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Roger news and articles

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Whistleway
01-07-2005, 03:04 PM
A nice article on yesterday's match.
Awesome Federer eases into top gear

Richard Jago in Doha
Friday January 7, 2005
The Guardian

Roger Federer's 44th win in 46 matches, a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Feliciano López yesterday, carried him to the Qatar Open semi-finals in less time than it takes for a dhow to sail across Doha's cosy bay.

It became difficult to remember that López is currently billed as the best left-hander on the tour. On the evidence of Federer's results over the last two days, Greg Rusedski might feel he can challenge for that status again.

But Federer played far better against the seventh-seeded Spaniard than he had against the Briton on Wednesday. Indeed he was overwhelmingly brilliant.

"It's fantastic when you come up with one of the backhands that I hit in the last game," said one the most modest men on the tour, and nobody batted an eyelid.

Spectacular Arabian architecture is soaring up around here as if in a gigantic open-air art gallery, and Federer too is busy building an eye-catching edifice which should stand the test of time. He is now hitting his backhand no less well than his famous forehand; he is also intent on developing his net game and constructing rallies with more options than ever.

His movement is even more languorously deceptive than usual. That is partly because his sky-high confidence makes for relaxation, but also because we are seeing a fresher Federer. For much of last year he was tired.

"My performances have been good, but the off-season was very short and so I hope to have time off to work on my fitness. I don't want to say I have improved right now," he said. There is no doubt he thinks he will in future.

Next up for the Swiss is Russia's Nikolay Davydenko, who has grown in belief since October when he won the Kremlin Cup by saving three match points against Rusedski. Yesterday he upset the seedings by beating the Wimbledon semi-finalist Sébastien Grosjean 2-6, 6-3, 6-2, having been within a point of a set and 4-0 down. The other semi-final is between Spain's Albert Costa, the former French Open champion, and Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia, last year's runner-up here.

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1384998,00.html

avocadoe
01-07-2005, 09:05 PM
thanks for the infro on Roger's schedule next week. That's perfect. To play matches against top tenners there completes the prep...GO ROGER!!!!

RonE
01-07-2005, 10:24 PM
"... I didn't really have time for that in the off season."


:eek: I thought this would have been the first thing to work on during the off-season. If he gets into a five-setter against someone like Agassi in the Australian Open in 40 degree heat :unsure:

Dirk
01-07-2005, 10:25 PM
Ron he is very fit. His fitness level just remains the same that is all. It's high as it is. i'm sure he will do this for clay season training. If his body needed rest then so be it.

RonE
01-07-2005, 10:28 PM
Yeah good point. But sometimes you need that little bit extra in a really long match.

I would assume that by working on his fitness he would do that in preparation for the clay season like you said- that's why he missed Monte Carlo last year so he could get into better shape. I wonder if he is going to do the same thing again.

RonE
01-07-2005, 10:30 PM
I have to say Dirk, you came back to MTF just in time to reassure us heathen worriers.

Dirk
01-07-2005, 10:36 PM
I hope he plays Carlo and I think he will. He will have enough time to train and get ready for it . Ron I've been going over this possible Andre Roger match in Oz. I really believe that on that slower surface it will be very tough for Andre to beat Roger. At the Open where it was faster Andre was able to play his old style and push Roger to the brink because he takes the ball early on both sides and is powerful and a great shotmaker but here at the Aussie it will be tougher to put Roger on the defense thanks to the slower surface therefore Andre will likely be on the defense from Ninja. They both have great returns but I think Roger's kick serve will help him here and he will have even more chances to break Andre.

RonE
01-07-2005, 10:46 PM
I hope he plays Carlo and I think he will. He will have enough time to train and get ready for it . Ron I've been going over this possible Andre Roger match in Oz. I really believe that on that slower surface it will be very tough for Andre to beat Roger. At the Open where it was faster Andre was able to play his old style and push Roger to the brink because he takes the ball early on both sides and is powerful and a great shotmaker but here at the Aussie it will be tougher to put Roger on the defense thanks to the slower surface therefore Andre will likely be on the defense from Ninja. They both have great returns but I think Roger's kick serve will help him here and he will have even more chances to break Andre.

Rebound ace is Andre's best surface- it really fits him like a glove. And the tournament director did say the surface would play a little faster than last year. But I agree Roger's kick serve would have more effect- I remember Safin used the kick last year to great advantage against Andre's backhand. But remember Andre has a pretty useful kick serve himself so I think it will be a pretty even contest like it was at the Open. It will basically be the same question as in all of their previous matches- who will be able to stay as close to the baseline as possible and not lose ground. This made for some quite exquisite shot making especially half-volleys in their last encounter.

But I truly believe that victory Roger had over him in the US Open has given him the belief that he can beat the toughest opponents in the most difficult conditions so I expect it to be a great match if they do end up meeting down under.

Dirk
01-07-2005, 10:49 PM
Yes it is faster but not as fast the USO. Roger will not be on the defense as often. "I can't out winner Roger, I need to force errors from him" Miami 02 press conference. Very true words spoken from Andre. I've yet to see anyone out winner Roger.

RonE
01-07-2005, 10:55 PM
Same can be said of Andre- I've watched that USO match again recently and noticed that comparatively few clean winners were hit by either player, at least not the amount you would expect from them normally. Most of the points ended up by one of them being forced into error by the other. And what was so incredible was like I said earlier no one was willing to give up any ground and were blasting shots at each other that were virtually half-volleys. It is extremely rare that you have two players standing on the baseline and trade such vicious blows. But then again they are both very special specimens.

Dirk
01-08-2005, 12:17 AM
Yes they are almost equal in terms of talent. I think the wind really destroyed the quality of that match. I just hope Roger keeps it up. I don't think anyone can touch him.

WyveN
01-08-2005, 01:01 AM
I think that US Open match will give a lot of confidence to Roger for future matches against Andre.
Andre is one of the best wind players around yet Roger beat him at the US Open in front of his home crowd. That win gave Federer a big psychological edge and in my opinion Agassi will have to play one amazing match to beat him at the AO.

Dirk
01-08-2005, 01:02 AM
Maybe Andre thinks too much of the Pete and Rogi comparison?

WyveN
01-08-2005, 02:05 AM
Maybe Andre thinks too much of the Pete and Rogi comparison?

I think he will from now on. At US Open Agassi was pretty much beaten before he walked out on court against Sampras.

SUKTUEN
01-08-2005, 05:41 AM
I think Roger is a part like Pete~~

Fedex
01-08-2005, 07:35 AM
Yes it is faster but not as fast the USO. Roger will not be on the defense as often. "I can't out winner Roger, I need to force errors from him" Miami 02 press conference. Very true words spoken from Andre. I've yet to see anyone out winner Roger.
I think Berdych 'out winnered' Federer at Athens last year, but that was mainly due to the fact that Federer was busy hitting unforced errors or double faults.

Daniel
01-08-2005, 08:05 AM
Rone as always i enjoy reaidn your posts ;)

^Sue^
01-08-2005, 11:09 AM
Roger Federer will surpasses Pete Sampras one day and becomes the most rememberance tennis player in the world and in history book forever and ever....

Daniel
01-08-2005, 12:01 PM
I wish the same Sue ;)

RonE
01-08-2005, 01:34 PM
Rone as always i enjoy reaidn your posts ;)

Thanks Daniel, glad you did :hug:

Pete and Rogi are like chalk and cheese in terms of their styles but where Roger is really becoming Sampras-like is in the mental strength department and the ability to raise his game to dizzying heights when he has his back to the wall. Particularly on break points against him he has found the ability to hit big serves (I'll never forget the 0-40 he saved against Roddick in Toronto :yeah: ) and become more focused and alert.

Dirk
01-08-2005, 01:38 PM
I think Thomas hit 12 winners. Roger gave him a gift really although unwillingly. Ron I wish he could make it so that he doesn't get into a hole before raising his game. I do like how he plays really well when returning. He goes after every point now something Pete never did. Wyven I do believe that Andre now does get too awed by Roger just like he did with Pete. Every time the press asks Andre about Roger, Andre always brings up Pete. Andre is doing himself no favors but doing it so..........DIRKY SAYS KEEP IT UP AA!! :yeah:

RonE
01-08-2005, 01:47 PM
Dirk I wish that too, but then he wouldn't be human if he didn't dip in form every now and then ;)

And yes, Roger always fights in every game be it on serve or returning and that's what makes him so tough. I think in this sense Roddick summed it up perfectly when comparing Pete and Roger in the return department- he said sth like "playing against Pete his main weapon was the serve and he would just wait for an opportunity to pounce on the return game and hopefully get lucky. With Roger it is constantly 'drip, drip, drip' he pushes you all the time when you are serving and eventually wears you down".

Dirk
01-08-2005, 01:49 PM
Andy said that?????? Well he is right. Andy's serve motion doesn't do him any favors since it generates pace from the legs. :o

SUKTUEN
01-08-2005, 02:57 PM
Roger will be Great as Sampras, I turst myself, I also turst Agaiss and Pete said~~

Roger will be classical and remember by people Forever~

lsy
01-08-2005, 03:22 PM
he said sth like "playing against Pete his main weapon was the serve and he would just wait for an opportunity to pounce on the return game and hopefully get lucky. With Roger it is constantly 'drip, drip, drip' he pushes you all the time when you are serving and eventually wears you down".

It does seems that way in many of Andy/Rogi matches, he always started off rather strong but almost got deflated easily after losing the opening set.

They talked about Andy's arms in Bkk, but I thought it's also his mind that caused him that bagel.

RogiFan88
01-08-2005, 04:13 PM
Sounds like the Chinese Water Torture... Pandy's funny and honest!

federer_roar
01-08-2005, 04:20 PM
Not sure whether this one's posted. Rafter, Laver, and Agassi talk about Roger's game.
http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,11886384%255E3162,00.html
Rafter tips Roger
By PAUL MALONE
09jan05

PAT Rafter believes Roger Federer can become the greatest tennis player of all time.

"I never played Roger at his best, thank God," Rafter said.
"Federer has the opportunity now to go down as the greatest player of all time. To me, he's the smoothest player.

"Tony Roche will make Roger an even better player. But he already has the most complete game I've ever seen."

Federer's three grand slam titles in his $7.9 million 2004 took his total to four by the age of 23 -- 10 short of Pete Sampras's men's record of 14.









Rafter, 32, won all three matches he played against Federer in 1999 and 2001.

By that stage, Federer had played three full years on the tour and entered the top 20, but was yet to reach a grand slam semi-final.

Most of Rafter's career-defining battles were against Sampras and Andre Agassi, winner of eight major titles.

Yet even they did not make Australia's former world No. 1 marvel in the same the way Federer has in performances such as his two "love" sets against Lleyton Hewitt in last year's US Open final.

"There's a lot that makes up a winning formula in players," the dual US Open winner said.

"In terms of Pete and Andre, they all have different attributes that makes them champions in their own right.

"Confidence was the difference with Roger as a player, then and now. He's different to Lleyton. Lleyton believed in himself from the start and would rip your head off to win a match.

"Federer wasn't like that. He had to get the belief and his game has fallen into place, too."

Federer's winning streak against opponents ranked in the top 10 has risen to 23 matches.

