game just because
you're changing surfaces is the wrong way to do it, you know. That's my opinion.

But, you know, again, I always adapt very much to who I play, you know. I think for instance yesterday I played much more serve and volley than I played today. Why, I don't really know, it's just the feeling I had to do it. I play very much with my feeling I have, and it's been working out for me this way. So I'll keep it for sure this way also against Gasquet and against any other player.

You know, I feel good from the baseline, you know. On clay you have more time to set up the shot, and this actually allows you to sometimes take much more offense. Defense, sometimes it can get really tough, especially on the quick clay court where it's quite slippery.

I don't know. I feel good on the surface, you know, but I always adapt to my opponents.

Yasmine
04-16-2005, 07:47 AM
I haven't seen the interview posted yet;) so here it is!

R. GASQUET /R. Federer

6‑7, 6‑2, 7‑6

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English , please.

Q. It was exciting to watch, but how frustrating was it for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, of course it's rather frustrating, you know, after having matchpoint and ending up losing. So of course frustration is high and disappointment is there, too.

But, you know, he played good, you know, when it mattered. He could have closed it out earlier. He missed it, though. That gave me a chance, I came back. I should have won it.

But it was a close match. I thought it was good, quality tennis.

Q. What is it about his game that worried you most?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I couldn't quite understand the way he was playing. You know, in the beginning he was rather pushing the ball. In the second, he was just hitting clean winners all the time.

And to do that on a regular basis, I find it very hard, you know. But you don't get those players very much anymore, you know. You would consider Gonzalez a dangerous player, you know, but he tees off of both sides on the run. On the return, it doesn't matter.

You just don't face opponents like this these days. I guess this was a little unusual for me. You know, he played great in the second set, in the beginning of the third. Really played into this zone where you had the feeling there was no more you could do, you know. And that's a little bit how I felt, too.

I would have to play him, you know, more often to really get a sense of, you know, how consistent he is, you know. But he's definitely played a great match today.

Q. It seemed you had some problems to return his serve, especially the second serve. Did you feel you did not return as well as you usually do?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't want to say I played a bad match or a great match. It was just a match where I was hanging in there, you know. For this reason, I missed maybe forehands I don't miss, I missed backhands I don't miss. I played good forehands, too.

It was just a very okay performance, you know, by my side. You know, of course with my experience and with all I have, you know, I can hang into these matches, you know, and when it matters, usually I could raise the bar. Today it almost happened again. But you can't get it out of every match like this, of course.

I mean, I thought, you know, the unfortunate was that I couldn't hang on with him in the second set when he started to really, you know, change his game. Because this is when I would get him frustrated. I think then the match could really turn my way very quickly, you know.

But I wouldn't say, you know, my return was bad today. It was just all right, you know. Same as the rest of my game.

Q. How good is Gasquet now, and how good can he become from what you've seen today?

ROGER FEDERER: I've hardly seen him play on other surfaces than clay. He stands very far back and he's got a great backhand, you know. I feel he can really hit it extremely hard, you know, both ways ‑ up the line and crosscourt.

I have the feeling he returns well, especially off the second serve, you know. But how that's gonna do on the hard courts and everything, you know, I don't know.

But he also showed that, you know, like in the second set, in the beginning of the third, when he was taking his chances also, taking the return early, he's a very dangerous player.

He's definitely got the tools, you know. It's a matter of consistency. That's what I was struggling with in the beginning. I think that's what he was doing, too.

I think a result like here at Monte‑Carlo , at least the semis, will boost his motivation to really go at it.

Q. When you have such a long winning run, does that actually create a tension of its own? Does it weigh on you at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, in a way, it does. It's tough to wake up every morning knowing you have to defend your streak or defend your, let's say, Top 10 record, or the finals streak, the streaks I'm having, you know. I have the feeling at the moment I'm playing against history, against the other players. So it's not so easy also.

I'm happy the way I'm coping with it. So far it's been doing me good and not harm, so that's a good sign.

Q. Is it more difficult for you on clay to find your timing? You missed a few shots that you don't miss usually. You can't take the ball as early as you do.

ROGER FEDERER: It always depends on who you play. We're still very early in the season. I'm happy with the way I played this week, you know, to be honest.

Of course I always hope to play well, to keep the streak alive, and all those things. But still, you know, to win three matches here and play, you know, be so close to make it to the semis again of the Masters Series , it's just not some bunny event we're playing here, we're playing the real deal.

So this is still a pretty good result for a first tournament on clay. On this, I can build. I know what I have to kind of work on. I know where I can still improve. I know what has been going well. For the season, I think it was the right choice to come to Monaco .

Q. In terms of the French Open , is this a setback or do you feel you have plenty of time between now and Roland Garros to prepare?

ROGER FEDERER: No, this is not a setback at all. It's still too early. Also if I would have won it, it wouldn't help me much, you know, because, you know, the French is the French ; it's the best‑of‑five. Only there we will see really how good I'm playing. But I think this is a good start to the clay court season.

Q. I think you never even practiced against Gasquet . You obviously don't know from experience how to play against him. Does it create that problem itself, that you haven't practiced against him?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I feel like it's an advantage for him, you know, because he's seen me play thousands of times, you know. I never get to see him. I mean, it's a little advantage.

But on the other hand, you know, I have all the experience. But then again he's got nothing to lose. It kind of makes it tough to play players like this. I've lost to a few youngsters now over the last couple of years, but they played good matches, they took chances, they played well when it mattered, and that's why they beat me.

As long as I keep on losing, you know, losing so tight, it's okay. If I lose Love and 1 against these guys, then I have a problem, you know.

So I can walk away with these matches pretty all right.

Q. He said yesterday he might be a bit intimidated against you on court. He didn't seem very intimidated.

ROGER FEDERER: Nothing I could say about that.

Q. What would you say his chances are at the French Open ?

ROGER FEDERER: Still so far away. He's got the home crowd, you know. The French , they are huge supporters for their own players. For this reason, he's going to be tough, you know. He's still young, you know, so don't expect him to win it right away.

Q. You almost lost with Nadal , and you lost with Gasquet . The new generation coming up, is it more dangerous for you because maybe you don't know them, they have nothing to lose? What is your opinion?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, Nadal is ‑‑ of course they are the same age, but Nadal , it seems like he's been around. I don't want to say he looks more mature, but he's played more big matches, you know, for instance the Davis Cup finals. Has Gasquet played a 27,000‑seater? No, he hasn't. He's just got that little bit of advance, you know, over Gasquet . But they definitely got both a great game. We've been talking about them for a long time, so...

It's nice to see also Monfils getting all the wildcards and making it, you know, come along, you know. So not only we have our generation, and Agassi is still playing, but we also have the youngsters coming. So it's great for the game. This is going to be interesting for the future, you know, to see how the youngsters can play against our generation, and then our generation, how we go with Agassi and Henman , let's say, and maybe Moya you almost got to put in there. I think it's a very interesting time in tennis right now.

Q. The only two matches you lost, you had matchpoints.

ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling).

Q. What that means?

ROGER FEDERER: I choke badly (laughing).

I don't know. It's a tough one, you know. Of course it crosses your mind at times ‑ the last match you lost was a matchpoint, you know you saved them already, suddenly you miss your first, you're like, "Oh, my God, if I lose this now again..."

It's just in the heat of the moment you've got to take the right choices. I thought on the one forehand I had matchpoint on I should have gone to his forehand. But I also just missed it by a little bit, you know.

