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Roger news and articles

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SUKTUEN
02-01-2005, 01:21 PM
ROGER will be better :wavey:

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 05:12 PM
I realy like your analysis. Really, Im agreed in 80 percent.
Roger lost to a MARAT in better conditions, not only physical but mentally.Besides his injuries, , no matter what they were or are... ROGER GAVE "THE" FIGHT. But Marat was superior.
Two things they said here in latin america on the transmition ( live). Javier FRANA, ex tennis player and now part of ESPN, said, something like " I DO NOT SEE FEDERER AS CONFORTABLE AS IN OTHER GAMES", And it was at the first or second set ( half of it) do not remember. IT MADE NO SENSE to me at that time but later... when Roger asked for assistance... I said, my GOD this FRANA knew him well.
Other thing I liked was at the last set. When Roger started to give FIGHT. At a GREAT POINT I think Roger went to the net he said something like " HAAA HAA HE WONT GIVE IT EASY; HE IS FIGHTING HARD, HE WONT GIVE THIS MACTH FOR FREE."
And, I have to admit at the end of set 4 I thought Roger was " done". So Im proud he fight so much, so well, with the RF spirit. Was enoght? Was not? Do not know, BUT also have to say, MARAT played very well, So aplausses to both.
Silvy

Gracias, Silvy! Tu puedes hablar en espanol!

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 08:00 PM
Federer v Safin could be a season to treasure
By Mark Hodgkinson
February 2, 2005

Marat Safin after beating Roger Federer in their semi-final.
Photo: Vince Caligiuri

Lleyton Hewitt and Bec Cartwright included, the most significant coupling to emerge from the Australian Open remains champion Marat Safin and Roger Federer. Let us hope that this one is for keeps.

What this sport needs more than anything is a proper, full-blooded rivalry, and Safin - once he has cleared what probably will be a heroic vodka-and-champagne hangover - could be the man to challenge Federer.

Several days on, tennis is still reverberating from Safin's semi-final defeat of Federer.

Safin demonstrated that Federer is not an untouchable, ending a 26-match unbeaten run with five sets of brutal shot-making. It can be hoped only that the next time Safin and Federer meet, the Russian beats him again, and then a year that had started with talk of a Federer grand slam - all four majors - could develop into something even more special.

Not since Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi, the quiet American against the loud one, has there been a rivalry worth speaking of in men's tennis and it has been badly missed.

Behind Federer, Safin has the most natural gifts in tennis. The 25-year-old and world No. 4 has a hulking physique, and a serve and groundstrokes that are capable of destroying anyone apart from Federer, and of stopping the Swiss in his tracks.

The Fed Express may not run as smoothly, or as punctually, as he had envisaged this season. This is not to start some kind of revisionist thinking on Federer. He won three of the grand slam tournaments last season and his position as world No. 1 is far from under threat.

It is just that Safin has suddenly, with the help of coach Peter Lundgren, curbed much of his wild-child behaviour and looks in the mood for more grand slam titles.

For all the entertaining tennis during the centenary celebrations of the Australian Open, it was the Safin story that captivated.

Hewitt does not have the shots to become a serial thriller against Federer, and while Andy Roddick was once said to have had a rivalry with Federer, what sort was that when the American was not winning any matches?

Safin had waited too long for his second grand slam title, a five-year hiatus since he thrashed Sampras in the final of the US Open.

Safin's four-set win over Hewitt showed that he is unhappy with years of under-achieving. He finally learnt that his win over Sampras was "a mistake", that it came too soon and too easily for a 20-year-old. This was far more satisfying, as he had to work for it.

The French Open in May is the next biggest prize. While the red clay of Roland Garros is still something of a problem for Federer, it is the preferred surface of Safin. Unfortunately, Wimbledon is a different story. Safin has never done better than a quarter-final finish.

The only slight worry is that Safin's work ethic may fade. The sense with Safin is that he will go mad if forced to train hard, play hard and rest hard for too long.

Perhaps the biggest twist to Safin's outlook is that smashing racquets now appears to help, rather than hinder, his tennis.

The crumpled frame, it seems, can serve as an emotional release. And if Safin continues to mangle racquets, crack jokes, bludgeon backhands, and beat Federer, then this will be a season to treasure.

- Telegraph
http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Federer-v-Safin-could-be-a-season-to-treasure/2005/02/01/1107228697381.html?oneclick=true

Jimena
02-01-2005, 09:05 PM
Safin demonstrated that Federer is not an untouchable, ending a 26-match unbeaten run with five sets of brutal shot-making. It can be hoped only that the next time Safin and Federer meet, the Russian beats him again, and then a year that had started with talk of a Federer grand slam - all four majors - could develop into something even more special.

Pardon me when I say that I don't share this sentiment...

While the red clay of Roland Garros is still something of a problem for Federer, it is the preferred surface of Safin.

Seriously, since when? Roger has beaten him 3 times on clay, when Safin was ranked higher than him. Indoor, that's Safin's preferred surface.

Stupid journalists. Grrrrrr. :rolleyes:

Sjengster
02-01-2005, 10:22 PM
The media are like sheep at times, give them a theme and they'll suddenly run with it. Before the AO there were no articles talking about Safin being THE threat to Federer this year (even though his indoor run last autumn and the tiebreak against Federer at the TMC gave quite a few hints of such a threat), and now all of a sudden it's Sampras v Agassi for the 00s. I do find it ridiculous that Safin's victory is hailed not merely because he beat Federer, but because he managed to stop him winning the Grand Slam this year - as if all the other three were in the bag already if he'd defended the title here. Now they're speculating whether Safin can do it instead, just because he's 1/4 of the way there. Note to journalists - NO ONE is going to be winning the Grand Slam in men's tennis for the foreseeable future. If it can only be good for the sport to see more variation in the winners of Slams and more people challenging Federer, then stop speculating about someone winning all four the moment they get on the board at the start of the year.

As for Safin having better chances at RG than Federer, I would say yes and no. Safin's best two surfaces are indoor carpet and Rebound Ace (those are where his two victories over Federer have come), and while he always says his main ambition is to win at RG his best chances at the Slams are still on hardcourt. It's interesting that the first meeting they ever had, on clay, was won 7-6 in the third by Federer, but the other two in 2002 were absolute drubbings, in the DC and the Hamburg final. I never saw the former, but to be honest Federer would have destroyed anybody the way he was playing in the latter. I think his game is better suited to clay than Safin's, bearing in mind he has more spin on his shots and is a quicker mover, but at the same time Safin is much better at grinding out the long, long matches you need to win in Paris. He should have lost twice last year, to Mantilla and to Starace, yet he somehow came through both matches; when it comes to the long haul he's one of the best out there, whereas Federer definitely needs to improve in five-setters.

RogiFan88
02-02-2005, 12:49 AM
...or just avoid them altogether [5-setters, that is]!

Billabong
02-02-2005, 12:59 AM
Thanks for the articles:)

RogiFan88
02-02-2005, 01:07 AM
No. Soy de Puerto Rico... La bandera se parece a la de Cuba: tienen el mismo diseño, pero con los colores invertidos. Creo que Daniel tiene la de Cuba debajo de su nombre...

I don't think Marat will be as hyped as Roger, though I hope he is. I doubt it, because he just hasn't proven in his career that he can sustain a high level of play for a long time. So people don't really expect excellence from him, after expecting it for so many years and being disappointed. Don't get me wrong, I'm happy that it was Marat and no one else who beat Roger and I'm glad he won the title that was frankly overdue. BUT, Roger's my favorite player and I have never been a fan of any other player the way I am a fan of Roger's. And I have to take care of my fave. So I say, let's hype Marat so there's less pressure on Roger and then Roger gets annoyed and wins everything in sight. :p

I'm so greedy! :o :

I know exactly what you're saying there, Jimena! Rogi is also my FAVOURITE and there's just sth special and unique about him... altho it has been nailbiting at times, the last couple of years [well, actually, since I've been following Rogi before his big breakthrough] have been so rewarding!

I also want Juan Carlos to come back to the elite level. Why do you think that's impossible?

Did I say that it was impossible for Juanqui to come back?? I can't remember; perhaps someone else said that. I w hate it if Juanqui never came back to his former high level -- I really want HIM to win his 2nd slam because he is also talented and such a hard worker. He just needs to forget everything and just play... as well as he can and slowly build up confidence. I want him to beat Pandy and one day beat Lleyt [it just bothers me so much that he lost Shanghai to Lleyt... ]... he really needs a break for once!

The thing is that Hewitt never really dominated. He only won one GS title per year he was year-end #1. That doesn't come close to what Roger did (thank goodness!). During that time, no other player really rose to the challenge. You had two years when 4 different players won the GS titles, and the ones who should've really been challenging for #1 those years (Marat and Guga :inlove: , IMHO) were having too much fun, having major confidence issues, were bitten by the injury bug or having hip operations, changing coaches repeatedly, etc. Hewitt was never really loved, I think. But he wasn't dominating enough for people to say that tennis was boring because of it. Again, JMO.

I remember that people were saying that tennis was boring at the time because of the parity. Anyone could win at any given time, so rivalries were not developed, the stories that came out of GS play were not that great, etc. That's what I remember hearing. Ironic, isn't it? I guess people are always going to find something to complain about.

Anyway, I think that people that are not fans of a certain player are going to be saying that tennis is boring if that particular player dominates. It doesn't matter that the tennis being played is breathtaking (Roger's), or that watching this player move is pure joy (Roger), or that he might be a unique talent that comes along once in a blue moon (guess who? ;) )

:wavey:

Even if Hewitt wasn't truly dominating at his height, I for one found it immensely BORING!! :p It bugged me that the other players didn't step it up [Rogi was still a baby then; Juanqui always struggled w Lleyt; Pandy was still a gawky teen and guys like Haas never really lived up to [overblown] expectations [altho his tennis is nice to watch]. I don't mind 4 different players winning a slam this year, as long as they're guys I think deserve to win: my picks w be [since Marat already won and I'm happy with that] Rogi [of course], Juanqui and perhaps Gaston or David N. Now who w win which slam? Hmmm... how about Rogi RG, David Wimby[!!!] and Juanqui USO? But I'd really like Rogi to 3-peat at Wimby... but if he didn't and he shocked the tennis world by winning RG, I'd be over the moon! ;)

Jimena
02-02-2005, 01:28 AM
Even if Hewitt wasn't truly dominating at his height, I for one found it immensely BORING!! :p It bugged me that the other players didn't step it up [Rogi was still a baby then; Juanqui always struggled w Lleyt; Pandy was still a gawky teen and guys like Haas never really lived up to [overblown] expectations [altho his tennis is nice to watch]. I don't mind 4 different players winning a slam this year, as long as they're guys I think deserve to win: my picks w be [since Marat already won and I'm happy with that] Rogi [of course], Juanqui and perhaps Gaston or David N. Now who w win which slam? Hmmm... how about Rogi RG, David Wimby[!!!] and Juanqui USO? But I'd really like Rogi to 3-peat at Wimby... but if he didn't and he shocked the tennis world by winning RG, I'd be over the moon! ;)

So, not a Hewitt fan, huh? ;) Neither am I. Juanqui's loss to him in Shanghai bugged me to no end. Sniff. I really want him to get better. And I want Guga to come back, and I want David to win a big one finally... But I'm conflicted. You see, I'd like for my other favorite players to win slams, but I still want Roger to have a fantabulous year. And seeing that I really really really really wanted Marat to win another slam, and then he went and won it at Roger's expense and now it's taking me a while to forgive him :ras: (take that Marat!), I don't know if I'm going to be happy with Roger not winning [/drama]. I didn't think I could be this petty, really. I wasn't that way with my previous faves. You'd think that as you get older, you'd get less childish in your reactions, but apparently that's not the case with me when it comes to Roger. Rather disturbing, if you ask me. :eek:

I hope I get over this quickly. I want to like Marat a lot again. :(

I'd be extremely happy if Roger won RG, too. But Wimbledon is his favorite, so I hope he wins the one that makes him happier and gives him more confidence! Or, you know, he could just go ahead and win both... ;)

brazuca5copas
02-02-2005, 02:37 AM
I just read a very interesting interview by Federer from brazilian Magazine (Veja), very very nice. But sorry it's in portuguese, I'd like so much translate but I can't :sad: . If another brazilian speak english please do it !!!! :D

Edição 1890 . 1 de fevereiro de 2005

Entrevista: Roger Federer

"Só temo contusões"

O tenista número 1 do mundo diz
que teme se machucar, como
aconteceu com Guga, e perder
o prazer de jogar


Gustavo Poloni

AFP

"Chega um estágio na vida de um atleta profissional em que ele sente tanta dor que precisa parar. É uma pena, mas é a vida"


De noite, o tenista Roger Federer costuma sonhar que está fazendo gols em um estádio de futebol lotado. De dia, sua realidade é ainda mais espetacular. A Sports Illustrated, uma das mais conceituadas revistas esportivas, considera que Federer, de apenas 23 anos, tem tudo para se tornar o melhor tenista de todos os tempos. Os admiradores de suas raquetadas argumentam que ele não tem pontos fracos e que seus golpes beiram a perfeição. O talento do suíço ficou evidente na última temporada, quando encerrou o ano em primeiro lugar no ranking dos melhores do mundo, com quase o dobro de pontos do segundo colocado. Na semana passada, ele perdeu sua primeira partida desde as Olimpíadas de Atenas, em agosto de 2004. A derrota foi contra o russo Marat Safin durante o Aberto da Austrália. Federer estava para ganhar o jogo quando sentiu fortes dores nas costas. Em entrevista a VEJA, Federer, nascido em Basel, na Suíça, disse temer que uma contusão o tire do topo do esporte, como aconteceu com o brasileiro Gustavo Kuerten.

Veja – Você já ganhou 15 milhões de dólares em prêmios, dinheiro suficiente para viver bem o resto da vida. Qual a motivação para continuar treinando e viajando?
Federer – É difícil deixar o tênis. Você passa a gostar do circuito. É uma vida muito movimentada. Além de jogar, tenho de atender às exigências dos patrocinadores, da imprensa e dos fãs. Não dá para acordar um dia e simplesmente jogar tudo para o alto. É claro que eu poderia, mas não quero. Sempre sonhei em ser um grande esportista. Agora que cheguei lá, quero aproveitar ao máximo. Quando comecei, não sabia que ser um tenista famoso incluía entrevistas coletivas de imprensa após cada partida e sessões de autógrafos.

Veja – Como você gasta o dinheiro que ganha?
Federer – Adoro carros esportivos, como a Mercedes conversível que ganhei em um torneio nos Estados Unidos, no fim do ano passado. E cada vez mais me ligo em roupas de marca. Comprei uma casa para meus pais, um bom apartamento para mim. É bom saber que não preciso me preocupar com cada centavo que gasto. Só viajo de primeira classe. Ter dinheiro faz com que a vida seja muito mais fácil.

Veja – Você se considera um metrossexual, como o inglês David Beckham, jogador do Real Madrid?
Federer – Não sei bem o que é ser um metrossexual, mas faço questão de cuidar bem de mim mesmo. Vou com freqüência ao cabeleireiro e minha namorada fica de olho na forma como me trato. As mulheres são mais ligadas nessas coisas.

Veja – Todo esportista de sucesso agora faz questão de demonstrar generosidade e preocupação social. Cultivar a imagem de cidadão preocupado com os pobres se tornou obrigatório no mundo dos esportes?
Federer – Nós, esportistas, às vezes somos tão ricos e temos uma vida tão boa que sentimos necessidade de dar alguma coisa de volta à sociedade. Queremos ajudar as pessoas que, por um motivo ou outro, não tiveram a mesma sorte que nós. Doei 15 000 dólares e várias raquetes às vítimas do tsunami. A Fundação Roger Federer, na África do Sul, dá educação e alimentação a trinta crianças. Escolhi a África do Sul porque minha mãe é de lá. Criei a fundação quando ainda era muito jovem, com 22 anos. Quero apoiar o futuro do mundo, que são as crianças. Fico feliz de poder usar meu nome para ajudá-las. Vou visitá-las pela primeira vez em fevereiro e estou ansioso para encontrá-las.

Veja – Se fosse técnico de um outro tenista, o que diria para ele vencer o Roger Federer?
Federer – Não posso revelar. O que me faz tão forte é que posso me adaptar a diferentes tipos de pisos e estilos de jogo. Durante o torneio em Doha (o primeiro deste ano, vencido por Federer), por exemplo, joguei contra um tenista que ficava mais no fundo da quadra, jogando de modo defensivo, e contra outros dois que eram muito agressivos e jogavam no ataque. Fui capaz de vencer todos. A temporada passada provou que posso ganhar dos dez melhores jogadores do ranking o tempo todo. E eles têm estilos completamente diferentes.

Veja – Os tenistas disputam tantos torneios seguidos por imposição do patrocinador, para manter uma boa posição no ranking ou é pelo dinheiro envolvido?
Federer – A vida do tenista não é como a de um jogador de futebol, que não pode tirar uns dias de férias para esquiar por causa do risco de contusão. Os tenistas são seus próprios patrões, podem escolher que torneios querem disputar. A quantidade de jogos depende muito da forma física do jogador e de como ele planeja sua carreira. É claro que existem regras dos patrocinadores que precisam ser seguidas, como disputar um torneio de Grand Slam ou de Master Series. É curioso, mas subir no ranking significa jogar mais partidas em cada torneio. Quando entrei no circuito profissional, jogava trinta torneios por ano. Como saía de muitos deles na primeira rodada, tinha mais tempo para descansar. De qualquer forma, não jogo tanto assim. No ano passado, disputei apenas dezessete torneios. Alguns jogadores no circuito jogam até 35 por ano.

Veja – Você nunca fica farto com tantas partidas?
Federer – Eu me acostumei. Gostaria de ter férias mais longas no fim do ano. Infelizmente, não dá para ficar pensando em folga se tenho de participar de um torneio na Austrália logo em janeiro. De qualquer forma, se estiver muito cansado, consigo uma folga. Posso mudar meus planos da maneira que quiser, conforme a necessidade. O que importa é tentar enxergar a carreira como um projeto de longo prazo.

Veja – O que você acha do Gustavo Kuerten?
Federer – Ele me traz más lembranças. Foi o único jogador que me venceu numa partida de Grand Slam no ano passado. Ele foi perfeito naquele dia. Eu o respeito muito, é um sujeito excepcional e ótimo jogador. É pena que esteja machucado. Espero que se recupere bem e que volte às quadras mais forte do que nunca para que a gente possa disputar mais jogos. Não sei qual é a gravidade da contusão. Ter de passar por duas cirurgias nunca é um bom sinal. Tive poucas chances de jogar contra ele e quero me vingar da última derrota.

Veja – Você tem medo que uma contusão encurte sua carreira?
Federer – Claro. Quando vejo o que aconteceu com Guga e com outros tenistas, sinto que tenho muita sorte. Jogar com dor não é bom. É o que está ocorrendo com Guga. Chega um estágio na vida de um atleta profissional em que ele sente tanta dor que não tem mais prazer em jogar. É uma pena, mas é a vida.

Veja – Os jogadores de futebol costumam disputar partidas com os amigos durante a folga. Você tem paciência para jogar tênis com os amigos nas horas vagas?
Federer – Nunca pego na raquete durante minha folga. Os tenistas até marcam de jogar squash ou futebol juntos. Quando entramos em uma quadra de tênis, no entanto, não é para diversão. Será um jogo para valer. Por isso preferimos fazer qualquer outro esporte que não o tênis.

Veja – O que gosta de fazer quando está de folga?
Federer – Gosto de ficar sem fazer nada. Procuro passar um dia bem relaxado com a família. Tento colocar o papo em dia com os amigos. As pessoas acham que você quer fazer coisas diferentes quando está de folga. Eu gosto mesmo é de ficar em casa. É algo diferente, pois viajo muito o ano inteiro.

Veja – É difícil se manter no topo do ranking?
Federer – Todo mundo diz que é mais difícil ficar no primeiro lugar do que chegar lá. Para mim, foi o contrário. Virar o número 1 foi muito mais difícil, eu sentia muita pressão e cobrança. Quando cheguei lá, reagi com naturalidade. Pensei: "Poxa, isso é ótimo. Quero ganhar mais torneios, mais Grand Slams. Quero ficar no topo o maior tempo possível". Chegar ao primeiro lugar me deu mais incentivo. Gostaria de ficar no topo por mais dez anos, o que será muito difícil. Se não conseguir, terei novas chances de reconquistar o primeiro lugar.

Veja – O que é mais importante para se dar bem no tênis feminino: ser bonita ou jogar bem?
Federer – O efeito Anna Kournikova fez com que as mulheres ganhassem atenção tanto dentro quanto fora da quadra. Elas passaram a trabalhar também como modelos. O tênis feminino fica mais interessante com jogadoras bonitas, desde que também saibam jogar.

Veja – É por isso que a tenista russa Anna Kournikova sempre disputa os maiores torneios, apesar de nunca ter sido uma grande tenista?
Federer – A Kournikova é um fenômeno. Ela nunca ganhou um título importante, mas sempre teve muita atenção porque é realmente bonita. Ela é uma exceção. Não acho que outra tenista vá conseguir repetir o que ela conseguiu.

Veja – O americano John McEnroe, um grande campeão da década de 80, disse que você é o melhor tenista de todos os tempos. Como recebe esses elogios?
Federer – No começo da carreira foi difícil lidar com isso, tinha medo de não corresponder. Hoje recebo os elogios com naturalidade. Gosto de ser elogiado, mas sei que preciso me concentrar muito no meu jogo para ter uma carreira bem-sucedida. Não posso me arrepender de nada que fiz durante os anos em que joguei tênis.

Veja – Você acha que tem algum ponto fraco?
Federer – É claro que existem coisas que eu gostaria de melhorar. Sou muito competitivo e perfeccionista, e por isso quero sempre me aperfeiçoar, ainda que seja apenas um pequeno detalhe. Preciso buscar a melhoria sempre, caso contrário os outros tenistas chegam ao meu nível e me deixam para trás.

Veja – Você diz que seus ídolos no tênis são o alemão Boris Becker e o sueco Stefan Edberg. Você acha que conseguiria vencê-los quando estavam no auge?
Federer – É difícil dizer, os tempos mudaram. O tênis evoluiu muito desde então. Naquela época o piso das quadras era muito mais rápido. Seria um jogo muito difícil. Os dois eram muito bons na rede. Hoje existem poucos jogadores tão bons quanto eles na rede.

Veja – O técnico do time suíço de futebol Basel disse que você é um bom atacante. É verdade?
Federer – Se não fosse um tenista, gostaria de ter sido um grande jogador de futebol. Jogar nos grandes estádios do mundo, marcar gols e comemorar como um louco. É com isso que sonho quando estou dormindo. Um dia fui fazer um treino com o time do Basel, do qual sou torcedor. Foi uma experiência incrível, mas o técnico do Basel exagerou. Ele deve ter sido obrigado a me elogiar.

Veja – Por que você escolheu o tênis e não o futebol?
Federer – Eu tinha 3 anos quando segurei minha primeira raquete. Meus pais costumavam jogar com os amigos nos fins de semana, e eu estava sempre por perto, brincando na quadra, jogando paredão e catando as bolinhas. Também gostava de jogar futebol. Eram os dois esportes de que mais gostava. Aos 12 fui obrigado a tomar uma decisão difícil: escolher entre o futebol e o tênis. Optei pelo tênis porque é um esporte que me permite controlar melhor meu destino. No futebol, o goleiro pode cometer um erro que pode custar um título e jogar por terra o esforço de todo o time.

Veja – Qual é seu ídolo no futebol?
Federer – Meus jogadores favoritos são o francês Zinedine Zidane (do Real Madrid) e o italiano Francesco Totti (do Roma).

Veja – E os brasileiros?
Federer – Há quem diga que são os melhores do mundo. Se tivesse de escolher um deles, seria o Ronaldo.

Veja – Você quer bater o recorde do Pete Sampras, que ganhou catorze torneios de Grand Slam?
Federer – Não gosto de me comparar com os outros. É legal bater recordes, mas não é por isso que jogo. Se meu maior objetivo na carreira fosse bater os recordes do Sampras, daria a entender que disputar a Copa Davis ou o torneio de minha cidade natal, Basel, não é importante. Não gosto de ver a carreira dessa maneira.

Veja – O que pretende fazer quando largar o tênis?
Federer – Vou me dedicar mais a minha fundação, ajudando as pessoas que não tiveram a mesma sorte que eu. Quero aproveitar a vida fora das quadras, talvez ter uma família. Quero fazer coisas que não fiz enquanto estive envolvido com o tênis.

Veja – Você é vaidoso?
Federer – Procuro estar sempre bem vestido. Tenho de ir a muitos eventos, shows, entregas de prêmios. É importante estar com uma boa aparência. No começo, gostava de usar calça jeans e camiseta. Hoje prefiro roupas de marcas como Prada e de estilistas italianos. Não dá para aparecer de jeans e camiseta num evento em que todas as outras pessoas estão bem vestidas.