The only man to win the Grand Slam twice, Rod Laver, said Federer was equipped to become the third man to achieve it, although the French Open, the one major title he was yet to claim, would be difficult.

Laver said Federer was "head and shoulders" above his rivals last year, but was at his most vulnerable in the first week of a grand slam event.

"He's got great talent and desire -- he's such an instinctive player," said Laver, who will come to the Australian Open for the event's centenary year celebrations.

"If he really gets into a tournament, he's so hard to beat these days. But there are a lot of good players and he might need to be playing well in the second or third round."

Laver declined to say how his game from the 1960s would have gone in a time-tunnel match against a 2005 model Federer.

"I'd say give Roger an old racquet, then we're looking at equal things," he said.

"You shouldn't compare players from different eras in my book. The amount of spin and power they get with the composite racquets now makes it even harder to compare people from this era with Don Budge (1938 Grand Slam winner)."

Rafter said there was good reason to believe world No. 3 Hewitt would go further into this month's Australian Open than he had done previously in a tournament in which his best result so far has been the fourth round.

"He's prepared better than any other year and I think he's really excited about the Australian Open," he said.

"Lleyton's really given himself a good chance. We'll wait and see how the (speed of the) courts pan out."

Laver said Australian Open officials were right to no longer tinker with the speed of courts to maximise Hewitt's winning chances, as European players criticised them of doing when Rafter and Mark Philippoussis were given faster conditions to win at Melbourne Park.

"You shouldn't do it to prove a point and get your player a win, which some tournaments have done in the past," he said.

"It has to be level for everyone, and I thought Rebound Ace was a fairly good court anyway."

Agassi, 34, a four-time Australian Open winner with a determination for off-season training some of his contemporaries have lacked, has accepted he needs to lift his performance level to challenge Federer.

Agassi lost both his clashes with Federer in last year and has an unusual complaint about the Swiss star's effect on men's tennis.

"Most of the time he's making it look too easy to enjoy," said Agassi with a smile.

"His biggest weapon is his forehand and his movement. He's a really explosive mover and his forehand's just a nasty shot.

"He does a lot of things really well and he does a few things really great."

RogiFan88
01-08-2005, 04:38 PM
Thanks for the article -- anything that Pat says I'm interested in, esp about Rogi!

Dana
01-08-2005, 05:05 PM
http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,11888057%255E3162,00.html
McNamee chases Swiss miss

09jan05

HOPMAN Cup director Paul McNamee wants to re-unite Swiss champions Roger Federer and Martina Hingis in next year's tournament.

McNamee definitely will target Federer, the biggest name in world tennis, when he arrives in Australia this week for the Kooyong Classic and Australian Open.

Federer and Hingis combined to win the Hopman Cup in 2001.

"Obviously Roger is the No.1 player in the world and he won his first tournament here, so he's got fond memories of Hopman," McNamee said.

Hingis, a world No.1 at 16 but forced into retirement at 22 because of on-going foot problems, is playing the Volvo Women's Open in the Thai town of Pattaya, starting on January 29.

A five-time grand slam singles champion and boasting 76 WTA Tour titles, Hingis has admitted a pain-free tournament could prompt a comeback.

"I think the other curve ball is Martina Hingis is back playing a tournament soon," McNamee said.

"Wouldn't it be amazing if she does come back into the competitive side of the sport? We can put a watch on that."

Dirk
01-08-2005, 06:45 PM
Rogi and Patty could do very well there. I wish he would have taken her in 02.

RogiFan88
01-09-2005, 03:02 AM
Dana, you beat me to it!

Did I post this one already? If so, forgive me, but I love the title!

Imperial Federer dominates in Qatar
January 9, 2005 - 12:03PM

Roger Federer of Switzerland holds the winner's trophy after beating Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia in the Qatar Open.
Photo: Reuters
Roger Federer added to his long list of remarkable statistics today by winning the 23rd title of his career with a 6-3 6-1 win over Croatian Ivan Ljubicic in the final of Qatar Open.

It was both the 14th final in a row and the 20th match in a row that Federer had won, and his 44th victory in 46 matches.

All these are comparable to some of the better achievements of greats like Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl and Stefan Edberg, and given how much more physical the modern game is becoming, Federer's efforts appear all the more remarkable.

But the triple Grand Slam titleholder was not especially interested in such things.

For him it was more important to have gone through the tournament without having dropped his serve and to know that, with the defence of his Australian Open title only a week away, much of his game is already where he wants it to be

"It's always special to win somewhere for the first time, but I just hope I can keep it up," he said. "Because I have a very important title to defend in Melbourne."

Curiously, despite the one-sided score-line, Ljubicic came closer than anyone to achieving the break of serve which nobody had managed throughout ten sets.

He had a heavier game than Federer and appeared to try to play big on the important points to embarrass him.

It made sense but it also betrayed Ljubicic a little.

He had Federer at love-40 in the sixth game and was unable to take advantage of two Federer second serves on two of them; then he had a great chance to put Federer at love-40 again when he was serving for the first set, but from love-30 missed a volley and then overhit with an ambitious backhand return.

Federer was sometimes forced to scuttle quickly to contain the bombshells from Ljubicic, who had won three of the previous six encounters including the last one 15 months ago in the Wimbledon champion's home city of Basle.

But Federer was also constructing points, as usual, in a wide variety of ways.

After Ljubicic served a double fault disastrously to concede a break at the start of the second set, the world No.1 increased the frequency of his net attacks.

He concluded the next game with a fierce volley and finished the match with a deft approach facilitating an exquisitely angled forehand volley winner - moments which would have pleased his new coach Tony Roche, who apparently will be trying to develop this aspect of Federer's game further.

"At the moment I think Federer is playing better than Sampras did," said Ljubicic. "It's just that Pete went on for seven years. We will have to see through the years how Roger copes."
- AFP
http://www.theage.com.au/

LCeh
01-09-2005, 05:30 AM
It was both the 14th final in a row and the 20th match in a row that Federer had won, and his 44th victory in 46 matches.

Now I am confused... I thought it's 22?

7 from USO
5 from Bangkok
5 from TMC
5 from Doha?

Daniel
01-09-2005, 07:51 AM
it is wong he only won 6 in USO cos PAvel pulled pout so he got 6 + 5 + 5 +5 = 21 victories ;)

RexEverything
01-10-2005, 07:47 AM
Nice story about Roger. But these journos need to calm down a bit, they tend to exaggerate when it comes to Roger. Just my two cents.

Can Federer go a year unbeaten?

Sublime Swiss has the world in his thrall as he makes daunting grand-slam sweep look distinctly possible

John Rawling
Monday January 10, 2005
The Guardian

Rod Laver, the best tennis player of his generation and perhaps the greatest ever, was once asked how he had managed to stay at the top of the game for so long. How did he dominate his rivals so completely through the 60s both as an amateur and then a professional? He replied: "The time your game is most vulnerable is when you are ahead. You must never let up."

Fast forward more than 30 years and it is more than apparent that the current world No1 Roger Federer is learning from the old master's philosophy. Not content with a phenomenal year of success in 2004 that brought him 11 tournament titles, including three of the four grand slam championships, Federer has set his stall out to get even better. It is a frightening prospect for the rest of the world because, alongside the sublimely talented Swiss, the best of them are being consistently outclassed. He is making outstanding players look like hod carriers in hob-nailed boots at a ballroom dancing convention and many of his matches are simply ceasing even to be competitive.

As he makes final preparations for the first grand slam event of 2005, the Australian Open which begins next Monday in Melbourne, Federer's mantle of invincibility is such that there is a real possibility of him becoming the first man since Laver to win all four grand slams in the same calendar year. Certainly, if his form in the Qatar Open is anything to go by, where he swept the opposition aside while hardly breaking sweat to take the title on Saturday, there even seems a chance, albeit remote, that Federer might go through 2005 undefeated.

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Quirks of form and fitness can ambush any player, of course, and Federer can seem more fallible on the slower clay courts, where back-court sluggers have more chance of negating the speed, touch and power that make him such a breathtaking performer on faster surfaces. He is the first to acknowledge that his greatest challenge this year might come on the clay of Roland Garros, where the French Open was the one major championship to elude him last year. And who knows if he will be able to go through the year without injury? But Federer's run of success over the last six months or so makes it seem that just about anything is possible for him on a tennis court.

Statistics can be misleading but Federer's current record provides compelling evidence that we are talking about a truly exceptional player. He has now won 44 of his last 46 matches and has triumphed in all 14 of the most recent finals in which he has played. In the words of Laver himself, Federer is "an unbelievable talent". The Australian left-hander added: "I would be honoured to be even compared to Roger. He is such an unbelievable talent and is capable of anything. Roger could be the greatest tennis player of all time."

Perhaps it is only a matter of time before experts begin to say Federer's brilliance is killing the sport as a spectacle, just as the critics once wrote about Laver as he won the full set of grand slam titles in both 1962 and 1969 to become, with the American Don Budge who did it in 1938, the second of only two men to have achieved the feat. If it were not that he was excluded from the grand slam tournaments for five years because of his professional status, before tennis went open in 1968, Laver would unquestionably have won many more than the 11 grand slam titles he collected through his career. But was his brilliance boring? Not for me.

Federer's precocious ability was obvious before he made his breakthrough. The man himself ranks his two Wimbledon titles as his supreme achievement but it was at last year's US Open that Federer showed he was playing tennis of a standard that put him on to a different plane from the rest. In the final, facing the then world No4 Lleyton Hewitt, Federer touched heights that can rarely have been seen. It was not just that he trounced Hewitt 6-0, 7-6, 6-0 but also the manner in which he did it, drilling and dinking all manner of shots past his hapless opponent. Professional sportsmen call it "being in the zone". Federer looked like a man from another planet.

Now, Australian fans will be clamouring to catch a glimpse, especially since Federer announced last week his quest for perfection had drawn him to a part-time coaching agreement with one of Laver's old contemporaries, Tony Roche. The Australian Open has not produced a home winner since 1976, when Mark Edmondson was the champion, but Federer's link with Roche, one of the best loved of all tennis-playing Australians and one of the game's most respected coaches, should ensure he has no shortage of home support.

Roche guided both Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter to world No1 status and is suffering with a dodgy hip. Initially he effectively told Federer he was too old and knackered to begin touring the world once again as a coach. But Federer, who went through 2004 without a permanent adviser, seemingly would not take no for an answer.

"I needed somebody to analyse and improve my game," Federer said, after happily revealing he had persuaded the old guru to help hone his tennis in the weeks before this year's biggest tests. Awesome already seems an inadequate word to describe Roger Federer, so God only knows how good he will be when he finally cracks this tennis thing.

Daniel
01-10-2005, 10:14 AM
nice article :)

lsy
01-10-2005, 10:25 AM
it is wong he only won 6 in USO cos PAvel pulled pout so he got 6 + 5 + 5 +5 = 21 victories ;)

:lol: You're right Daniel!

I agree Rexeverything, the media tends to go overboard, raise high expectations from everybody on Rogi but they very often are also the first to exaggerate when things weren't going as well, r'ber last year when Rogi lost in Olympic and Miami? :rolleyes:
=========================================

Roger Rules Doha


Photo By Tonelli/Zimmer By Brad Falkner
01/09/2005

He's known in some circles as the "Artful Roger" and he lived up to the label in creating another championship today. Roger Federer made an art form of high-percentage tennis, playing with a perfect blend of precision, touch, and guile en route to capturing his 21st straight victory with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over Ivan Ljubicic to capture the ExxonMobil Open title in Doha today. It was Federer’s 14th consecutive final victory.