So, I mean, what can I say, you know? He played well. He deserved to win so...

Q. Did you try to keep away from his backhand as much as possible?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I just had the feeling, you know, for me it was better to go to his forehand. He hit some terrific forehands as well. Both did. Maybe his backhand is more consistent.

Q. Would you say his backhand is one of the best you've faced?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's a few. There's a few good ones around.

Q. He is French . French answer.

ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling). What is the title going to be?

No, it's always tough to tell who's got the best, especially backhand, because we got one‑handeds, we got two‑handeds. But one‑handed backhands, definitely one of the best, yes.

Q. Can you remember anybody going so deep into the court to return your second serve?

ROGER FEDERER: Deep into the court, you mean coming close?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, that's his ‑‑ how the way he plays. He commits to take a chance. And if he wants, he can half‑volley my serve. It's not going to mean anything extraordinary, I feel, you know. If he returns the way he did, you know, by playing inconsistent, that is a great effort, you know. He mixed it up sometimes. You can see when he commits, but it's still tough to get away from it because he stays back 90%, and then he comes in on a few. So I don't really feel like this is what decides the match.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French , please.

Q. It's the second time in this season that you lost a match. How do you cope with it?

ROGER FEDERER: I'm really disappointed because I had matchpoints. It's never simple to lose a match like that.

But in the third set, I was down, and I was able to come back again. He played well.

I started well on the clay. I'm happy that I came to Monte‑Carlo ; it's just a pity that I lost this match.

Q. Were you surprised by his level?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I knew it was going to be a difficult match. In the beginning already he showed he was able to play good shots. I already saw him before play extraordinary shots.

I knew I was supposed to be the favorite, but not as much as people thought. I know he said about me that I was his idol, but that didn't change anything for me. I approached that match like any other match. I saw during that match that he was able to remain for a long time at the same high level.

Q. He certainly played the best match of his career, there's no doubt about that. But you, on your side, you never gave up, so he really had to have a considerable performance.

ROGER FEDERER: Sure. Against the No. 1 player, it's very good to win a match after saving matchpoints. I suppose it's good for him and for the French press. For me, it's average.

I'm not going to say I'm happy for him, but I know these things happen. I also lost already against other young players this season, and I know they can be very dangerous because they have nothing to lose.

Q. Did you enjoy your match all the same?

ROGER FEDERER: Average. I had not only to fight against him, but also to struggle with my game. It was not a bad match on my part, but it was not the best match of my life either. In the beginning, he was remaining very passive; then he became more aggressive.

Now it still remains to be seen whether he can maintain this during a whole tournament or during a whole season. That was the next obstacle I had to fight against when I came up.

I know he has the means to do so.

Q. What do you think about the next match against Nadal and Gasquet ?

ROGER FEDERER: I would give the advantage to Nadal . Last time they played was in Estoril , and after that Nadal got injured. It will be an interesting match. Whatever happens, there will be a young player in the final, which is good for the tournament.

I also believe that in tennis nowadays we have the generation of Agassi , my generation, and the young players, so it's an interesting time for tennis.

SUKTUEN
04-16-2005, 10:39 AM
Roger You are the Best!!

Daniel
04-22-2005, 02:55 AM
indeed,

thanks dancing queen for the interview :)

Puschkin
04-22-2005, 01:33 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Federer

For all those you are a little bit bored and not lucky enough to be in Basel today.

SUKTUEN
04-22-2005, 02:33 PM
GOOOOOO Roger!~`

I love the video of Nike new TV avd~~

Daniel
04-27-2005, 01:02 AM
Thanks Pushkin :)

babsi
04-27-2005, 07:05 AM
Thanks for the link,Puschkin :)




_________________
Is she trouble,
like I´m trouble
make it a double
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Daniel
04-27-2005, 07:32 AM
Serving up the next Roger Federer

swissinfo April 20, 2005 10:34 AM




The project is going nationwide (Swiss Tennis)
The Swiss Tennis Association has launched a programme to persuade more youngsters to pick up a racket – and perhaps unearth the next Roger Federer.

"Kidstennis", which was launched on Wednesday, aims to increase the number of registered young players in Switzerland by 15 per cent over the next five years.






"This project is not simply designed to produce champions," said Sandra Kirchhofer, from the association’s marketing team.

"Its main aim is to introduce children to tennis, get them interested in the game and playing competitively."

The scheme, which is aimed at children aged 4-12, was launched at the National Tennis Centre in Biel in western Switzerland.

The coaching regime has been specially tailored for youngsters, who will undergo a series of tests at the end of each of the four training levels. They will also play short-court tournaments under simplified rules.

At the end of the year around 30 tournament winners will be picked to join members of the national squad for a day-long training session in Biel on December 15.

According to the tennis association, around 4,500 children are expected to enrol for the first year of kidstennis, with this figure rising to 10,000 a year by 2009.

Organisers hope that the number of registered young players will grow over the same period from the current 13,500 to 15,500.

Federer and Schnyder

The Swiss count only two of their number among the top 100 players in the world: world number one Federer and Patty Schnyder.

But Kirchhofer denies that the kidstennis programme is solely about grooming stars for the future.

"This is already in safe hands," she told swissinfo. "Robin Roshardt, the European under-16 number one, is there to prove it."

Roshardt, who comes from Zurich, won two International Tennis Federation (ITF) under-18 tournaments in Thailand and Malaysia in November last year.

Shortly afterwards his 15-year-old compatriot Stefanie Vögele won an ITF under-18 tournament in Kuala Lumpur.

The Swiss Tennis Association plans to stage ten kidstennis events across the country over the summer to introduce the concept to the public.

Top players, including Federer, are backing the project and some of them will take part in the end-of-year training session.

swissinfo, Raphael Donzel

SUKTUEN
04-27-2005, 04:05 PM
Thanks Daniel ~~~ :worship:

Who is the sexy gun in your avarat ? :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Stevens Point
04-28-2005, 06:59 PM
Swiss medias are reporting that Roger might not be playing in Gstaad this year, but Roger himself hasn't called it off yet, so he might be playing.... Who knows. We will know by the time of the tournament in Hamburg when the registration for Gstaad is due.

from www.20min.ch

Federer fehlt in Gstaad wahrscheinlich

TENNIS - Vieles deutet darauf hin, dass Roger Federer erstmals seit 1998 nicht in Gstaad antreten wird. Abgesagt hat der Schweizer Weltranglisten-Erste beim Allianz Suisse Open (2. bis 10. Juli) aber noch nicht.

Noch hoffen die Organisatoren, wissen aber, dass ihr Turnier in der Woche nach Wimbledon und zwischen Rasen- und Hartplatzsaison aus Federers Optik denkbar ungünstig platziert ist. Andererseits ist Federer emotional mit dem Turnier verbunden. "Wir planen so, als wäre Federer nicht dabei", erklärte Claudio Hermenjat, der stellvertretende Turnierdirektor.

Federer sagte dem Turnier, das heuer sein 90-jähriges Bestehen feiert, noch nicht defitiniv ab. Turnierdirektor Jacques "Köbi" Hermenjat trifft Federer übernächste Woche in Hamburg wieder. Köbi Hermenjat: "Nach Hamburg läuft die Anmeldefrist ab."

babsi
04-29-2005, 11:03 AM
He skiped the first round of the Davis-Cup - so his fellow countrymen and -women might get angry,if he does not play Gstaad,saying he does not care for them anymore.