Veja – Como é o assédio das mulheres?
Federer – É normal. Se minha namorada ainda não me disse nada e não ficou morrendo de ciúme, então acho que não é tão forte assim. De qualquer forma, é bom saber que as mulheres sentem atração por mim.

Veja – Você gosta da agitação decorrente da fama?
Federer – Às vezes eu preferiria estar sentado na frente da TV ou jantando tranqüilamente com minha namorada. Mas sei que tenho a obrigação de retribuir de alguma maneira o que o mundo do tênis me dá e que preciso satisfazer meus fãs

RogiFan88
02-02-2005, 03:00 AM
brazuca, interesting interview, what I can make of it... can you tell us what he says about women liking him and the metrosexual thing?

entiendes espanol, brazuca? puedes explicarme algunos puntos?? no comprendo completamente portugues pero un poquito...

Você é vaidoso? << is he asking are you vain??

Veja – Como é o assédio das mulheres?
Federer – É normal. Se minha namorada ainda não me disse nada e não ficou morrendo de ciúme, então acho que não é tão forte assim. De qualquer forma, é bom saber que as mulheres sentem atração por mim.

is Rogi saying that it's nice to know that women like him?? dice que esta contento que a las mujeres le gustan??


veja... what does this word mean?? que quiere decir esta palabra??


Veja – O que você acha do Gustavo Kuerten?
Federer – Ele me traz más lembranças. Foi o único jogador que me venceu numa partida de Grand Slam no ano passado. Ele foi perfeito naquele dia. Eu o respeito muito, é um sujeito excepcional e ótimo jogador. É pena que esteja machucado. Espero que se recupere bem e que volte às quadras mais forte do que nunca para que a gente possa disputar mais jogos. Não sei qual é a gravidade da contusão. Ter de passar por duas cirurgias nunca é um bom sinal. Tive poucas chances de jogar contra ele e quero me vingar da última derrota.

I guess Rogi is saying that he respects Guga and hopes that he will recuperate fr his surgeries, etc.

Veja – O que pretende fazer quando largar o tênis?
Federer – Vou me dedicar mais a minha fundação, ajudando as pessoas que não tiveram a mesma sorte que eu. Quero aproveitar a vida fora das quadras, talvez ter uma família. Quero fazer coisas que não fiz enquanto estive envolvido com o tênis.

Rogi saying that when he retires? he will continue w his foundation, maybe have a family??

brazuca5copas
02-02-2005, 03:39 AM
brazuca, interesting interview, what I can make of it... can you tell us what he says about women liking him and the metrosexual thing?

entiendes espanol, brazuca? puedes explicarme algunos puntos?? no comprendo completamente portugues pero un poquito...

Ok, I will try somenthing
Você é vaidoso? << is he asking are you vain??
yes, you sure

Veja – Como é o assédio das mulheres?
Federer – É normal. Se minha namorada ainda não me disse nada e não ficou morrendo de ciúme, então acho que não é tão forte assim. De qualquer forma, é bom saber que as mulheres sentem atração por mim.

is Rogi saying that it's nice to know that women like him?? dice que esta contento que a las mujeres le gustan??
Veja - How is the woman's siege(insistence) ?
Roger - It's normal. If my girlfriend still not complained and not getty jealous I don't think it's really strong. BTW, it's good to know that the womans feel atraccion for me.

veja... what does this word mean?? que quiere decir esta palabra??
Es como "miras" "look", it's the name of the magazine


Veja – O que você acha do Gustavo Kuerten?
Federer – Ele me traz más lembranças. Foi o único jogador que me venceu numa partida de Grand Slam no ano passado. Ele foi perfeito naquele dia. Eu o respeito muito, é um sujeito excepcional e ótimo jogador. É pena que esteja machucado. Espero que se recupere bem e que volte às quadras mais forte do que nunca para que a gente possa disputar mais jogos. Não sei qual é a gravidade da contusão. Ter de passar por duas cirurgias nunca é um bom sinal. Tive poucas chances de jogar contra ele e quero me vingar da última derrota.

I guess Rogi is saying that he respects Guga and hopes that he will recuperate fr his surgeries, etc.
Veja - What do you think about Gustavo Kuerten ?
Roger - He give me bad recorders. It was the unique player that beat me in a Grand Slam last year. He've been perfect in this day. I respect him a lot, he's a great guy and great player. It's sad that he's injuries...
... I had few(less) chances against him and I wat revenge the last defeat.

Veja – O que pretende fazer quando largar o tênis?
Federer – Vou me dedicar mais a minha fundação, ajudando as pessoas que não tiveram a mesma sorte que eu. Quero aproveitar a vida fora das quadras, talvez ter uma família. Quero fazer coisas que não fiz enquanto estive envolvido com o tênis.

Rogi saying that when he retires? he will continue w his foundation, maybe have a family??
yes, you sure. "I will dedicate more in my fondation, helping peoples that not have the same luck that I had. I want enjoy the life outcourt, maybe have a family. I want do things that I never did while I've been in the tennis.

OMG !!!! SORRY FOR MY RIDICULOUS ENGLISH

brazuca5copas
02-02-2005, 03:59 AM
[QUOTE=RogiFan88]brazuca, interesting interview, what I can make of it... can you tell us what he says about women liking him and the metrosexual thing?QUOTE]

Veja- Do you think you are a metrosexual, like Beckham ?
Roger- I don't know what is be a metrosexual, but I take care about my image. I go very often on hairdresser and my girlfriend worry about how I care. The woman heve more worry about those things.

Well, it's something like this, if my ridiculous english can help you in something else, ou can ask me. ;)

babsi
02-02-2005, 08:42 AM
Hi,brazuca5copas
thank you for posting the article - it is very long so i really apprechiate the effort.
I bet some of us are able to read it - maybe someone can translate it for the rest of us.
Btw. your english isn´t as bad as you think it is - if you like, post more here.
Good luck for your favorit - hope he can come back fully fit - if he does, it would be nice if could give Roger a break,if they are going to meet at RG :)

Daniel
02-02-2005, 09:20 AM
Thansk for the article :)

fightclubber
02-02-2005, 10:53 AM
brazuca!!!
Eu adorei el reportagem!
Obrigado voce.
Can you tell me if its on the last VEJA magazine and if it has photos? SO I can ask my friend guga to buy it for me?
I do not speak portuguese very well, but I understood 90 percent of it, in case any of you need to ask something... Ill try to tranlate it

SIlvy

ytben
02-02-2005, 01:11 PM
Thanks for the articles brazuca even though I don't understand a word of it :p

Pardon me when I say that I don't share this sentiment...

Ditto :rolleyes:

Juanqui's loss to him in Shanghai bugged me to no end. Sniff. I really want him to get better. And I want Guga to come back, and I want David to win a big one finally... But I'm conflicted. You see, I'd like for my other favorite players to win slams, but I still want Roger to have a fantabulous year. And seeing that I really really really really wanted Marat to win another slam, and then he went and won it at Roger's expense and now it's taking me a while to forgive him :ras: (take that Marat!), I don't know if I'm going to be happy with Roger not winning [/drama]. I didn't think I could be this petty, really. I wasn't that way with my previous faves. You'd think that as you get older, you'd get less childish in your reactions, but apparently that's not the case with me when it comes to Roger. Rather disturbing, if you ask me. :eek:

I hope I get over this quickly. I want to like Marat a lot again. :(

I'd be extremely happy if Roger won RG, too. But Wimbledon is his favorite, so I hope he wins the one that makes him happier and gives him more confidence! Or, you know, he could just go ahead and win both... ;)

I want JC, Guga, David, and Coria(not a fan but I want all the top guys to be back to where they belong) to become healthy too all year long and become a serious contender again. And please JC, get some confidence and raise your ranking before RG! With Rogi's kind of luck for tournament draw, I have a bad premonition Rogi may meet him in early rounds at RG :tape:

Hahaha yeah, I also prefer him to win both...;) But seriously I will be over the moon if he makes second week in RG already and defend his Wimbly crown. Defending Wimbly afterall is one of his two main goals, and his fave tourney.

avocadoe
02-02-2005, 01:14 PM
Not sure how this happened but I am still watching the match, the semis, and at 2-All in the fourth I am absolutely convinced that Roger will win. Maybe I should stop, lol. I think I have noticed Roger walking like his feet are bothering him. I know I'll feel he shoulda won the 4th. Marat was playing very well, and so was Roger. Not always at the same time. I really dislike the PRESS, they are like babies wawawing and oohing and ahhing and being crushed surprised and disappointed to an extreme. It is interesting watching Roger's confidance rise and fall and rise in the match. So much of watching Roger is just watching him play against someone too easy, not easy like he doesn't have to do it, but not a threat. Safin was a threat, and won a few key points that gave him the match. It was vvv close. Roger shoulda closed out in the fourth. He's gotten used to having so many chances, and not having to make this one or that one, don't have the stat but it seems like a lot of matches recently have break points galore, and he only gets enough of them to win. This time he didn't get it done, and as I rememeber, in the TB, the lost points for the crucial fourth set, at least some of them, came off his racket, rather than forced by Marat (this is not to say that at other points in the match Marat did not make winners, trouble Federer) Anyway, I need to get past 2-All in the 4th to be sure.

yanchr
02-02-2005, 01:47 PM
I hope I get over this quickly. I want to like Marat a lot again. :(
Don't cheat yourself. Yes, you WANT to like him a lot again, but you just don't and won't, until maybe Roger gains another big win against him ;) Don't get yourself wrong. That's exactly the same case with me. I think I like Safin, but now I think actually I don't like him as I have thought I do :p And I just live with it comfortably now ;)

yanchr
02-02-2005, 02:20 PM
Not sure how this happened but I am still watching the match, the semis, and at 2-All in the fourth I am absolutely convinced that Roger will win. Maybe I should stop, lol. .....and as I rememeber, in the TB, the lost points for the crucial fourth set, at least some of them, came off his racket, rather than forced by Marat (this is not to say that at other points in the match Marat did not make winners, trouble Federer) Anyway, I need to get past 2-All in the 4th to be sure.
Believe it or not, I was watching the MP for Roger again and again (simply repeating playing that point), I still can't get over it how Roger lost that one. I think Roger picked up Safin's return so well (well let's forget that maybe it was out if Roger hadn't picked it up :o ) and then also volleyed well to make Safin hit that lob. I think Roger had got enough time to turn back for the lob and made a forehand pass, or just lob it back...and he did choose the tweener...

Let me get past that point first...;)

SUKTUEN
02-02-2005, 02:22 PM
thanks :worship:

Puschkin
02-02-2005, 02:50 PM
Believe it or not, I was watching the MP for Roger again and again (simply repeating playing that point), I still can't get over it how Roger lost that one. ..


Don't torture yourself. Just imagine the man himself, I don't think he watches that point over and over again, it's time to get on :)

SUKTUEN
02-02-2005, 03:01 PM
:sad: Roger feel uncomfortable in the match~~~

So he was do his best~~

Dirk
02-02-2005, 03:05 PM
Yes Suktuen it was the blisters on his godly feet that defeated him not Saffy. Next time Ninja will kill that oaf and that will be that.

lsy
02-02-2005, 03:51 PM
The media are like sheep at times, give them a theme and they'll suddenly run with it. Before the AO there were no articles talking about Safin being THE threat to Federer this year (even though his indoor run last autumn and the tiebreak against Federer at the TMC gave quite a few hints of such a threat), and now all of a sudden it's Sampras v Agassi for the 00s. I do find it ridiculous that Safin's victory is hailed not merely because he beat Federer, but because he managed to stop him winning the Grand Slam this year - as if all the other three were in the bag already if he'd defended the title here. Now they're speculating whether Safin can do it instead, just because he's 1/4 of the way there. Note to journalists - NO ONE is going to be winning the Grand Slam in men's tennis for the foreseeable future. If it can only be good for the sport to see more variation in the winners of Slams and more people challenging Federer, then stop speculating about someone winning all four the moment they get on the board at the start of the year.

Couldn't have said it better myself. I don't know if that's for the better on Rogi, since the grand slam talk is off his back but then also he would have more pressure to defend Wimby and do well in other slam than if he had already won AO.

We'll see.


It's interesting that the first meeting they ever had, on clay, was won 7-6 in the third by Federer, but the other two in 2002 were absolute drubbings, in the DC and the Hamburg final. I never saw the former, but to be honest Federer would have destroyed anybody the way he was playing in the latter.

Was that his best clay performance you had seen then? The Hamburg final I meant.


I think his game is better suited to clay than Safin's, bearing in mind he has more spin on his shots and is a quicker mover, but at the same time Safin is much better at grinding out the long, long matches you need to win in Paris. He should have lost twice last year, to Mantilla and to Starace, yet he somehow came through both matches; when it comes to the long haul he's one of the best out there, whereas Federer definitely needs to improve in five-setters.

If oaf the headcase can do it, I can't see why Rogi shouldn't ;) Unless fitness aspect which if I dare mention it again, Dirk will surely kill me ;)

brazuca5copas
02-02-2005, 04:59 PM
brazuca!!!
Eu adorei el reportagem!
Obrigado voce.
Can you tell me if its on the last VEJA magazine and if it has photos? SO I can ask my friend guga to buy it for me?
I do not speak portuguese very well, but I understood 90 percent of it, in case any of you need to ask something... Ill try to tranlate it

SIlvy

You're Welcome !!!!
Yes, this is the last magazine, this current week. www.veja.com.br
About the photos, no, don't has them, just that I posted before.

yanchr
02-03-2005, 05:04 AM
Don't torture yourself. Just imagine the man himself, I don't think he watches that point over and over again, it's time to get on :)
:hug: I have wanted to rep you several times, but I can't :wavey:

I'm not torturing myself. I'm just trying to find some facts myself. At least I was not replaying that last point... ;) :p

Puschkin
02-03-2005, 11:04 AM
http://www.abnamrowtt.nl/

De spectaculaire kick off van het ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament begint een traditie te worden. Net zoals in 2003 en 2004 vormen ook dit jaar de Maas en de Erasmusbrug het decor waarin toptennissers het prestigieuze toernooi op bijzondere wijze openen. Op zondag 13 februari omstreeks 14.15 uur vertrekken Roger Federer, de onbetwiste nummer één van de huidige mondiale tennisranglijst, ‘local hero’ Raemon Sluiter en toernooidirecteur Richard Krajicek vanaf de Veerhaven voor een tocht op het ABN AMRO zeiljacht dat dit jaar zal participeren in de Volvo Ocean Race rond de wereld.

Het schip met de tennissers vaart vanuit de Veerhaven in de richting van de Erasmusbrug, waar ter hoogte van de Wilhelminakade de Matador 3 ligt. De Matador 3 is een van de grootste drijvende bokken van de wereld. Boven in deze kraan, op enkele tientallen meters hoogte, hangt een gigantische tennisbal. Het doel van de stunt is dat Roger Federer en Raemon Sluiter vanaf het zeiljacht proberen de tennisbal te raken. Als dat gebeurt, zal de tennisbal vanaf deze hoogte omlaag vallen in de Maas en is het 32e ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament officieel geopend.

I am not perfect in Dutch, but the key message is that Roger together with Dutch player Sluiter will be on a boat on Sunday 13 February for a PR-event to open the Rotterdam tourney. Somewhere in Rotterdam Harbour a big crane carries a huge tennis ball and the two players are supposed to hit it. The big ball will then be launched into the river.

I am rather sure that the tournament responsibles could only publish this with Roger's agreement. And it doesn't look to me as sign of being timid on the next tourney. As I posted earlier, it's time to move on.

Daniel
02-03-2005, 11:23 AM
thanks Pushkin :D

avocadoe
02-03-2005, 12:48 PM
sounds like a pinata tennis ball ceremony :)

Dirk
02-03-2005, 01:02 PM
If any of you can give me examples of Roger's lack of fitness please do so. Losing the 5th set is not evidence, especially if you actually saw it.

novanora
02-03-2005, 01:44 PM
http://www.abnamrowtt.nl/
I am not perfect in Dutch, but the key message is that Roger together with Dutch player Sluiter will be on a boat on Sunday 13 February for a PR-event to open the Rotterdam tourney. Somewhere in Rotterdam Harbour a big crane carries a huge tennis ball and the two players are supposed to hit it. The big ball will then be launched into the river.

I am rather sure that the tournament responsibles could only publish this with Roger's agreement. And it doesn't look to me as sign of being timid on the next tourney. As I posted earlier, it's time to move on.
thanks, puschkin. sounds a very interesting opening ceremoney :lol:
does it mean he is sure to play Rotterdam? i heard from Laura he could retire from this tourney for the injury.

SUKTUEN
02-03-2005, 01:48 PM
thanks~~

I miss Roger :sad:

Jimena
02-03-2005, 02:28 PM
thanks, puschkin. sounds a very interesting opening ceremoney :lol:
does it mean he is sure to play Rotterdam? i heard from Laura he could retire from this tourney for the injury.

Who's Laura? Does she know anything you could share with us? ;)

And what's this injury? Nothing serious, I hope...

yanchr
02-03-2005, 03:13 PM
Who's Laura? Does she know anything you could share with us? ;)

And what's this injury? Nothing serious, I hope...
Well it's me :p but nothing inside news to share with you. The obvious fact is that Roger will probably go to Rotterdam which also shows the injury is not that serious. Hope you are enlightened :) So just wait and see, no worries pls ;)

helloworld40
02-03-2005, 04:39 PM
The press just needs something to talk about. All of us who saw Marat match in Houston knew that he was back & to me at least had at least a 50-50 chance of defeating Roger in Aus. You'd have to be brain dead not to know the key rivalry at top of men's tennis is Roger-Marat & Safin-Safin!!

But did everyone check the match stats? Roger actually won 7 more points in the match than Marat. To me that suggests the crucial role played by the inside information provided by Peter, as clearly it was, as Rog said, a few key points that made the difference. I trust everyone read -in Chris Clarey's NYT art. & L'Equipe art. trans. by someone on Marat's website- about Marat's agent running around locker room environs after the match bragging about all the key details that Peter was able to provide about Roger...where Rog would serve on break point, etc. etc.

Let's hope that got back to Rog & he is able to adjust.

Which one is the L'Equipe article? Could you provide a link (which Marat website?) I'm intrigued by the "inside info" Peter provided to Marat about Roger's tendencies ...

cheers

Doris Loeffel
02-03-2005, 04:49 PM
Well I know this might sound funny - but I have the strange feeling that with this loss now ppl really see what kind of a year Roger had in 2004. And that ppl are even more avare that also Roger has to win his matches - they're not given to him and therefore the ppl start to regognise and really appreciate what he has done last year now that he for once lost an important match. (Sure he lost at the olympics but it was "only" a second round match and not a semi or final)

Well sometimes you have to lose something to really appreciate what you had before...

... looking forward to Rotterdam.

RogiFan88
02-03-2005, 05:42 PM
So true, Doris, I was just thinking about the 2 incredible years Rogi has had -- who else could have done what he accomplished?? We'll just see how Rogi manages this year w all the pressure and accumulation of matches played and titles won... it can't continue forever and I don't want it to if that means he's getting injured now, like so many other top players [and not-so-top players].

Whistleway
02-03-2005, 06:10 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/28/sports/tennis/28tennis.html

"Sure it helps," said Safin's agent, Gerard Tsobanian. "When Federer started to drop off, Peter was telling us it was because his feet were hurting. He knew when Roger would hit certain shots, when he'd take risks. He knew, when he faced break point, where he'd serve. He was doing a running commentary for us throughout the match."

Whistleway
02-03-2005, 06:14 PM
I would like to thank you for the immense number of comments on the Australian Open. Having been defeated so close to reaching the final, including having had a match-ball certainly hurts. On the other hand it is great to have gone that far already.

I have nevertheless had a very good start into the new season and there are many important tournaments yet to come. I am now thoroughly enjoying a few days at home. It is a very welcome break with my family and friends before heading off to Rotterdam.
http://www.rogerfederer.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=313

Yay... i am happy Roger is taking it in strides and going about his business.. awesome !! Go roger...

babsi
02-04-2005, 07:44 AM
Let´s hope Roger read that article in the NY times - he needs to change his game plan completly,when he plays Marat again.

Puschkin
02-04-2005, 08:01 AM
Let´s hope Roger read that article in the NY times - he needs to change his game plan completly,when he plays Marat again.

:confused:

All these talk of PL telling secrets about Roger is greatly exaggerated in my view. PL did, however, achieve a lot. He made Marat believe in himself and that was part of winning that match, talking about which I am getting sicker and sicker. It is time to move on, sorry if I keep insisting on this ;)

Daniel
02-04-2005, 09:47 AM
Well I know this might sound funny - but I have the strange feeling that with this loss now ppl really see what kind of a year Roger had in 2004. And that ppl are even more avare that also Roger has to win his matches - they're not given to him and therefore the ppl start to regognise and really appreciate what he has done last year now that he for once lost an important match. (Sure he lost at the olympics but it was "only" a second round match and not a semi or final)

Well sometimes you have to lose something to really appreciate what you had before...

... looking forward to Rotterdam.


:worship: :worship:

yanchr
02-04-2005, 11:28 AM
Let´s hope Roger read that article in the NY times - he needs to change his game plan completly,when he plays Marat again.
I don't think Roger has to change his game plan completely when he plays Safin again, and I don't believe he will. As for PL, I actually don't think he really came up with sth special and secret to help Safin beat Roger, he just took advantage of being around with Roger for long enough to know he was not his normal self that day. If Roger was in full health that day, it probably would've been another story, no matter what PL came up with to tell Safin.

So take it easy, Susanne :wavey:

Puschkin
02-04-2005, 11:36 AM
I don't think Roger has to change his game plan completely when he plays Safin again, and I don't believe he will. As for PL, I actually don't think he really came up with sth special and secret to help Safin beat Roger, he just took advantage of being around with Roger for long enough to know he was not his normal self that day. If Roger was in full health that day, it probably would've been another story, no matter what PL came up with to tell Safin.



What the hell is going on with the rep system? you wanted to rep me, I want to rep you on this, but the system ignores our mutaual understanding :)

Jimena
02-04-2005, 11:44 AM
All these talk of PL telling secrets about Roger is greatly exaggerated in my view. PL did, however, achieve a lot. He made Marat believe in himself and that was part of winning that match, talking about which I am getting sicker and sicker. It is time to move on, sorry if I keep insisting on this ;)

Oh Puschkin. It's the first painful loss Roger has had since the DC match against Hewitt. We Roger fans have had it easy the past couple of years, so it's to be expected that we're having a bit of trouble letting go (and some of us are being very dramatic over it- cough* Me! * cough). It'll be much better once Roger plays again. But since we know very little of what he has been doing and the last thing we saw was the match against Safin, we're still focused on it. It'll go away in a little while, don't worry. :)

fightclubber
02-04-2005, 11:55 AM
Oh Puschkin. It's the first painful loss Roger has had since the DC match against Hewitt. We Roger fans have had it easy the past couple of years, so it's to be expected that we're having a bit of trouble letting go (and some of us are being very dramatic over it- cough* Me! * cough). It'll be much better once Roger plays again. But since we know very little of what he has been doing and the last thing we saw was the match against Safin, we're still focused on it. It'll go away in a little while, don't worry. :)

Well I think its time to move, too. We suffered, we confort each other, we left messages to Rogi on his site. We blame Marat, Peter L, the blister, the injuries.. I think we had enought time to talk and let it go. To me ....its time to move to the Rotterdam thead.
AO is over, and we need to follow Roger, think on our new objetive. Rotterdam, Dubai, and care for injuries if they still are.

So guys, Lets meet at the Rotterdam thread, ok??

Silvy

babsi
02-04-2005, 01:45 PM
Yes, you are right guys - let´s move on :)
sorry for the bother :(

Susanne

fightclubber
02-04-2005, 02:18 PM
:wavey: Yes, you are right guys - let´s move on :)
sorry for the bother :(

Susanne OH You do not bother, Susanne! But put a smaile on your face and we think sun will shine again, too soon, right???
Kisses

silvy :worship:

SUKTUEN
02-04-2005, 03:10 PM
thanks ;)

*M*
02-07-2005, 02:10 AM
Man, I am still going through AO withdrawal. I re-watch that Safin match, and still half-expect Roger to come through in the end . . .

A nice, long article on Roger came out in SI a few weeks ago. I'm sure some of you never got the chance to read it, so here it is. There was some concern on Roger's site about posting it, so I'm just going to leave it here temporarily. (Edit: Someone has since copied it there, so I guess it's okay to leave here too.) I'm breaking it into parts, because it's pretty long.

________________________

He Stands Alone (Part 1/4)

It’s not surprising that Roger Federer’s fans put him on a pedestal. What is shocking is how many of those fans are his fellow competitors, who feel that Federer has taken his game – and their sport – to a higher level.