The top-ranked Swiss, who has won 44 of his last 46 matches, will enter the Australian Open on January 17th as a strong favorite to capture his second consecutive Australian Open crown.

"I am extremely happy to start the new year in such fine fashion," Federer said. "I am sure this win will give me great confidence going into the Australian Open."

In the first set, Federer broke in the sixth game to take a 4-2 advantage. In the following game Ljubicic was on the verge of becoming the first man to break Federer's serve this year when he forged a 0-40 lead. It was not to be as the strapping Croatian seemed incapable of keeping the ball in play during the decisive points in the match. Ljubicic squandered his break-point chances, committing three errors into the net and sending two backhand service returns long as Federer took a commanding 5-2 lead. On his first set point Federer delivered a cracking serve deep to the backhand side which Ljubicic could not handle.

The pair had split their prior six meetings with Ljubicic scoring scoring a 7-6, 6-7, 6-4 victory over Federer in their last meeting in Federer's hometown of Basel on carpet in 2003. When Federer saved his serve, he broke Ljubicic’s belief in the process.

"These are just moments where I'm showing this is not the direction that I want to go into by saving those breakpoints and by winning the first set," Federer said. "I think that's maybe when I broke his belief and that's exactly what I wanted. So for me the match went like planned, I never lost my serve and I won the first set. I put more pressure on my opponent. Coming from one set down against me is not the easiest thing to do."

The entire week Federer showed the type of versatility to beat any type of adversary. Playing steady, solid backboard tennis, Federer forced Ljubicic to go for shots from awkward spots on the court. The second set belonged entirely to the world number one who broke a deflated Ljubicic three times. On his first match point Federer stabbed a forehand volley into the open court and thrust his fists in the air in triumph.

The highly anticipated final flooded the Khalifa center with fans of all ages and nationalities, the vast majority of whom were pulling for the top seed. Federer gained the admiration, respect and esteem of the locals, leaving the sixth-seed Ljubicic as perhaps the only person unimpressed by Federer’s performance.

"He didn't impress me actually. Yeah, the combination of his shots is perfect," said Ljubicic. "If you talk to any top 20 guys in tennis we cannot be impressed by anyone in tennis. He's doing everything right, he's moving well, playing great forehands, good backhands. But It's not like he's going to go out and serve 75 aces."

That is one of the reasons why Federer is so exciting to watch: his grace and balance in covering the court combined with his highly-creative combinations of shots from all areas of the court are the keys to his game. Rather than being a one-note player who relies solely on a big serve to win, Federer is that rare virtuoso who showed his mastery of a variety of shots in every match this week. (I can't agree more, it's difficult to find a dull moment watching this man in action (of course unless he's shanking balls all outside the courts/into the net...but even that can be hilarious to watch, do you all still r'ber Rome and Toronto? :haha: )

The victory gives Federer his 23rd title in his 31st final appearance. It is his eighth title in his past 10 tournaments. With the Qatar crown in hand, Federer takes the early lead in the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race with 50 Race points. Federer won the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race after having been in the lead for 42 weeks and accumulating a total of 1267 points.

"I knew if someone beats me here it's a big upset," Federer said. "It's the first tournament of the year and you never know what's going to happen. To have won this is a relief, because also I feel the pressure, coming into this tournament being the huge favorite, living up to all of the expectations, especially the ones that I put on myself."

The Tennis Channel's Brad Falkner has been in Doha covering the Qatar ExxonMobil

yanchr
01-10-2005, 02:40 PM
Can Federer go a year unbeaten?
Yes, he can, when out for the whole rest season :tape: :rolleyes:
What question will those journalists come up with next time? Go a year not losing a set? :unsure:

Though nice articles. Thanks Rex :wavey:

"He didn't impress me actually. Yeah, the combination of his shots is perfect," said Ljubicic. "If you talk to any top 20 guys in tennis we cannot be impressed by anyone in tennis. He's doing everything right, he's moving well, playing great forehands, good backhands. But It's not like he's going to go out and serve 75 aces."
If he is all ace, I won't get addicted like I do now that's for sure.

WyveN
01-10-2005, 03:08 PM
What question will those journalists come up with next time? Go a year not losing a set? :unsure:


I am sure "Roger wont lose serve in 2005" articles are getting printed as we speak.

avocadoe
01-10-2005, 03:11 PM
it is so absurd. like sharks around the great. luckily Roger has a good head on him and will not be distracted, I hthink, and hope.

SUKTUEN
01-10-2005, 03:11 PM
nice :worship:

yanchr
01-10-2005, 04:16 PM
I am sure "Roger wont lose serve in 2005" articles are getting printed as we speak.
That surely comes into my mind, with also 'not facing a bp', blah blah blah... and I already choose the most likeable one, I mean for Roger :unsure::scared:

Poor Rogi baby :sad:

babsi
01-10-2005, 06:46 PM
You are right yanchr - poor Roger :(

Nobody expectes them to win a pulizer prize,that´s for sure!

*M*
01-11-2005, 01:13 AM
They build you up, so they can tear you down . . .

fedsfan1
01-11-2005, 02:58 AM
To all the Aussie Roger fans....

He will be at book signing today at a book store in Melbourne--signing the new ATP guide.....here's the info

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/federer_unveils_guide.asp

I know its late but maybe some of you can make it......

cheers mates

Clara Bow
01-11-2005, 06:01 AM
Here is the article on Roger from the December 2004 edition of American Vogue. A few things-
* The author has a couple of timelines a bit wrong, but since this is for a fashion magazine, I'm cutting the author a lot of slack.
* Also- since it's a fashion mag- the article doesn't talk about tennis that much.
*It's a pretty long article so I'm gonna have to take a couple of posts.
* I'm sorry for any typos.

Supreme Court by Robert Sullivan
Vogue - December 2004

With Roger Federer playing what may be the best tennis in history, Robert Sullivan discovers the champ’s winning style.

Perhaps you think that Roger Federer, the tennis player playing the greatest tennis in the world today, is dying to talk about tennis. Well, he is not. Today, in Los Angeles, in his denim blazer over a hooded sweatshirt and T-shirt, with black Prada leather sandals and Diesel jeans, he has no real interest in talking about this year’s win at the US Open, which was a feat for the history books- he became the first player in a long time not to play as if the game were merely a display of brute strength, but to mix power with a kaleidoscopic array of skills and play a luxuriously finessed game out of tennis past. Nor does he want to talk about the Thailand Open in Bangkok, in which he is scheduled to compete in a few weeks (a tournament he went on to win- his 12th consecutive victory, an achievement he shares with only two other players, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe).

“I’ve answered enough times how my forehand works,” Roger says. The answer, by the way, is magically. But to hear him talk about using it against Andre Agassi, in one of his trademark you’ve-got-to-be kidding moment, is like hearing him nonchalantly describe the sunrise over his native Alps. “I smashed it back from the baseline for a winner,” he recalls, shrugging, not seeming at all like a guy with a 130-mile-an-hour serve.

No, what Roger Federer wants to do is relax and enjoy a breakfast of eggs Benedict at the Polo Lounge in Beverly Hills Hotel with his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec. For the record, Mirka is not his coach. Amazingly, in this day and age of hyper attenuated sports management, Roger has no coach. He fired him last year [2003], around the time he suffered a first-round loss in straight sets in the French Open. {Not really an accurate timeline but whatever}. It was a move that showed that the young man was ready to start thinking for himself.

Mirka is, however, just about everything else- his scheduler, his press agent, his stand-in practice coach. If you could have been at the Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens earlier this year, when Roger needed to work on some shots before the start of the US Open, you would have witnessed Mirka, a former top-100 women’s player on center court, on the other side of the net. “I’m good for emergencies, “she says.

Mirka is also most certainly his fusion coach and has been since they met four years ago, during the Sydney Olympics. He is from the northwest of Switzerland, in Basel; she is from the northeast, in Lake Constance, a two-hour drive. While they play doubles matches only occasionally, they almost always shop together. “She knows me better than I know myself sometimes,” he says.

And as far as wardrobe goes, she has changed his life-even talked him out of dyeing his hair red.

“When we met, my wardrobe was…not exploding, but it was quite full,” she says. “And he had-

“Two jeans,” Roger interrupts.

“Two jeans and those blue sweaters,” Mirka says. “And I started to buy him clothes. I try to read all the fashion magazines, but I try to be ----“

“Up to date,” Roger says.

“Up to date, yeah. I’m not like following---“

“The trends,” Roger offers.

“The trends. I’m not all trends. I rather like timeless…”

Despite his recent upgrade from tennis star to star, Roger is amazingly low-key. As he walks our of the Polo Lounge and faces lobs of kindness, as the Hollywood people are putting down their forks to say, “Congratulations,” and “Hey, nice job” and “I just want to say that you were incredible,” he looks like a well-mannered kid.

“Thank you very much,” he says, acknowledging the compliments graciously. When he’s out of everyone’s earshot, he smiles and lowers his voice: “Robin Williams is here.”

Roger in person is as he is on the court- a personal that is unlike that of nearly every other male tennis champ, and perhaps the majority of sports stars in general. In victory, he simply does not gloat. He is not prone to the volcanic displays of emotions that professional athletes are known for these days (although he did break down in tears when he won Wimbledon). Such stoicism comes in par, he says, from his roots. Die Weltoche, the Swiss-German newspaper, claimed his game personality as Swiss, extolling his “seriousness, solidity, politeness, and a touch of hardness.”


(continued in next post)

Clara Bow
01-11-2005, 06:05 AM
Supreme Court by Robert Sullivan
Vogue December 2004

(continued from previous post)

Aside from his Swissness, there was the archetypal influence of one particular cultural icon – the tennis champ’s hero when he was growing up was none other than Michael Jordan, the first king of Just Do It, the man who made it look all easy and then, after the big point, just smiled. Picture the young Swiss teen on a basketball court in Basel, wearing the following, according to Roger: “Jeans too big, shirts too big, and a cap, of course.” Picture him trying to be like Mike. “Jordan for me was always the absolute superstar,” Roger says. “I’ve always liked the way he was on the court, his whole style.”

Sadly, Roger sees tennis’s past as perhaps the best of tennis times. Once, a long time ago, sports were about competition – or at least more about competition. As far as the young champion can tell, this was somewhere in the time of Bjorn Borg, whose heyday was in the early eighties, when Roger was learning to walk. He envies the old tennis life, the stories of players hanging out together, maybe even being friends. “Now it’s quite individual,” he laments.

Today tennis, like most other sports, with the possible exception of badminton, is about money, about the corporate sponsors, about the sportsman being a marketer, with, eventually, a signature clothing line. Witness, for example, Serena Williams’s new collection, Aneres – Serena spelled backwards. According to Mirka, Roger is content to keep his eye on the tennis ball and leave the fashion to fashion, for the most part. He does relish his consulting trips to Nike. And there is his line of colognes and men’s toiletries, a concession to fame.