But to be honest - it would make more sence not to play - anyway,I´m glad it´s not me,who has to make,that desition.

Oh,and thank you for the article,Stevens Point :)

___________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how I´m supposed to be
in the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Dirk
04-29-2005, 01:19 PM
Glad he is still considering it. I'm sure his people would more than understand. It is hard because who knows how well he will do at Wimbledon. If he goes far or wins it, then it makes it tough because you can't expect him to go deep in Gstaad every year if he goes deep at Wimbly. If he loses early then he can prepare better for Gstaad but at the same time he might not want to play tennis so soon after losing early and being hurt by it.

If Roger doesn't play this event anymore or skips it here and there, the people will have to understand. Roger's health if the biggest issue here. I am glad the director will meet him in Hamburg to discuss this more. Roger wants to do the right thing, but at what expense?

Nocko
04-29-2005, 01:22 PM
Thank you Stevens. I thought about Gstaad since last year. This claycourt season is much tougher than last year for Rogi. After Wimby, he must be very very very tired. I think Swiss supporters should allow him to have a rest after Wimby. :hug: But of course it is very dificult decision for Rogi , so.... :unsure:
Anyway I hope Rogi stay fit for whole year. :bowdown:

*M*
04-29-2005, 04:06 PM
I think it'd be nice if Roger could maybe play an exhibition and make an appearance there for the fans, but not have to actually play the tournament.

Stevens Point
04-29-2005, 06:32 PM
Swiss fans had a great understanding when he made a decision not to compete in the first round of Davis Cup this year. And after his team's loss to Holland, nobody seems to be blaming Roger... So whatever decision he would make for Gstaad, we would support him because we want it to be the best for him.

And, *M*, I think it is a nice idea that he makes an appearance there for an exhibition match, in the case he doesn't compete.

TenHound
04-30-2005, 03:12 AM
Couldn't they reschedule it for him? He is The Tennis God of All Time - sorry Pete & Bjorn, no offense intended - he is pure Swiss (1/2 genetically) & it's a small tournament??? Maybe move it forward one week?

I completely understand that it would be nuts for Roger to play it. Yet, it really gets my goat, when players get too big to play in front of their home fans. When Coria, who I enjoy immensely, took a pile to play Marseille this yr. rather than Buenos Aires, I thght. that was utterly disgusting. He's rich enough & his country needed him......I know it's different for the Swiss since Europe is small & the Swiss much more affluent, but I sure hope they work something out.

After all, you cannot possibly see Roger too many times at the height of his powers!!!

Nocko
04-30-2005, 05:13 AM
I think you guys here already knew...Rogi won't play at Rome. :sad: I got this news from Rome thread here and from RF com.'s chatroom. No informations on ATP site or Tournament's site yet. I wonder why. I hope he is just tired. :bowdown:

SUKTUEN
04-30-2005, 06:00 AM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Is Roger fine ??? He just be tired ? Isn't he ?????? :bigcry: :bigcry:

GOD Please Bless Roger be good~~~ :worship: :worship: :worship: :angel:

WyveN
04-30-2005, 06:04 AM
Hope Roger isn't injured and pulled out to rest, cant blame him for resting with he amount of matches he has played. Rome sure will be boring though.

SUKTUEN
04-30-2005, 06:08 AM
Roger plaease be good and health~~ :hug: :hug:

PaulieM
04-30-2005, 06:10 AM
has there been any official news??

SUKTUEN
04-30-2005, 06:12 AM
no

PaulieM
04-30-2005, 06:23 AM
if it is, rogi's just being considerate. he knows that i have exams next week and wants me to focus instead of worrying about his matches. so sweet of him ;)

SUKTUEN
04-30-2005, 06:30 AM
if it is, rogi's just being considerate. he knows that i have exams next week and wants me to focus instead of worrying about his matches. so sweet of him ;)

:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

babsi
04-30-2005, 09:38 AM
Good Luck for your exames,PaulieM :)

I´m not saying you need it - because I´m sure you are well prepared - there was time enough the last two week.

Thanks for all the posts everyone :)


___________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how I´m supposed to be
In the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
04-30-2005, 09:45 AM
HI

yanchr
04-30-2005, 11:57 AM
if it is, rogi's just being considerate. he knows that i have exams next week and wants me to focus instead of worrying about his matches. so sweet of him ;)
Lucky for you...
and good luck to your exams :)

You know we'll have the next whole week off for some national holidays, and NO ROGER which there is meant to be :mad: :mad: :bigcry: Oh well, just have to face the music now and actually all the time...

I hope his foot is nothing serious, just a small excuse for pulling out. I want to see a fresh Roger ready to defend his Hamburg the week after next and do what he wants in RG...

Daniel
05-01-2005, 09:18 PM
Hello guys :wavey:

Paulie, good luck in your examans

Suktuen , the gu y in th eavatar is a french ru gby player ;)


Roger Federer for warm-up in HallePublished: Saturday, 30 April, 2005, 09:16 AM Doha Time

LONDON: Wimbledon champion Roger Federer will take his tried and tested route to the grasscourt grand slam this year by playing the warm-up event in Halle, Germany.
Federer will be the number one seed for the 659,000 euros ($851,700) June 6-12 Gerry Weber Open, organisers said on Friday.
The Swiss will be joined by Australian Open champion Marat Safin, former Wimbledon runner-up David Nalbandian and French Open favourite Rafael Nadal on the Westfalian lawns.
While world numbers one and four Federer and Safin hone their grasscourt skills in Germany, number two Lleyton Hewitt and third-ranked
Andy Roddick will prepare for Wimbledon at London’s Queen’s Club in the 659,000 euros Stella Artois Championships.
Federer, Halle champion in 2003 and 2004, has not lost a match on grass since Wimbledon 2002.
Other confirmed entries for Halle include Spain’s Feliciano Lopez, Fernando Verdasco
and Albert Costa, wily Frenchman Fabrice Santoro, powerful Swede Joachim Johansson and home favourites Tommy Haas and Nicolas Kiefer. (Reuters)

Daniel
05-01-2005, 09:19 PM
Foot Injury Forces Federer Out of Rome Masters Sat Apr 30, 9:08 AM ET



ROME (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer has been forced to withdraw from next week's Rome Masters after inflaming ligaments in his feet, tournament organizers said on Saturday.

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The injury comes at a bad time in Federer's claycourt season with the Rome event considered an important tune-up for the French Open, starting at the end of May.

The 23-year-old Swiss had been hoping to win the Rome title for the first time. His best result in previous visits was a runner-up spot in 2003.

Federer has been in superb form this year, winning 35 of his 37 matches and picking up five titles, including the first two Masters Series events in Indian Wells and Miami.

He is the second top-ranked player to withdraw from the Rome Masters this week, following former world number one Lleyton Hewitt who pulled out with a toe injury.

In Federer's absence, American Andy Roddick takes over as top seed with Russia's Marat Safin, who beat Federer in the semi-finals of the Australian Open earlier this year, seeded second.

The clay court tournament begins Monday at Rome's Foro Italico stadium.

Daniel
05-01-2005, 09:21 PM
Federer's pain is Roddick's gain

James Eve | May 01, 2005 18:24 IST


Andy Roddick is likely to be the main beneficiary of the late withdrawal of world number one Roger Federer from the Rome Masters with a foot injury.

Roddick has traditionally struggled on clay, a surface that saps the power from his huge first serve, and his best result in Rome is reaching the semi-finals in 2002.