By S. L. Price
Photograph by Adam Pretty / Getty Images

HE DID WHAT little boys do when faced with something huge and dark: He ran. He rushed out into the warm Toronto night; he was alone and the street was unfamiliar, and there were no taxis anywhere and he had to find someone to explain how this nightmare could’ve happened, but . . . where was his hotel? Where were the cabs? He ran and ran, past storefronts and doors and lights. No, he thought. He ran through the strange city, gasping, trying not to believe what he’d just heard. God, no . . . . He had been in a bar. It was near midnight. His cellphone rang, but he ignored it, thinking, What does he want now? It rang again, he ignored it again. Why? Because he was 20 and had lived half his life being told he was special, and he had become rich too early; because Roger Federer was a boy still. He didn’t want to deal with responsibility that August night. He didn’t want to hear his coach, Peter Lundgren, telling him to get some sleep, or think about the next day’s doubles match or about how great he was supposed to be. Hadn’t he already bombed out in his singles match three days before? He lifted his glass. He didn’t have to answer if he didn’t want to.

Federer had, by then, shed his more brattish ways. He didn’t weep during matches anymore, or throw rackets or scream so loudly after mistakes that even his father, Robert, would yell down fnom the stands, “Can you please just stop?” Roger was years past the point of howling back at his dad, “Go have a drink and leave me alone!” embarrassing the man to the point that father and son would make the long drive home in silence, the trip ending once with Robert shoving his son’s face into a snowbank. But it still took Roger a half hour stop crying in the locker room after losses, and he still flung rackets in practice. When going to sleep, he often needed to lie on his stomach and slam his face over and over into the pillow – “head-banging,” he called it – searching like a troubled child for the rhythm that would send him into slumber.

He was soft. Everyone knew it. The year before, at Wimbledon in 2001, Federer seemed to make his long-predicted breakthrough when he snapped Pete Sampras’s 31-match winning streak there, but he lost in the next round. His game could be breathtaking, and that hurt him. He got lost in trying to play beautifully, to create astonishing points, and anytime he climbed into the cage with someone who could stretch a match to the place where talent and beauty weren’t enough, he was in trouble. He won minor titles but lost too early, too often, on the game’s biggest stages. By the summer of ’02, Federer had cracked the top 10 buy cemented a reputation. “The word on me was, Mentally he’s not the strongest,” Federer says. “People would hang on, thinking, If the match goes on over two hours, I will get him.”

Some people are middle-aged at 30; some remain children forever. Here was Roger Federer on Aug. 1, 2002: callow and unfinished. His cellphone rang, and he didn’t answer. He checked his messages, though, then called his coach at last. That’s when Lundgren told him: There’d been a car crash. Federer’s mentor, the 37-year-old man who had traveled with him for years, who had shaped him more than anyone into the player and person he’d become, who was more brother than coach, was dead. He had been en route to a safari, a trip Federer had long pushed him to take. Guilt coursed through Federer like poison. The cabs had vanished and Federer ran a mile, maybe more, searching for a ride back to his hotel. “I was going crazy,” he says. “It was horrible.”

Back at the hotel he went from being the recipient of bad news to the bearer of it, sobbing as he called friends. He was, as someone who spoke to him that night says, “destroyed. You cannot describe how he was at that moment: You had to hear it, feel it.”

Now experience and age came together for Federer, like hands of a clock lining up at midnight. How many of us can point to the moment they crossed into adulthood? When his friend’s body arrived in Federer’s hometown of Basel, Switzerland, a week later, Federer had grown up. It was his birthday. He was 21.

*M*
02-07-2005, 02:12 AM
He Stands Alone (Part 2/4)

ON A RAINY AFTERNOON in October, Roger Federer strolled to the dais in the council chamber at Basel’s city hall, taking both the applause and the setting easily in stride. Paintings depicting scenes from Swiss history covered the ceiling. The benches were only half-filled with officials and journalists, most wearing jackets and tightly knotted ties, and from the wood-paneled walls and the middle-aged men rose the scent of order, history, law and money. Ostensibly, all had come for the official draw of the 2004 Swiss indoor tournament set to open in Basel the next day, but it was more a celebration of the city’s favorite son. For the first rime, Federer had come home as the No. 1 player in the world, the first Swiss man to reach that height and— unlike his often mouthy compatriot Martina Hingis—now seemingly incapable of making the Swiss establishment cringe.

The old like Federer. He plays a classic game, never upbraids umpires or linespeople and, though he spent 2004 on one of the most spectacular rolls in tennis history, shows little sign of conceit. After being named the tour’s most popular player, Federer thanked everyone and finished with a catchphrase prized by grandmothers the world over: “It’s nice to be important, but it’s more important to be nice.”

It’s no wonder that Basel tournament president Roger Brennwald, noticing Federer posing for a photographer before the oversized draw sheet, bolted in mid-sentence and darted across the room to throw an arm around his neck. Ten years ago Federer had been a ball boy at this tournament, and his mother had made name tags in the press office. This all fits nicely with Basel’s homey self-image; the town sits just minutes from both the French and the German borders, and in his multilingual openness, Federer is, as provincial president Jorg Schild puts it, “typically Basel.”

“Roger’s easy,” Brennwald said. “We are down-to-earth people. In Zurich they are a little . . . “ — and here he lifted his nose in the air —” . . . like the French. Basel is not like that. You can talk to Roger like a simple man on the street.”

Simple. Easy. Nice. Talk to anyone in the game who had to wrangle with John McEnroe or the Williams sisters or any open-era No. 1, and you will never hear those words together. Federer’s dominance has been so absolute, his winning of three 2004 Grand Slam titles so effortless, his assumption of the attendant media and sponsor responsibilities so angst-free, that it’s only human to overlook how radical a force he is. Tennis has never seen anything quite like him.

Sailing alone, making his own game plan, famously outthinking coaching guru Brad Gilbert during the Wimbledon final against Andy Roddick, the 23-year old Federer lost just six matches in ‘04, went 11-0 in finals and won his last 23 matches against top 10 players, routing the field to win November’s Masters Cup. Only a third-round loss to Gustavo Kuerten at Roland Garros stopped Federer from winning all four Grand Slam tournaments; the last time the sport got even a whiff of that was in 1997, when Hingis won three.

Yet if Federer’s campaign placed him in the company of tennis greats, it also had an oddly unique feel. Throughout, Federer seemed less intent on making history or crushing the competition than on exploring his limits. Whenever a big or tricky match loomed, he wondered if he could handle, say, Roddick’s power or bad weather or New York’s singular pressures; he was the first to say he didn’t know. Faced with Ivo Karlovic’s massive serve at Wimbledon, he was less nervous than intrigued. “I thought it was an unbelievably nice test: Can he serve me off the court? Am I not a good enough returner to cope with that pressure?” Federer said after. “Well, I did, and I’m happy.”

It’s not often you see the tennis tour used as a platform for personal growth, but Federer hasn’t followed the norm for a while. Despite his conservative demeanor, he has broken with convention far more fundamentally than, say, Andre Agassi or McEnroe; where it matters most—money and winning—the game’s rebels have needed their hands held as much as anyone. By the 1980s every young player had a big-time agent, either from behemoth IMG or one of its enemies, and a No. 1 without a full-time coach was as normal as a limo without a driver. But in 2003 Federer broke with IMG and directed his business dealings to his parents; his girlfriend, former Swiss player Mirka Vavrinec; plus a media expert, accountant and lawyer. Later that year, despite winning Wimbledon and the Masters Cup championship in Houston, Federer fired Lundgren. For the next 13 months, he talked over his game mostly with Vavrinec and a friend from his junior days. Last week Federer hired Aussie coach Tony Roche as a consultant, but he’s still in no rush to hire someone full time. After all, Federer broke into greatness on his own.

“Roger has this natural instinct for getting better—and he did,” Hingis says. “I find that incredible. I always had someone to tell me if something was wrong. He just felt it.”

Hingis, of course, upended the women’s game with brains and touch similar to Federer’s, but it’s no shock that his game leaves her mystified. It does that to everybody The service motion, forehand and demeanor prompt an easy comparison with Sampras, but Federer’s youthful nickname of Petit Pete hasn’t held up. Sampras’s career was built on aces and quickness; his greatness was easily explained and thus, for the easily bored, boring. But no one has accused Federer of being dull, because his tennis is as smooth and elusive as a ball of mercury. You can’t quite put your finger on him. In an age of power his is a game of manipulation: Federer doesn’t shut down opponents so much as expose them. Few players generate more racket head speed, and his combination of conditioning and exquisite footwork leaves the impression that he always has more time, more space, in which to react. His rivals, in a clear sign of surrender, have all but given up using tennis terms to describe him. Marat Safin, arguably the second-most-talented man on tour, calls Federer “a magician”; ‘04 French Open champ Gaston Gaudio calls him “a genius”; for Agassi he is “an inspiration.” Rod Laver, whose Grand Slam season in 1969 may well be the only one comparable with Federer’s 2004, is no less awestruck. Federer’s anticipation and court sense, Laver says, leave him wondering, match after match, How did he do that? “It’s uncanny” Laver says. “He’s never out of place. But you think, How can he never be out of place?”

Serena Williams says, “I wish I could play like Roger Federer.” It has been 20 years since a man has been talked about in such a way. McEnroe’s touch allowed tennis cognoscenti to bandy a word like “artistry,” and Federer is blessed with the same rare gift. But it’s harder to be an artist these days. Racket technology and weight training have made the players bigger, more powerful; Federer who is 6’ 1”, 177, is creating beautiful tennis off a barrage McEnroe never faced. At the same time, the tour is dominated by athletes, not players, and though the top 100 is better than ever, the top 10 is not. It’s easier to look as though you’re working with brush and palette when everyone else is playing painthall. “Nobody hits a good slice, so nobody knows what it is anymore,” says Swiss coach Heinz Gunthardt. “So Roger hits his little short slice—which used to be a standard approach shot—and nobody knows how to get past him, and people say, ‘My God! Look at that shot!’”

There’s never been a player more complete. Unlike McEnroe and Sampras, Federer can beat the best on clay and will be a favorite to win the French; unlike Laver and Bjorn Borg, he has won Slam titles on hard court. “He stays back better than me, his backhand is better, and his forehand is just as good,” Sampras says. “His temperament will enable him to stay on top as long as he wants.” This is why, though Federer has won only four Slam titles, many believe he can complete a Grand Slam and gun for Sampras’s record of 14 Slam tities. “There’s no one who can play with him today,” Sampras says. “For the next four or five years, his competition will be the record books.”

Aside from injury, then, the only thing capable of stopping Federer is Federer. For now, he’s motivated: On Saturday it took him just 63 minutes to win the Qatar Open. Whether he cares enough to chase Sampras won’t be known for years, but it’s clear that the first stage of his career has ended. When Federer returned to Basel last autumn, he came home for the first time free of pressure, free of frustration and fear. “Everything from now on is only positive,” he says. “Of course there will be ups and downs, many moments when I’ll think I should’ve won that match or done this or that differently. But I’ve lived up to all the expectations. It gives me huge relief: I can look in the mirror and know I can achieve. I’m playing great tennis. I’m enjoying the tour, having fun with the fans off the court. I’m loving it now.”

*M*
02-07-2005, 02:13 AM
He Stands Alone (Part 3/4)

PETER CARTER died young, but that wasn’t the only reason his death felt cruel. The Swiss Davis Cup coach had just emerged from a wrenching period: He had been married just more than a year but had never taken a honeymoon because his wife, Sylvia, had leamed she had Hodgkin’s disease five weeks after their wedding. Their world revolved around doctors, chemotherapy, hair falling out in clumps, and Peter was there for all of it. Then, in the summer of ‘02, Sylvia’s tests came back clean. Federer’s mother is from South Africa, and he had always pushed Peter to go there, go on a safari, so Sylvia and Peter made their plan. “The trip was a celebration,” says Bob Carter, Peter’s father. “To celebrate her becoming well again.”

It was Aug. 1, the day after Sylvia’s birthday. Peter was riding in a Land Rover with a guide in Kruger National Park. Police say a tire may have blown out; the driver lost control, and the vehicle plunged off a bridge into a stream and overturned. Both men were killed instantly. Sylvia was in another car, riding with the other man’s wife. “It just destroyed her,” Vavrinec says of Sylvia. “It cannot get any worse. Her birthday is now a nightmare to her.” Nothing compares with the loss of a spouse or a child; Federer knows that his grief pales in comparison. But he was green enough to gain something priceless from that tragedy: the knowledge that nothing is guaranteed. Not happiness, not love and not, certainly, anything as flimsy as tennis greatness.

Carter knew that. He grew up in rural Australia, a graceful serve-and-volleyer but slight; “a waif,” says his coach Peter Smith. Carter had just two big moments: beating Pat Cash when Cash was the world’s No. 1 junior and then, in 1982, ranked 756th, stunning 34th-ranked John Alexander. But every year brought a new injury, and at some tournaments he played in constant pain. There was only one reason he accomplished the little he did. “He was so tough,” Smith says. Later, when Smith began coaching Lleyton Hewitt, he gave the tenacious blond boy the best compliment he could imagine: “You look like a little Peter Carter out there.”

By then, though, Carter had moved to Switzerland, playing club-team tennis and coaching, and washed up at the Old Boys Tennis Club in Basel. He met Federer as a 10-year-old, and already people were talking about Federer’s touch—and his attitude. The Basel youth tennis scene then was like Bollettieri’s-on-the-Rhine, highly competitive and highly strung; smashed rackets and screechy tirades made every tournament a trial. In one match Federer was beating his opponent so badly the boy started crying. On the changeover Roger told him not to be so hard on himself; things would turn around. Then the boy started winning, and Roger cried. Federer never screamed at anyone but himself, tormented by mistakes, poor judgment, his inability to stay in control. “Everybody tried to calm me down,” Federer says. “But I told them it eats me up from the inside. I knew I was over the top, but I just had to get it out.”

Carter coached Federer until he was 14. The two traveled together, “father and son stuff,” as Smith puts it. Federer credits Carter with teaching him his peerless technique, his backhand, a professional attitude, politeness—in many ways, how to be a man. It didn’t all take, not then anyway. After seeing Hewitt play in Europe, Carter called Smith and said, “I saw your boy today. Pretty good, but I think mine’s a bit better.” One thing bothered him, though. “He thought Roger didn’t have Lleyton’s mental toughness,” Smith says.

Federer may have been soft, but he didn’t lack will. At 13 he announced it was time to leave home and attend the Swiss national training center in Ecublens. He came home on weekends and cried every Sunday night on the way to the train. But he always went back. After joining the coaching staff at the new training center in Biel, Carter began coaching Federer again at 16, guiding his rise to world No.1 junior. It wasn’t easy. Federer’s talent gave him so many options on each ball that it was almost paralyzing. “You learn one new language quicker than four new languages,” says Pierre Paganini, Federer’s longtime trainer. “He plays 10 languages on the court.” Federer knew how good he was supposed to be; he heard what everyone said. “I really felt I had to please the crowd: to hit the most difficult shot,” Federer says. “But it made me lose.”

Lundgren, a former coach of onetime No. 1 Marcelo Rios, joined the staff at Biel and began coaching Federer on a limited basis in 1997. Two years later, when Federer joined the tour full time, he stunned everyone— including Carter—by choosing Lundgren as his coach. It made sense; Lundgren, a former top 25 player, had tour experience that Carter lacked. It also demonstrated that Federer possessed a ruthless objectivity about his career. But he also made sure to consult constantly with Carter, and after helping oust Jakob Hlasek as Switzerland’s Davis Cup captain in 2001, Federer used his clout as the No.1 Swiss player to install his old coach in Hlasek’s place. It wasn’t a simple task; in fact, it was a bit like making Nick Faldo the captain of the U.S. Ryder Cup team. The Swiss Tennis Federation insisted that Carter, an Australian, couldn’t officially assume the captaincy and sit on-court with the team until he had gained Swiss citizenship. But Federer didn’t have to feel guilty anymore. Everyone had a place now.

Federer and Carter had one Davis Cup tie together, in February 2002. Federer beat Safin and Yevgeny Kafelnikov in Russia, but Switzerland lost 3—2. Then came the summer, Federer’s first-round losses in Paris and London and Toronto, the phone calls, his first funeral. “Did it change anything in me?” Federer says. “I was playing quite badly, but it put everything in perspective. I fought a lot, and I came out stronger.”

Not instantly. Federer’s game collapsed at first; he lost in the first round in Cincinnati and the fourth round at the U.S. Open. Then came a late-September Davis Cup tie with Morocco, on clay, in Casablanca, with the loser to be knocked out of the world group. Federer rose to the moment, avenging the loss at the French Open by beating Hicham Arazi in straight sets, pairing up with George Bastl to win the doubles, then beating Younes El-Aynaoui to win the tie single-handedly. His rampage continued deep into the 2003 season, 10 straight wins, and he won Wimbledon for the first time. Everyone around him says it: Carter’s death gave Federer the inspiration he had always lacked. But he had soft spots still. Federer lost in the first round of the ‘03 French Open in straight sets to Luis Horna.

In September of that year Switzerland traveled to Melbourne for the Davis Cup semifinal against Australia. For the first time the two teams would play for the Peter Carter Memorial Trophy— awarded now at every Davis Cup meeting between the two nations. Bob Carter and his wife, Diana, and Peter Smith all came in from their houses near Adelaide. Federer won his first match on Friday but, with Switzerland down 2-1, needed to beat Hewitt on Sunday to keep the tie alive. He glided to an easy two-set lead, then to 5-3, 30-all in the third: two points from the win. Hewitt dropped a tricky return on the back of the line, and Federer swiped at it lamely, hoping for a call that never came. He had choked, and instantly knew it; when Federer looked up, his eyes were as wide and shiny as quarters. Hewitt came back, of course. He screamed, “Come on!” revved the crowd up, and clawed his way into his opponent’s head. Federer buckled, went down 6-1 in the fifth and ran off the court sobbing.

An hour later the two teams congregated in the team’s dressing room with Bob and Diana. Federer hadn’t seen them since before their son had died. His teammates urged him to stay strong, but something inside him gave way, something he had been carrying for a year, and for the second time that day, Federer broke down. He went into a smaller room with Peter’s parents, where they comforted him. “I’m very happy it happened,” Federer says. “It was hard to lose, and [Peter’s] parents came in and I got more emotional—so many emotions. But it was important for me to face it.”

The morning after he won Wimbledon last year, Federer called the Carters. He still does that occasionally, telling them how often he thinks of their son during tough matches. For them his success has become a vivid reminder of their youngest child, a graceful embodiment of everything Peter knew and taught and was. “We’re rooting for Roger,” Bob says. “We feel part of his tennis. We feel part of his team.”

*M*
02-07-2005, 02:15 AM
He Stands Alone (Part 4/4)

MELBOURNE CHANGED Roger Federer. At 22 he had the artistic temperament down—everything had to be just so, the weather perfect, his hair set, before he could perform. He was a diva. But after his fold Down Under, he got harder. In November 2003, at the Masters Cup in Houston, tournament chairman and furniture magnate Jim (Mattress Mac) McIngvale cornered Federer and blistered him for some benign remarks Federer had made about the “wavy” court and smallish stadium. Federer argued a bit but got so rattled that he had to retreat to the locker room to compose himself. He told Lundgren he couldn’t play. “I’m not happy;’ he said. “I’m not ready.”

But he shook it off. He went out before the pro-Andre crowd that night, saved two match points and beat Agassi. He dropped one set the whole week, beat longtime nemesis David Nalbandian and No. 1-ranked Andy Roddick, then weathered a 2 1/2-hour rain delay and Agassi again to win the year-end championship. McIngvale all but ignored him while lauding Agassi during the postmatch presentation, but Federer just smiled. He had the win, and Mattress Mac’s money.

Even with his success, he wasn’t satisfied. Federer dumped Lundgren within days of his win in Houston because their relationship had gotten too comfortable for comfort. He went on vacation, but two days in he called his trainer to map out his fitness program for 2004. “I realized, Roger, you have to wake up now,” Federer says. “The train is leaving. You have to catch the train.”
[the Federer Express? Why, he’s the conductor, isn't he?! :)]

Roddick pushed him at last year’s Wimbledon, but Federer adjusted and won. Wind and rain disrupted his quarterfinal match at the 2004 U.S. Open against Agassi; Federer adjusted and won. After losing seven of their previous nine meetings, Federer took Hewitt on an around-the-world clinic in 2004, beating the No.3 player on all surfaces—in every Slam in which they met—six times in all. Federer launched their U.S. Open final with perhaps the finest set of tennis ever played, winning all but five points in an 18-minute, 6-0 blitz. A point away from 5-2 in the second set, Federer wobbled, lost serve and gave Hewitt his chance. For a moment it smelled like Davis Cup all over again. But Federer didn’t get scared this time. He eased past Hewitt in the tiebreak and then carved him up again, 6-0, in the third, the first time that a U.S. Open finalist had been doublebageled. Federer made Hewitt look mystified, resigned; he took Hewitt’s fight, his Hewittness, away from him. “No one had ever done that to Lleyton.” says Smith.

It was, in a sense, the performance that men’s tennis has been leading to, the moment when class, artistry and athleticism gathered into something close to an ideal. “We’ve never seen tennis like that,” Hlasek says. “Nobody ever played as creatively, but it is as correct as you want to play too. He’s creating every point as it should be.” At the year-end championships, there was no drama: Federer beat Hewitt twice, including a straight-set yawner in the final. Mattress Mac couldn’t have been nicer.

Yes, Federer knows that he can only go down from here. But he doesn’t worry; he’s not that young anymore. In bed at night he bangs his face into the pillow only when he wakes up cold. Then his girlfriend covers him, and he sleeps again, deep and silent, like a man without fear. In the morning he remembers none of it, not even the dreams.

federer_roar
02-07-2005, 07:11 AM
Thanks *M*, it's a joy to read.

Puschkin
02-07-2005, 07:39 AM
There was some concern on Roger's site about posting it

Concern by whom :confused:
It is a great article and well worth to be posted on Roger's site as well. Thanks a lot.

babsi
02-07-2005, 07:54 AM
What a great read :)
Thank you so much *M* :)

Hi,Puschikin - I think the concern at Roger site was only one regarding the copyrights of the article,not the content.

Mrs. B
02-07-2005, 08:07 AM
Well done *M*, for posting it here! a friend sent me a copy of the magazine from the US and it's really well written!
wow, did you type all of this? :worship:

Daniel
02-07-2005, 08:54 AM
Thanks M :)

SUKTUEN
02-07-2005, 09:57 AM
OHHHHHHHHH :worship:

Thnkayou~~ Very long articles!~~ :eek:

fightclubber
02-07-2005, 10:31 AM
What a great read :)
Thank you so much *M* :)

Hi,Puschikin - I think the concern at Roger site was only one regarding the copyrights of the article,not the content.

Thanks for the article. Very nice to read about younger Roger- I do not think we'll have problems with the copyright. I think we have to quote the source. If not, none of the stuff we posted here ... could be here.
right?

SUKTUEN
02-07-2005, 10:46 AM
It is poor that My English is very very bad~~~

I not really understand what is the article talking about~

babsi
02-07-2005, 11:59 AM
Hi,sily :)
I´m not concerned about posting articles either - after all nobody makes any money off it - and many off us wouldn´t be able to buy a certain Magazin or newspaper -because they aren´t sold in every part of the world.
Anyways - I haven´t seen any fan page,that doesn´t post articles about there favoried subjekt.

babsi
02-07-2005, 12:04 PM
Hi,SUKTUEN
you might print the article and take it with you,when you meet WINGYEE for dinner - mabe she can translate some of it :)

SUKTUEN
02-07-2005, 12:07 PM
wingyee's english ? I don't know her english is what level

Sophie1030
02-07-2005, 12:45 PM
Thanks for that great article! :bounce:

avocadoe
02-07-2005, 02:12 PM
thanks so much, it gave me goosebumps!!!!

yanchr
02-07-2005, 03:02 PM
Many thanks *M* :) A well written and great article. It gives me more information about Roger and Peter Carter. I thought Carter has had a big impact on Roger, but just not THAT big as was hinted in the article......

A man without fear... I love it. So *M*, stop sticking to that match. Roger will be stronger :)

vene
02-07-2005, 03:16 PM
Thanks so much, *M*!

fedsfan1
02-07-2005, 03:24 PM
Thanks , M , for posting this GREAT article!!!

It made me :crying2: again, thinking of him getting that awful phone call!!

BTW-i posted a link on rf.com , cos some of them might like to read this , too!


cheers :cool:

Doris Loeffel
02-07-2005, 03:36 PM
M Thank you so much for posting that article - it was great to read it. Thanks

Yeap Roger had his ups and downs but now stands where he belongs to. guess he needed it to become the man he is now.

Keep it like this Roger!!

RonE
02-07-2005, 09:43 PM
Roger was years past the point of howling back at his dad, “Go have a drink and leave me alone!” embarrassing the man to the point that father and son would make the long drive home in silence, the trip ending once with Robert shoving his son’s face into a snowbank.