Meanwhile, the recognition back home rolls in. Last year, he was named the Swiss Person of the Year, about which he is typically modest. “I mean, this is not something too difficult to do,” he says. “We only have seven million people.”

Roger’s levelheadness extends to his activities off court. He has put some of his own millions into a group called Imbewu; a nonprofit group in New Brighton, South Africa, that helps feed and educate young people in an area where the unemployment is nearly 80 percent. “And I hope this will stay with me a long time, because this will go beyond my tennis career, obviously,” he ways. Imagine being 23; imagine having yet to hone your obviously extraterrestrial skills; imagine having possibly your best tennis years ahead of you and thinking about what goes on after your career.

By the end of the morning, he’s so vacationed, so relaxed, that he even begins fielding a few questions about tennis – which is a good thing if you happen to be learning how to play in order to maybe someday win a game against your wife.

The Beverly Hills Hotel has a tennis court, and after a while, you persuade Roger to show you a couple of pointers. So there you are with the world’s best tennis player, and you are ready to demonstrate your moves.

“Show me your forehand,” he says graciously. You begin to swing, ungraciously.

“You’re coming to…under,” Roger says, putting it mildly. You understand this. You appreciate it, as a criticism, and you want to ask more about it, but then the waiter brings out the cordless phone.

Roger speaks to the caller, “Ja.”

Mirka eavesdrops. “Oh, that’s Arthur Cohn,” she says, speaking of the Swiss-born filmmaker, producer of Central Station. “He is an old friend.” Apparently Cohn has been setting up meetings for Roger all week. Roger is still chatting, pacing excitedly. He has forgotten tennis again, happily.

Mirka is translating, and as a result, suddenly they are ready to leave.

“We have to go see Kirk Douglas today,” she says.

And they are off for another Los Angeles celebrity match, with maybe some shopping on the side.

THE END

There were some cute pictures of Roger and Mirka with the article (I think you can find them in the pictures thread.) The January 2005 edition of Vogue included Mirka in its list of "50 Best Dressed Women," whcih also included people like Sarah Jessica Parker and Cate Blanchett. Go Mirka!

Mrs. B
01-11-2005, 08:34 AM
Thanks, Clara! :hug:

babsi
01-11-2005, 12:03 PM
I wasn´t able to get a copie,so thank you Clara, for your time and effort :) :)

fightclubber
01-11-2005, 12:05 PM
FROM KOOYONG PRESS COMFERENCE... I GUESS
SILVY

Agassi lauds Federer as elite tune up for Australian Open

Tue Jan 11, 2:46 AM ET Sports - AFP



MELBOURNE, Australia (AFP) - Tennis icon Andre Agassi lauded Roger Federer as a standard-bearer who is lifting the sport to a new level, as the game's elite prepared for the Australian Open (news - web sites) at the Kooyong Classic event.


AFP/File Photo



The eight-man special tournament at the former home of the Open boasts the best field in its history, with world number one Federer heading an entry which includes eight-time Grand Slam winner Agassi, world number two Andy Roddick and Britain's Tim Henman.


The round-robin event which begins Wednesday and ends with a Saturday final also includes Argentine holder David Nalbandian, Olympic champion Nicolas Massu, French Open (news - web sites) winner Gaston Gaudio and Thai Paradorn Srichaphan, finalist at the weekend in Chennai.


Agassi, a four-time Australian Open winner, praised Federer after the Swiss picked up his momentum from a record-setting 2004, beginning this season with a victory in Doha.


While avoiding a direct comparison of Federer with his own longtime rival Pete Sampras, elder statesman Agassi threw some perspective on games of the two greats.


"Roger has been compared to Pete on many occasions," he said of the retired American who won a record 14 Grand Slam titles. "I've played both on days when I was convinced they were the best in the world.


"They both bring a phenomenal amount of weaponry to the court, they are a pleasure to watch."


Agassi, a master of modesty, added: "Playing against them, I have the best seat in the house -- both have the ability also to make me look like a spectator.


"You have to be at your best. Rogers has already taken a step towards accomplishing things that most of us just dream about."


Federer won his 14th title in succession Saturday as he beat Ivan Ljubicic for the Doha trophy for a 21st victory without a loss dating to last season.


The Swiss is a heavy favourite to repeat as Australian Open winner.


"I prefer to be playing well coming in with a great season of 2004 and good start to 2005," said Federer, who begins group play at Kooyong Wednesday against Gaudio.


Other opening matches are: Nalbandian versus Henman, Agassi versus Massu and Roddick against Paradorn, who was only arriving in Melbourne later Tuesday.


The confident Federer predicted it would take "a good player to beat me in Melbourne," at the Open which begins Monday.


"The last three years, I've had a good start to the season in Australia. This surface suits my game. If you can play well in Australia, it usually carries through until Miami or so (in March)."


Federer said that his new 10-week collaboration with Tony Roche as a coach could bring more polish to his already formidable game.


"I don't have a plan as to when we will get started, but we will meet this Saturday," he said of the Sydney-based legend who will advise him on a limited basis.





"I've thought about a coach for a long time, but I wanted to take my time. I know Tony can't do 30-40 weeks a year. We will spend time training before the big events, I don't think he'll do many tournament weeks," said the man who dominated the sport in 2004 without any coach at all.

"I hope he can improve my game just a little bit. I had a good time with him in Sydney (last month). Maybe he's improved my game already.

"I'm fine with the way I'm playing now, but if he can improve a few things that would be great."

fightclubber
01-11-2005, 12:07 PM
ONE MORE FROM TODAY

SILVY

Federer Calls for Tennis to Join Tsunami Relief Effort

Mon Jan 10, 9:22 PM ET Sports - Reuters


By Simon Cambers

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer (news) has led calls for tennis to join other sports in raising money for victims of the south Asian tsunami disaster.


Reuters Photo



Federer said tennis players should follow the example set by the world's top cricketers, who joined forces for a one-day international in Melbourne on Monday which raised more than $A14 million ($US10.63 million) for the relief effort.


"I straight away was thinking about different options for us to help," the Swiss told reporters at Tuesday's draw for the Kooyong Classic, the traditional warm-up event for next week's Australian Open (news - web sites).


"If we can help just a bit then I'd definitely play as much as they (organizers) like. Obviously we can't be there to help but I'll play in as many matches as possible throughout the year."


TERRIBLE TRAGEDY


Andre Agassi (news) echoed Federer's comments, saying that the governing bodies of tennis should come together to organize events.


"I think this would be the best opportunity in the world for all of us (players) to come together," said the American.


"Because tennis is an individual sport it would need one of the professional bodies to organize it. But it was a terrible tragedy and I think you'd find all the players happy to do all they can to help those who've been affected."


Thousands of people in south and east Asia were killed in the giant waves triggered by an undersea earthquake off the Indonesian island of Sumatra on December 26.


Like many tournaments, the Kooyong Classic will be holding daily collections, with the money raised being donated to UNICEF (news - web sites), the United Nations (news - web sites) Children's Fund.


Top seed Federer will open his bid for the title in the eight-man event at Kooyong against French Open (news - web sites) champion Gaston Gaudio (news) of Argentina.


Another Argentine, defending champion David Nalbandian, meets Briton Tim Henman (news), Agassi faces Olympic champion Nicolas Massu (news) of Chile and American Andy Roddick (news) takes on Paradorn Srichaphan (news) of Thailand.


The Kooyong Classic begins on Wednesday

fightclubber
01-11-2005, 12:10 PM
ONE MORE
SILVY
Federer, Roddick in Australian Open tuneup

John Pye / Associated Press
Posted: 6 hours ago

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) - Roger Federer doesn't need to remember all the details of a recent streak that includes 21 consecutive match wins and a 14-0 record in his most recent trips to finals.

"I am aware of the (statistics) because I get reminded all the time," said Federer, who'll start this week's Kooyong Classic exhibition tournament as favorite after finishing 2004 at No. 1 and opening this season with a win at Qatar. "It's nice to have them but it's not the most important thing."
Someone else who won't need reminding is French Open champion Gaston Gaudio, Federer's first opponent when the annual Australian Open tuneup starts Wednesday.

Argentina's Gaudio had his best clay court season in 2004 but struggled for a 5-10 record on hard courts, failing to win back-to-back matches on the surface.

Next week's Australian Open will be played on hard courts at Melbourne Park, making the Kooyong tournament across town an ideal warmup in the same conditions.

With six top 10 players in the eight-man draw, the 2005 Kooyong field is probably its strongest ever.

No. 2-ranked Andy Roddick will open against Thailand's Paradorn Srichaphan, who lost in the Chennai final to Carlos Moya in India on the weekend, while eight-time Grand Slam winner Andre Agassi faces Olympic gold medalist Nicolas Massu of Chile.

Defending champion David Nalbandian opens against seventh-ranked Tim Henman, who is seeded third.

The world's top two ranked players are in Melbourne with new coaching set-ups.

Federer has hired Australia's former Davis Cup coach Tony Roche on a part-time basis and Roddick split with Brad Gilbert after an 18-month partnership that yielded his first Grand Slam title and No. 1-ranking at the end of 2003.

Roddick is working with U.S. Davis Cup assistant coach Dean Goldfine.

"I felt like it had run its course," Roddick said of his decision last month to part with Gilbert.

"I've had a great training period with Dean, felt better than I have in a long time," he added. "I'm happy with the team around me now. I feel very optimistic for 2005 - I'm excited."

Federer didn't have a coach in 2004, when he won 11 titles including three majors and became No. 1.

Despite all the success, having some input from a coach will help, Federer said.

The 23-year-old Swiss star spent two weeks training with Roche in Sydney in December and said he was happy to let the arrangement develop over time.

"I don't really have a plan for this whole thing. He'll be around me for a few weeks this year," he said. "I thought about having a coach for a long time but I wanted to take my time.

"I hope he can improve my game just a little bit. I like the way I'm playing right now. If he can improve just a few things in my game, that will be good."

Coming into a season with an unbeaten run stretching back to the Athens Olympics in August was a good thing, said Federer, who wasn't thinking that a loss had to be on the horizon.