Last year's tournament holds bad memories for the American as his opening match defeat by Guillermo Canas was his only first-round exit of 2004.

This year, however, he arrives on the back of victory in Houston - his only claycourt event of the year so far - and he will be confident of beating his opening round opponent, Greg Rusedski, another big server neutered by clay.

The only serious threat to Roddick, the top seed, claiming a place in the last eight looks to be a possible second-round match against former French Open champion Alberto Costa.

Australian Open champion Marat Safin, French Open champion Gaston Gaudio and Tim Henman are the other top seeds and none of them have made it past the third round here.

Henman seems most at risk of an early exit. The Briton has a tough first-round match with three-times French Open champion Gustavo Kuerten, on the comeback trail after hip surgery.

If past form in this French Open warm-up is anything to go by, the winner of the title will be Spanish.

Spain's slow court specialists have won three of the last four Rome tournaments - Juan Carlos Ferrero triumphed in 2001 followed by Felix Mantilla in 2003 and Carlos Moya last year.

Of this trio, only Moya is back this year but the meteoric rise of 19-year-old compatriot Rafael Nadal means Spain have another serious contender.

Nadal claimed his first ATP title barely a year ago. Of the six claycourt tournaments he has played this year, Nadal has won four including last month's Master Series event in Monte Carlo where he crushed Gaudio 6-3, 6-0 in the quarter-finals.

"Nadal is definitely up there and playing great on clay," said Roddick on Saturday.

lunahielo
05-02-2005, 12:12 AM
Thanks, Daniel :hug:

PaulieM
05-02-2005, 12:29 AM
Hello guys :wavey:

Paulie, good luck in your examans

Suktuen , the gu y in th eavatar is a french ru gby player ;)


Roger Federer for warm-up in HallePublished: Saturday, 30 April, 2005, 09:16 AM Doha Time

LONDON: Wimbledon champion Roger Federer will take his tried and tested route to the grasscourt grand slam this year by playing the warm-up event in Halle, Germany.
Federer will be the number one seed for the 659,000 euros ($851,700) June 6-12 Gerry Weber Open, organisers said on Friday.
The Swiss will be joined by Australian Open champion Marat Safin, former Wimbledon runner-up David Nalbandian and French Open favourite Rafael Nadal on the Westfalian lawns.
While world numbers one and four Federer and Safin hone their grasscourt skills in Germany, number two Lleyton Hewitt and third-ranked
Andy Roddick will prepare for Wimbledon at London’s Queen’s Club in the 659,000 euros Stella Artois Championships.
Federer, Halle champion in 2003 and 2004, has not lost a match on grass since Wimbledon 2002.
Other confirmed entries for Halle include Spain’s Feliciano Lopez, Fernando Verdasco
and Albert Costa, wily Frenchman Fabrice Santoro, powerful Swede Joachim Johansson and home favourites Tommy Haas and Nicolas Kiefer. (Reuters)

thanks daniel :hug:
hope roger does well in Halle! :D

SUKTUEN
05-02-2005, 04:41 PM
thankyou so much

babsi
05-03-2005, 07:25 AM
Thank you,Daniel - nice of you :)




_____________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how I´m supposed to be
in the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Nocko
05-03-2005, 10:29 AM
Thanks Daniel. :worship:

RogiFan88
05-03-2005, 06:46 PM
Rogi's playing DC in Sep in SUI!!!!!! Check it out fr his site:

Today Roger followed the draw with great interest; he immediately decided and said:“ I will play and am delighted to support the Swiss team against Britain. Hopefully I contribute to keep the Swiss Team in the World Group of next year's Davis Cup.“

Next week Roger will play the Hamburg Masters on clay.

Stevens Point
05-03-2005, 07:20 PM
Next week Roger will play the Hamburg Masters on clay.
Thanks, RogiFan.

Is this his official confirmation that he plays in Hamburg???

RogiFan88
05-03-2005, 08:20 PM
yes it is -- he said it on his site!

RonE
05-03-2005, 09:06 PM
yes it is -- he said it on his site!
Thank goodness I am much relieved to hear this! I only hope that not playing in Rome won't affect him too much in RG :unsure:

TenHound
05-04-2005, 01:27 AM
YIKES...Not much rest for such a serious condition...Maybe the doctor spoke Romanian & he misunderstood plantar fasciitis!!!!

WyveN
05-04-2005, 09:07 AM
Thank goodness I am much relieved to hear this! I only hope that not playing in Rome won't affect him too much in RG :unsure:

It might end up helping.

Glad his playing DC, Wawrinka is having a fairly good clay season as well.

Dirk
05-04-2005, 10:25 AM
Only Roger and his doctor know how serious it is. Again people let's use our head here. I am talking to you Tenhound. Now if Roger's foot problems were very serious don't you think his record would be a little different than 35-2? He was not constantly being bothered by it, it just came and went at certain times. Roger has been off for 2 weeks and only he knows how much time his doctor gave him to take off. If it was really serious Roger I am sure would have no problem scrapping the whole clay season to heal it.

SUKTUEN
05-04-2005, 10:25 AM
Thanks :worship:

babsi
05-04-2005, 11:08 AM
Thanks,Dirk
the vioce of reason!- this one is to be taken straight.



_____________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how I´m supposed to be
in the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
05-04-2005, 01:18 PM
Hi basbi ~~~

babsi
05-04-2005, 02:58 PM
Hi SUKTUEN,
I guess the day is nearly over for you - have a good rest - it´s boring without Roger playing,isn´t it?



____________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how I´m supposed to be
in the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

TenHound
05-05-2005, 03:37 AM
Yes, Dirk. I get yr. msg.

We have no idea how serious it is & the LESS Roger says in public the better. Too bad the doctor couldn't get him out of Rome merely claiming a cyst. I'm bracing myself for a fall...And do notice that there has been a noticeable fall off in his play from last yr. Fortunately, he's so much better than everyone that he could still win, but that fall off needs to be explained.

At the least, there's a lot of uncertainty now...hell, something like that is all about uncertainty. And the opposition will probably start running him ragged all over the court, whereas before they gave up that strategy 'cuz it was obvious Roger could chase everything down & still hit Astonishing Winners. Now, it'll prob. be, go after Roger's feet time.....Suddenly, For the First Time, Roger is vulnerable And Everyone Knows It... It's Painful and Worrisome, all the moreso w/Thuggy emerging & Wimby so close. So, I'll shut up now.......

SUKTUEN
05-05-2005, 03:23 PM
Roger ~~ miss you~~

Nocko
05-05-2005, 03:32 PM
:wavey: Hi SUK~~ :hug:

SUKTUEN
05-05-2005, 03:34 PM
Have a nice sleep ~ Nocko~~~ :hug:

onm684
05-07-2005, 02:19 AM
:D

2K Sports Steps Onto The Court With Top Spin (http://ir.take2games.com/ReleaseDetail.cfm?ReleaseID=162685)


New York, NY - May 6, 2005 - 2K Sports, a publishing label of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. (NASDAQ: TTWO), today announced that it will be releasing the number one rated* tennis game, Top Spin, on the PlayStation®2 computer entertainment system. Developed by PAM Development and produced by Indie Built, a 2K Sports development studio, Top Spin for PlayStation 2 will be available this summer.

"The release of Top Spin on the PlayStation®2 gives a broader audience access to a great game, with some fantastic additions," said Steve ZoBell, president of Indie Built, Inc. "We're very excited to bring this critically acclaimed and extremely popular tennis game to PlayStation®2 owners."