:eek: :eek: Child abuse!!!!!!!!!! :scared:

Nothing like father and son quality time is there? :tape: :tape: :tape:

That one even shocked me, I mean I knew Roger had some ugly moments as a junior but I never imagined it was to this extent :bolt:

eleven
02-08-2005, 01:39 AM
Thank you very much, *M* !!!!

Reading through the whole article just like seeing a movie....

Thank you for all of the other pics and articles posts from you guys/gals as well.

Don't worry! Roger will be fine!!!

Puschkin
02-08-2005, 08:58 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/02/07/mailbagiv/index.html

From Wertheimss tennismailbag:

I desperately want to root against Roger Federer because of his dominance. But I can't work up any bile against someone who seems so nice. Do you know of any reason to dislike him? Any little thing will do.
-- Brian, Arlington, Va.

He once failed to speak with a telemarketer? He used the wrong fork during a meal in the late-'90s. He once saw someone with untied shoelaces and didn't say anything?

Your question is a good one, because I wonder if his professionalism and downright "nice-guyness" doesn't play some small role in his success. We can talk about his lack of a conspicuous killer instinct and what I would classify as a questionable taste for combat. But perhaps his pleasant demeanor helps him inasmuch as it "softens" opponents. A number of players have no trouble getting up for a guy like Hewitt, whom they respect as a player but not as a person. But how do they summon those feelings for Federer, whom they genuinely like, a guy who has mounted the summit but has never been remotely antagonizing or graceless?

"lack of a conspicuous killer instinct" and "a questionable taste for combat", it does not happen too often, but this time you got it wrong, Mr. Wertheim;)

crimson
02-08-2005, 04:55 PM
*M*, many thanks for taking the time to type up that article, it's much appreciated. :)
Thanks also to Puschkin for posting the other article.

MissMoJo
02-09-2005, 12:30 AM
Thanks *M*, a really good and enlightening read

Daniel
02-09-2005, 09:10 AM
thnask fro the articles :D

Sjengster
02-09-2005, 09:42 PM
Serena Williams says, “I wish I could play like Roger Federer.” It has been 20 years since a man has been talked about in such a way.

Note to Serena: I really don't care if you can't play like Federer. Your own game has been effective enough to guide you to 7 Slams and a three-quarter Slam of your own a couple of years ago, so it works fine as it is. But if you could act like him in the interview room, it would certainly make me better disposed towards you. You will never, ever hear Federer say in an interview, "I feel no-one can beat me when I'm playing at my best", even though such a comment would be partly justified after last year. He always gives credit and respect to his opponent where it's due, something Serena "I played so badly today, 2/10 at best" Williams does not. While we're at it, Federer doesn't make terrible attempts at foreign accents and routinely mangle the English language either, but that's a separate issue.

Sjengster
02-09-2005, 09:51 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/02/07/mailbagiv/index.html

From Wertheimss tennismailbag:

I desperately want to root against Roger Federer because of his dominance. But I can't work up any bile against someone who seems so nice. Do you know of any reason to dislike him? Any little thing will do.
-- Brian, Arlington, Va.

He once failed to speak with a telemarketer? He used the wrong fork during a meal in the late-'90s. He once saw someone with untied shoelaces and didn't say anything?

Your question is a good one, because I wonder if his professionalism and downright "nice-guyness" doesn't play some small role in his success. We can talk about his lack of a conspicuous killer instinct and what I would classify as a questionable taste for combat. But perhaps his pleasant demeanor helps him inasmuch as it "softens" opponents. A number of players have no trouble getting up for a guy like Hewitt, whom they respect as a player but not as a person. But how do they summon those feelings for Federer, whom they genuinely like, a guy who has mounted the summit but has never been remotely antagonizing or graceless?

"lack of a conspicuous killer instinct" and "a questionable taste for combat", it does not happen too often, but this time you got it wrong, Mr. Wertheim;)

Wertheim gets it wrong on a virtual weekly basis, whether it's simple factual errors or laughably bad and ill-informed opinions, there's always something to ridicule in his column. In some ways I can see his point, given Federer's less than stellar record in five-setters and his most recent loss coming in a deciding set to Safin after an epic battle, but last year he must have slept through the entirety of the Hewitt and Nalbandian matches at the AO, the Hamburg final against Coria, the Wimbledon final against Roddick, the US Open QF against Agassi, the TMC match against Moya, the 20-18 tiebreak against Safin in the same event... I think the problem is that Wertheim defines "killer instinct" and "taste for combat" as pumping your fist and shouting in your opponent's face, when Federer has demonstrated that it's actually about hitting the right shot at the right time.

Sjengster
02-09-2005, 09:58 PM
That group match against Moya in Houston probably says a lot more about Federer than the other examples, even though it meant little in comparison; after he'd won the first set he was guaranteed to finish top of the group even if Moya came back to win in three, and he said afterwards that he found it hard to concentrate (which explains the stream of errors in the second set and his generally shaky play off the ground), but he still knuckled down and scraped through the final set by serve-volleying more, thus ensuring that he kept that unblemished record against Top 10 players in 2004. If that doesn't show a killer instinct and an appetite for combat, I don't know what does (although on the other hand, the result says an awful lot about Moya's killer instinct in comparison, bearing in mind he was the better player for most of the match).

RogiFan88
02-10-2005, 01:44 AM
Note to Serena: I really don't care if you can't play like Federer. Your own game has been effective enough to guide you to 7 Slams and a three-quarter Slam of your own a couple of years ago, so it works fine as it is. But if you could act like him in the interview room, it would certainly make me better disposed towards you. You will never, ever hear Federer say in an interview, "I feel no-one can beat me when I'm playing at my best", even though such a comment would be partly justified after last year. He always gives credit and respect to his opponent where it's due, something Serena "I played so badly today, 2/10 at best" Williams does not. While we're at it, Federer doesn't make terrible attempts at foreign accents and routinely mangle the English language either, but that's a separate issue.

yes apparently Serena and Venus are tackling languages, i.e., Japanese and Russian... :rolleyes:

fightclubber
02-10-2005, 01:28 PM
I found this old interview, and my GOD,Rogi made lots of his drams come true. Oh I hope he can go on dreaming and get great results. It put lots of emotions when I read this one.
Maybe it was published here LONG ago? Or maybe not...
I just cross with it


Kisses

Edited transcript of the Live Chat with Roger Federer on Wednesday Jan 10th 2001

Interviewer: Good evening everyone, today we are chatting to Roger Federer winner of the Hopman Cup. Hi Roger how are you?
Roger Federer: I'm very good, I had a great game so I’m very happy about my day

Interviewer: How did it feel winning the singles in the Hopman Cup?
Roger Federer: It was like my first title it was great to win along side Martina and an in event like the Hopman Cup.

Interviewer: Did you feel disappointed at your results in the mixed doubles with Martina Hingis?
Roger Federer: The final result was not important and didn't matter to us, it was a lot of fun.

Interviewer: How old were you when you started playing tennis?
Roger Federer: I was about 4 when I first started hitting the ball I think, I don't really remember.

Interviewer: leesa: who’s the toughest player your feel you have come against?
Roger Federer: I played Andre Agassi in 98 when playing the junior, he was just too good and I really felt a big difference

Interviewer: When did you realise that tennis was going to be your career?
Roger Federer: Well when I quite school at 16 and stuck to tennis and when I finished number 1 junior in 98. I knew then I had to stop playing the juniors and start playing on the pro tour.

Interviewer: who are your idols?
Roger Federer: Before it was Becker, Edberg, then Sampras. Now I’m playing for myself so I don’t' really have idols any more. I do like watching Rios though.

Interviewer: If you were to retire playing tennis tomorrow would you feel you have achieved all that you have wanted to achieve in your career?
Roger Federer: Tough questions, my career has just started and I feel like there is a lot left. I've never won a title so I would want to have done that.

Interviewer: sim: what's the best thing about being a professional tennis player?
Roger Federer: To travel the world, see beautiful cities, different cultures, I think its just a great job to have *laughs* its my hobby and profession so that’s a dream come true.

Interviewer: missbomber: Are there any players you modelled your game on growing up?
Roger Federer: No, not really, I think imitating players doesn't help tactic wise. You could but it’s not good, but you can learn from other players.

Interviewer: nessa: who is the highest ranked player you have beaten?
Roger Federer: umm Kieffer when he was number 4, Moya when he was number 4, that’s all that comes to mind, ooh, and Norman when he was number 3.

Interviewer: Dominik: apart from the other Swiss players who are your friends on tour?
Roger Federer: Hrbaty, Vincigueria, Rochus.... DePasquale, Koubek... there are a few

Interviewer: Deuce: have you played against Lleyton Hewitt and what do you think of his game?
Roger Federer: He's a very tough opponent to have because he makes you run a lot. I've played him 4 times and I lost 3 times but won the last one, 7-6 in the 3rd

Interviewer: leesa: what goes through your mind on breaks between games?
Roger Federer: I think about the game , the game plan, the tactics, relax, breathe and try to get the pulse down yet still stay focused.

Interviewer: missbomber: What do you think are the biggest strengths of your game?
Roger Federer: My ability to play every shot, my serve, and forehand maybe. I have a good sense of feeling the game.

Interviewer: leesa: do you have any bad habits you feel you have while playing tennis?
Roger Federer: I get pissed off sometimes. if that’s a bad habit I don't know, nothing else comes to mind. my temper has become better over the years though.

Interviewer: Deuce: Switzerland isn't exactly well known as a tennis country, do you and Martina Hingis have a lot of support back home?
Roger Federer: The main sports in Switzerland are hockey and soccer. Tennis is pretty big now with Martina being number 1 so I think its ok... we had some problems during the Davis Cup and tennis was struggling for a while back home.

Interviewer: Dominik: Just so you know I'm the one who asked you about playing doubles with Dominik Hrbaty after your practise session on Monday, do you remember me? I’m just wondering what is Dominik like on and off the court, who are his friends on the tour?, also is singles the priority for both of you and how serious do use take your doubles?
Roger Federer: He is one of my best friends on the tour. He's a very funny guy off the court and we decided to play doubles together because we get on well both on and off the court but yes, we do take our doubles seriously.

Interviewer: Hingis-federerfan: Is mixed double harder or easier than doubles?
Roger Federer: That depends on the partner, with Martina its very easy because she plays so well. You have more time when you play to the girls, they play a little bit slower and give you a little more time to react. In the men’s doubles everything goes so quick, so I guess it is easier for us men

Interviewer: Deuce: Is this your first visit to Australia and are you enjoying your stay?
Roger Federer: I have been to Australia a few times. The first time was on vacation about 4 years ago, then I came back for the Australian Open Juniors and the Australian Open Qualifying. This is about my 5th time. I was also at the Olympics and I have been to Perth 2 times but this is the first time to the International.

Interviewer: Essendon: G'Day Roger, I was just wondering If you have seen Australian Rules football before? And if yes, what do you think of it?
Roger Federer: I have been once in Melbourne but I don't remember the team. My ex coach peter carter knows an aussie rules footy player, well I met him and he organized for us to go to the locker room. I don't understand the rules though, maybe I’ll go another time and see how it goes.

Interviewer: funky_nik: Do you think one day you could make it to #1??
Roger Federer: Well, it is very tough to get to number 1. I think it needs a lot of work but it’s for sure my dream and hope I get to do it, or at least get close to it.

Interviewer: deano: roger how long do you practice on average?
Roger Federer: It depends if your at a tournament or at home practicing. At home I practice 3-4 hours a day, at a tournament I practice 1-2, it depends if I have a match or not.

Interviewer: Are you on a special diet or can you eat whatever you like?
Roger Federer: I try not to drink coke or soda's, I don't eat chocolate or sweets and I don't eat fish. I just make sure I eat the right things

Interviewer: ame: which grand slam would you like to win the most?
Roger Federer: Wimbledon :)

Interviewer: matt: do you have any grudge matches, against anyone on the tour?
Roger Federer: I always like to play Hewitt because its always a great fight on the court. It’s always about 3 sets and its just good to play him.

Interviewer: missbomber: What do you like to do in your spare time?
Roger Federer: I like to relax, watch TV, listen to music, cinema, play golf sometimes, go to dinner with friends and have a good time

Interviewer: Deuce: OK I have to ask: do players get weak in the knees when Anna Kournikova is on court?
Roger Federer: As players we don't, well that’s what I heard *laughs*

Interviewer: ame: have you ever had a funny incident while playing tennis?
Roger Federer: I don't know, .... ummm... there was one time, I was practicing with my friend. This bird landed on the net, he didn't see it and served, he knocked the bird down. I couldn't believe it, there was feathers everywhere and I had to laugh.

Interviewer: Hingis-federerfan: Do you think it is a good strategy for a player to state publicly that he or she will win a tournament?
Roger Federer: It depends how much confidence a person has *laughs*

Interviewer: deano: roger - what kind of car do you have?
Roger Federer: I have an Opel at home.

Interviewer: matt: do you set yourself goals? or do you just go with the flow?
Roger Federer: You have to set yourself goals and the coach knows what you want to achieve. My goal this year is to break top 15 and to win my first title.

Interviewer: tequila-sunrise: which is your preferred court surface to play on?
Roger Federer: Indoors - hard..... anything that’s indoors is good to me, I like the grass but my game isn't so great.

Interviewer: funky_nik: Hi Roger, I play tennis myself I was wondering can I improve on my game by hitting on a wall or do I need someone to hit with me?
Roger Federer: It depends on how old you are, when your pretty young its good to play on the wall. The wall doesn't make any errors and if your a beginner its ok too, it depends on how good you want to get. The wall isn't too bad but you have to mix it up a bit.

Interviewer: Are your family tennis fans and if so, do they come and watch you play?
Roger Federer: My parents both played a little tennis. They follow my results of course, they don’t' travel around but they come to the ones in Switzerland or the French open. It’s just my coach who comes with me, Peter Lundgen

Interviewer: lleytons_chick: if you could play double with any one player you've never played with, who would you chose?
Roger Federer: Pete Sampras

Interviewer: do: roger, how do you think you will go if you have to play Lleyton Hewitt?
Roger Federer: We could play in the semi's if we both win. It will be very interesting I think........ SO COME OUT AND WATCH *laughs*

Interviewer: lleytons_chick: when you were younger, who did you practice with?
Roger Federer: with my coach, with everyone, wall, cupboards, garage doors.... everything, not windows though *laughs*

Interviewer: maydec: I enjoyed the Hopman Cup and will be going there for the next tournament. How do you rate the Hopman Cup?
Roger Federer: It was a great event, I loved it, I really hope to go back and defend my title with Martina.

Interviewer: tequila-sunrise: who is one player you have never played against before, that you would really like to play against?
Roger Federer: Pete Sampras

Interviewer: Deuce: Being Swiss do you like skiing and do you get time to do it?
Roger Federer: I like cheese *laughs* I like skiing at little, but not too much, its too cold for me. I like the beach and sun.

Interviewer: Do you get recognised when you walk down the street, does that feel weird if you get fans coming up to you?
Roger Federer: It depends where I am. Back in my hometown I do get recognised and it’s a weird feeling. In Perth I was recognised at the end of the tournament, it was a happening place with the Hopman cup. Here nobody knows me though so I can walk around, it’s a nice feeling.

Interviewer: gigi: how effective do you feel are two-handed shots over the conventional one hand?
Roger Federer: Its a different style. You have less reach with a double hand, the one handed players have a better volley and a better slice. I don't know if it’s an advantage or disadvantage but there are a lot of guys using the double handed. I can not hit a double handed, I’m terrible at it

Interviewer: lleytons_chick: out of all the hot new young players, who do u think has the most potential to be number one?
Roger Federer: Safin, Ferrero maybe, Hewitt, myself, I don't know *laughs*

Interviewer: Dominik: where do you live, during tournaments do u ever room with other players?
Roger Federer: Very rarely do I share with other players, I normally have a single room and I live in Switzerland

Interviewer: maydec: With the Hopman Cup, Martina seemed to look forward to winning the diamond studded tennis trophy more so than the money. Is this true?
Roger Federer: yes she was very happy to win the diamond ball we got which was worth $30,000. In her mind it was worth more than the actual paycheck we got.

Interviewer: Duke: Will you be partnering Martina in the mixed at the Aus.Open, or do you both have other commitments?
Roger Federer: She will play the women’s doubles with Monica Seles, and I will play the men’s doubles with Hrbaty. We haven't talked about it as three is a lot to play but we will talk and see what we gotta do.

Interviewer: Deuce: a sport gear producer said the player is 99% the equipment is the missing 1% - do you use special shoes, custom rackets etc?
Roger Federer: For me its important what I wear: . I want to look good in my clothes and so far I’m happy with Nike and Wilson, so that’s about it.

Interviewer: matt: what do you think is the hardest shot in tennis?
Roger Federer: Most definitely the serve, it travels at over 200 km per hour

Interviewer: gigi: do u feel that a strong serve will always be advantageous, or can people still have a Ken Rosewall slice serve?
Roger Federer: It's so tough to compare now. The material has changed so much and I think Ken Rosewall would serve different now. All the guys at the top have great serves, so what can I say.

Interviewer: Roger: Hi there Roger! I´ m a great fan of tennis, and I would like your opinion on the proposal to remove the second serve. Do you think that would improve the play in general?
Roger Federer: No, I think we should stick to the rules the way they are now. Enough people are interested in 2 man tennis and there is no need to change the game. They are already trying to have bigger balls but players are getting hurt. If you want to change it then go back to the old rules, but don't try and come up with new stuff.

Interviewer: lleytons_chick: if you weren’t a tennis player what would you be?
Roger Federer: maybe a soccer player, I played till I was 14 then I had to decided, tennis or soccer, picked tennis and so that was it.

Interviewer: Thank you for your time Roger, we wish you all the best in your future games - are there any final comments you would like to make to the fans?
Roger Federer: thanks for the cool chat we had, hopefully you will come and watch at the international, if not, where ever you are in the world, cheer for me




http://www.bigpond.com/res/images/v7/px_trans.gif http://server-au.imrworldwide.com/cgi-bin/count?cid=au_bigpond_0

SUKTUEN
02-10-2005, 01:53 PM
Thanks~ Roger is really a great person~~ :hug: :yeah:

babsi
02-10-2005, 02:43 PM
Yes,where ever we are in the world - we cheer for you!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks Silvy -never seem the intervew before :)

Poor bird - and Roger laughed - boys.........they are all the same!

SUKTUEN
02-10-2005, 02:50 PM
ROGER LOOK cute~~~

yanchr
02-10-2005, 03:40 PM
Thanks silvy for the interview. It's fun reading it 4 years later. 4 years has changed many things. I'm glad that Roger has achieved most if not all of his goals. I think Roger would never have guessed that he would have soooooooo many fans cheering for him from every corner of the world now.

Interviewer: lleytons_chick: out of all the hot new young players, who do u think has the most potential to be number one?
Roger Federer: Safin, Ferrero maybe, Hewitt, myself, I don't know *laughs*
Roger was so honest like he usually is :lol:
Roger Federer: thanks for the cool chat we had, hopefully you will come and watch at the international, if not, where ever you are in the world, cheer for me
Roger is a good advertiser ;)
Yes, Roger, we are cheering for you wherever we are :hug:

Dirk
02-10-2005, 03:44 PM
Rogifan at least they are trying to learn more languages. Give them a break. I know many don't like Serena's attitude but it's because of that attitude that she has had the career that she has. Serena never gives up and fights the bitter end. She really should believe that when she plays well nobody can beat her because generally it's true. I don't mind her.

SUKTUEN
02-10-2005, 03:49 PM
I cannot understand the interview :confused:

Seleshfan
02-10-2005, 09:39 PM
Hello everyone. I have been "lurking" here at this site since the Australian Open. I just wanted to thank everyone for the wonderful articles, interviews, and just about everything you guys post. You all are a group of truly dedicated "Fed Heads"

lunahielo
02-10-2005, 10:43 PM
Originally posted by seleshfan~
Hello everyone. I have been "lurking" here at this site since the Australian Open. I just wanted to thank everyone for the wonderful articles, interviews, and just about everything you guys post. You all are a group of truly dedicated "Fed Heads"
Hi, seleshfan! :wavey:

I am proud to be a "Fed Head"~ :)

Thanks, everyone, for the great articles and the interview.
And, *yes* I'll cheer for Rogi where ever he is!

Mrs. B
02-11-2005, 07:38 AM
hi, seleshfan! :wavey:

welcome to Roger's forum! Do drop by more often and join us! :)

avocadoe
02-11-2005, 12:29 PM
thanks for the blast from the past article...so he doesn't eat chocolate or sweets :) how did you know who the interviewers were? were those questioners posters? Or were you just putting in names, lol. HI SELESHFAN...haven't seen you in ages...I was avocadoe on the cbs? boards, back in the days when Zazi and the gang ran off to turkey :)

Seleshfan
02-11-2005, 03:54 PM
Thanks Mrs. B, and Lunahielo for the warm welcome! Hi avacadoe! You're right it has been ages. Good to hear from you again. As you can see, I'm still a die hard Monica Seles fan, even though she's pretty much retired. :sad: Thank God for Federer, who seems to be the male version of Seles. By that I mean, he's so dominant as number 1, and still ever so kind and gracious off court.

SUKTUEN
02-11-2005, 03:57 PM
It is great~~

I also look forward to Roger come to HK again~~ :worship:

vene
02-15-2005, 04:58 PM
From r.s.t., translated from French and posted by dikdietrick (thanks).
Not sparing the words, Mats, pretty intransigent.

----------------
Here's a snippet from French Tennis Magazine:

TM: Roger Federer has no full-time coach. The current players, do you
think they need a coach from January to December?

MW: It all depends on the coach they have. Roger Federer doesn't need
Tony Roche for 30 weeks. It's too much for both. 10 weeks, their
choice, that's the rightest one. Sometimes, it's surprising to see
Nadal with coaches whose tennistic past is much more than limited
whereas he should be pictured more with former champions such as Emilio
Sanchez who could teach him important stuff. Those are players who
prefer working on small details, whereas I think you should be more
definitive and say: here's what you do wrong, here's how you can
improve. You also get the feeling that their coach, who haven't been
high-ranked players, do learn at the same time. For example, I'm
worried about somebody like Ferrero who, from the level he's reached so
far, should be able to volley much better than he actually does. Same
for a champion like Hewitt, who has to improve on some points. I'm
admiring Roddick's decision to separate from Brad Gilbert. Because
Gilbert wasn't the one who could have bettered Roddick's backhand or
his game on clay. He was absolutely not interested in all this. I'm
myself not much talking technics in my training way. It's not much what
happens on my side of the court that matters for me, but more what
occurs on the other side of the net.

TM: Speaking of Roger Federer, how do you perceive his domination?

MW: It's so great to see him play that you hardly feel like seeing
somebody else play. I have admiration for Roddick and Hewitt's will,
but Federer is another game topic. The question one might wonder to
ask, if one feels like asking one of course, would be "will he be
physically strong enough to win matches the day his mind would have
remained in his hotel room"? Me for example, it was impossible because
I had to give my best 100% from the first up to the last point. And
from the moment my desire has started decreasing, after winning 3 out of
the 4 GSs in 1988, it was over, it was the end of my career.

TM: Can he win RG?

MW: Of course, he can! He can do whatever suits him on clay and he's
already proved it. If I was in Roger Federer's shoes, and given what he
has already gone through, I would focus mostly on RG. Furthermore, if I
were him, I would be wishing to win the 4 GSs each year. For me, he has
the means to equal the great results of somebody like Rod Laver. But if
he wants to achieve it, he has to ask himself the essential question
right now : how can I put all the chances on my side to win RG? Pete
Sampras for example, has never granted himself the means to achieve it.
And this didn't mean for him to radically change his game on clay. But
in order to be faithfull, he should have trained sufficiently so that
the game which allowed him to win the USO could also allow him to be
the best in Paris. Many people will certainly disagree with what I'm
about to say but for me, RG is the easiest GS you can win. Because ALL
lies in the player's hands. ALL depends on him. You'll never get a
chance to witness 4 aces in a row like in Wimbledon. It's only you who
are building your victory from the beginning till the end of the match.
Why should Federer fail here? Last year, against Kuerten, he had
absolutely taken no risks. It was as if his mind was already wandering
in Wimbledon. And we should therefore stop pretending that Wimbledon is
the most important GS of the year. That's crap. It's the least
important one simply because it's played on a surface on which you
never play anymore.

TM:If you had to change one thing in tennis today...

MW: Precisely Wimbledon. Let's make it be what it was used to be. The
surface has been slowed too much and today, apart from Tim Henman and
Taylor Dent, who plays serve and volley? Nobody! To be lively, the game
needs the contrasts of different styles.

Daniel
02-16-2005, 08:56 AM
Thanks vene,

Matts was her ein CT last week and saw hinm on tv talkng about roger and he said he thinks Roger is the best players he has ever seen :)

Daniel
02-16-2005, 09:00 AM
Federer aims for third Dubai title
By A Correspondent

16 February 2005



DUBAI — World number one Roger Federer is eagerly looking forward to the challenge of winning his third consecutive Dubai Tennis Championships title next week.