"I'd prefer to be playing well coming into the Australian Open. I had a great 2004 and a good start to 2005, so I'm very happy with that," he said. "I feel good. It's a good place for me."

babsi
01-11-2005, 01:47 PM
Thanks silvy - you out do yourself :) :) :)

avocadoe
01-11-2005, 02:21 PM
thanks Clara for the Vogue...that was so sweet of you to do...and thanks fighclubber and others for more articles today...read them all. Does anyone know if GW will be doing live reporting from a computer at courtside, lol

Daniel
01-11-2005, 02:27 PM
Thanks Silvy :D

Puschkin
01-11-2005, 02:47 PM
What an inflation;) Thanks a lot.

lunahielo
01-11-2005, 03:33 PM
Thanks Clara and Silvy. :)

fightclubber
01-12-2005, 03:59 AM
TRANSCRIPT OF PRESS CONFERENCE - KOOYONG CLASSIC 2005 HELD ON TUESDAY 11 JANUARY 2005
[Welcoming remarks and introduction of players]
HOST: Would you please welcome the field for this year's classic: Roger Federer, Andy Roddick, Tim Henman, Andre Agassi, David Nalbandian, Gaston Gaudio and Nicolas Massu.
HOST: You will notice, unfortunately, that the seat nearest my left is vacant; Paradorn Srichaphan cannot be with us this morning, he is currently in transit from Chanai where he was a finalist losing to Carlos Moya in three sets.
Roger, I might start with you. You started 2005 with a bang again winning Dohar at the Qatar Open, which was your 14th final win in succession dating back since 2003 and you've also got a streak of 21 consecutive matches going. TH: Do you think we need to be told that?
HOST: In fact, won 24 earlier in 2004. Do you follow these sort of statistics? Are you aware of them?
RF: I am aware of them because I get reminded all the time. It's nice to have them but it's not the most important.
HOST: Andre, you have been quoted as saying that Roger makes it look easy. Has he set the bar higher than ever before in the last 12 months?
AA: Yeah, how do you not? To finish number one and the way he did it is an incredible effort but it's also sort of now become the standard that everybody is trying to push for and I'm always thankful for those that make us better and Roger definitely does that.
HOST: Is that part of the reason you changed your routine heading into this year's event; you've come out here a little bit earlier?
AA: Yeah, I don't want to sort of change the formula I've had over the years but with that being said, getting down here a little earlier was something I was anxious to do, trained hard, but it's not until you get to the court that you start putting everything together and I was a little excited to do that. Plus with two kids, it's leave early and take your time and give yourself a few extra days.
HOST: Gaston, a wonderful 2004 for you, breaking into the top 10 for the first time, winning your first Grand Slam title at Roland Garros. What are you expecting of yourself in 2005?
GG: I hope to be top 10 and finish top 10 this year and I'm happy about that and if I can stay like this would be great.

HOST: Nicolas, like Gaston, your first time here at Kooyong. I believe you've had surgery recently; is that correct?
NM: Yeah, two months ago.
HOST: What did you have done?
NM: A hernia I have in my leg.
HOST: And we're hoping that hasn't affected your preparation at all.
NM: I tried to practice the last three weeks and this is my first tournament, I'm very happy to play with the best tennis players in the world.
HOST: You achieved a very unique double at the Athens Olympics in 2004: gold in both the singles and doubles. Where does Olympic gold fit into the picture in comparison to the grand slam events?
NM: I think it's different but it's also important to win the Olympic Games and I'm very happy for that.
HOST: David, a fantastic effort to maintain a top 10 ranking despite missing four months with injury in 2004. How is the body holding up?
DN: I hope better. It was a very tough year for me and I didn't play many tournaments so I practised very, very in December and I think I'm very fit now.
HOST: Of course, fond memories for you, a great win here last year before a quarter final appearance at the Australian Open so it's a great stepping stone for the top players, isn't it?
DN: Yes, it was incredible, the best players were playing here and I think I played very good and this year I think with more players - Tim, Gaston, Nicholas - I think it's going to be very interesting.
HOST: Tim, no titles for you in 2004 but still a very strong year, particularly at Grand Slam level. Semi finals at both the French and US Opens, quarter final at Wimbledon, Third Round at the Australian Open. How do you feel heading into this year's Open?
TH: I'm looking forward to it and I'm not getting any younger but it's an inspiration to watch the man on my left because he's fortunately a few years ahead of me but still playing some phenomenal tennis so I think last year was my most successful year and I'm looking forward to improving on that this year.

HOST: Andy, Lleyton Hewitt has been very critical of the Open organisers, claiming that the courts are too slow at the Australian Open, favouring international visitors. How do you feel about that?
AR: Yeah, I feel like I played well last year and pretty excited to be back. I've hit on them and I like them so I guess you have to ask Lleyton that question.
HOST: I was interested to hear him say that the United States tennis officials consult you guys leading up to the US Open; is that in fact correct, how much input do you have into the courts there?
AR: I've never been asked about the court surface at the US Open in my life. Maybe ... or something, I don't know.
HOST: I think that puts that to bed pretty quickly. Ladies and gentlemen, we will now take some questions from the floor.
Q: Roger, yesterday Hewitt said that one of your main obstacles at the Australian Open might be the ongoing expectation for you to succeed. I'm wondering if that's an issue for you?
RF: It might be, but I prefer to be playing well and coming into the Australian Open with a great season of 2004 and a good start to 2005 so I'm very happy with that, I feel good. I think it's going to need a good player to beat me at the Aussie Open but only time will tell if he is right or wrong.
Q: Andre, a question about the Open. Whenever you win, you always talk about the crowds and the atmosphere. Is there something distinctive about the Australian Open that is different to the other tournaments?
AA: Well, I would talk about it when I lose but I don't get a chance to afterwards but I think every tournament has its environment that is very unique and special to itself and the sporting fans here in Melbourne are some of the greatest sports fans in the world, they're not just an educated group of tennis fans, they're also very passionate and brings out the best in so many players and I've had the benefit of being able to compete here for the last 10 years and regret that I didn't get a chance to understand that the first 10 years.
Q: Does it actually lift you when you are actually playing in the final?
AA: I think it does, yeah, it helps all the players. This is what we do and when people care about what you do it even makes it even more special so it's a great environment to play.
Q: Roger, how will Tony Roach be involved with you for this Australian summer?

RF: Well, he's going to be here playing the senior mixed doubles, the second week, so hopefully I get to see him. He is coming this Saturday so we will be talking to each other and I don't really have a plan, how we are going to start this whole thing but he's only going to be around me just a few weeks this year and I was very happy to hear that. I don't know how it's going to be really.

Q: What was your reasoning behind that, talk a little bit about the reasons you specifically wanted Tony and what is it that you hope he can provide on a limited basis?
RF: I thought about having a coach for a long time but I really wanted to take my time and I knew that Tony is not going to do 30 or 40 weeks with me, he gave me just a few here and that's fine for me so we will spend time on the practice courts and maybe preparation weeks but it's not going to do many of the tournament weeks, which is fine for me, and I hope it can just improve my game just a little bit, would help already. I had a good time with him in Sydney for two weeks and maybe I have improved already, I have no idea, but I'm fine the way I'm playing right now and if he can just improve a few things in my game, that's good.
Q: Tim, your performance in Paris and the US Open were the best of your career last year and you would obviously be hoping to do your best so far over here. Where would be a satisfactory finish, where would you be happy with?
TH: I think upon reflection of my performances at this tournament over the years I've never really played particularly well and I've played well on this surface, having won one tournament but it's definitely a goal of mine to get into the second week as I did in Paris and in New York and I think when you get involved there that's when anything can happen so being in the fourth round I think three or four times there is an element of disappointment but also a lot of motivation to improve on that.
Q: How does your preparations for this tournament compare to preparations for, say, Wimbledon later in the English summer? How do your preparation differ?
TH: I think it is different. I think with the way the season evolves, this is different because we have such long seasons and then you come into a major tournament and it's going to be my first event and that's sometimes not always easy. My preparation changed a little bit this year having had another child so it's been pretty eventful off season but I'm looking forward to getting started.
Q: Have you had many sleepless nights changing nappies?
TH: Not for me now, I'm sleeping well, thanks, but it's always pretty eventful; it certainly puts things in perspective but it's great that we've got another happy and healthy one.
Q: Andre, after the Stockholm Open you pulled out from the last tournaments of the year. Can you explain a little bit what happened and how was your year end?

AA: Last year during the middle of the year I struggled with a hip concern that was leaving my movement rather dodgy at best and I needed some time off, unfortunately during one of the biggest tournaments of the year, Wimbledon, but the result of that time off I felt got my body healthy and strong for what I consider to be a good summer and then playing a couple of weeks in a row in the Fall I sort of had the same concern that was starting to develop and I'm a bit more familiar with what my body is feeling, going through it just a few months earlier, and I didn't really want to take the chance of pushing it through anything when I could really use that time to sort of recover and prepare for what always turns out to be a pretty long year. I was happy with the way the year ended, meaning I felt good about my game and had a couple of disappointing losses but was healthy and over this training time and feel good now and pretty eager to go.
Q: Andre, you turned 35 in April, you've had these injuries last year, how long will you keep going? Is this one of the last times we will see you in Australia?
AA: End of April, so don't cheat me out of those days. I don't know is the simple answer. I don't really know now to answer that, I don't feel like it's my place to sort of choreograph an ending, the sport has been great to me and I will give it everything I've got. As long as I'm out there feeling like somebody has to play a great match to beat me or expecting myself to win if I play a great match, I will find reason to keep going but last year was a question for me to be back here one year later because a lot can happen in a year so I definitely hope to be back and as of right now that is my plan.
Q: Andre, I think your dad was quoted in the States saying about a month ago that you could play for another three or four years. What did you make of his comments?
AA: My mom thinks I can play for 10 more, so it's good. We will see. The body has to hold up, you have to train sort of harder and smarter and you have to find ways to keep getting better because everybody around you always is so I don't know how long I can do that or how long I'm going to want to do it for but as of right now this is what I do and I'm not thinking past that.
Q: Looks like you might have lost a little weight. How are you feeling physically and tennis-wise at the moment?
AA: I feel good. I can really only base it on the way practice has been going, I feel real good on the court. I think this week will be an important week, all of us are here for the same reason and having each other to sort of help prepare ourselves is what we are all looking forward to and I think this week will be a great step in that direction.
Q: Andre, you had some great battles with Pete Sampras at his top. With Roger at his top (indistinct)?

AA: That's a bit hard to do. I've played all these guys on days when I'm convinced they're the best in the world. I know Roger's game has been compared to Pete on many different occasions and I find that both of them bring a phenomenal amount of weaponry to the tennis court and it's a pleasure to watch. Sometimes playing against them I feel like I have the best seat in the house, where both of them have an ability to make you feel like a spectator so you have to make sure you're at your best and I have had that feeling with a lot of guys and Roger took a step last year towards accomplishing things that most of us only dream about. Pete had a long career and a great one so I'm sure Roger is a lot more to look forward to.
Q: Roger, is there an emotional or a sentimental element for you coming back the second time, going for it a second time around?
RF: Yes, it's something very interesting for me because Wimbledon last year was the first time I came back as a defending champion, I did well so hopefully of course I can repeat it but it's going to be very hard but I really like coming to Australia every year, it's a fantastic country and, like Andre also said, the crowds here are fantastic, they already know a lot about the sport and they love sports, so for this reason I hope I can play well and enjoy it for a long time.
Q: Is there something different about this as a Grand Slam event to the others? Does it set the pace for you for the year?
RF The last three years or so I've always had a good start into the season and I always thought I played pretty well at the Australian Open, I think the surface suits my game and, of course, if you can play here well here usually you can carry all the way through maybe until Miami or so and then the clay court season starts and I start there again but that's what happened for me last year.
Q: What was it like to actually win?
RF: It was fantastic because I had the feeling I kind of proved myself a little bit, or I beat many difficult opponents in Houston 2003 and then to right away start with the win at the Australian Open to win my second Grand Slam felt great and I got even more hungry of winning more Gland Slams so that's what happened.
Q: Andy, can you talk about your change of coaches and what you expect this new year?
AR: What exactly do you want you know?
Q: The reason why you changed coaches, the reason why you split with Brad?
AR: I just felt like it had run its course. I've had a great little training period with Dean, we've been working harder than I have in a long time, and I am very optimistic for 2005, I'm happy with the team I have around me right now and I'm excited.