Top Spin takes 16 of the top professional tennis players in the world including Maria Sharapova, Roger Federer, Venus Williams and Carlos Moya and puts them in gamers' hands to create the most realistic tennis game ever. Players must work their way up from an unranked amateur with no skills, to a top ranked player in the world with huge endorsement deals. Top Spin further pushes the edge of competition as the only PlayStation®2 tennis game playable online.

For more information, please visit www.2ksports.com (http://www.2ksports.com/)

*According to www.gamerankings.com (http://www.gamerankings.com/)

PaulieM
05-07-2005, 02:22 AM
finally a game with roger :eek: i might have to start playing video games just for this :yippee:

onm684
05-07-2005, 02:49 AM
finally a game with roger :eek: i might have to start playing video games just for this :yippee:
I usually don't play the video game. I can't control it well.
If I played "Federer" on the video game, he will be a different player. :smash:

PaulieM
05-07-2005, 03:51 AM
I usually don't play the video game. I can't control it well.
If I played "Federer" on the video game, he will be a different player. :smash:
:lol: i can only imagine what i would do to roger's beautiful game :scared: perhaps it's best if i stay away...

Daniel
05-07-2005, 09:48 PM
:lol: @ Paulie

Daniel
05-07-2005, 11:37 PM
'Awesome' Federer awaits Brits
3 May 2005

Great Britain captain Jeremy Bates insists his Davis Cup side will be relishing the opportunity to face world number one Roger Federer after being paired with Switzerland.

The rivals meet on the weekend of September 23-25 for a place in the world group of next year's competition with the all-conquering Federer expected to feature in the Swiss team.




"It's an exciting challenge. The opportunity to play against the world number one is something everyone should look forward to. It's a massive test because Federer is an awesome player," said Bates.

"I played in the Pete Sampras era and he was incredible. Some people think Federer has a little more in terms of shots but whether that's true or not, he's certainly one of the greatest to have played the sport.

"He didn't figure in Switzerland's last match against Holland but I'm working on the basis he will be playing against us. We'll certainly have to focus our attention on the second singles player and second doubles player.

"But we still have a chance of pulling off an upset - Greg Rusedski has faced Federer a few times already this year and although Federer has looked awesome, Greg has been in with a shout."

US Open boys' champion Andrew Murray could meet Federer for the first time and Bates declared the gifted 18-year-old should not be intimidated by the prospect of facing one of the all-time greats.

He said: "Team selection is wide open at the moment and I will pick it on form leading up to the tie. But Andy made a fantastic debut in Tel Aviv and I'm sure he will be one of the names coming to the fore."

Daniel
05-07-2005, 11:39 PM
It is not related to Roger directly but mentions him .

Nadal the man to beat in Paris, says Becker
May 5, 2005





Boris Becker knows a thing or two about winning grand slams as a teenager and he is convinced Spain's Rafael Nadal is the player to beat at the French Open. World number one Roger Federer will seek to complete his grand slam collection in Paris but the Swiss has a relatively poor record on the slow clay of Roland Garros and 18-year-old Nadal is on fire. "At the moment Nadal is a big favourite," Becker told Reuters. "Yes, you have (Argentine Gaston) Gaudio, the defending champion, you have (Argentine Guillermo) Coria, you have (Spain's Juan Carlos) Ferrero and you have Federer. "Federer on clay is also a big threat so you shouldn`t overlook him. But the top player right now is Rafael Nadal." Twenty years ago Becker took tennis by storm when he won the Queen's Club tournament and the first of three Wimbledon titles at the age of 17. The now-retired former world number one sees more than a hint of `Boom-Boom Boris'' Nadal, the Mallorcan who has won four tournaments this year including back-to-back clay titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona to break into the top 10 for the first time. "He is better on clay than I was," laughed Becker, who never won a claycourt tournament despite accumulating 49 titles during his career. "He is the up-and-coming new star of the tennis world and it is wonderful to see such a young kid with so much firepower and so much will to win. In a way he reminds me little bit of a young teenager in Germany 20 years ago or more. "I am often in Spain, in Mallorca. I saw him playing four or five years ago and he had the same attitude and the same energy that he brings to his tennis right now." One of Nadal's biggest advantages, Becker said, was that he possessed the fearlessness of youth. "It helps to be younger and just be very much in the zone, in the moment, just thinking about the next tennis balls," said Becker at the London launch of Nobok, a company that offers fans the chance to meet sporting greats face-to-face. "But more importantly, I think that is his attitude, his personality anyway. You cannot really switch in and out of it. He doesn''t have any fear. "He goes out and plays in front of his home crowd and wins tournaments -- that's something that will follow him through his whole career." Becker said Federer must acquire the virtue of patience in order to better his quarter-final appearance at Roland Garros in 2001.

Shy
05-08-2005, 01:39 AM
NY - May 6, 2005 - 2K Sports, a publishing label of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. (NASDAQ: TTWO), today announced that it will be releasing t:D

2K Sports Steps Onto The Court With Top Spin (http://ir.take2games.com/ReleaseDetail.cfm?ReleaseID=162685)


Top Spin takes 16 of the top professional tennis players in the world including Maria Sharapova, Roger Federer, Venus Williams and Carlos Moya and puts them in gamers' hands to create the most realistic tennis game ever. Players must work their way up from an unranked amateur with no skills, to a top ranked player in the world with huge endorsement deals. Top Spin further pushes the edge of competition as the only PlayStation®2 tennis game playable online.


About time

TenHound
05-08-2005, 01:46 AM
re the D-C- matchup. I thought i saw it headlined in the liberal Brit press as the Brits meeting Mount Federer! Maybe they could have special rules - Rusedski & Henman could team up against Roger!!

SUKTUEN
05-08-2005, 04:21 AM
Thanks

Daniel
05-08-2005, 04:50 AM
Soory the topic is not Roger in the article but again mentions him and i find the article interesting.


Battling Nadal has Federer in his sights
By Clive White in Rome
(Filed: 08/05/2005)



Rarely has a player come so far so quickly as the 18-year-old man-child Rafael Nadal. Prior to the Australian Open, his growing band of supporters had been quick to snatch up odds of 33-1 on him winning the French Open. If he wins his fifth ATP title of the year here today against Guillermo Coria, of Argentina - who beat Andre Agassi 7-5, 7-6 in the other semi - new-found supporters won't even get 2-1 on him, even though he has never played at Roland Garros in his life.



His 16th consecutive victory was without question the hardest of the lot, dug out in the kind of heat which the Foro Italico's Court Centrale seems to specialise in and against an opponent who was not about to give notice to quit, even when defeat seemed inevitable.

Spain's David Ferrer is no less a competitor than his young fellow countryman, as he had given warning of when he saved four match points against Alberto Martin in the quarter-finals. He had been beaten soundly by Nadal when the two last met, in the semi-finals of the Miami Masters a month ago, but he is as much at home on clay as his opponent and was ready to give it his all in his first Roman semi-final.

When an inside-out forehand - Nadal's favourite shot - gave the No 5 seed two match points at 5-4 in the final set the young man from Mallorca celebrated with his customary uppercut salute. If it heralded Ferrer's imminent knockout he was oblivious to it and he saved both of them, the second when he ran down a net-cord with a desire that positively hurt on-lookers fortunate enough to be just sitting in the sun. The spectators who cheered prematurely - there was a lot of that in this match - should have known better as both players had made some exceptional gets.