The Wimbledon and US Open champion lifted the trophy last year after coming through a tense and thrilling three-set final against rising Spanish star Feliciano Lopez, who later went on to win his first career title in Vienna.

First, Federer had to come through the most difficult opening round imaginable, defeating former number one Marat Safin in a replay of their recent Australian Open final as he edged through in two tiebreaks.

Federer’s victory over Lopez followed his 2003 triumph, when he didn’t drop a set in the entire week on his way to victory over a canny Jiri Novak in the final.

“Roger has quickly become one of the superstars of the game and we are delighted he is coming back to Dubai to defend his title,” said Colm McLoughlin, Managing Director of Dubai Duty Free. “Should he win his third consecutive Dubai Men’s Open, Roger will create history and set a new precedent.”

Many of Federer’s fellow players are now predicting that the modest, soft-spoken Swiss will go down in history as the greatest ever. It isn’t that he wins so many matches, it is that he makes it look so easy.

Tennis fans will be able to watch the master for themselves when play gets under way at the Dubai Tennis Stadium on February 21.

The Dubai Tennis Championships, owned and organised by Dubai Duty Free and held under the patronage of General Shaikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and UAE Minister of Defence, also features many other top stars to ensure that Federer will have to work hard if he is to win the title yet again.

Marat Safin is back, this time as the reigning Australian Open champion, and among other top challengers will be the legendary Andre Agassi, one of just two players in the Open era and the fifth of all time to win all four Grand Slams.

Others making their bid to upset Federer’s progress are British pair Tim Henman and Greg Rusedski. Henman, who has accepted a wild card for the Dubai Men’s Open, made semifinal appearances at both the French and US Opens in 2004, and Rusedski is also still a force to be reckoned with as he fires down one of the fastest serves in the history of tennis.

Whatever the week brings, Federer is happy to be back in Dubai once again.

“It’s so well organised and you don’t have to look far to find help,” said Federer, who recently spent time in Dubai to prepare for his Australian Open campaign. “The site is nice, the centre court is good and the crowd is loud and that gives a good atmosphere,” he added. “I love the country too. I enjoy the ceremony after the final. It’s different and really special. There’s a little bit of magic in the air, and I like that.”

Daniel
02-16-2005, 09:00 AM
Safin most likely to challenge Federer
Story Tools: Print Email
Dan Weil / Special to FOXSports.com
Posted: 11 hours ago




Marat Safin's victory at the Australian Open last month, which included an epic five-set defeat of world No. 1 Roger Federer in the semifinals, has led tennis experts to speculate that the 25-year-old Russian could battle Federer for the top spot this year.

"I think we got a pretty good answer in Australia," said Patrick McEnroe, who captains the U.S. Davis Cup team. "Safin can certainly challenge him. The big question is can he be consistent enough week in and week out?"


Marat Safin has all the skills to have a dominant year, but will he have the drive? (Jimin Lai / GettyImages)



Safin is currently ranked No. 4 behind the 23-year-old Swiss wunderkind, Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, and Andy Roddick. But tennis analysts say Safin has a better chance to challenge Federer than the other two because he has a more complete game.


"I think he's the only one who has enough guns," said Tony Trabert, who won four Grand Slam tournaments in the 1950s. "Roddick has a big serve and forehand, but Federer has proved he can handle that. And Hewitt has to work so hard just to hold his own serve that it takes a toll over a long period of time."


Safin, on the other hand, has enough game to threaten Federer. "He has the size, power, movement and variety in his game, where he can bother a guy like Federer," said Tom Gullikson, who, as U.S. Davis Cup captain, coached Pete Sampras. "He can overpower Federer sometimes, which isn't so easy because Federer has so many skills, including defense."


McEnroe noted that Safin is one of the few players on tour who isn't intimidated by Federer's prodigious talent and unflappable playing style. "A lot of players, after Federer hits one of those ridiculous shots, just say he's too good," McEnroe said. "Safin isn't over-awed by Federer like a lot of players."


Still, the charismatic Russian had to put forth a heroic effort to beat Federer in Australia, staving off a match point in the fourth set.


"Safin had to play his best and still had a match point where he had to play an unbelievable shot to get out of it," McEnroe said. "Now he has to be able to do that consistently. Federer set the bar high in the last 18 months. Game wise, Safin has a big serve and can return well. His mentality will determine how far he will go."


Tennis aficionados expected big things out of Safin after he blitzed through Pete Sampras to win the US Open in 2000. But Safin wasn't ready to stay at the top of the rankings then. At times he showed more interest in the joys of the nightlife and the company of beautiful women than in the rigors of training. He would lose his temper on the court, break racquets and occasionally stop trying.

And in 2003, he was out with a serious wrist injury.


"Nobody knows how Safin is going to respond this time," McEnroe said. "Will he get lax in his training? Will he say he's won another major and everyone can shut up? Last year he did well at Australia (losing in the final to Federer) and then was disappointing until the end of the year. I don't expect that to happen this year."


Gullikson said Safin's coach, Peter Lundgren, who formerly mentored Federer, deserves some of the credit for Safin's more disciplined approach in recent months. The fact that Safin has had a steady girlfriend during the past year — Russian medical student Dasha Zhukova — also helps, Gullikson said. "I think Safin can handle it better now. When he won the U.S. Open, he was so young and immature. He didn't know what he accomplished and then went on a walkabout."


With his newfound maturity, Safin could be a threat at both the French Open and Wimbledon, experts say. Having spent most of his teen years in Spain, he is accustomed to the red clay surface of Roland Garros in Paris. Still, "It's a tougher task for Safin to win seven matches on clay," McEnroe said. "He can't serve or hit his way out of trouble as easily" as on a grass or hard court.


Wimbledon may suit his game better. Though Safin said he hated the surface after losing in the first round last year, "his game is tailor-made for grass," McEnroe noted, with big shots, good movement and strong ability to improvise shots.


Nonetheless, Federer has to be rated a stronger favorite to win both at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, experts agreed. "Federer's the kind of guy that as soon as he lost at Australia, he was setting his sights on the French Open (which begins in May)," McEnroe said. "He's the sort of guy that immediately starts looking toward the next major. The loss will make him hungrier. I think it will motivate him even more. And that's a scary thing for the rest of the field."

Mrs. B
02-16-2005, 09:46 AM
Gracias, Daniel! :kiss:

Doris Loeffel
02-16-2005, 11:21 AM
Thanks

Art&Soul
02-16-2005, 12:25 PM
:yeah: "The loss will make him hungrier. I think it will motivate him even more. And that's a scary thing for the rest of the field." :yeah:

Thanks for posting a great article, Daniel :)

SUKTUEN
02-16-2005, 01:36 PM
thanks :worship:

Yoda
02-16-2005, 11:06 PM
cheers daniel

MissMoJo
02-17-2005, 04:17 AM
Thanks for the article Daniel, wishing Rogi all the best in Dubai :)

SUKTUEN
02-17-2005, 04:23 AM
Although I cannot watch the match of Dubai~~ :fiery: but~

GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ROGER !!! :bounce: :bounce:

Puschkin
02-17-2005, 06:37 AM
Post -match comments, Rotterdam, 1st round

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/rotterdam_wednesday.asp

Federer: "It’s never easy you know, the first round matches. I’m happy that I’m through. I’m playing against another Swiss in the second round, that will be interesting. It doesn’t happen very often playing another Swiss in ATP events so I’m looking forward to that. He is the up-and-coming new player in Switzerland. It’s going to be very interesting I think.

"I thought consistency made the difference today. He was quite up and down. I had to make sure that I just played my game, concentrating on my serve so I didn’t lose that and give him confidence. I was always ahead in the score so that definitely helped."

"It was a sell out crowd today again, they are very enthusiastic. It was a lot of fun and I’m happy that I can play another match in there."

SUKTUEN
02-17-2005, 10:47 AM
Roger~~ We love you~~ :hug:

Just do your best !!! :yeah:

RogiFan88
02-17-2005, 07:52 PM
Wawrinka, after he beat Grosjean in the first round:

Wawrinka: "Yes, I would say this is my best victory to date, especially indoors which isn't my best surface. It was a great feeling, I'd watched him a lot on television."

On the possibility of Federer next:"Well he hasn't won his first round match yet. He should do, but you never know - look at me, I won today. I've known him for about three years. We've practiced a lot together. He's a good friend and it would be a great experience."
http://www.atptennis.com/

Daniel
02-18-2005, 08:53 AM
Roger, :hug: good luck in QF :)

SUKTUEN
02-18-2005, 03:36 PM
Yes

fightclubber
02-19-2005, 02:57 PM
ATP Players to Star in Charity Exhibition Event at Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells



© Henk Koster
http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/180X250/federer_rotterdam5.jpgFederer, Safin, Henman among the first players assembled Proceeds to fund UNICEF and other worldwide tsunami relief efforts

Unique event part of evening’s “Salute to Heroes” activities

The ATP and the Pacific Life Open announced today that the world’s greatest men’s players will unite for a special charity exhibition event during the Pacific Life Open designed to benefit UNICEF and other worldwide tsunami relief efforts. Roger Federer, winner of the 2004 INDESIT ATP Race and defending champion of the Pacific Life Open, was the catalyst behind organizing the event to be held at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden on Friday, March 11.

“In Australia in January, the players were talking about what we could do as a group,” Federer said. “I’m delighted that we will come together to play in this unique event designed to raise funds for tsunami relief efforts. It’s an important cause and the night will be a very enjoyable one for the fans who come watch.”



A portion of proceeds from ticket sales will go to charity. For tickets, call 1-800-999-1585 or log onto www.PacificLifeOpen.com (http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/). The event will begin at 6:00 p.m. prior to a Pacific Life Open tournament match.



Federer is working with the ATP Foundation to assemble a cast of stars for the unique first-of-its-kind event. Marat Safin, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria, Gaston Gaudio and David Nalbandian all will participate. Additional players will be announced later.



The format of the exhibition will include a combination of singles and doubles matches, including a Super-Tiebreak played between Federer and Safin, whose two most recent matches at the Tennis Masters Cup and the Australian Open have ignited talk of an exciting new rivalry. At the Tennis Masters Cup, they played an ATP-record-tying 20-18 tiebreak won by Federer.



Players also will participate in special fundraising activities starting at 5:00 p.m. at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden Village Stage, which will showcase scenes and outtakes from Facing Federer, the ATP documentary filmed at the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup. Players will sign autographs, answer questions and help raise funds. All fans with tickets for the day or evening session will be able to attend the Village Stage activities. The exhibition event will follow the traditional Pacific Life Open “Salute to Heroes” that opens the Friday evening session.



Charlie Pasarell, Tournament Director of the Pacific Life Open, said: “The Friday night session at Indian Wells has traditionally been a ‘Salute to Heroes,’ so this event fits in perfectly with that theme. Everyone has been impressed at how quickly the players and tournaments responded to the crisis in Asia, and we’re pleased to host this special event at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to help raise additional funds. It should make for a very memorable night.”

fightclubber
02-19-2005, 03:11 PM
Federer ready to fill gap in trophy cabinet
2005-02-18 23:21:35 GMT (Reuters)



By Pritha Sarkar

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands, Feb 18 (Reuters) - Roger Federer will need to clear a towering obstacle if he is to get his hands on the World Indoor Tournament crown this weekend.

That hurdle happens to be the 1.96 metre tall Mario Ancic and the duo will lock horns for the second time in Saturday's semi-finals, with Federer looking to make amends for his 2002 first-round defeat at Wimbledon.

"I lost to Ancic quite a while ago but I never won a set against him. It will be interesting," said the Basel FC fan.

"This is the position where I like to be in, semi-final days and this is when I usually raise my game and I hope I can do it again this week."

Federer has already described this week's event as strange because it is one of a handful of tournaments he compete at this year in which he is not the defending champion.

"Here is one of the few ones that I didn't win so something quite bizarre this pressure not being there (to defend points)," said Federer.

Having played at the Ahoy arena for five of the past six years, Federer is determined to add his name to the circular billboard of champions that can be seen around centre court.

The popular Swiss lost only six times in 2004, the first of those coming in the Rotterdam quarter-finals against British number one Tim Henman.

It must have been a strange experience for a player who went on to capture 11 titles, including three of the four grand slam crowns last year. Impressively, he achieved all that without the services of a coach.

This year, however, the script has not gone according to plan and Federer is not willing to suffer any more slip ups.

He has already lost his Australian Open title, losing in the semi-finals despite holding a match point against eventual champion Marat Safin, and feels he has to make amends.

"It (losing) was a good story for the season as I'm third in the (ATP Champions) race and I definitely want to get up there so I need good results and might as well start at Rotterdam," said Federer.

Unlike his previous three opponents, Federer is aware he will have to face the bullet-like deliveries of Ancic and an attacking game plan.

However, having built an almost indestructible aura around himself since his loss to Ancic, Federer said he will be ready.

"I don't want the pressure off my shoulders as I always want to win. As long as you win, you're confident and it's the best way to play tennis," he said.

RogiNie
02-19-2005, 03:18 PM
Cool article Silvy!! Great that Roger will do this! :D

SUKTUEN
02-19-2005, 03:58 PM
thanks :worship:

*M*
02-19-2005, 06:32 PM
Ahh, the truth about his haircut . . . :)

http://www.abnamrowtt.com/engels/page.asp?item=News&title=&subid=458

“The pressure doesn’t affect me.”

He is the undisputed world No 1. An all-rounder who could well break Pete Sampras’ record of 14 Grand Slam wins. However, for the time being Roger Federer faces a more mundane challenge here in Rotterdam.

http://www.abnamrowtt.com/images/wedstrijdfotos/HK050218-776federer.jpg

The ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament is a regular fixture on your busy schedule. How does it feel to be back?
“I have played here for many years. The first time was in 1999, when Tournament Director Wim Buitendijk gave me a wildcard to the qualification tournament. I’m still grateful for that. I remember making it to the quarter-finals, during which I nearly beat Yevgeny Kafelnikov. I’ve always had a good feeling about this tournament. Come to think of it, I feel at home on indoor courts in general.”

You lost to Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open. It was a long match that ended 9-7 in the fifth. How did you cope with your loss?
“It left me with mixed emotions. On the one hand I’d won a large number of matches before losing to Safin, making the loss more inevitable, while on the other I had difficulties coming to terms with my defeat. After all, I did miss an opportunity to win another Grand Slam title. Still, Marat played a fantastic match. It was exciting from start to finish and he deserved to win.”

You enjoyed many successes last year, but had to make do without a coach. You’re currently working with Australian Tony Roche, a highly experienced coach. Why is that? Does it improve your game?
“In view of last year’s performance I might well have asked myself whether I really need a coach. However, I still believe that having a coach is imperative. You see, after a while, one or two bad habits invariably creep into your game and you need someone to point them out to you. As a matter of fact, I’d been hoping to work with Roche for quite a while. He’s a little older though, and wasn’t keen on all the travelling. As a result, he was in two minds for a while.”

Roche is not with you in Rotterdam. What arrangement have you come to?
“Well, he’ll certainly be there at Roland Garros. We’ve agreed that he’ll coach me when I’m training, and not necessarily while I’m playing tournaments.”

You are meanwhile the undisputed world No 1. How does that feel?
“It feels great. Luckily the pressure that comes with it doesn’t seem to bother me much. I even feel quite relaxed. It was harder to reach the top of the rankings than it is to stay there. Of course, you’ll only hear me say that as long as I rank first. I realise only too well that the other players want to beat me, but I still feel the urge to prove that I’m the best.”

Pete Sampras holds the record for winning the most Grand Slam titles (14). So far, you have won four titles. Do you intend to break Sampras’ record?
“I wouldn’t mind if I made it to the record books. But beating Sampras’ record is not a goal I’ve set myself. If that’s what motivates you, winning a tournament like the ABN AMRO WTT will be meaningless.”

How do you rate your chances here this year?
“I hope my name will be on the boarding next year. And I also hope that I meet expectations.”

There are rumours circulating that a lady by the name of Juliet has entered your life. Do you have any comments?
“Ah Juliet! Juliet is a cow that I was given following my first Wimbledon title in 2003. As a matter of fact I have two cows now - Juliet gave birth to a calf.”

Your girlfriend is called Miroslava. Was it she who decided that the ponytail should go?
“Actually it was the hairdresser who made that decision. Or rather, he was forced into making that decision. He was trying to trim my hair, but the end result wasn’t quite what he had in mind. That’s when we decided to lose the ponytail altogether."

RonE
02-19-2005, 07:52 PM
Your girlfriend is called Miroslava. Was it she who decided that the ponytail should go?
“Actually it was the hairdresser who made that decision. Or rather, he was forced into making that decision. He was trying to trim my hair, but the end result wasn’t quite what he had in mind. That’s when we decided to lose the ponytail altogether."

If I ever find that hairdresser I am going to cut something off of him and it won't be his hair :mad:

lsy
02-19-2005, 07:59 PM
Thanks *M*!

If I ever find that hairdresser I am going to cut something off of him and it won't be his hair :mad:

:haha: :haha: oh you whiner!!! Get over it already!

Rogi looks perfect in his hair now!

Skyward
02-19-2005, 08:00 PM
If I ever find that hairdresser I am going to cut something off of him and it won't be his hair :mad:

:haha: :haha: :haha:

You are too cruel. A lot of people think this haircut has been a huge improvement over the ponytail.

RonE
02-19-2005, 08:06 PM
A lot of people think this haircut has been a huge improvement over the ponytail.

I am obviously not one of them :sobbing: :p

fightclubber
02-19-2005, 08:11 PM
I am obviously not one of them :sobbing: :p
:nerner: :bigclap: :bigclap: :haha: :haha:

really I love the new hair!


:banghead: :banghead: , the fact that cost 600 dollars (someone said that right??) piss me off! But I love it

yanchr
02-19-2005, 08:13 PM
Your girlfriend is called Miroslava. Was it she who decided that the ponytail should go?
“Actually it was the hairdresser who made that decision. Or rather, he was forced into making that decision. He was trying to trim my hair, but the end result wasn’t quite what he had in mind. That’s when we decided to lose the ponytail altogether."
:haha::lol:

I love that hairdresser :hearts:

It seems that man really has different views regarding the look from woman on the whole, yes Ron? Rogi is more gorgeous with short hair from every aspect :angel:

RonE
02-19-2005, 08:28 PM
Well I am obviously in a minority regarding my opinion the matter so no further comment :p

*M*
02-19-2005, 09:42 PM
Well, he's always had two looks -- his off-court look and his on-court look. When his hair was long, I disliked his off-court look but liked the on-court one. It was neat and tidy and hid how much he was sweating. It was like a barometer of how he was playing -- whenever it became the least bit mussed it seemed like he wasn't playing as well.

When he got it cut in the summer I liked it better off-court but hated it on-court. He put all that gunk and hairpins in it to keep it down, and it gave the impression that his hair wasn't washed.

Now I'm flip-flopped the other way again. I really love the way he looks on-court. Even though I'd still like it a touch longer, I love the way his natural curls come out. He looks better there than when it's styled for those TV award shows, etc. I thought he looked especially good during the AO. In fact, now when I see his old pictures I think the look is a bit dated. I'm still waiting to see if guys like F-Lo all cut their hair to copy Roger.
:nerner: :bigclap: :bigclap: :haha: :haha:


really I love the new hair!


:banghead: :banghead: , the fact that cost 600 dollars (someone said that right??) piss me off! But I love itIsn't that funny? He paid all that money, and the guy screwed up his trim. Luckily he was able to salvage it.

RogiFan88
02-20-2005, 01:04 AM
some trim!

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 02:39 AM
Thanks~~~ :worship:

I love Roger pony tail too~~~ :D :D

fightclubber
02-20-2005, 03:05 AM
ABN AMRO Championship
Rotterdam, The Netherlands


February 19, 2005
Federer Eyes Second ATP Title of 2005



© Henk Koster
http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/180X250/ljubicic_rotterdam2.jpg World No. 1 Roger Federer safely negotiated his way past another obstacle on Friday, seeing off big-serving Croat Mario Ancic. Federer got better as the match progressed, raising his game to break Ancic in the 11th game of the first set. The Swiss clinched another break of serve at 1-1 in the second set and capped that with another break at 5-3 for a 7-5, 6-3 win. Federer looked comfortable on serve throughout, winning 84 per cent of first serve points and never facing a break point. He converted three of six break points on his opponent’s serve. Federer’s win avenges a first round shock defeat suffered at the hands of Ancic at Wimbledon in 2002.

Ivan Ljubicic continued his outstanding start to the year on Saturday, defeating Thomas Johansson 7-6(4), 7-5 to edge into Sunday’s final. The Croat fired 12 aces and saved three of three break points during the match.

There were no breaks of serve in the first set although Ljubicic crucially saved a break point at 4-4 before clinching the tie-break. One loose game from Johansson in the 11th game of the second set was all Ljubicic needed to complete the win. The Croat is now 16-4 in 2005 and has won more matches this year than any other player.


WHAT THE PLAYERS SAID Federer: “It was a good match. I’m very happy with it. Last time I played him was in 2002 so that’s quite a long time ago now. I’m very happy with my performance. I never lost serve and really stayed focused throughout the whole match. I think I needed a performance like this to beat Mario today.”

On reaching his second final in Rotterdam: “I’m going into the final much more comfortable than the last one I did a couple of years ago here against Escude where I lost 7-6 in the third which was a real heart-break. I’m happy to be back in the finals, to give myself a second chance to win this title and I think I’m really the big favourite for tomorrow against Ivan. Played him a couple of weeks ago in Doha where I beat him quite comfortably so if I can repeat that that would be fantastic.”

Ljubicic: “I knew that I had to focus on my serve a lot and I think I served unbelievably today. Every time I needed a big serve I did it. At 5-5 in the second I put a bit of pressure on and he missed a few serves and that’s what made the difference today.

On Croatian tennis: “We’re both doing really good. We’ll see how he [Ancic] does tonight. It’s going to be tough as Roger is the best. It would be amazing, we played the semis last week in Marseille and it would be even better in the final tomorrow. We feel really good, we’re young, we have a good team for Davis Cup and we have a tough tie coming up against the US.

“Obviously I want to win tomorrow. It’s a big event and it would be unbelievable to win this one. If I win tomorrow, I will buy everyone in the crowd a drink.”

On his record against Federer : “Well yes I’ve beaten him three times, but you know, that was before Roger became Roger.”

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 05:38 AM
thanks

Mrs. B
02-20-2005, 07:11 AM
love that comment by Ivan on Roger at the bottom! :lol:

Mrs. B
02-20-2005, 07:16 AM
If I ever find that hairdresser I am going to cut something off of him and it won't be his hair :mad:

:haha: so perhaps you should emulate Roger too, Ron and get rid of your ponytail? ;)

thanks for posting, *M*

Daniel
02-20-2005, 07:21 AM
Federer gains sweet revenge over Ancic

Sat Feb 19, 5:52 PM ET World Sports - AFP



ROTTERDAM, The Netherlands (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer gained sweet revenge for one of the most shattering defeats of his career when he beat Croatia's Mario Ancic 7-5, 6-3 to reach the final of the Rotterdam Open.


AFP Photo



At Wimbledon (news - web sites) in 2002, Federer was knocked out by Ancic in the first round but there was never any chance of a repeat on Saturday as the duo came face-to-face for the first time since that shock.


Federer sliced his way into a second career final here, one of the few events that the Swiss has never won and on Sunday he will now face another Croatian, Ivan Ljubicic who defeated Swede Tomas Johansson 7-6 (7/4), 7-5.


After losing a title shot to Federer in early January at Doha and another last Sunday against another Swede, Joachim Johansson in Marseille, Ljubicic is keen to break that streak.


Federer broke Ancic late in the opening set as he got accustomed to the Croatian's huge serving style.


The Swiss surged into the lead in the second set, assuring victory and his third final of the season with breaks in the third and final games of the set to wrap up the one-hour, 21-minute victory.


"I knew I had to return well today and get him to work hard on his serve if I was to win," said Federer, now 14-1 this season with a title at Doha and just that shattering semi-final defeat at the Australian Open (news - web sites) against Marat Safin to set in the debit column.


"In the first set I was struggling to get his serve back and to win points, but I played a very consistent and good match today," said Federer.


"His serve speed is pretty good - first you have to handle that. I was able to start picking the correct side of the court where he was going to serve, sometimes that works for you.


"I'm looking forward to my second final here (he lost in 2001 to Frenchman Nicolas Escude). I'm hoping to win it."


Ljubicic beat Johansson for the first time in his career.


"I've been playing better and better," said the 19th-ranked Ljubicic, who re-confirmed his brash promise made on court in the heat of a quarter-final victory that he would buy everyone in the crowd a drink should he lift the title on Sunday.


"Let's do it," he said of the gesture, which could end up costing the better part of 20,000 euros to buy a round for a sellout crowd of 8,500 at the Ahoy stadium. "I hope to be celebrating a victory Sunday."


Ljubicic had never won a match against his opponent, losing his three previous encounters, including two in 2002.