Q: The end of last year didn't go as well as you wanted, obviously your main goal was Davis Cup final, how big was the disappointment? Can you talk a little bit about how you prepared for this game?
A: Yeah, it was huge. Obviously we were very disappointed at the end but we went over there and we gave it our best shot. It's pretty tough conditions but you take your lessons, you learn a lot more from losses I think than wins. But, you know, I think disappointment also makes you hungry to get back out there and try to train even harder so that's what we are trying to do this off season.
Q: Andre, just a bit of a different question. Yesterday the cricketers got together and raised millions of dollars for victims of Tsunami, do you think tennis players should put on - do you feel that there could be an opening for something like that in tennis?
AA: I think this will be the best opportunity in the world for all of us to come together. It's a terrible tragedy was happened and it affects us all so absolutely, I think you would find the players in support of that. Being an individual sport you would need sort of an organising body to take the lead there but we all want to help those who have been directly affected by that tragedy.
Q: So you think a good way to go about it is a charity match, a charity tennis match or something?
AA: Certainly think that would be one way to go about it.
Q: Maybe if I could ask Roger the same thing?
RF: I thought right away about different options to help because it's a terrible thing that happened and if we can help just a bit because we can't be over there working so I would definitely play in a match, as many matches as they like, so if something already would happen here in Australia I would be doing that, or otherwise down the road this year all the time, as long as we can help.
Q: Tim, are you on the ATP executive?
TH: No, not that I know of.
Q: Any gentlemen at the table involved in the executive side of things with at ATP?
TH: Don't think so.
HOST: Last few questions.
Q: David, how far from your form you were in last year when you were playing brilliantly, given the injury concerns you have is it hard to assess?

DN: I think last year I started very, very good the year, I win here and then I do quarters, I lost with Roger in a great match, and after I start my injuries but I believe that I do a very good job in the last weeks so I want to try to do the best of course try to improve all the time and try to keep going in the goals.

Daniel
01-12-2005, 04:04 AM
oppss :o got a headache of reading the long interviwew, Silvy is there any way u could space the quesitonand answers, looks to difficult to read it like this :p thanks

fightclubber
01-12-2005, 04:18 AM
oppss :o got a headache of reading the long interviwew, Silvy is there any way u could space the quesitonand answers, looks to difficult to read it like this :p thanks


dany quedo mejor, eh?? Perdona.. estoy un poco dormida
Ok Now looks better
silvy

Daniel
01-12-2005, 05:31 AM
Thank you very much Silvy :kiss: :D

lunahielo
01-12-2005, 12:54 PM
Thank you, Silvy~~very interesting.

Colosseo
01-12-2005, 01:13 PM
Is that mean Tony will be Roger's new coach???

avocadoe
01-12-2005, 03:08 PM
Is that mean Tony will be Roger's new coach???
just a little time together, maybe ten weeks in all.

Thanks for the press conference interview, silvy!!!

Mrs. B
01-12-2005, 03:29 PM
Gracias, Silvy! :kiss:

lsy
01-12-2005, 04:25 PM
There we go again with the media...seem like they're trying to fire Hewitt up vs Rogi ;)

I'm sure Rogi was as usual saying his mind when being asked, yet the way they wrote it was kind of taking the extreme? But :yeah: to Rogi to say it like it should be.

================================================== ===

Roger Federer has taken issue with Lleyton Hewitt's call to change the Open surface.

In a surprising attack on Lleyton Hewitt's criticism of the playing surface at Melbourne Park, defending Australian Open champion Roger Federer said yesterday the courts must be prepared for all players, not just the local hope.

The usually mild-mannered Federer said it would be unfair for the Open's organisers to radically alter the speed of the courts to suit the needs of the best Australian player.

"I know that he likes it quicker but he shouldn't forget there are 500 or 600 other players playing the tournament as well. (With) 'qualies' and main draw, women's and men's, for everybody the same, it's just not the one court where he is going to play on,' said Federer, who won Wimbledon and the US Open last year on much quicker surfaces than he will experience here.

The 23-year-old Swiss star, who yesterday won his first match at Kooyong 5-7, 6-1, 6-4 against Gaston Gaudio, will have his first practice session at Melbourne Park today. Last year's Australian Open champion believes he should be allowed to defend his crown in similar conditions to which it was obtained.

Advertisement
Advertisement"I think it has got to be fair. For me, it doesn't really matter if it's quick or it's slow, but I think it is not fair if one guy defends, is the titleholder and he comes back and the conditions are very different," Federer said.

"It's OK, I don't know if it is quick or it is fast, I feel it's all right and that is important."

So far this summer, Hewitt has been vocal regarding the court surface at Melbourne Park, saying it is too slow for his liking. He says he has complained to Australian Open organisers about their failure to consult him regarding the issue.

But Hewitt's suggestion that US Open organisers offered that privilege to their players was shot down this week by world No. 2 Andy Roddick. "I have never been asked about the court surface at the US Open in my life," Roddick said at the launch of the Kooyong Classic.

Federer yesterday lost the opening set against Gaudio, the first set he has dropped this year after winning the Doha tournament in Qatar without even losing a service game.

"I think it's more getting used to the surface and the conditions here in Australia. They are much quicker than they were in Qatar, so I lost my opening serve, which basically hasn't happened since last year," he said.

"For me it's important not to really play well from the start, I hope I really play well the last match of this tournament, hopefully that's the final. I'm mostly trying out some things, so I might lose some points by just taking some chances, taking more chances on my return, so I don't get the ball into play so often, like I would if it were a break-point situation in a tournament.

"These are little things that make the match maybe become closer or you end up losing it, but for me in the end it's still important that I end up winning."

Federer is scheduled to play Tim Henman tomorrow in his next match in the eight-man round-robin tournament. Henman defeated 2004 Kooyong champion David Nalbandian 6-1, 7-5 yesterday. While no player can go into a meeting with Federer with confidence, Henman had as much cause for optimism as any, having beaten the Swiss star at Rotterdam in 2004 and boasting a 6-3 career record against him.

"I am excited to play him after the year he has had . . . and to play the way I did today is an important stepping stone for me," Henman said.

"Where I've had some success against him in the past I have been able to take his time away and not allow him to use his enormous array of shots."

In other matches yesterday, the evergreen Andre Agassi defeated Olympic champion Nicolas Massu 6-1, 7-6 (7-4), while Roddick beat Ivan Ljubicic 6-1, 6-4. With AAP

http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Federer-delivers-court-serve/2005/01/12/1105423556807.html?oneclick=true

Teemuh
01-13-2005, 01:08 AM
I found this little tidbit from the Times Online. I think it goes to show how gracious Fed is.

"Once upon a time, before some sort of magic was visited upon him, the Swiss used to worry that Henman was one player who could muddle with his mind and mix up his game to an extent that he felt especially vulnerable. That has changed, but Federer’s regard for Henman is as genuine as the man himself. In the midst of his parade through New York after his US Open triumph in September, Federer stopped to ask how critical I had been of Henman’s loss to him in the semi- finals. “He gave me my toughest match of the tournament by far,” Federer said. “Remember that. He is a great player"

Edited to add:This poses some interesting questions.

1)I would have thought Agassi was the toughest match. Sounds like maybe Fed thought the conditions were tough rather than the player, in which case, bad news for Agassi.

2)How great a rapport does Fed have with journalists? Sounds like he has a very casual and friendly communication with certain people that he can take them aside and say these kinds of things. Has a number one ever done/or been able to do stuff like this?

3)How sweet a guy is he? He doesn't have to worry about how other players are portrayed in the press. But it seems Henman is his friend and he was protecting him.

4)Is Roger changing all the trash-talk on tour? Everybody has nice things to say about him. Even Hewitt just recently said what a great bloke he was. Between him saying nice things about the players, and the players saying nice things about him, this is turning into the love-in tour :)

fightclubber
01-13-2005, 01:45 AM
:worship: KOOYONG PRESS CONFERENCE 12 JAN 2005 AFTER DEF GAUDIO :worship:

ROGER FEDERER: :worship: :worship:
Q: You had a little bit of a slipup in the first set, Roger, second set was very lopsided. Was it the sort of awakening you needed, do you think?

A: I think it's more getting used to the surface and the conditions here in Australia, they are much quicker than they were in Qatar so I lost my opening first serve which hasn't happened since last year basically because I never lost my serve in Qatar and I had to rally back from that. I had a set point but still thought actually my timing was all right, I could have definitely served better but all in all I'm happy with the match and I ended up winning it so it was good a sign and it was three sets, it was good, I get a day off and hopefully play better at the next match.

Q: Do you feel December was enough of a break for you?

A: I had my two weeks off, which I usually get, and preparation was a little different than the previous years when I was in Australia and that makes it hard not being home for quite some time now but it was a very professional choice, I think it was worth it and it already paid off by winning in Qatar, and I hope I can carry it through here also.

Q: When you're having such a good winning streak and you come to a tournament like this, is it important for you still to win the matches or are you looking maybe to try some things and experiment?

A: It gives you a little bit of an option to try out some things, that's very clear, because for me it's important not to really play well from the start, I hope I really play well the last match of this tournament, hopefully that's the finals, you know, but it's always much nicer to win the matches than to lose them. Looking ahead to the Australian Open, it's important that the confidence stays high, not that I play some poor matches here, and I am not quite sure how my game is because, like I said, the conditions are different and I also want to play good matches here on this surface.

Q: How do you control that, when you say you don't want to play too well early? You want to hit a couple out?

A: I haven't had much of a hit yet on these courts. I arrived on Monday, had a 45 minute hit then, had a one hour hit yesterday, and now I'm playing a match so it's clear that I'm not used to the conditions yet, it takes me usually longer but, like I said, I'm happy with today's match after such a little hit on those courts.

Q: What is the process in terms of getting your form to peak, how do you actually do that?

A: I'm mostly trying out some things so I might lose some points by just taking some chances, or taking more chances on my return so I don't get the ball into play so often like I would if it would be on a break point situation in a tournament, so those are little things that make the match maybe become closer or you end up losing it but for me in the end it's still important that I end up winning the matches so again I stick to my game plan which I set myself for all the regular matches, to keep the ball in play and try to play aggressive when it counts, also in this tournament because in the end I want the victory and I don't want to lose too many matches here.

Q: You spent time in Sydney, what date did you arrive in Sydney and briefly what were the circumstances of your coming out? Was it two weeks you spent?

A: Yes, it was about two weeks. I arrived in the middle of December and left just before Christmas so that was the time I spent in Sydney. Perfect weather, perfect preparation, I thought.

Q: Was it specifically to work on some aspect or just generally?

A: Well, no, it's general because I think if you just work on one thing you shouldn't forget maybe your strong points of your game, if you don't work those they don't work as well and usually it's that that you make the difference in the match. A few years ago it was important to get my weaknesses better but now that they have improved and I don't have that many any more, I think it's important to also work on your strengths in your game so we did work on everything, I think that was the right thing to do.
Q: What were those weaknesses?

A: Before?

Q: Yes.

A: Well, I've always been practicing on my serve and return and my backhand.

Q: Nalbandian or Henman in the next game, could you assess those two opponents, please?