Besides, a net-cord would have been a cruel end to Ferrer's campaign. The supreme effort he expended in that 10th game, however, seemed to have taken it toll on him physically and the 13th break of service in this match was duly recorded in the very next game. Ferrer threw up his hands in despair when another net-cord this time went against him in the 12th game and then a majestic backhand passing shot gave Nadal another two match points. This time there was no coming back for Ferrer and after one minute short of 2½ hours he was finally done for, beaten 4-6, 6-4, 7-5. Aftewards, Nadal sportingly conceded that Ferrer had been the better player in the first two sets.

If Nadal wins today he will be just 10 points behind Roger Federer in the Indesit Champions Race going into Hamburg where he could overtake the world's No1. The temptation to put one over the Swiss, whom he had been within two points of beating in that memorable Miami final Nadal, must be great, but one does wonder whether he ought not give the German Masters event a miss. There were times yesterday, not surprisingly, when he looked weary from his exertions this year and afterwards admitted to feeling tired mentally as well as physically.

Someone who needs to be in Hamburg, though, is Tim Henman. While the British No1 maintains he is feeling better going into this French Open than he has ever done, the fact remains that at this point in his preparations for the clay season's premier event he has played less than half as many games as he did last year, when, of course, he achieved an all-time best semi-final place at Roland Garros. If by "feeling better" he means his health, that, fingers crossed, at least may be true. He started the Paris event last year suffering from a virus.

He certainly doesn't seem quite as relaxed as he did last year, when a carefree mood helped take him to the quarter-finals at the Monte Carlo Masters on a surface he had hitherto never really mastered. That was three rounds further than he went this year, although in the damp conditions that prevailed he was never likely to enjoy himself.

But what helped prime him perfectly for Paris last year was the amount of competitive play on the clay he was able to get in, which was aided by a successful run in the doubles at the principality event. In fact, he and the Croatian Nenad Zimonjic ended up winning it and having their names engraved in marble like all previous winners at the Monte Carlo Country Club.But most importantly from Henman's point of view, he played 107 games on the red dust in that event alone. At this year's event, in harness with Yves Allegro, of Switzerland, he lost in the first round.

Henman is going to have hope that he has an extended run in Hamburg, his last event before Paris, although the slowness of the court and the weather conditions there are likely to favour him much less than they did here.

RogiNie
05-08-2005, 10:02 AM
thanks Daniel :)

SUKTUEN
05-08-2005, 05:00 PM
Thakyou Daneil~~~ :worship: :wavey:

babsi
05-09-2005, 09:19 AM
Thanks,Daniel - for taking the time :)



____________________________________
There´s nothing wrong with me
this is how i´m supposed to be
in the land of make believe
that don´t believe in me
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Nocko
05-09-2005, 03:37 PM
Thanks!! :hug:

Puschkin
05-10-2005, 05:43 AM
Swiss newspaper "Neue Zürcher Zeitung" in its paper version from 10 May has a short article about Roger's match against Verdasco. But more interesting is the following: Roger will go to RG six (!) days before the tourney starts, as early as never before.

Start worrying, boys, he means business ;)

babsi
05-10-2005, 06:36 AM
Great to hear,Puschkin - yes, he means busimess this time!

He arrived very early at the USO - that work out just fine, so keep your fingers crossed!



____________________________________
The time has come and it´s going nowhere
nobody ever said that life was fair now
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

ytben
05-10-2005, 06:58 AM
Start worrying, boys, he means business ;)

Done! :scared: :scared: :help: :help:

Seriously I am getting zero coverage for RG, so I will be a complete nervous wreck around that time :o

avocadoe
05-10-2005, 11:35 AM
http://62.201.170.1/livescoring/pc/press-conferences.html

There are press conferences in German at the site this week, has anyone read Roger's?

Puschkin
05-10-2005, 11:46 AM
http://62.201.170.1/livescoring/pc/press-conferences.html

There are press conferences in German at the site this week, has anyone read Roger's?

The English text is after the German one :p

SUKTUEN
05-10-2005, 02:20 PM
THANKYOU

Daniel
05-11-2005, 01:09 AM
Federer finds his feet but Roddick falls in Hamburg Mon May 9, 4:09 PM ET



HAMBURG, Germany (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer indicated that all is well with his problematic feet by making a winning return to the ATP Tour after a three-week absence in the Masters Series.

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Federer defeated Fernando Verdasco, the left-handed Spaniard who has twice overcome world number three Andy Roddick this year, but never looked likely to repeat the upset against the top seed going down 6-4, 6-3.

But once again Roddick, the third round victim of Verdasco in Rome last week, was brought down in the early stages of a clay court Masters Series, this time falling 7-6, 4-6, 7-5 in the first round to Chile's Nicolas Massu.

Federer's success over Verdasco was based on two perfectly timed breaks of serve, and excellent movement on the slow clay, suggesting that the blisters which kept him out of the Rome Masters have healed.

"I was quite worried going into this match to be honest," said Federer.

"I know what a good player he is and what potential he has for the future.

"He's also a lefty which is dangerous because it can be difficult for my backhand, especially on clay.

"But I coped well with it which is a bonus for me. After three weeks without a match, this was difficult fore me."

Federer's last match had seen him beaten by the 18-year-old Frenchman Richard Gasquet, but now he was rolling smoothly, his ground strokes fluently creating angles and options as he probed for openings.

Verdasco responded by trying to deny Federer time, trying to swing the ball from side to side, occasionally taking chances coming forward in conditions not suited to net attacks, and winning his first four service games.

Verdasco also looked odds on to reach 5-5 when he went 40-love in the tenth game, only for Federer to put together a wonderful rally in which he worked his way forward and finished it off with a neat volley.

That seemed to inspire the defending champion to move into a higher gear. Suddenly he was dominating the rallies, winning a fierce forehand-to-forehand exchange to reach set point and converting it with an audacious forehand nimbly taken from wide on the backhand side.

Something similar happened in the second set. Verdasco clung to his service games up to 3-3 at which stage Federer again produced a supreme shot, a backhand slice carved so short it became a drop shot winner, again lifting his game for a killer surge.

Once again he completed the break by skipping across to the backhand to take his big forehands, and two inside-out drives did the damage which took him to 5-3.

Federer closed it out without fuss to extend his record for the year to 36 wins out of 38 matches.

Federer's task in defending his title should have been made slightly less difficult by the withdrawal of Rafael Nadal, the winner of back-to-back Masters Series, with a cut and blistered forefinger.

Olympic champion Massu produced a tenacious performance against Roddick.

Frequently the match involved baseline manoeuvring with both men trying to get in with big forehands from the backhand side, but it sometimes made for a slow-paced match which suited the South American better.

Once Roddick could be seen simultaneously cursing and shaking his head as he prepared to receive serve, unable to believe that a long struggle to chisel out the second set had been followed by his dropping serve immediately.

Inside he may still have been fretting when, on the second match point against him, the former US Open champion attempted an ambitious inside-out drop shot and saw it go wide.

"It was back and forth and the drama was high and I am sure the last point must have been 30 shots. But it was disappointing for me," said Roddick.

"You just have to realise that you are going to have bad days in this tennis profession. But losing sucks, no doubt about it."