But the inspired Croatian converted on the lone break of the match, which came late in the second set after he had won the first in a tie-breaker.


Down two break points at 5-all, Johansson saved the first with a backhand volley winner but put a forehand out to hand Ljubicic a 6-5 lead.


The eager Croatian served it out a game later with his 12th ace of the afternoon, which complemented another nine winners.





"This was my 20th match of the season," said the hard-working winner. "And each match just gets better and better. The pressure is less. I just think about every shot, what I have to do next."

Daniel
02-20-2005, 07:22 AM
Federer sets up final against Ljubicic
Story Tools: Print Email
Associated Press
Posted: 7 hours ago



ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) - Top-seeded Roger Federer of Switzerland beat Mario Ancic of Croatia 7-5, 6-3 Saturday and will face Ivan Ljubicic in the final of the ABN Amro.

Federer is playing in his third tournament this year, and this will be the second time he will face Ljubicic in a final. He beat the Croat 6-3, 6-1 at the Qatar Open last month.
Earlier, Ljubicic used 12 aces to top Thomas Johansson of Sweden 7-6 (4), 7-5. It will be Ljubicic's third final this year.

Federer, who lost to Ancic at Wimbledon in their only previous meeting in 2002, broke in the 11th game of the first set and then served to take the lead.

In the second set, Federer took a 2-1 lead after an early break, and then broke again in the ninth game to get the win.

In the early match, Ljubicic beat 2002 Australian Open champion Johansson for the first time in four meetings.

Johansson played the more aggressive tennis, rushing to the net often while Ljubicic stayed on the baseline. After each player held serve, Johansson double-faulted in the tiebreaker to give Ljubicic the first set.

Ljubicic was able to break Johansson in the 11th game of the second set to set up the win.

Ljubicic, who also reached the final at the Open 13 in Marseille, France, said he would "buy everybody a drink" if he beats Federer on Sunday




i guess the crowd will have to wait one more year for the drinks :p

Vamos Roger :clap2:

Daniel
02-20-2005, 07:24 AM
Federer, Ljubicic reach final of ABN Amro indoor tennis tournament

Sat Feb 19, 5:02 PM ET


ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (CP) - Switzerland's Roger Federer beat Mario Ancic of Croatia 7-5, 6-3 Saturday to reach the final of the ABN Amro indoor tournament, where he'll face Ivan Ljubicic.



Croatia's Ljubicic used 12 aces to get past Sweden's Thomas Johansson 7-6 (4), 7-5 in the other semifinal.


Federer beat Ljubicic to win the title at Doha, Qatar, in January.


Federer evened his career mark against Ancic at 1-1, making up for a loss at Wimbledon (news - web sites) in 2002.


In a doubles semifinal, Daniel Nestor of Toronto and partner Mark Knowles of the Bahamas dropped a 7-5, 6-4 decision to Czech duo Cyril Suk and Pavel Vizner.


The No. 1 ranked doubles duo in the world, Nestor and Knowles are still seeking their first title of the year.


Their best result so far came at a Marseille tournament, where they lost to another Czech duo, Martin Damm and Radek Stepanek, in the finals.

RonE
02-20-2005, 09:09 AM
:haha: so perhaps you should emulate Roger too, Ron and get rid of your ponytail? ;)



And perhaps if Roger decides to jump off the roof of a building I should emulate him and jump off too? :p

The ponytail stays :nerner:

babsi
02-20-2005, 12:46 PM
Thanks, Silvy and Daniel :) :) :)

Ron - cut the ponytail - save the hair for a nice hairpiece - the time will come,you know.


__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

Mrs. B
02-20-2005, 03:27 PM
Ron - cut the ponytail - save the hair for a nice hairpiece - the time will come,you know.

:haha:

__________________________________________________ ______________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)[/QUOTE]

*M*
02-20-2005, 03:35 PM
Roger again shows his maturity:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,1-527-1491670,00.html

Tennis: ‘Okay, so I lost in Melbourne’
BARRY FLATMAN
Roger Federer promises to learn from the pain of defeat in Melbourne and warns his new coach will make him a better player

The mark of somebody right at the top of his sport, who is more accomplished than any of his rivals, is the ability to steal away when things occasionally go wrong and then re-emerge looking every bit the all-conquering champion.

Just a few weeks ago, Roger Federer was bounced out of the Australian Open by Marat Safin — the first time he had lost to a top-10 player since October 2003 and the first time he had lost a match since the Athens Olympic Games. Ambling casually back into the spotlight in Rotterdam last week, the memories of that painful night on the opposite side of the world seemed as distant as the sunshine of Melbourne. “Everything is fine.

All is well,” he reported engagingly. “Why shouldn’t it be?” Well, perhaps because he is fallible after all? “Of course, losing to Marat was hard at the time and I struggle to remember when I was in more pain on a tennis court,” said the Swiss player, toying with his racket. “The blister on my foot was so bad, I doubt whether I would have been able to play the final anyway, and that would have been a horrible situation in which to find myself. But the more success you have, the easier it is to deal with defeat. I didn’t think too much about it even the next day. I woke up, the sun was shining. Sure, my foot was hurting, but there was nothing to worry about. I hadn’t been robbed or attacked. Everyone I cared for was fine. It was not a question of blocking out the defeat, I just accepted having to live with the fact and, really, that’s not too difficult.”

Federer didn’t finish his sentence with the words “when you have won as often as I have”, but the intent was clear.

An hour earlier, world tennis domination was not exactly uppermost in Federer’s mind as he tried to dodge the spray off the River Maas with ABN AMRO tournament director Richard Krajicek, the man who won Wimbledon in 1996. To promote the Rotterdam event, both men braved stiff winds in the estuary to sink a giant suspended tennis ball from a yacht 50 yards away. Neither man is exactly feeble from the service line, so the mission to hit and sink the target was accomplished in less than a minute.

Only an idiot would suggest that Federer’s tenure as world No 1 hangs as precariously as that giant ball after his semi- final demise in Melbourne. True, his attempt to become the first man in more than 3Å decades to complete the Grand Slam must be put on hold for another year, but that isn’t something he burdens himself with as his primary ambition. Neither does he squander too much energy wondering if he really is the greatest tennis player ever, although Rod Laver and John McEnroe have gone on record as saying that he could usurp them all. “One of the hardest things I have to do is repeatedly hear people saying things like that,” said the 23-year-old.

“Right now it’s not true because I am too young. My career is far from over and I have many more things to prove. You can only compare the best once their careers are ended — and even then, I’m not sure whether it is worthwhile. How can you compare the conditions of all the different eras of men like Laver, (Bjorn) Borg or (Pete) Sampras? With the year I had, people can say I was dominant because the last time somebody was so successful was maybe 20 to 25 years ago. Of course, I understand why people heap so much praise but I try not to take much notice.”

Federer was also aware of the perception that victory in the Australian Open should have been a foregone conclusion. Three major titles in 2004, that winning streak against his closest rivals and a supreme year-ending display at the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston made it hard to believe anybody else could win. It seemed almost irrelevant that Lleyton Hewitt was determined to win a Grand Slam on home soil, that Andre Agassi could look back on three Australian titles in the preceding five years and that Safin had extended the No 1 to a record-equalling 20-18 tie-break in the Houston semi-final.

Federer was supremely well- prepared for Melbourne. He had trained harder than ever in the brief close season and had done it, moreover, in the Australian heat, after convincing Tony Roche to be his occasional coach. A year- opening title at the Qatar Open in Doha showed he was in ominous form, and his performance in the warm-up tournament at Koo yong underlined that potential. “I said to the people who were with me that the peak I hit in January is something I’ll probably never experience again,” he admitted. “That wasn’t just about my physical condition, although I have never felt so professionally prepared.

“I like to spend the break at home with my friends and family, but I made the sacrifice this time because I so wanted to work with Tony and wasn’t sure what his decision would be. Maybe I would have stayed home if I knew he would agree to working with me throughout 2005, but as it was I spent Christmas Day flying back from Australia. But the feeling also had much to do with what people were saying. The press were praising me and so many people were saying it would take a miracle for somebody to beat me.

“It’s hard not to smile. I said, ‘Let’s enjoy listening to it, but don’t believe a word’. What I didn’t want to hear people close to me saying were the statistics about how long it’s been since another top-10 player beat me or how many wins I’d had in a row. The more you win, the more people ask you, and as I seemed to get asked about it every day, each time I had to wash it out of my system and start again for the next match.”

Federer is amazed that he maintained his success throughout 2004 without a coach. After parting with Peter Lundgren, his initial overtures to Roche elicited a negative response. Although he was prepared to be patient, a year’s wait was not something he’d planned. His achievements (11 titles, including the three majors) playing with just the advice of his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, and fitness trainer, Pierre Paganini, are a source of pride. The finest example of his single-mindedness was the Wimbledon final, when he used a rain delay to rethink his tactics against a forceful Andy Roddick, and successfully turned the match to win 4-6 7-5 7-6 6-4.

As last year wore on, Federer watched some of his peers continually praise their coaches (such as Hewitt with Roger Rasheed and, more recently, Safin with Lundgren), while others, such as Roddick, got rid of theirs. Federer, meanwhile, continued to deliver proposals to Roche and simply bided his time. “A year was a long time, and the fact I could handle the situation so well that it produced the best season of my career brings a good feeling,” he said. “That assures me I can always face situations on my own.”

Federer thinks it taught him more about himself than any other phase of his career. “I had to figure out what had worked in the past and what were the best decisions. It seems I was correct with most of the choices. When I went out on my own I was not worried, but certainly a little tense, and though the results kept on coming, I do wish Tony could have come on board a little earlier. But it’s fine now.”

With Roche approaching his 60th birthday in May, the age difference between player and coach is far greater than any other on the tour, but Federer is excited by the possibilities of working with the Australian, who guided Ivan Lendl to eight majors and then pushed a totally different sort of player and individual to the top — Patrick Rafter.

“Tony is a quiet man, but so wise, just what I need because there is still so much potential to explore and facets of my game to improve,” said Federer. “He doesn’t need to be there every week. He does not need to be at the matches at all. I don’t need a coach in that way. Once you are on court, it’s all down to you and there’s no point looking up to a coach as if to say, ‘ How about that?’ or ‘So what do I do now?’ Once you are in a match it’s like an examination at school, and you can’t look at another guy’s sheet of paper to get ideas. If I kept asking for help, it would suggest to me there’s something wrong.”

There is no danger of Federer and Roche becoming tired of each other’s company. The pair spoke briefly in the locker room after the Safin match and then in more detail the next day. Just one more telephone call ensued before Federer left Australia a couple of days later. They have not spoken since, and there are no plans to do so until after the two initial Masters Series events of the year in Indian Wells and Miami next month.

“Tony is just so different from anyone I’ve ever worked with,” said Federer, “but I think the way I play the game is kind of in an Australian style, and that is something that appeals to him.”

Federer admitted he felt some initial apprehension when he got back on court in Rotterdam’s Ahoy stadium for the ABN AMRO tournament. Last year he lost to Tim Henman in the quarter-final. However, straight-sets victories over Czech qualifier Bohdan Ulihrach and teenage Swiss compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka saw him rapidly reacclimatise.

The tennis world is now hoping that somebody will be able to challenge Federer. Safin, with his Australian title, seems a more likely candidate than Hewitt or Roddick. Federer believes the top four are showing a consistency that suggests they will monopolise majors for some time to come, and if anybody is to join such illustrious company, he must legitimise his membership by winning a Grand Slam title.

“Juan Carlos Ferrero still has the potential and should not be forgotten, and the two Argentinians, Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian, could do it,” he said. “Maybe Rafael Nadal will get up there, too, and in the long term we all know what we are going to get from him. But right now I have to view Marat as a big threat.

“He’s finally grown up, realised what it is all about and appreciates there is not much time left to waste. And the person I credit for all of these things is Peter (Lundgren). Marat has found somebody he can trust and I understand that because I, too, still trust Peter, who was an excellent coach for me. People have told me the match we played in Melbourne was one of the great contests. Though I realised the standard was very high, that is not something that was obvious at the time.”

After his defeat, looking for a period of anonymity and relaxation, Federer and his girlfriend headed to the Swiss Alps for a week’s skiing at St Moritz. Then he got back to training. Some might view skiing as a dangerous pursuit for a top-flight sportsman who insists his greatest triumphs are still to come, but not Federer. “I ski well. I can confidently go on the black runs and I never fall. I was told it was not so wise to go down the Cresta run on a toboggan, but skiing is never a problem.” Neither, it seems, are the pressures of maintaining his grip on tennis — a sport he threatens to dominate for years to come. Roger Federer just has that look about him.

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 03:48 PM
Thankyou~~ Roger is a staunch boy~!! :yeah:

lsy
02-20-2005, 03:52 PM
Well I am obviously in a minority regarding my opinion the matter so no further comment :p

yeah, you better stop critisizing Rogi's beautiful hair here else we will cut something off you too.......

......your ponytail :nerner:

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 03:57 PM
I love Rogi's beautiful hair :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Mrs. B
02-20-2005, 04:01 PM
Once you are in a match it’s like an examination at school, and you can’t look at another guy’s sheet of paper to get ideas. If I kept asking for help, it would suggest to me there’s something wrong.”
:yeah:

good article, thanks for posting, *M*

avocadoe
02-20-2005, 04:08 PM
Great article...I'm glad I didn't know Roger was cruising the Alps, but good on him for doing so safely. He really does have an amazing genuine maturity. Love hwat he had to say about not blocking out the defeat but accepting it.

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 04:12 PM
Is Roger's interview come out? :D

RonE
02-20-2005, 04:20 PM
yeah, you better stop critisizing Rogi's beautiful hair here else we will cut something off you too.......

......your ponytail :nerner:

:p :p :p :p :p :p :p

RogiFan88
02-20-2005, 04:20 PM
if anyone can post eng articles fr the tourney site, pls do cos I can't get eng at all!

RonE
02-20-2005, 04:20 PM
Thank you for the lovely article M.

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 04:25 PM
Roger will feel good in Dubai~~~

Dubai is a half of his home land~~ :devil:

lsy
02-20-2005, 04:30 PM
if anyone can post eng articles fr the tourney site, pls do cos I can't get eng at all!

http://www.abnamrowtt.com/engels/index.asp?item=home

Attendance record helps Federer Foundation
20-2-2005 | 11:03:08
Apart from being inimitable on court, Roger Federer has many other qualities. Last year, the Swiss established the Roger Federer Foundation, an organisation that helps children in Africa. Following this evening’s semi-final match against Mario Ancic, Tournament Director Richard Krajicek had a surprise for tomorrow’s finalist. In addition to announcing a new attendance record, Krajicek handed Federer a cheque on behalf of the tournament organisation. The foundation will receive € 2 for each visitor over and above 100,000 (subject to a minimum donation of € 10,000). Ahoy’ welcomed nearly 105,000 visitors last year.

Roger Federer was visibly moved: “Thank you, this is a very kind gesture. It’s quite different to receiving the winner’s cheque.”
============================

108.030 spectators

The world's largest indoor tennistournament has broken its own record. In this year's edtion 108.030 spectators visited the Ahoy' stadium. This means that the Roger Federer Foundation € 16,060 (8,030 x € 2,00) receives for the good work in Africa.

==========================

Federer wins exhilarating final
20-2-2005 | 18:12:48
Roger Federer has won the 32nd ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament. The Swiss beat Ivan Ljubicic in three sets: 5-7, 7-5, 7-6 (5).

“It was an exceptionally close match, and there was very little to separate us,” Federer explained afterwards. “Ivan played a fantastic match and he deserved to win as much as I did. Unfortunately there can only be one winner, however.” (how is he arrogant??? :rolleyes: ) As Federer looked up at the first ring, he could see his name being added to the boarding. The world No 1 was delighted with the way things had gone: “I would like to thank Richard Krajicek as well as ABN AMRO. It’s a fantastic tournament. I would also like to thank the crowd. You’ve won my heart and I hope to see you all again next year.”

Federer needed some time to get into his stride today. Unlike his previous four matches, the favourite made quite a few mistakes during the opening set, particularly on his forehand. Although he managed to keep Ljubicic at bay during the first and the seventh game, he was unable to stop the Croat in the eleventh. Ljubicic faced a breakpoint himself during his next service game, but nevertheless took the opening set 7-5. It was the last time that the Croat broke his opponent’s service game. Federer’s service steadily improved in the second set, allowing the number one seed to get a grip on the match. Having failed to make the most of breakpoints in the second, the sixth and the eighth game, the Swiss managed to level the match in the twelfth (7-5).

With neither player willing to give in, the third set had spectators sitting on the edge of their seats. A tiebreak was inevitable. Even though Ljubicic forced the first break to take a 1-3 lead, Federer came back to 3-4. A close call unsettled Ljubicic at a crucial moment. Federer again broke his opponent, and used his second match point to secure victory.

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 04:37 PM
Roger feel tired~~~

lsy
02-20-2005, 04:47 PM
“Right now it’s not true because I am too young. My career is far from over and I have many more things to prove. You can only compare the best once their careers are ended — and even then, I’m not sure whether it is worthwhile. How can you compare the conditions of all the different eras of men like Laver, (Bjorn) Borg or (Pete) Sampras? With the year I had, people can say I was dominant because the last time somebody was so successful was maybe 20 to 25 years ago. Of course, I understand why people heap so much praise but I try not to take much notice.”



“It’s hard not to smile. I said, ‘Let’s enjoy listening to it, but don’t believe a word’...The more you win, the more people ask you, and as I seemed to get asked about it every day, each time I had to wash it out of my system and start again for the next match.”

:yeah: I really do hope he can block his mind off all these talk. It's important for him to maintain the right mentality towards his career and game.


“Marat has found somebody he can trust and I understand that because I, too, still trust Peter, who was an excellent coach for me.

oh Rogi...compare to him, we're so terrible ;)

Thansk *M*! Great read!

SUKTUEN
02-20-2005, 04:48 PM
don't play terrbile again~~My dear~~ :devil:

yanchr
02-20-2005, 05:04 PM
Great article. Thanks *M* :)

fightclubber
02-20-2005, 06:48 PM
Safin sulks over media treatment

1 hour, 46 minutes ago
http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/us/my/addtomyyahoo3.gif (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6419&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26u=/afp/20050220/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpuae_050220175934) World Sports - AFP (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6419&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26u=/afp/20050220/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpuae_050220175934)





DUBAI (AFP) - Australian Open (news (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/manual/afp/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpuae/14355594/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22Australian%20Open%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw) - web sites (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/manual/afp/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpuae/14355594/*http://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=web-storylinks&p=Australian%20Open)) champion Marat Safin launched a blistering attack on the international media as he bids to take away another of Roger Federer's titles at the one-million-dollar Dubai Open which starts Monday.

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20050220/thumb.sge.mgn93.200205175927.photo00.photo.default-282x380.jpg (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/050220/photos_sp_wl_afp/050220175934_yuz29bd8_photo0)
AFP/File Photo (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/050220/photos_sp_wl_afp/050220175934_yuz29bd8_photo0)


Safin, who knocked Federer out in the semi-finals in Melbourne before capturing the Australian Open crown, said that he takes strength from a worsening relationship with those who write about him.



"I learnt a lot of stuff," said the Russian as he reflected on a 2004 trying to struggle back to the top.



"I burnt myself too many times. I had this belief that people are good, but then I realise that you can't trust anybody. You have to say you find yourself in the newspapers and sometimes I read articles which are ridiculous.



"I used to say I have to explain everything, and I opened my mouth and explained more than I should. I will not do it any more.



"People try to sell sensation, and claim I said this and that. It's not good but now I know you have to be careful what you say."



Safin has been particularly annoyed at allegations that, during his lengthy spell out of the top 20, he had been indulging in alcohol abuse.



He also denied that, as reports recently claimed, he had been criticising his sister Dinara Safina.



"I only said she had to do it for herself. That is advice, not criticism," he said.



Safin, who is seeded to meet Federer again in the final here next weekend, has a none-too-easy first round against Nicolas Kiefer, the former world number four from Germany.



Federer, the champion in Rotterdam on Sunday, starts against Ivo Minar, a qualifer from the Czech Republic.



Andre Agassi, who has an opening match Monday with Radek Stepanek, the in-form Czech, suggested that at the age of almost 35 he was playing on partly to fund his academy for under-privileged children.



"It is wonderful seeing what a child can do with a bit of opportunity and hope in life, and when someone takes an interest in what they do, to see them dream and think about the future as if it were a reality," he said.



However, Agassi played down his chances after the operation which he believes may have solved his hip problems for good but has left him short of matches.



"I have not been pain-free for a long time and if you don't have confidence in playing matches you can expect to struggle," he admitted.



Meanwhile the draw also threw up a clash between the two leading Britons, Tim Henman, the third seed, and Greg Rusedski, the former US Open champion. The two have not played against each other for more than three years.



Henman, who has won five of their seven meetings on the tour and has not lost to Rusedski for six years, played down the significance of the clash, but Rusedski felt differently about it.





"Both of us on the day will be very determined to win because there will be a lot of pride at stake - it will be very focussed and intense because this is a big tournament," he claimed

fightclubber
02-20-2005, 06:54 PM
Sports - Reutershttp://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/us/nws/p/reuters120.gif (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/reuters/brand/SIG=pd7i95/*http://www.reuters.com) Federer Downs Ljubicic to Reclaim Winning Aura

1 hour, 53 minutes ago
http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/us/my/addtomyyahoo3.gif (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6415&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26u=/nm/20050220/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc_3) Sports - Reuters (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/addtomy/*http://add.my.yahoo.com/content?id=6415&.src=yn&.done=http%3a//news.yahoo.com/news%3ftmpl=story%26u=/nm/20050220/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc_3)

By Pritha Sarkar

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (Reuters) - Roger Federer (news (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/tennis/nm/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc/14355585/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22Roger%20Federer%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw)) reclaimed his aura of invincibility with a stirring 5-7, 7-5, 7-6 victory over Ivan Ljubicic (news (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/tennis/nm/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc/14355585/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22Ivan%20Ljubicic%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw)) in the World Indoor Tournament final on Sunday.



The Swiss world number one kept his winning streak in finals intact by winning his 15th consecutive title showdown.



Federer, who had defeated his Croatian opponent in the Doha final in January, wore down Ljubicic to add his name to the billboard of champions that circles the Ahoy arena's center court.



"Today it was very close and it could have gone either way but I'm happy I fought through because this might be a crucial victory for me for the rest of the season," said Federer.



Federer arrived in the Dutch port city with a mission to repair his dented confidence after his loss to Marat Safin (news (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/tennis/nm/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc/14355585/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22Marat%20Safin%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw)) in the Australian Open (news (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/manual/nm/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc/14355585/*http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22Australian%20Open%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw) - web sites (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/DailyNews/manual/nm/sp_nm/atp_rotterdam_dc/14355585/*http://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=web-storylinks&p=Australian%20Open)) semi-finals.



The top seed's triumph handed Ljubicic a hat-trick of final defeats this year. The Croatian number one also lost in Marseille last Sunday.



Ljubicic enjoyed the better start to the match, holding break points in Federer's first and fourth service games.



Although the Croatian was unable to capitalize on either opportunity, he kept his nerve against the world's best player.



Ljubicic broke the previously impregnable Federer serve for the first time in the tournament in the 11th game of the first set, winning it to love after the Swiss swiped a backhand into the net.



"I knew I had to fight hard today and that's exactly what happened," said Federer, who pocketed a winner's check of 147,000 euros.



"I played one shocking game to be broken. He took advantage of it and broke me to love but I still felt I gave that game away.



"That haunted me all the way, right until match point. I fought well today so I'm happy."



A shell-shocked Federer tried to hit back in the next game by earning his first break point when Ljubicic served for the set.



PILING PRESSURE



The Croatian was up to the challenge, however, slamming a backhand passing shot past Federer's outstretched racket.



Four points later, Ljubicic had the set in his possession when Federer's backhand sailed wide.



The top seed piled on the pressure in the second but failed to convert any of his numerous break point chances until Ljubicic was serving to stay in the set at 6-5 down.







Having saved the first with an unreturnable delivery, Ljubicic allowed Federer to draw level by drifting the ball over the baseline.

The deciding set proved much tighter as neither player earned a break point and there was little to separate the pair as the tussle headed into a tiebreak.

While Ljubicic claimed an early advantage to streak ahead 4-2, it did not last long.

After two hours and 42 minutes of high-quality action, Federer finally claimed victory when Ljubicic mis-hit the ball into the crowd.

Despite coming so close to pulling off the biggest win of his career, Ljubicic remained gracious in defeat.



:angel:

"I can't blame people for wanting Roger to win and see his name up there on the board," Ljubicic said. "Because it's nice to see 2005, Roger Federer as the champion. "If I had won, 50 years from now people would have said 'who the hell is Ljubicic?' No one would have remembered that I beat Roger so I can understand why people back Roger."