A: Well, very different but used to be very tough opponents for me so I expect a tough match. They are great players, especially on this surface, and either one of them is fine. You have to accept that next opponent and it will be interesting who wins that match because it's quite a contrast the way they play.

Q: Tim is one of the few players in the world that actually did win a match against you last year. Last year was the best of his career and coming into the new year with a lot of confidence.

A: I had the feeling he played a very consistent season, I don't think he won a title but still his Grand Slam results speak for themselves and he is a very tough opponent, he showed that he can do it on all surfaces. I always knew it but it's another thing to do it and I think he has improved, especially from the baseline which before was his weakness and he had to rely too much on his attacking game and that put him under pressure to get to the net first so now he can also play from the baseline with the guys and if he plays correct tactics then he has great results against clay courters especially.

Q: Do you feel he is a genuine candidate to win a Grand Slam this year? Do you feel the way he has developed as a player, do you feel he is ready for the next step?

A: My main objective for the season is also to win Wimbledon so that doesn't help him but that's his biggest chance there so I guess if he wants to win that one he needs to beat me but I think he's definitely got the game to win one, all the players have a lot of respect the way he is playing, the way he is, so I believe that there is a Grand Slam in him.

Q: Andre Agassi was in here before and he was asked a couple of questions about you and your game. This seems to happen quite a lot. Do you find the amount of talking that other players do about you, do you find that flattering or a little bit embarrassing?

A: I guess that's just the way it is, you can't change it. It's always quite normal that you're being asked about the number one player in the world because he sets the standard in tennis right now, and right now it's me so it's normal that other players are being asked what they think about him and sometimes he goes over in compliments, some other players are very quiet, they don't like to give many compliments, and then like if Agassi starts going of course they are higher rated than other compliments from other players and it's nice to hear them but I think in the end when we walk on the court all those compliments are forgotten and all he wants to do is beat me so I expect always a tough match against him. In a way I enjoy it, to get so many compliments because I haven't heard much negative talk up until now.

Q: What about off the court, is there a difference when you came here last year, same tournament, and no doubt you have been spending time in Melbourne Park, is there a different feeling when you walk into the place and you are the guy to beat, last year it was Agassi and more focus was on him. Is there a different relation you have with the players than the other top players that are seen around the place and how they relate to you?

A: I get along well with many of the players, almost with all of them, not that I have a problem with some of them, we just don't talk because we don't know each other but we have a good feeling with all of them, I speak three languages which helps, and no
problem. I don't feel there is like a big change. Some of them have more respect if I win a tournament, maybe not losing a service game like in Qatar, they would think it's much more impressive than if I win a tournament maybe two years ago by not losing my serve so it's different relations now.

Q: Other players don't just talk about you as the current number one, they talk about what you can be as well and they always talk as one of the absolute greats that you could be up there with Pete Sampras. Do you find that a little bit embarrassing or do you just let that flow through?

A: Well, I had such a great season last year and I guess I had such a good season like nobody had in 15 or 20 years so it's normal that right away everybody compares me to the all-time greats, now it's up to me to prove it and to be up there for a long time. I know how tough it is because to wake up every morning and to again do it all over again it's hard at times and you always arrive at tournaments, you are the huge favourite, and that's not such an easy thing to handle on a daily basis. There is much going on, much press, much attention, you're always being followed, and you have to get used to it like I did, I can handle it well, luckily, so this actually gives me a good feeling for the future.

Q: Lleyton and Andy have said you are the man to beat next week. Is there one player in particular that you think poses a threat to your title defence?

A: Well, there is many guys. I think the top four have the best chance, including Andre, I think then it's just a few dark horses here and there but I think the top 10 are quite consistent now, especially in Grand Slams, and they have the best chance to win with the favourites being the players I just named.

Q: First round Davis Cup ..., are you making any significant changes to your schedule. Are you playing a little bit less than last year, tournament wise?

A: No, not really. I'm playing Australian Open, Rotterdam, Dubai, Indian Wells, Key Biscayne, Monte Carlo, Rome, Hamburg, Paris, Wimbledon so basically the same schedule except that Davis Cup is out and Monte Carlo is in so that's the difference.

Iza
01-13-2005, 03:34 AM
Roger's Ready
by Murray Brust
Wednesday, 12 January, 2005


It may not be a revelation to anyone, but world number one and defending Australian Open champion Roger Federer is the man to beat at Melbourne Park this year.

Four-time Open champion Andre Agassi says so … and Federer agrees!

Agassi said the only player comparable to the Swiss star is 14-time Grand Slam title winner Pete Sampras.

"Roger has been compared to Pete on many occasions," Agassi said. "I've played both on days when I was convinced they were the best in the world."

"They both bring a phenomenal amount of weaponry to the court, they are a pleasure to watch."

"Playing against them, I have the best seat in the house - both have the ability also to make me look like a spectator. You have to be at your best. Roger has already taken a step towards accomplishing things that most of us just dream about."

"To finish No.1 and the way that he did it was an incredible effort," Agassi added.

"It also now is the standard that everyone is trying to push for and I'm always thankful for those who make us better, and Roger definitely does that.

Not surprisingly, Federer is feeling pretty good about himself, after his total domination of the men's tour last year and his first tournament win of the new year in Qatar on the way to Melbourne.

"Wimbledon last year was the first time I came back as defending champion. I did well and hopefully I can repeat it here," Federer said.

"I feel good. It's going to need a good player to beat me."

lina_seta
01-13-2005, 04:42 AM
Roger's Ready

"I feel good. It's going to need a good player to beat me."


i like that confidence ;)
confidence builds a strong mental game

SUKTUEN
01-13-2005, 05:36 AM
thanks

fightclubber
01-14-2005, 03:06 PM
kooyong 14 -01-2005 roger press conferebce after def henman 6-4 6-2


ROGER FEDERER:
Q: You are having a good time out there. You've got a good relationship which extends both on and off the court.
A: Yeah, we had a good match today, I thought, a lot of winners and a lot of attacking play, like we could expect, and I thought the conditions were nice, thought they were quite quick actually today. Of course, always ... playing Tim but anyway I thought it was hard to control and that's the reason I'm very happy with today's performance because he is always a tricky opponent, has been in the past and still is, and whenever I can beat him I'm always a very happy man.

Q: To play the number two seed two days out from a grand Slam, how do you approach a match like that?
A: I was supposed to play him last year as well, he pulled out because of blisters, so I hope tomorrow we will play the match like we were supposed to play last year, even though tomorrow is the final and last year was I think third or fourth but I'm looking forward to this prospect because it's always nice when the number one and number two play each other and it's going to be interesting to see two days just before a Slam.

Q: You have both been working on stuff over the break. Is there a part of you that might not show him some of your best stuff that you have got, things that you have been working on that you might save for the tournament?
A: I think it's more in a defensive situation, just going to make sure you are not going to pull a muscle. I might just hold back on a couple of stretch balls, which maybe you are going to lose a point anyway, the chances are so small. Other than that, I think everyone wants to play his own game because looking ahead to the Open I don't think you should change your game too much because then you might enter the tournament a little bit confused.

Q: You've seen who you are playing at least in the first round of the Australian Open, how do you see that match-up?
A: It's a tricky match. I always prefer to play such opponents maybe later on in the draw, like I played him at the US open, I think it was the third or fourth round, I think it was the third round, and beat him quite comfortably over there but you never know; if the rhythm is a little bit off you are guessing many of the shots and you have to be confident to move into the net, in the past I've coped well with that so I expect myself again to go into the match and play aggressive and put him into a defensive position.

Q: You've got Andre Agassi in your quarter as well, presuming he is fit. Do you look at quarter finals this early?

A: You see he's around, who's around, but I believe that draws are tough, it's the best of five, you don't play best of fives every day, so first you've got to get used to them and win them before you can start thinking about quarters and semis. The same with the Grand Slams, you know the draw but you don't really talk about it.

Q: Roger, as things stand at the moment is there anything at all that's giving you any cause for concern going into this Slam?
A: No, everything is pretty good and I'm very happy with my second match here at Kooyong, it's much better than the first and this is already a very good sign. Also if I don't play well tomorrow, which could happen very quickly because the rhythm against Andy is not the easiest one to get, but with today's match I had the feeling I'm really heading in the right direction and that's exactly the feeling you've got to have just a few days before the Open.

Q: Correct me if I'm wrong, you don't actually have your conditioning guy with you?
A: No.
Q: Is that a concern at all? Talk us through that decision to not bring him to Australia where the conditions can be quite harsh?
A: I've got my physio here, not my condition trainer so I'm not going to start doing fitness on my off days during a slam; everything is very carefully planned, my schedule has been discussed and we thought this was the right way to do it. He was in Australia with me in Sydney so I've been doing my work on and off court.

RonE
01-14-2005, 03:39 PM
Thanks Silvy-

So he has been doing some fitness work while training in Australia after all it seems.

crimson
01-14-2005, 03:48 PM
Interview in The Guardian today:

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1390135,00.html

Federer works hard on the big easy

Eleanor Preston in Melbourne hears why even as gifted a talent as the world No1 can't afford an off-day

Friday January 14, 2005
The Guardian

Watching Roger Federer play tennis, it is hard to believe he has ever found anything difficult in his life. Moving with such grace, he seems so utterly in command of what he is doing that hitting a fluffy ball with a handful of graphite and Kevlar might as well be breathing in and out.
If he had a franc for every time someone in the bleachers or the commentary box has said he made tennis look easy he would be a good deal richer than he is already. Speak with him away from press-conference platitudes, though, and it does not take him long to persuade you that the business of being a fledgling legend is a sight harder than his laid-back demeanour and velvet shots make it seem.

"Once you get on a run you are just trying to keep it up. That sounds very easy but it's not, because you have to stay professional, you have to wake up every day for this one match, then you win and you play for the next match and it goes on and on and on," he says.

"I find it hard to stay professional all the time and I'd love to have more time for my friends, my family, my girlfriend, for vacations, but I know that my career won't last 50 years so I might as well do it properly for 10, then I can say I've had enough and take it easy. But I'm young and I love tennis and I'm not here to go on vacation and stay on the practice court. I'm an absolute match player."

Few would argue, especially not the likes of Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin, all of whom spent last year in Federer's slipstream. All three are great players and grand slam winners but none made even a tiny dent in the huge pile of ranking points Federer amassed in winning three of the season's four grand slams and the year-end Masters Cup in Houston.

It was one of those occasions when the epithet "world No1" seemed pathetically inadequate; for Roddick and the rest it must have been like trying to doggy-paddle past Michael Phelps.

Now, in 2005, Federer is attempting to do it all again, starting with the defence of his Australian Open title, which begins on Monday, and should he do so the hyperbole about whether he will turn out to be one of the greatest players of all time will turn up a notch.

At 23 he has won four grand slams, one fewer at that age than Pete Sampras, a man whose record of 14 major titles he looks more than capable of surpassing. "I think it's the wrong approach for people to think that I have the chance to break this record or that record, because I don't care about all the records that other people have done," Federer counters, keen perhaps to minimise the fuss that perpetually surrounds him.