Daniel
05-11-2005, 01:10 AM
Federer Wins First Match in Hamburg Mon May 9, 2:22 PM ET



HAMBURG, Germany - Top-ranked Roger Federer returned after a three-week layoff because of injury and beat Fernando Verdasco 6-4, 6-3 Monday in the opening round of the Hamburg Masters.

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Federer last played when he lost in the quarterfinals of the Monte Carlo Masters to Richard Gasquet, only his second loss of the season. He then took a break because of inflammation in both feet.

Although rusty in the opening games, Federer soon found his rhythm on a cool, wet afternoon. The longer the rallies, the steadier the Swiss star played against Verdasco, the Rome Masters quarterfinalist last week.

The defending champion broke Verdasco's serve to win the first set and broke serve again for a decisive 5-3 lead in the second.

Federer also won the Hamburg Masters in 2002. The $2.7 million clay-court tournament is a major warmup for the French Open this month.

No. 11 Joachim Johansson became the first seeded player to exit, losing 6-1, 6-4 to Sebastien Grosjean.

Juan Ignacio Chela defeated Thomas Johansson 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, and Gasquet advanced when Ivo Karlovic retired in the second set. Gasquet was leading 6-1, 1-0.

Also reaching the second round were Mario Ancic, Mikhail Youzhny, Greg Rusedski, Nicolas Kiefer and Christophe Rochus.

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 08:48 AM
Thanks Daniel!

You can also watch the videos of the interviews (Real Media), but it is really hard to hear the interviewers' questions.

http://62.201.170.1/livescoring/pc/press-conferences.html

After Roger's interview in English, an interview in German takes place, and I don't think this interview isn't written anywhere in the web. Has anyone found this interview in German written down?? He also talks about different things. It is frustrating, because the questions are hardly hearable. :(

babsi
05-11-2005, 10:25 AM
Thank you Daniel and Stevens piont :) :)

Couldn´t find anything in writing,either :(



__________________________________________
From so long ago and in the darkest night
if my memory serves me right
I´ll never turn back time
forgetting you,but not the time
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

yanchr
05-11-2005, 02:36 PM
http://www.welt.de/data/2005/05/10/716520.html?s=1

It is said to be a great interview made on Roger in Hamburg by a German journal. Pity that it's in German. Part of it was translated into my language (a really good one deserving to give a read) and I was so shocked at one point of it. Here is this little extract and the auto-translation by Babel Fish.

Die WELT: Sie waren auf den Malediven im Urlaub, kurz danach wütete der Tsunami. Wie nah ist Ihnen das gegangen?

Federer: Ich war geschockt. Für mich war es das zweite Mal kurz hintereinander, daß das Schicksal es gut mit mir meinte. Vergangenen November stürzte in Houston ein Privatjet ab, mit dem ich hätte fliegen sollen. Da fragt man sich natürlich: Wie nah war das jetzt, wie viel Glück hatte ich? Und deshalb habe ich auch meine Stiftung gegründet, die sich um mittellose Kinder in Südafrika kümmert. Ich möchte etwas von dem Glück, das ich in meinem Leben hatte, zurückgeben. Ich möchte, daß diese Kinder zweimal am Tag warmes Essen bekommen, in die Schule gehen können, eine Ausbildung haben. Und ich werde mich persönlich darum kümmern, daß das auch klappt.

------------
The WORLD: They were on the Maldives in the vacation, briefly thereafter raged the Tsunami. How near could that be done to you?

Federer: I was shocked. For me it was the second time briefly one behind the other that the fate meant it good with me. Past November fell in Houston a private jet, with which I had been supposed to fly. There one asks oneself naturally: How near was that now, how I had much luck? And therefore I created also my donation, which worries about children without means in South Africa. I would like to return something from the luck, which I had in my life. I would like to be able to go that these children get warm meal twice on the day, into the school, training have. And I will worry personally about the fact that also folds.

OMG :eek::eek: How much can I be thankful to God :eek: :eek: Luckily he said it just now... It reminds me of some previous evil post here by Fumus (Dirk said it was)

May God always bless you Roger !!!

fightclubber
05-11-2005, 03:36 PM
Press Conference with ROGER FEDERER



Federer vs. Berdych 6:2, 6:1





Q: That was a very professional performance. You got through very quickly. Are you happy with the way you played?

A: Yes. It was a good match. I’m really happy. From the start I felt good. Maybe there wasn’t that much at stake. Just a third round in a Masters Series. But I wanted to get rematch from the Olympics. That always plays a role in such matches. You don’t just forget what happened in the previous matches against any player. And with him I have kind of a tough past: He ruined my Olympic dreams in Athens (laughs), so it’s nice.



Q: Were the conditions less heavy?

A: The conditions are totally different. It’s much slower. The ball flew like crazy in Athens. I could never control it. Even though I had my chances, I didn’t take them. Today, I thought from the start that I was the better player from the baseline. I didn’t have that feeling in Athens. That’s a lot to do with the way I approached the match today. That was the difference.



Q: Does it create more physical strain because the conditions are slow and heavy?

A: The balls are heavy. So you feel it more from serving. The shoulder is a little sore. But I had the same problem last year and I played through the pain. But physically, moving, it’s not too bad. You can actually move quite similar to a hard court because it’s quite sticky. You can slide but not the length you slide on a hot day when it’s slippery. I kind of like this way. Maybe that’s one of the reasons I’ve been playing here.



Q: Do you see it as separate from the build-up to the French Open?

A: Well, once this tournament is over you start to analyse what went right and what went wrong, also including Monte Carlo and the practice sessions in between. Then you work on being ready for the French. I don’t like to see tournaments like this, which are so important as a build up for other events. So, I take this tournament and try to win it and I know I have enough practice days before the French. That’s kind of my approach and with other events it has been working. Maybe not with the French. But I still believe it’s professional to go into a tournament like this. Because I don’t agree with seeing a tournament as preparation for other events.



Q: With the improvement on your backhand and being mentally stronger, do you feel you can be as successful on clay?

A: It’s tough to say. I can play on all surfaces. It’s also hard for me to say what is my favourite surface. Grass is so short. Again, on hard court I have an unbelievable record even though I love indoor too. And then the clay feels natural for me too, but I hardly play on it. It’s kind of hard to say. I still believe I’ve got most potential left on clay. It’s also where I feel that I will improve the most quickly. Of course, I believe strongly that I can play great clay court matches and I’ve shown it in the past.

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 03:54 PM
Thankyou so much

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 04:04 PM
Gracias, Silvy.
There are more questions and answers in the interviews in German, but I don't know why they omitted the rest of the interview in English. :confused: The interview actually continues and he talks about the next match against Robredo and also about Tony Roche... and more. I hope they put the complete interview in English....

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 04:07 PM
really?

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 04:14 PM
really?
Are you reffering to my post, Suktuen??

Yeah, just go to the press conference page of the tournament website and check out how many Q/As there are in German and English... By the way, am I the only one who gets Coria's interview instead of Roger's when I click on RealMedia in order to view the video of the interview...??

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 04:15 PM
steven but I cannot read Germany~~

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 04:21 PM
steven but I cannot read Germany~~
No, I meant that you compare the number of questions and answers in German and English, or you can just compare the length of the interview in German and English. The interview in German is twice as long as the English one, and the interview in English is the translation of the first part of the German one.

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 04:27 PM
Are you understand the Germany part ?

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 04:30 PM
Ja (yes). ;)

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 04:32 PM
What things are missing in English part ?