:angel: :angel:


oh yeah! So true!;)

RonE
02-20-2005, 07:15 PM
"Today it was very close and it could have gone either way but I'm happy I fought through because this might be a crucial victory for me for the rest of the season," said Federer.


I must say I am surprised to hear him say this :eek:

Yes, it was a good match to win and losing it might have had a bad short-term effect. But it's questionable IMHO to give such weight to this match in the long run.

On the other hand I can understand him, as had he lost another really close battle that would have gone right down to the wire he might suddenly start lacking a little bit of self belief.

Jimena
02-20-2005, 08:00 PM
I think Roger's comments might also have something to do with trying to win as much as possible befoew he starts trying to defend his biggest titles. So the more he wins now, the less pressure there is to defend his points and remain number one.

I like Ljubicic's comments about Roger! Awwwww. Hopefully, Ivan will have a great season also and people will remember him too!

Dana
02-20-2005, 08:02 PM
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=tennisNews&storyID=URI:urn:newsml:reuters.com:20050220:MTFH96 409_2005-02-20_19-00-09_L2063525:1

Federer relieved to restore dented reputation
Sun Feb 20, 2005

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands, Feb 20 (Reuters) - Six years after making his debut in the event as a precocious blond-haired teenager, Roger Federer finally triumphed at the World Indoor Tournament on Sunday to restore his dented reputation.

The blond hair is long gone but his win over Ivan Ljubicic helped the Swiss silence any detractors who might have thought 2005 would prove to be a season of anti-climax following his shock loss to Marat Safin at last month's Australian Open.

"I was aware that if I lost a very close match again, losing in the breaker, people would have been quick to say 'he's lost his invincibility'," said Federer after beating the Croatian 5-7 7-5 7-6 in the final.

"I was playing for a lot today and I'm very happy I came through because it's a crucial victory for the future."

Federer was went down to Russian Safin in the semi-final at Melbourne Park despite holding a match point.

He was aware he could not afford to slip up again if he is to hold on to the aura he has built around himself after claiming 11 titles, including three grand slams, during 2004.

Sunday's triumph also extended his winning streak in finals to 15, his last defeat coming in a title match back in July 2003 in Gstaad.

It is a feat he is extremely proud of and one he wants to extend for as long as possible.

"I don't know where the secret of winning comes from," said the top seed.

"Suddenly you're on a streak and everybody talks about it. The more you talk about it, the more you worry it won't last.

"Of course, every time I win a semi-final, I put myself under pressure because I'm putting that record on the line," he added with a wink.


PAINFUL MEMORIES

As he has done for almost two years, Federer had entered the Rotterdam final as the favourite. When the players entered into the third-set tiebreak, however, painful memories of a final four years ago came flooding back for the Swiss.

On that occasion, the Swiss master came agonisingly close to winning the title in Rotterdam, only to be denied by maverick Frenchman Nicolas Escude 7-6 in the decider.

"It would have hurt me today to have lost 7-6 in the third again," conceded Federer.

"It wouldn't have been the first time in my career to lose a final like this as I've lost a few close ones over the years.

"But I think this is the first time for me to win a final 7-6 in the third.

"I was nervous going into it. I just tried to hold the record of mine, you know the previous finals I've played, in my eyes. I just said I have to win this but I was a little worried.

"I've won the doubles twice before so I'm happy to have finally won the singles today."

Having added his name to the impressive billboard of champions that circles the Ahoy arena's centre court, Federer revealed a little known fact about his first visit to the Dutch port city.

"When I was here in 99, I had blond hair but things have changed since," he said.

"I think I also had a beard before ... I'm now on centre court rather than on the outside court and, oh, more people recognise me."

Skyward
02-20-2005, 08:22 PM
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=tennisNews&storyID=URI:urn:newsml:reuters.com:20050220:MTFH96 409_2005-02-20_19-00-09_L2063525:1

Federer relieved to restore dented reputation
Sun Feb 20, 2005

"I was aware that if I lost a very close match again, losing in the breaker, people would have been quick to say 'he's lost his invincibility'," said Federer after beating the Croatian 5-7 7-5 7-6 in the final.

"


Thanks Dana! Roger should stop reading stupid comments on the MTF. ;)

RogiFan88
02-20-2005, 08:39 PM
lol!

RogiFan88
02-20-2005, 08:40 PM
from ATP INSIDER:

IN ROTTERDAM: ROGER FEDERER, RICHARD KRAJICEK and RAEMON SLUITER got the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament off to a flying start on Sunday. The trio defied rain and wind in Rotterdam to board the ABN AMRO yacht - which is taking part in the Volvo Ocean Race - on the river Maas and signal the start to the ever-popular tournament that begins on Monday. Federer, Krajicek and Sluiter, racquets in hand, fired tennis balls at a giant inflatable tennis ball that hung tens of metres in the air. They knocked it into the river, triggering thousands of green and yellow balloons to be sent floating into sky. "It was a good boat," said Federer of the ABN AMRO yacht, which will take part in the Volvo Ocean Race later this year. "Unfortunately we couldn't go on the water because it was too windy but we got to shoot some balls at the big ball above the water, so it was fun. We had Richard Krajicek and Raemon Sluiter out there as well so it was fun to do something with the local heroes. Richard is doing a good job here for the tournament, he has a great field. I think it's important for every tournament to come up with something exciting like this for the media, the fans and the city, it's good promotion."

-- > ROGER FEDERER received the European Player of the Year for 2004 by the European ATP Tournament Directors at the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament on Tuesday. It's the second year in a row the Swiss was presented the award, a Waterford Crystal engraved trophy. The ATP European Player of the Year Award is based on diverse criteria such as the final INDESIT ATP Race position of the player, attitude towards media and sponsors, cooperation and support of the European events. The World No. 1 player was presented the award by Patrice Dominguez, ATP Board Member and Tournament Director at the ATP tournament in Metz, France, and Horst Klosterkemper, ATP President and Managing Director, Europe. Federer: "I'd like to thank the European Tournament Directors for liking me so much…It's a pleasure to play in Europe, when I go to a tournament I always try to do my best on and off the court. This award is fantastic, it's something that goes a little bit beyond my forehands and backhands and for this reason I would like to say thank you. I hope I can live up to everybody's expectations again."

-- > Each year the ATP presents the annual ATP Tournament Awards of Excellence to those Tournaments that distinguished themselves by highest standard achievements in areas identified by the ATP, in recognition of their contribution to the overall success of the circuit. The ATP is proud to announce that the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament 2004 has been awarded the ATP Award of Excellence for Best VIP Hospitality and Sponsor Experience. Richard Krajicek was presented the Award, made by Waterford Crystal, together with a certificate, by Horst Klosterkemper, ATP President and Managing Director, Europe. Krajicek: "Thank you very much for the beautiful award. The people that really deserves this award are the people at ABN AMRO making this possible, and also the people from Ahoy." "To be honest, I just came here last year, but this whole setup, this whole idea, the engine behind this was Wim Buitendijk. We all agree on that. He was the Tournament Director in Rotterdam for almost 30 years and thanks to him all this is possible. Actually this trophy belongs to Wim Buitendijk."

fightclubber
02-20-2005, 09:01 PM
"When I was here in 99, I had blond hair but things have changed since," he said.
Thanks God Rogi!
silvy;)

babsi
02-20-2005, 09:13 PM
Yes,Skyward
Roger should only read his personal "Express site" on this board -were everybody is allways full of positv spirt,mental strengh and without a dout in his abilitys and no one is ever dishearted,when he loses................................ok,ok I´m out,don´t through rocks at me!


__________________________________________________ ____________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 06:13 AM
I must say I am surprised to hear him say this :eek:

Yes, it was a good match to win and losing it might have had a bad short-term effect. But it's questionable IMHO to give such weight to this match in the long run.

On the other hand I can understand him, as had he lost another really close battle that would have gone right down to the wire he might suddenly start lacking a little bit of self belief.

It must be a very close match. I think the victory is important to Roger more of a fact that he edged ahead in another close final after AO semi lost.

I can only watch the final tonight. Right now I can't imagine what's going on his head on those tigh moments, but I am happy he's been through again.

Dirk
02-21-2005, 06:20 AM
Roger didn't lose Oz semi because of his confidence, he lost it because he made bad tactical choices or Marat made better shots. As far as this match goes Roger's horrible game in the 1st set decided that and I don't know what it was. Roger is just fine but I do think he might be feeling the heat to keep his final streak going. It's hard to not get consume by it but as long as he channels it into motivation for winning then it's all good.

moonlight
02-21-2005, 06:32 AM
I know Federer's weaknesses Safin

By Alaric Gomes, Staff Reporter

Dubai: Australian Open champion Marat Safin admitted he has found the formula to defeat Roger Federer.


"I know his [Federer's] weaknesses, but I will keep them a secret," said Safin confidently. "But they are for my knowledge only," said the powerful Russian after a practice session on the centre court yesterday afternoon.

Safin has been one of the few players on the ATP Tour who has managed to defeat the seemingly invincible Federer with his power-packed serve and stroke play.

The Swiss tennis ace had been tipped by experts to win a Grand Slam, and emulate Rod Laver, but he failed in the first hurdle towards that quest at the Australian Open last month by losing to Safin in the semi finals.

"If you want to compete with him [Federer], you have to be confident," Safin said.

The tale of the tape, however, tells a different story. Going head to head against each other, Federer leads Safin 6-2 on the Tour so far.

"The secret for me is simple: if you can get close to him then you can beat anyone on the tour," Safin admitted.

The Russian, seeded No.2 here, is likely to run into the Swiss top seed in the final of the Dubai Duty Free Men's Open at the end of this week should the draw hold up for both of them.

Federer will launch his campaign in Dubai after coming in from the World Indoors in Rotterdam.


Despite his increasing confidence, Safin managed to inject a dose of realism into his chances by saying: "There are a lot of quality players and we must not forget that Andre [Agassi] is one of them. There are going to be some interesting matches before the final. I really do not want to look so far ahead," Safin said.

Respect for Federer was also not in short supply from the Australian Open champion.

"Many say that Sampras is the greatest player. But I say with all due respect to the rest, that he [Federer] is the most complete player in the world so far," Safin stated.

http://www.gulfnews.com/Articles/SportNF.asp?ArticleID=152920

moonlight
02-21-2005, 06:41 AM
"I know his [Federer's] weaknesses, but I will keep them a secret," said Safin confidently.

What could they be? :scratch:

I hope Roger remains confident of his abilities despite the Aus Open loss and wish him the best of luck next time he plays Marat.

Hopp Rogi! :bounce: Defend your Dubai title!

Daniel
02-21-2005, 08:19 AM
Thansk for the articles :D

RonE
02-21-2005, 09:09 AM
And likewise I am sure Roger knows what Marat's weaknesses are and they are still there make no mistake. It is just a matter of who exploits the opponent's weaknesses more effectively and last time it happened to be Marat.

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 12:08 PM
thankyou so much for all articles~~ :worship: :worship:

yanchr
02-21-2005, 12:57 PM
I must say I am surprised to hear him say this :eek:

Yes, it was a good match to win and losing it might have had a bad short-term effect. But it's questionable IMHO to give such weight to this match in the long run.

On the other hand I can understand him, as had he lost another really close battle that would have gone right down to the wire he might suddenly start lacking a little bit of self belief.
Roger's words are exactly my words. He needs it desperately to find back his already a little bit faltering confidence. Confidence is what matters in his recent matches I believe. If he had lost this one, I simply couldn't imagine what this year ahead of him would be.

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 01:04 PM
"I know his [Federer's] weaknesses, but I will keep them a secret," said Safin confidently.

What could they be? :scratch:

I hope Roger remains confident of his abilities despite the Aus Open loss and wish him the best of luck next time he plays Marat.



Roger will beat Safin very hard!!!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:

Puschkin
02-21-2005, 01:11 PM
If he had lost this one, I simply couldn't imagine what this year ahead of him would be.


Yanchr, :wavey: I hardly ever disagree with you, but here I have to. Roger would not have faltered for the rest of the year, if he had lost yesterday. He seems tougher than some his fans to me ;) Nevertheless, I agree that winning the hard fought battle in Rotterdam meant a lot to him. And this is no contradiction.

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 01:20 PM
I think Roger will has a Big Sleep today!!! ;)

yanchr
02-21-2005, 01:32 PM
Yanchr, :wavey: I hardly ever disagree with you, but here I have to. Roger would not have faltered for the rest of the year, if he had lost yesterday. He seems tougher than some his fans to me ;) Nevertheless, I agree that winning the hard fought battle in Rotterdam meant a lot to him. And this is no contradiction.
Roger is always tougher than me I guess :p But I still believe double losses in close matches would've hurt more than we have thought it would. I mean the mental part. Luckily Roger nipped the potential double losses in the bud.

Disagreement is what makes forums somewhat more interesting (well in a friendly way though :o )

:wavey:

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 01:42 PM
Can Roger win Dubai? :devil:

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 01:51 PM
"I know his [Federer's] weaknesses, but I will keep them a secret," said Safin confidently. "But they are for my knowledge only," said the powerful Russian after a practice session on the centre court yesterday afternoon.


Having a game plan and executing it are two different things. We shall see how much Safin knows those weakness after beating Roger more often.

It's definitely an important win for Roger. I think he wanted to rally up from his AO defeat right there, from another tight match, 3rd set tie breaker final. I actually haven't figured out how he managed to win this after watching the match. It reminds me of his 03 TMC RR with Agassi, he then hit many down the line shots, from both wings. I haven't seen many these shots since last year TMC. Anyway, I'm still happy he's been through. What a relief. :angel:

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 01:53 PM
roar~~ what is your name in tennis.com.cn? :D

yanchr
02-21-2005, 02:09 PM
I actually haven't figured out how he managed to win this after watching the match. It reminds me of his 03 TMC RR with Agassi, he then hit many down the line shots, from both wings. I haven't seen many these shots since last year TMC. Anyway, I'm still happy he's been through. What a relief. :angel:
This one still has no way to be compared with that TMC RR match against Agassi methinks. I haven't seen this match so far, but I don't think this one is as high quality as that one. He actually was playing very well in that RR match as well as Agassi. And also with the no-way-less-than-this-one nerve-wracking tightness and the final result, it was such a thriller that I had to weigh it extremely big. I think the bh dtl in that TMC was the best I've ever seen him play.

:wavey:weiwei, haven't talked to you for ages ;)

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:09 PM
鳳凰~~你在做什麼? :devil:

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:10 PM
roar~~ what is your name in tennis.com.cn? :D

I don't have one. I seldom go there becoz I hate people calling him da bi zi. (which unfortunately is partially true) :(

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:12 PM
I don't have one. I seldom go there becoz I hate people calling him da bi zi. (which unfortunately is partially true) :(

我不太明白哦,你可以打中文嗎? :devil: :worship: :worship:

yanchr
02-21-2005, 02:14 PM
鳳凰~~你在做什麼? :devil:
和你一样 ;)

federer_roar说,她没有注册,也很少去那里,因为她讨厌别人叫Roger大鼻子,虽然这是事实 :p

weiwei, actually me too :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:16 PM
大人,現在沒人叫他大鼻子了﹗大家現在叫他做奶牛﹗﹗ :D :D

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:20 PM
This one still has no way to be compared with that TMC RR match against Agassi methinks. I haven't seen this match so far, but I don't think this one is as high quality as that one. :wavey:weiwei, haven't talked to you for ages ;)


Hi Laura :wavey: , yeah agree, that's what I mean. Maybe my expectation is too high. So far I haven't successfully kept away from this board. Instead, it becomes my daily routine. :sad: :p

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:23 PM
Can anyone write the articles to some Chinese ? :worship:

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:23 PM
大人,現在沒人叫他大鼻子了﹗大家現在叫他做奶牛﹗﹗ :D :D

:lol: :lol:
Thanks " 鳳凰 " ;) :hug:

fightclubber
02-21-2005, 02:24 PM
I don't have one. I seldom go there becoz I hate people calling him da bi zi. (which unfortunately is partially true) :(What does it mean?? silvy

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:24 PM
:lol: :lol:
Thanks " 鳳凰 " ;) :hug:

我不是鳳凰啦﹗﹗﹗ 我是suk 啦﹗ (淑) :eek: :eek: :devil:

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:26 PM
What does it mean?? silvy


Dai bue zi is the Chinese of mean "Big Nose" ~~

Many pepole call Roger Big Nose in the Chinese Forums at past :devil:

yanchr
02-21-2005, 02:27 PM
So far I haven't been successfully kept away from this board. Instead, it becomes my daily routine. :sad: :p
That's :sad: ;) Unfortunately I can't escape this fame either :sad: ;)

大人,現在沒人叫他大鼻子了﹗大家現在叫他做奶牛﹗﹗
Actually I don't like it either :rolleyes:
把我们称为奶粉我勉为其难还可以接受……

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:27 PM
不是呀~~鳳凰~~奶牛幾可愛呀﹗ :D

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:28 PM
What does it mean?? silvy

oO. It means Mr.big nose. :(

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:35 PM
That's :sad: ;) Unfortunately I can't escape this fame either :sad: ;)


Actually I don't like it either :rolleyes:
把我们称为奶粉我勉为其难还可以接受……

我也是不是粉喜欢。 :p

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:39 PM
不喜歡都不打緊的~~~ ;)

federer_roar
02-21-2005, 02:41 PM
~~奶牛幾可愛呀﹗ :D

这样吗?

http://img203.exs.cx/img203/2381/cow0wm.th.gif (http://img203.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img203&image=cow0wm.gif)

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:43 PM
SLEEP ~~BB~~~ :worship:

yanchr
02-21-2005, 02:44 PM
这样吗?

http://img203.exs.cx/img203/2381/cow0wm.th.gif (http://img203.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img203&image=cow0wm.gif)
:lol: It's as cute as Rogi, but not as sexy ;)

SUKTUEN
02-21-2005, 02:53 PM
Sexy Roger~~~ :D :D :D :D :D :devil:

Dirk
02-21-2005, 03:28 PM
Oh and what is his weakness MARAT YOU BIG FUCKING GOOF?????? WHAT GIVE ROGER FOOT BLISTERS BEFORE EVERY MATCH???????//

Am I the only fucking one here who finds it funny that the last time Marat won a set from Roger before Oz was in 2002? Then he wins the 2nd set at Oz once Roger's foot blisters started to act up. HHHHHHHMMMMMMMMMMMMM Concidence I THINK FUCKING NOT!!!!!!!!!!! :fiery:

fightclubber
02-21-2005, 04:07 PM
Oh and what is his weakness MARAT YOU BIG FUCKING GOOF?????? WHAT GIVE ROGER FOOT BLISTERS BEFORE EVERY MATCH???????//

Am I the only fucking one here who finds it funny that the last time Marat won a set from Roger before Oz was in 2002? Then he wins the 2nd set at Oz once Roger's foot blisters started to act up. HHHHHHHMMMMMMMMMMMMM Concidence I THINK FUCKING NOT!!!!!!!!!!! :fiery:
Hey Dirk....
All is part of the circus to pressure Roger...
ok? Do not worry!

Silvy:worship:

laselva
02-21-2005, 04:18 PM
"I know his [Federer's] weaknesses, but I will keep them a secret," said Safin confidently.

What could they be? :scratch:
That he has A LOT of titles to defend this year, that he is in underpressure in A LOT of tournaments he enters? Therefore a secret to beat him is saying "confidently" and constantly , 'I have a secret to beat Federer.' to intimidate Roger once you manage to beat Federer? :rolleyes: Is this a tactic? Why is he keep saying that?
But very nice words from Marat about Roger being complete player. :yeah:

Dirk, nice post. I like when you get fiery to defend Roger. :D :devil:

Edit to add: Silvy, just saw your post. I have to admit the fact that Marat keep saying he got the secrets to beat Roger bothders me a little. But as long as Roger doesnt it will be alright.

Skyward
02-21-2005, 04:50 PM
Marat should stop talking for his own good. Just ask Hewitt, or Brad Gilbert. BG said that Roger had holes in his game, and look how notoriously Roger was determined to destroy his boy. :devil:

Dirk
02-21-2005, 05:05 PM
Brad is a fool but I must admit I did enjoy some of his commentating during Oz. Saffy will regret saying such shit once Roger beats him the next time they play. I just love how that piece of shit has been iffy for about 4 years is now suddenly treated as this new great champion because he fucking beat Roger 9-7 in the 5th set at Oz.

Yoda
02-21-2005, 05:10 PM
I know Federer's weaknesses Safin

Respect for Federer was also not in short supply from the Australian Open champion.

"Many say that Sampras is the greatest player. But I say with all due respect to the rest, that he [Federer] is the most complete player in the world so far ," Safin stated.


Safin's not that bad.....he gives Rogi his due respect :yeah:

asotgod
02-21-2005, 05:30 PM
Marat does not have a secret to beating Roger. However, there seems to be a particular execution that troubled Roger in that match. I think this troubled Roger more due to the movement problems Roger said he had. Obviously, Safin has a better backhand than Roger. This is what I think Safin did better than most of Roger's opponent. Safin used the crosscourt backhand setup to get Roger out of position or put Roger in positions that were uncomfortable before taking the backhand up the line. Now, this seems a very easy thing to do but it isn't. Why? Because many players are afraid of Roger's forehand so much that they would not take that risk as much as Safin did. Even when others take the risk, because they do not have Safin's power, creativity and control, Roger still gets back in position to control the point. Against Safin, Roger was pushed back because of the former's power. So, when Safin took the ball up the line, even though Roger reached most of the balls, he was not perfectly balanced to hit his forehand right, and so he undid himself. Once Roger was not in position, he hit an unforced/forced error of his forehand, whichever we want to call it. That's all Safin did in the match.

Other than this, I think Roger did not cover up the t-serves as well as he normally would. I think he should cheat more to that side. As good as Safin's serves are, he cannot hit the outwide serves consistently and effectively to control points, especially when the pressure is on.


I am persuaded that Roger will make the right adjustments should they meet in Dubai this weekend. Roger has to take the initiative first and take that game plan away from Safin. This he can easily do by taking the backhand deep and up the line to eliminate the crosscourt strategy of Safin. I am not saying Roger did not do this during the match but his backhand up the line were most times short because Roger was trying to match Safin's power on the backhand. So, Safin pounced on the short balls and put himself at an advantage. It was Safin's power that made it difficult for Roger to take it up the line with enough depth. But what Roger can do in this case is to take away some power from his return of the crosscourt backhand and loop it slightly higher but deeper up the line to get in position in time to hit his forehand right. Lastly, Roger played too fast in that match. He seemed to be constantly rushing his shots. He does not have to do that. As good as Safin's backhand is, Roger is quick enough to get in position. So, just like I said in one of my previous posts, Roger can slow down the crosscourt backhand by putting more 'juice' on his sliced backhand. It doesn't necessarily have to be always deep. It can have enough action to make it difficult for Safin to use the same pace he uses in driving his backhand. Roger can also go up the line with his slice with some more action and depth. No matter how good the opponent is, he will either have to loop higher into Roger's forehand or of enough height to Roger's backhand without either of them being at an advantage at the worst. This is just my honest perspective.

NOTE: Statistics even at the moment show Roger to be playing the best tennis of anyone even this year. Roger has the best stats in the service department as far as I am concerned, even though many more guys have more aces. But, Roger leads the 2nd serves won, ties for most service games won, leads the no. of break point saved and has lost just 4 sets this year with 3 coming to Safin after messing up his own matchpoint. Safin had so much luck going for him in that match, and the luck was made useful because Safin kept the scores close with Roger. But looking at that match and the ATP statistics, Roger is playing better tennis than anyone even this year, although the AUSOPEN 2005 result does not show that. That just goes to show how one bad day at the office can mess one up no matter how good the statistics may be. So, we can just relax and watch Roger put Safin back to his place. Enjoy!

Other than the previous week, Roger also led in first points won for returning, and was among the best in returning games won. Roger had an off-week in Rotterdam where he had the difficulty breaking serves as many times as he normally does. This also had some things to do with the surface.Other than that, Roger's stats are exceptional at the moment.

Whistleway
02-21-2005, 05:41 PM
You know, Nick Bolleteri mentioned earlier too..

It is not the easiest thing in the world to play infront of your ex-coach. Even federer mentioned this on masters cup SF as well as the day before the AO SF. I think, part of federer wants to impress PL. And safin is no pushover either.

But, at AO SF, blisters on feet, SF pressure and Peter Lundgren and federer's recent obssession for coming to net every time made him closely very closely lose the match. If federer sticks to what he knows works, he would easily get over safin this weekend, if they both get there, (which i doubt).

my 2cents..

babsi
02-21-2005, 05:50 PM
Talk is cheap - I just wish Roger would make Marat, move in with Lleyton!




__________________________________________________ _____________________
Here comes the rain again,falling from the stars - drenched in my pain again,becoming who we are (Billie Joe Armstrong)

babsi
02-21-2005, 05:53 PM
Talk is cheap -was of course directed at Marat not my fellow posters, who worte in at the same time.
Susanne

lunahielo
02-21-2005, 06:34 PM
I sure like both your posts, Dirk and Babsi~~

Personally, I don't see what's so great about Safin. As far as I am concerned, nothing!!
So he won a *close* match from Rogi~~~ :(

asotgod, your post was excellent! Thanks.

RogiFan88
02-21-2005, 07:10 PM
Whistleway, add PRESSURE to your list.

Luna, Safin fans won't agree w you! I happen to think Marat IS very talented, like Rogi, in fact, he is a "tortured genius". Rogi is a genius also but not tortured at all.

Finally, who knows if either Rogi or Marat will make the Dubai final... so all this concern may be for naught!! ;)

I just hope that Rogi isn't too tired out fr his week in Rotterdam where Kolya, Mario and esp Ivan made him work for his wins!

MissMoJo
02-21-2005, 07:19 PM
I just love how that piece of shit has been iffy for about 4 years is now suddenly treated as this new great champion because he fucking beat Roger 9-7 in the 5th set at Oz.

I like Marat, but i couldn't agree more. Before the AO, the only thing anyone had to say about him was 'Poor Marat, the one slam wonder/GS final choker....oh well, what a waste'. After his win over Rogi, some idiots are ready to anoint him the new tennis savior (Wertheim going so far as to imply that Marat :rolleyes: could win the GS), check the at least four 'Will Safin be the new #1' threads that popped up in GM after the AO. We''ll see who deserts the bandwagon ,and tries to hitch a ride on the Express again when the faux hype runs out

Skyward
02-21-2005, 07:21 PM
Whistleway, add PRESSURE to your list.

Luna, Safin fans won't agree w you! I happen to think Marat IS very talented, like Rogi, in fact, he is a "tortured genius". Rogi is a genius also but not tortured at all.




IMO, Marat is not genius. Roger, Hingis, and Rios are in this category. Marat is very gifted physically and has a good foundation.

lunahielo
02-21-2005, 07:55 PM
Originally Posted by RogiFan88
Whistleway, add PRESSURE to your list.

Luna, Safin fans won't agree w you! I happen to think Marat IS very talented, like Rogi, in fact, he is a "tortured genius". Rogi is a genius also but not tortured at all.

I am sure Safin fans won't agree with me, Whistleway, and that's OK..I just felt like I needed to get that off my chest.

I am not trying to stir up trouble...just throwing in my 2¢... :)

RonE
02-21-2005, 07:59 PM
Asotgod, that was a really great post! :worship:

You articulated my thoughts to a T and the thoughts of many others I am sure.

You don't hold a 6-2 record against someone if you don't have a game plan and know what makes them "tick". It is not as if PL transformed Marat into something completely new- his game is basically the same as it has always been. Roger knows how to deal with Marat.

And I absolutely agree that Roger's mistake was to try to overpower Safin- that is not the way to go. Pure power won't cut it because Marat can absorb the blows with his huge wingspan good balance and footwork, put the ball back deep and then boom attack the opening. Roger has to play more of a "Santoro"-like game. Use more angles, different spins, vary the pace, and then when Marat is off balance going in the wrong direction or with enough court exposed go for the power shot and finish him off.

RogiFan88
02-21-2005, 08:10 PM
what Marat has now is CONFIDENCE and that's his new weapon this year

unfortunately more people than not are gleefully anticipating Rogi's "downfall" this year... I said somewhere that Rogi will have a "down" year -- that doesn't mean he will suddenly plummet to the depths of the rankings, just that he won't do as well as he did in his previous 2 years. A down year for Rogi could be a fantastic year for some players.

luna, that's OK! skyward, I agree w you re: Rios tho for sure! I didn't really watch Marti but my sis confirms that she played a "perfect" game and played a clean game w few mistakes. Pity it's her stature that forced her to retire so early... she was talented, no doubt about it.

I love Marat, Juanqui, Gaston, Alex and a few others but ROGI is my #1 boy!

lunahielo
02-21-2005, 08:22 PM
Originally posted by RogiFan~
I love Marat, Juanqui, Gaston, Alex and a few others but ROGI is my #1 boy!

:) My #1 and only, I guess you know this by now~~
That's just the way it is.

I realize there are many talented players~~I'm just monogamous.
RonE...your post was good.

asotgod
02-21-2005, 10:08 PM
Thanks RonE and lunahielo. I just hope Roger is not fatigued from the past week. If not, he is good to go for this week on outdoor hard. It's payback time and time to restore order everywhere,lol. Good luck to him.

deekaye
02-21-2005, 11:31 PM
Well I think its time to move, too. We suffered, we confort each other, we left messages to Rogi on his site. We blame Marat, Peter L, the blister, the injuries.. I think we had enought time to talk and let it go. To me ....its time to move to the Rotterdam thead.
AO is over, and we need to follow Roger, think on our new objetive. Rotterdam, Dubai, and care for injuries if they still are.

So guys, Lets meet at the Rotterdam thread, ok??

Silvy

You said it Silvy! Right now I have the perfect antidote to the AO semifinal,watching my recording of Roger's victory over 'potato-head' Ljubicic in yesterday's final in Rotterdam :)


Deekaye

RogiFan88
02-22-2005, 02:00 AM
Deekaye, is this the first time on MTF? Welcome, if it is! At least you have that F to watch! Enjoy!

lsy
02-22-2005, 02:24 AM
Thanks for the articles Moonlight :hug: How have you been? You haven't been around long time :hug:

I'm not surprised with what Marat said, tennis is a mental game. Yes maybe it was a very close match that he won in AO 2005, but it was a win and sure boost his confidence by a lot and like it to get into Rogi's head the next time they play. It's same as Rogi's win over Andre in TMC RR 2004. Was close but looked at what it did to Rogi's confidence (of course I'm in no way hoping it will turn out the same way for Rogi/Safin :tape: ). But I have faith in Rogi that he will respond well in their next match, especially we all know he always does with "verbal challenge" such as these ;)

My only worry for Rogi is that as much as he said he can block off what the media said, I think he still let them bother him a bit too much, else he won't be saying sth like "the win in Rotterdam was important coz otherwise people will say he lost his invincibilty etc" But at least he took them in and was determined in Rotterdam and did cross the first hurdle and won the tournament he hadn't managed to win so far :yeah:

I still hope he will loosen up, that's why my red envelope messages to him always ends with :

"Enjoy playing, enjoy your tennis as much as we all do " ;)

Dirk
02-22-2005, 02:52 AM
Marat is nothing compared to Roger in almost all areas. Marat is a fool if he thought that one victory over Roger was a turning point. I would almost hate to see what the score would have been had it not been for Roger's foot blisters. I hate making excuses and all but when Saffy's ego carries him to high, he needs to be put back down to earth in reality.

HERE IS A WASTE OF TALENTED WHO DID ALMOST JACK SHIT FOR YEARS AFTER 2000 AND NOW HE IS THE FUCKING GOSPEL ON TENNIS????????????? :fiery:

lsy
02-22-2005, 02:58 AM
Roger had an off-week in Rotterdam where he had the difficulty breaking serves as many times as he normally does. This also had some things to do with the surface.Other than that, Roger's stats are exceptional at the moment.

Exactly what I was wondering. But I'm not sure coz this is the first time I watched his indoor matches.

Also I might be the minority here but I really don't get all this big hoo haa about Rogi not looking good etc etc. Or he comes into the net too much and that's why his baseline game is suffering...from what I saw he matched up well vs Davydenko who was very strong player at the back and had troubled Rogi in the past. Then he played a good match vs Ancic, yes didn't get a rhythm on Ancic serves at the beginining, but it was in 2002 since they last played.

Ok maybe he didn't return as well vs Ivan, missing shots and was close enough to lose the match but he did play a shitty game to lose serve in the first set and had chances to break in every game at the 2nd set but what can you do when Ivan served bomb each time when he did? Besides maybe when one aspect of his game is not working, at least he served well. He was hardly troubled in most of his service game there. Let's not forget also Ivan beat Rogi in Basel 2003 (indoor) and not like he's a yoyo player (phase borrowed from Safin) who had never troubled Rogi in the past :shrug:

Maybe I'm a much less demanding fan, not till Rogi loses to some nobody easily in important tournaments, I'm just going to celebrate each of his win like it should be.

lsy
02-22-2005, 03:11 AM
Calm down Dirk...

Like I said tennis is very much a mental game, Safin would like that loss to get into Rogi's head and who can blame him really?

It's normal how the media/fans would react to that win. Rogi had been winning so much, unless you're his hard core fans, everybody else would be happy to just see him finally lost. It's normal. But with how much he had been winning and the comments he had been getting from his peers/medias (not just about his tennis, but also him as a person), I would say Rogi is doing pretty well. (of course I don't care a bit of what was said in MTF though ;) )


Marat is nothing compared to Roger in almost all areas

errr....I'm pretty sure Marat will win hands down in the ATP hottest/sexiest player though as much as I don't agree ;)

Dirk
02-22-2005, 03:32 AM
Yeah only in degenerate Hollywood could Marat surpass Federer. Hong Kong Ninja flicks Marat doesn't stand a chance. ;)

Shy
02-22-2005, 03:38 AM
Calm down Dirk...



errr....I'm pretty sure Marat will win hands down in the ATP hottest/sexiest player though as much as I don't agree ;)
I don't know why (must be tired), but at first, I read thong instead of though.So, I read the sexiest player in thong instead.:help:

lsy
02-22-2005, 03:42 AM
I don't know why (must be tired), but at first, I read thong instead of though.So, I read the sexiest player in thong instead.:help:

:haha: :haha:....

ok I think the same conclusion still applies, I don't see Rogi winning a poll of sexiest player in thong ever :o

lsy
02-22-2005, 04:10 AM
Yeah only in degenerate Hollywood could Marat surpass Federer. Hong Kong Ninja flicks Marat doesn't stand a chance. ;)

:haha: :haha: I'm thankful you're here to entertain Dirk...

Which Hong Kong martial arts masters is your favourite btw? Bruce Lee, Jet Lee, Jackie Chan???

Daniel
02-22-2005, 05:25 AM
Marat is nothing compared to Roger in almost all areas. Marat is a fool if he thought that one victory over Roger was a turning point. I would almost hate to see what the score would have been had it not been for Roger's foot blisters. I hate making excuses and all but when Saffy's ego carries him to high, he needs to be put back down to earth in reality.

HERE IS A WASTE OF TALENTED WHO DID ALMOST JACK SHIT FOR YEARS AFTER 2000 AND NOW HE IS THE FUCKING GOSPEL ON TENNIS????????????? :fiery:


Dirk, love your post ;)
Roger will put MArat in his place in Dubai.

Daniel
02-22-2005, 05:52 AM
TENNIS: Safin on quest to prise Dubai title from Federer

DUBAI: Marat Safin will try to prise away another of Roger Federer’s titles when the Australian Open champion and the defending champion line up at opposite ends of the draw in the Dubai Open which starts on Monday.

Safin, who saved six match points to beat Federer before taking away one of his three Grand Slam titles in Melbourne last month, is seeded for a rematch with the world number one in the final of the $1million Gulf tournament. If this happens, the Russian will hope to show the Swiss star that freshly-acquired mental strength is at least a semi-permanent addition to his volatile personality and should continue to bolster one of the most irresistible baseline attacks in the game.

Safin has often enjoyed the irony of attributing his improved stability to the help of Federer’s former coach, Peter Lundgren. More recently though he has suggested that personal development during a difficult spell in the wilderness helped him. Safin told Novosti, the Russian Information Agency, that the rough period during 2003 when he slipped to 86 in the world gave him time to understand “what regime and what schedule he should stick too.” The 25-year-old explained: “Each of us should find his/her own way despite its ups and downs. One needs to make mistakes and gain experience.” He added: “Media reports saying that I had health problems, and engaged in alcohol and even drug abuse, were of course unnerving, but they also made me stronger.”

The permanence of this strength could be tested by others besides Federer. The fourth seed in the Dubai Duty Free sponsored tournament - which is reputed to pay generous appearance money should be Andre Agassi, the charismatic former world number one, who is determined to prove that on given weeks he can still be a force. Another, less celebrated, but very special rival is Fabrice Santoro, a former Dubai Open champion, whose subtle, gentle magic and obdurate attitude has often driven Safin mad. These qualities have earned Santoro a remarkable 7-1 head-to-head record over Safin, four of these victories coming on hard courts similar to those next week. Santoro also feels inspired by his memories of Dubai.

It was here in 2002 that the Frenchman won one of the most astonishing finals seen anywhere, anytime. Flu-induced dehydration forced him to spend 24 hours on a hospital drip, and caused him to arrive in a wheelchair planning to say that he was too ill. He only played to prevent disappointment and could hardly run. Federer has had none of Safin’s problems with Santoro, but he too has special attachment to Dubai. It was here that he gained a unique reconciliation and two years of prize money after having it withheld for insufficient effort in 2002. It was here that he took a holiday to recover from last year’s post-Wimbledon exhaustion, and it was from here that he made the call to Tony Roche which led to the Australian becoming his coach. afp

Puschkin
02-22-2005, 05:53 AM
Marat is nothing compared to Roger in almost all areas.

HERE IS A WASTE OF TALENTED WHO DID ALMOST JACK SHIT FOR YEARS AFTER 2000 AND NOW HE IS THE FUCKING GOSPEL ON TENNIS????????????? :fiery:


Dirk, your enthusiasm carried you too far ;) and I have to disagree. Marat is talented, capable, powerful and his strokes can be of great precision. I admire the precision more than the power, in fact. He can volley, has even touch and he moves extremely well given his size.

In addition, I never read in Marat's own words that he considers himself the new "king", the media yes, but not the man himself.

Daniel
02-22-2005, 05:55 AM
but dont tell me you believe Marat doesnt think he is the new "king" after beating Roger and winning the AO?

Puschkin
02-22-2005, 06:01 AM
but dont tell me you believe Marat doesnt think he is the new "king" after beating Roger and winning the AO?


We'll never have an answer to that ;) . But I really think he doesn't think so. He has had too many downs in his career not to know about the thin red line between success and failure.

Funny, BTW, that the discussion on one of his boards goes exactly the opposite way and there, I intervened and warned people not to get carried away by one close victory.

But we should have this debate elsewhere. The thread is called "Roger news and articles" ;)

Daniel
02-22-2005, 06:08 AM
ok Puschkin ;)

Dirk
02-22-2005, 06:38 AM
Marat doesn't do anything better than Roger because drive the backhand and produce power. I like Bruce Lee and Jet Lee. Chan is too dopey in his films but the guy is super gutsy for doing his own stunts.

rogertooogood
02-22-2005, 06:50 AM
Yeah only in degenerate Hollywood could Marat surpass Federer. Hong Kong Ninja flicks Marat doesn't stand a chance. ;)

Right ON!!!!!!!!! ;)

Puschkin
02-22-2005, 07:45 AM
from Wertheim's tennis Mailbag

Source: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/02/21/werheim.mailbag3/index.html

Could you specifically define "questionable taste for combat" and "questionable ballast when under attack" you say about Federer? With "questionable" play, the man has won four out of the last seven majors for Pete's sake.
-- Bo Peng, Palo Alto, Calif.

Let's put it this way: If my life were riding on the outcome of a match and I could pick one player to back, it would be Federer. If my life were riding on the outcome of a match that was tied at 4-4 in the third set, I'd be inclined to pick someone else. Federer's native talent is unimpeachable. And even as he has won Slams in bulk, he has never been less than a gentleman. But I don't get the sense he relishes the fight and is happy to grind and scratch and claw his way to victory. Fortunately for him, he seldom has to.


Go and watch the Rotterdam final, Mr. Wertheim!

Rommella
02-22-2005, 09:40 AM
Well, CNN's Candy Reid has this in her Tennis Mailbag today:

Q. Hi Candy -- now that Roger Federer's amazing winning streak is over -- do you'll think he be as invincible this year as he was in 2004? Jack Kevit. Durban, South Africa

A. Thanks for the question Jack. Well Marat Safin had to play at the top of his game to beat Federer at the Aussie Open -- and even then it took him five sets. So I think it's safe to say that, barring injury, Federer will top the rankings again and capture at least one Grand Slam, but I don't think he'll win three again this year. The French Open is going to be the toughest for the Swiss, since there are so many really good clay-courters. But Federer is without doubt the best player on tour -- and if he's on song, no one is going to be able to stop him. Its early days, but I do believe that Federer can surpass Pete Sampras's record of 14 Grand Slam titles!

avocadoe
02-22-2005, 12:21 PM
Asotgod-Good points about adjustments Roger can and most likely will make next time he and Safin meet. Also it is 2 out of 3 sets this time? And Marat has not won a shorter match. I believe Roger's movement was hampered by the blisters, and without them he would have reached many more balls. Marat will be confidant though until proven, again, that Roger can beat him. I see that Santoro, Safin's nemeisi lost quickly this morning to Davydenko.

WyveN
02-22-2005, 12:24 PM
Go and watch the Rotterdam final, Mr. Wertheim!
or AO SF, even though the result didnt quite work out.

SUKTUEN
02-22-2005, 12:37 PM
Roger will play better and better!!!! :bigclap: :bigclap:

I trust Him!!!!!!! :hug: :hug:

*M*
02-22-2005, 02:34 PM
from Wertheim's tennis Mailbag

Source: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/02/21/werheim.mailbag3/index.html

Could you specifically define "questionable taste for combat" and "questionable ballast when under attack" you say about Federer? With "questionable" play, the man has won four out of the last seven majors for Pete's sake.
-- Bo Peng, Palo Alto, Calif.

Let's put it this way: If my life were riding on the outcome of a match and I could pick one player to back, it would be Federer. If my life were riding on the outcome of a match that was tied at 4-4 in the third set, I'd be inclined to pick someone else. Federer's native talent is unimpeachable. And even as he has won Slams in bulk, he has never been less than a gentleman. But I don't get the sense he relishes the fight and is happy to grind and scratch and claw his way to victory. Fortunately for him, he seldom has to.


Go and watch the Rotterdam final, Mr. Wertheim!That's exactly what I thought too, when I read his reply!

TheMightyFed
02-22-2005, 02:42 PM
Go and watch the Rotterdam final, Mr. Wertheim!
Even after the SF against Safin he demonstrated he was a fighter despite the loss...

RogiFan88
02-22-2005, 04:31 PM
We'll never have an answer to that ;) . But I really think he doesn't think so. He has had too many downs in his career not to know about the thin red line between success and failure.

Funny, BTW, that the discussion on one of his boards goes exactly the opposite way and there, I intervened and warned people not to get carried away by one close victory.

But we should have this debate elsewhere. The thread is called "Roger news and articles" ;)

Perhaps we s start a STICKY RogiChat thread for all and sundry convos?

ACTUALLY, we already have a couple of "chat" threads here, so don't start a new one... just go to Rogi chat and chocolate thread instead! Can someone make it a sticky?? ;)

Doris Loeffel
02-22-2005, 04:59 PM
Just to add to the off topic convo - Marat may have worked out how he can beat Roger - but he hasn't worked out how to get past the first round in Dubai ;)

Well keep the fingers crossed for Roger!! Good luck!!

back to news and articles ;)

RogiNie
02-22-2005, 07:10 PM
Just to add to the off topic convo - Marat may have worked out how he can beat Roger - but he hasn't worked out how to get past the first round in Dubai ;)

Well keep the fingers crossed for Roger!! Good luck!!

back to news and articles ;)

:lol: this really is gloating :)

asotgod
02-22-2005, 07:57 PM
I believe Roger's movement was hampered by the blisters, and without them he would have reached many more balls. Marat will be confident though until proven, again, that Roger can beat him. I see that Santoro, Safin's nemesis lost quickly this morning to Davydenko.


Avocadoe,

Obviously Roger seemed hindered in his movement. Look, it does not matter whether the match is a best of 3 or best of 5. Safin finally won one which Roger should clearly have put paid to in the 4th set. The length of the match did not really affect the outcome, I think. One understated thing is that Safin is actually one of the best rebound ace players in the world, if not the best (some may say Agassi is). The surface allows the ball to bounce high and with enough spin to affect his opponents but just fall into Safin's striking zone. The bounce is even harder for a one-hander and that just goes to show you how great Roger is. He clearly should have finished Safin in the 4th. Well, life is not about 'should have's but getting it done. However, on any other court (except maybe Indoor Carpet), Roger wins hands down, even if it's raining, snowing, sunny, whatever, lol.

Anyways, Safin is not giving me the opportunity to witness Roger beating him down. Tennis, just like many other things in life, always has an element of luck, and things just falling right for you. Safin had that, and a deserved one after messing up for over 4 years. Hopefully, they play well enough to meet in Indian Wells. Till then, we'll have to wait.

One other thing: People have been saying Roger is having difficulty with Ljubicic, Davydenko. These same people however forget that these two guys are really very good but lacking mentally. Like I have said before, Davydenko can hold his own with anyone on the baseline, and I mean anyone. He is that good. He just does not have a very good serve and enough consistency especially on pressure points against players seeded higher than he is. Ljubicic, on the other hand, has a great serve, a somewhat good backhand and an ok forehand, but is also many times his own enemy. This year, however, he has been more consistent and constructive at the baseline making his results improve. These, two guys just give one some idea as to how consistent Roger has been even when playing patchy. Like I said in some post earlier, the ATP race does not show Roger as playing the best, but everything (the ATP 52 week ranking, the stats for this year, the stats for the past 52 weeks, the W-L ratio, the no. of sets won, even the AUSOPEN SF against Safin, lol) show Roger as playing the best. Just some luck going against Roger in the match, even when stats clearly show he was better. Roger just has to play well enough to win in Dubai and give himself enough time to rest up for the two master series. They are more important than all these small tournaments. So, good luck to him!

rogertooogood
02-22-2005, 08:10 PM
from Wertheim's tennis Mailbag

Source: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/02/21/werheim.mailbag3/index.html

Could you specifically define "questionable taste for combat" and "questionable ballast when under attack" you say about Federer? With "questionable" play, the man has won four out of the last seven majors for Pete's sake.
-- Bo Peng, Palo Alto, Calif.

Let's put it this way: If my life were riding on the outcome of a match and I could pick one player to back, it would be Federer. If my life were riding on the outcome of a match that was tied at 4-4 in the third set, I'd be inclined to pick someone else. Federer's native talent is unimpeachable. And even as he has won Slams in bulk, he has never been less than a gentleman. But I don't get the sense he relishes the fight and is happy to grind and scratch and claw his way to victory. Fortunately for him, he seldom has to.


Go and watch the Rotterdam final, Mr. Wertheim!

:mad: What does Roger half to do to prove that he is mentally tough- win Roland Garros with all 5 setters coming from 2 sets down against the "best" claycourts in the world? Seriously, what does he half to do to get some f****ing respect for his ability to fight with the best of them???? Every time he has won against Agassi in tightly contested matches, his serve has been the defineing factor with the exception of his first win over AA. Although I respect and always look forward to reading Mr. Wertheim's Mailbag, this reporter has seen the proverbial light by his statment:

While he's not playing his best, No. 1 Roger Federer is fighting like a demon, a terrific sign for the rest of his year and his much-desired goal of winning Roland Garros for the first time. He had to go to the wall to take down Ivan Ljubicic 5-7, 7-5,7-6(5) in the Rotterdam final. (tennisreporters.net)

Daniel
02-23-2005, 07:29 AM
Mr Wertheims is full of crap. i dont tihnk he likes Roger at all :fiery:

WyveN
02-23-2005, 10:56 AM
One understated thing is that Safin is actually one of the best rebound ace players in the world, if not the best (some may say Agassi is). The surface allows the ball to bounce high and with enough spin to affect his opponents but just fall into Safin's striking zone. The bounce is even harder for a one-hander and that just goes to show you how great Roger is. He clearly should have finished Safin in the 4th. Well, life is not about 'should have's but getting it done. However, on any other court (except maybe Indoor Carpet), Roger wins hands down, even if it's raining, snowing, sunny, whatever, lol.


I hope so but Roger didnt exactly have it easy against Safin in Houston. Marat could have easily won the 2nd set and then who knows what happens. Think Roger needs to go back to the way he played Safin early on in their careers, sort of like Santoro does, hopefully him and Roach work something out.

SUKTUEN
02-23-2005, 11:00 AM
When will Roger play today?

fightclubber
02-23-2005, 11:10 PM
from atp site
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/dubai_wednesday.asp

Federer: “It was close and I think he played well keeping me under pressure, but I definitely didn’t have my best day. This have something to do with me not being able to make the adjustments as quick as I would have liked to and him playing well.
It’s tough to break here, it seems quite fast. I was also holding quite comfortably all the time but I didn’t play a great first tie-breaker, I didn’t feel great form the baseline and that cost me the breaker.”

“I’m happy that I fought through. It’s similar to last week’s final, being down a set coming back. This time even being down a break in the third, so this is a good victory and a good start. It does me good to win matches like this.”

“I’m now looking forward to another tough one. It’s good to see Ferrero again, I haven’t seen him for a long time. We’ll see how he plays and I’m looking forward to it.”