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 04:43 PM
What things are missing in English part ?
Ok, I am checking it again.. Give some time, please. :)

SUKTUEN
05-11-2005, 04:50 PM
OK !!~~ thanks

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 05:35 PM
The questions that are missing in English interview (I will write just the important points, not translate everything..)

1. How do you see it agaisnt Robredo?

I remember the match well against him in Rome (6-1 6-1). It was also a surprise that Robredo beat Guga with that kind of result. It is going to be an iteresting match, but I am confident.

2. What is your explanation that German players are losing so early, even though they were really motivated to win here?

Maybe you should also know against who they lost. They were not always the favorites to win (manybe only Schuettler), and most of them are unseeded, so they meet difficult players in the first rounds. It is not surprising for me that they lose early, but a few Germans can reach quarter finals. Everything is possible at such a tournament.

3. The big names are gone, Agassi, Nadal, Roddick, Moya. Does it make it easier for you to advance further?

I just look at my next match. Surprise happens always. It is of course unfortunate for audiences and the tournament, but there are still good players left, who could make it difficult for me to defend the title.

4. Spaniards and Argentines are really playing all clay tournaments and most of the time they reach finals. Is one week enough before French?

It is understandable that they play many tournaments because they are clay specialists. I am play more on hard surface, because I think I am better there. I would play many as well, if I were them. Nadal has now 2 week time, he can maybe go on vacation (laugh). If they lose, they have 1 1/2 weeks, and that is enough. They should stay in Europe and could attend tournaments.

5. Can you explain how the collaboration with Tony Roche is?

He arrived last week. We just talk about tennis on clay. Next week is going to be interesting when I prepare for French. It is interesting for me to talk about tennis with him. He has a lot of experiences.

6. Is he giving you many influences??

No. only small things. He can't change my game completely, only because he is here. It is more about tennis in general like build some specific tactics against certain players.

babsi
05-11-2005, 06:58 PM
Thank you,Stevens Point :) - shouldn´t you studie,to make your parents proud?


__________________________________________________ ________
Who the hell are you,to tell me what I am and what´s my masterplan.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Stevens Point
05-11-2005, 07:14 PM
Thank you,Stevens Point :) - shouldn´t you studie,to make your parents proud?


Very good point, Susanne. :worship: So, I am now going to do my things. :p Roger's excellence keeps my grades declining... :sad: No, just kidding :D I can cope with things I have to do :)

By the way, feel free to correct my interpretation if you find something wrong there, or you can add some if I missed important things to tell. :)

lunahielo
05-11-2005, 10:00 PM
Thank you, Stevens Point~~
Just from reading your posts the past few weeks, I have no doubt
that you can cope with the other aspects in your life~~not only cope, but do well.
Luck to you~~ :)

And Best of luck to you, Rogi~~tomorrow, against Robredo.

SUKTUEN
05-12-2005, 01:39 PM
thanks again

Stevens Point
05-13-2005, 09:14 PM
Press Conference with Roger Federer

Federer vs. Coria 6-4 7-6 (3)

Q: ( :confused: I don't know what the question was.)

A: Yes two times in the first set, down a break, in the second the same and in the tiebreak once again. This was a tough match. He started to change his game in the second set. He went for much more. It kind of worked for him. So, it was hard to kind of play the same way. I had to adjust to the way he was playing. Of course, I am very happy. It's definitely a message for me to the French Open and to the other guys that I can beat him quite convincingly, at least the end. So this is definitely good stuff.

Q: You say a message to the other guys, but it's a message to yourself as well.

A: Yes, I definitely think so. It's always good to beat top clay court players. They call them the specialists because they play on their favorite surface. This is where they are the best. This is almost where I play the fewest. So, this is a big win for me.

Q: How much did having Tony here this early make a difference?

A: I could have told him to come a week later, but I thought it just might be interesting for him to see me play in Hamburg, of course hopefully the most. If it wouldn't work out we would at least have time to be on the practice court together which is always good with him, before the French. I thought it's good for him to see me play and then we can work on a few things the week in between here and the French. So this is the plan. So we can spend 3 1/2 weeks together.

Q: Are you definitely a better clay court player than 12 months ago?

A: Tough to say. I have the feeling, I'm back to a very good form on clay. The last few years I've always felt good here in Hamburg. I don't want to overestimate my level of play. Because once I get on the French Open courts, the balls are different, the clay a bit quicker, who knows. I will just have to adjust again. I'm feeling good.

Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your foot problem?

A: I had a strong pain at the Australian Open in teh Safin match. The days after were tough. My foot really hurt. I started feeling, because I played so much in the States and I played Monte Carlo as well. I took days off, started to practice again and just felt that the foot wasn't right yet. There must have been some sort of inflammation. So, I just preferred to take a rest and make sure that I spend some time at home to give me enough energy for what's coming now.

Q: Did the noise of the crowd in the five minute delay distract you at all? You lost four games after that?

A: Sometimes it rains. Sometimes something like this happens. You have to handle all sorts of things. But I just thought that it was appropriate to wait.

Q: You said Tony will be here 3 1/2 weeks. Will he be here throughout Wimbledon also?

A:That's not the plan for the moment, but if he starts to like my game and maybe is in the mood to stay longer, I have nothing against it. We'll see.

Q: What is the plan?

A: Until the French is over.


(from here, my interpretation from the interview in German. Feel free to correct if you find something wrong, comparing with the original text. ;) )

Q: How difficult is it to maintain the tension, after winning the final-like match?

A: I belive, if you have come this far like in semi final, then it is no longer difficult to maintain the motivation, because you know you are in the final spurt of the tournament. There are still only 4 players left, then winning the title is really important, because there are many points to get. That's why it is not a problem to maintain the motivation.

Q: Why are the conditions here so good for you?

A: In 2002, it was a huge surprise for me that I could win the tournament. I had had only a couple of titles back then and actually came here and was unmotivated, to tell the truth. Once I stood in the final against Safin. I still remember that I talked with Safin in Rome and he said I (he) didn't want to go to Hamburg, either. We met in the final. It was a little bit funny. Since then I always had a good feeling and I play good here. No idea, maybe it is the wet sand, although faster should suit me better actually. I can't really explain. In Germany it has been going very good always, I also won Munich, here twice, and Halle twice.

Q: Coria said Nadal is a better clay player than you. What do you think?

A: He has been dominating. It's clear that he says so. I haven't won these Master Series (on clay). Coria now lost twice against him in the final. It is definitely hard to compare the motivation between quarter final and final. That's why it doesn't surprise me. He has won many clay tournaments this year. That's why he is for me the biggest favorit next to Coria for French. It would have been strange, if he had said I am a lot better than Nadal.

Q: We have the impression that you, like today in the second set, again survive a scare and then push the opponent out of the place.

A: I had the feeling, he offered me a small chance when he served for set at 5-4. I took it right away. At 5-5 everything can happen. This time I couldn't miss it. I also played quite good in the tiebreak, although I had a double falt. Maybe I am still hectic in some moments on clay. But still, I felt always good. it wouldn't have been a problem also in the 3rd set.

Q: What do you say about the opponent tomorrow?

A: 5-0 head to head (laugh). I've had already so many hard matches against him. Many 3 setters out of 5. He plays many tournaments in a year and has his tournaments again and again where he loses in the first round. We don't know why. This is again one of the tournaments where he's been good. Then you have to be careful. He has played enough matches so far. So have I. However, it doesn't mean you can underestimate him. He plays very solid from the baseline. I am excited how the match is going to be.