"I'm not here to beat this guy's record or that guy's record. If I equal it or beat records then that's nice but I want to be remembered as Roger Federer, for what he has done, as a good player and idol to kids, because I'm not just acting out there on the court. This is me and I hope that the fans, especially kids, like to play like me and like my attitude and maybe want to be a little bit like me. I'm very proud that there might be kids out there saying 'I want to play like him' or 'I want to have his talent'."

Certainly the rest of the locker room yearns to be able to do what he can do with a tennis ball, even those who have claims to greatness themselves. "He's got the hands and the balance to be one of the best of all time, across the generations," says Martina Navratilova, an idol of the Swiss player. "Federer would still be a magician if you put a wooden racket in his hands."

The magician, speaking in his quiet but certain tone, is charmingly bemused by his own success and the preternatural talents that have helped him achieve it. "I spend my whole time being amazed," he says. "It's always a surprise to me. Sometimes I watch my matches in replay and I think 'Jeez, how did I pull that shot out?' or 'How lucky did I get with that rally?' but that's how tennis is, you know? It's played on instinct, it's natural and it's all about reaction and making the right decision when you only have a fraction of a second to think about it. Making the right choice is always the hardest thing."

Federer is not the sort of sportsman to ignore his multiple blessings in favour of a good whinge, but he is certainly keen to stress that there is far more to what he has done than merely hitting the ball across the net.

"You are standing there in front of thousands of people and you're trying to play your best and sometimes it just doesn't go like that. It's difficult. When you go and work in an office you don't have the best day every day but in our job the physical and the mental strengths have to be there, and the private life has to be intact so you don't lose your mind during changeovers and start thinking about weird stuff," he says. "It's very hard to keep it up but I've set myself a goal that in 10 years I can go and do something else, maybe something totally different outside tennis, but whatever I do I want to enjoy it.

"I've always dreamed of winning Wimbledon, of being No1 in the world, of leading the rankings, and I have to enjoy these moments. You should never forget how thankful you should be to the sport."

He expresses his thanks through tirelessly working with the media in a way that puts some of his less successful locker-room colleagues to shame. He is renowned among communications and tournament staff for his willingness to do more than his fair share of interviews and his linguistic gifts mean that he frequently has to do so in German, French and English.

"I never dreamed of being famous when I was younger - I only ever dreamed of winning Wimbledon and holding up that trophy. I never imagined that it takes so much around tennis. The fans, they see you out on the court and maybe they think 'He's a great player' but I don't know if they realise how much we are doing off court in trying to improve the game and the image of the sport, which from my point of view are very, very important.

"I don't get too nervous before interviews but I do worry that I'm going to say the wrong thing, especially when I'm swapping between vocabularies."

Whether it is interviews or scything through an opponent out on the court, it seems that being Roger Federer is anything but easy.

Federer's year of wonders

Australian Open February 1

Dropped two sets during the tournament, beating Marat Safin in the final.

Dubai March 6

Beat Feliciano López in the final.

Indian Wells March 21

Beat the British No1 Tim Henman in the final.

Hamburg May 16

An impressive win on clay, beating Guillermo Coria in the final.

French Open May 29

Suffered only defeat in a grand slam, losing to Gustavo Kuerten in the third round.

Halle June 13

Beat Mardy Fish in final.

Wimbledon July 4

Successfully defended his title, beating Andy Roddick in the final.

Gstaad July 11

Won his first title on home soil, beating Igor Andreev in the final.

Toronto August 1

Won fourth successive event, again beating Roddick in the final.

Olympics August 17

Suffered his last defeat of the year in the second round at the Athens Olympics.

US Open September 12

Defeated Andre Agassi in a five-set classic at the quarter-final stage, Henman in the semi-finals and Lleyton Hewitt in the final for his third grand slam of the year.

Bangkok October 3

Beat Roddick in final yet again.

Masters Cup, Houston November 21

Dropped one set during tournament and beat Hewitt in the final.

2004 stats

His 11 titles were the most by a player ending the year as No1 since Ivan Lendl did the same in 1985.

Became first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three grand slam titles in a season.

Compiled records of 46-4 on hard, 16-2 on clay and 12-0 on grass.

Earned $6,357,547 (£3.35m), just short of record set by Pete Sampras in 1997 ($6,498,311).

RogiNie
01-14-2005, 04:00 PM
cool :cool: interview crimson!!! thnx

RonE
01-14-2005, 05:19 PM
Thanks for the interview Crimson :wavey:

RogiFan88
01-14-2005, 10:11 PM
Federer helps Lleyton take his game to new heights
By PAT RAFTER :)

January 15, 2005

ROGER Federer is the best thing to have happened to Lleyton Hewitt's tennis.


Although Federer has beaten Lleyton six times in a row and looks almost unstoppable for the Australian Open, Lleyton is one of only five chances to win the title, in my opinion.

Lleyton is in the mix because he has been forced to take his tennis to a new level since Roger went past him.


Federer has given Lleyton a new lease on life. There were times when Lleyton had become bored; he was not getting challenged and he got complacent.


Over the past 18 months, Roger has stepped up to another level and he's made Lleyton move with him in an attempt to keep up.






Roger is stronger at the moment and he'll be keen to keep it that way, and that's why I am not envisaging an upset at Melbourne Park over the next fortnight.


Lleyton understands that once you get a grip on your rivals you don't want to let it go, and if Roger doesn't let go he's going to be hard to beat for a very long time.


Technically, he's already the best player I've seen. If he stays fit, and he maintains his grip, he will go down as one of the greatest of all time.


The Australian Open form is always hard to line up because there's not many results to judge it by.


But if you went on what happened last season, how can you go past Federer? He looks nearly unbeatable going into the tournament.


But there is a small group of guys who can stop him.


It's going to be really important for Lleyton to get through the first three or four matches in the first week as quickly as possible.


The same goes for Federer and the other top guys like Andy Roddick, Carlos Moya and Joachim Johansson. Nobody can afford to suffer and then expect to step it up, especially if it gets hot.


Jim Courier believes that if Federer is to be beaten, it's going to happen early and I think that's a really good call. Fabrice Santoro in the first round won't be easy.


The last thing you want is for Federer to get settled, cruise through the first week and then get into the last couple of rounds feeling fresh and strong.


If he cops a couple of tough matches in the heat early on, he's going to find it difficult.


If Lleyton can get over Arnaud Clement in the first round and avoid going into the second week with heavy legs and he's feeling positive about his game, he's a good chance.


I like Roddick and the way he's playing, Moya's going to be dangerous and Joachim Johansson – if he's fit – is going to be one of the top chances.


Marat Safin is dangerous, but it will depend totally on how he wakes up and how he is mentally.


It's really hard to look too far outside the top five.


The heat again threatens to be a major factor and will penalise the people who haven't acclimatised.


If they have done the work and have the fitness, they can definitely do well because this tournament really sorts people out quickly.


The heat can be severe and the reflective nature of the Rebound Ace surface can make it 10 times worse.


On the subject of the surface, I think Lleyton has made a good point. He is definitely justified on the point of trying to get it right for the Aussies.


At the same time, I can understand Paul McNamee saying he wants to be as impartial as possible, but the other tournament directors don't always think that way.


I would think it's in McNamee's best interests to look after the Australians.


Alicia Molik is playing well enough to win the Australian Open.


It is a big call, but she's probably got the best all-round game out there.


If Alicia can keep her form going, I think she can win the whole thing.


It is amazing what she has achieved over the past year.


She's confident out there and, although she doesn't serve-volley a lot, her volleys are as good as you will find in the game.


As with the men, I don't expect the women's champion to come from outside the obvious contenders.


Lindsay Davenport returns as the world No. 1 and that's a tremendous tribute to her.


Much interest will focus on the Williams sisters, Venus and Serena. They didn't win a major last year and there are questions about how committed they are to the game.


The Australian Open will go a long way to providing some of the answers.

Former world No. 1 Pat Rafter will write for The Daily Telegraph during the Australian Open

http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au

RonE
01-14-2005, 11:51 PM
Thanks for the article Rogifan :wavey:

Dirk
01-15-2005, 12:29 AM
Isn't his fitness trainer and physio the same guy? Pavel?

lunahielo
01-15-2005, 12:37 AM
Thank you RogiFan, Silvy and Crimson. :wavey:

soonha
01-15-2005, 03:41 AM
Here's an article from the Indepedent online edition. Seems like Rogi's already won in AO. Sweet...

================================================== =======
Phenomenal Federer's primary competition in 2005 is himself

The Swiss player's dominant 2004 will be repeated this year, says Nick Bolletieri, who believes the 23-year-old Wimbledon champion could win all four Grand Slams
15 January 2005


There Are three stages to winning a tennis match - control, hurt and finish. And Roger Federer, the world's best player by a margin and with all the tools to become the best of all time, is a master at all three.

That is why he is rightly the hot, hot favourite to win the first Grand Slam tournament of the season, which starts in Australia on Monday. I have no choice but to predict he will win.

For the first time in many, many years, it's possible to look at a player and believe he has a solid chance of winning all four Slams.

That is an unbelievable thing to be able to say, but in Federer's case it is true. :worship: The closest parallel I can draw is with Lance Armstrong in recent years in the Tour de France. As soon as his name appeared on the entry list, it was hard to see any other winner.

At such a level of performance, an athlete is no longer competing against the field but against himself. The thinking is: "How far can I push this? What new boundaries can I break?" Defeat, if and when it comes, arrives not because of opponents' superiority but because of a dip in phenomenal standards. :)

Just as everyone played catch-up with Armstrong, willing the guy just to take a tumble and fall off his bike, so it is with Federer at the moment. What can you do to stop him but hope that he eats something that doesn't agree with him, or just falls over? When other players are thinking like this - and believe me, they are - it shows the measure of his dominance.

But statistics show Federer's dominance anyway. Winning streaks of 20-plus matches. Months on end when his service isn't broken. No defeats in his last 14 finals. Three Grand Slam titles in 2004, plus eight other titles.

How does he do it? We know all about his all-round game: the powerful, accurate, varied serve; the peerless shot-making; the unrivalled forehand; the awesome returns; the almost supernatural reading of the game.

But it is consistency in all these things that matters. Control, hurt, finish. Every single ball that Federer hits has a purpose. He controls the court, controls his opponents. He moves them around, unsettles them, pressures them, dominates them. All of them.

There are very few realistic challengers to him in Melbourne, and even their records against Federer last year tell their own story.

Andy Roddick, with a new coach, Dean Goldfine - whose emphasis with Andy is on strenuous physical training - will show us this year what he is really made of. In 2004, he played Federer three times, in three finals, including Wimbledon, and lost three times.

Lleyton Hewitt, itching to be a winner on home soil, had an excellent 2004, something of a renaissance. He lost six out of six against Federer, including the final of the Masters Cup in Houston.

Marat Safin, who's starting to get his mind in the right place and should not be underestimated, lost three of three to Federer, including last year's Australian Open final.

Tim Henman beat Federer once last year, in Rotterdam, but lost twice, including in the US Open semi-final. He lost again to him yesterday, 6-4, 6-2, in the Kooyong Invitational. I cannot see Tim stopping Federer in a Slam. Federer said the other day that he believed Henman would win a Slam one day. All I can say to that is: "Are you not going to be at that tournament, Roger?"

Quite simply, I believe 2005 will be Federer's year again.

On the women's circuit, it is a sad year already and it has barely started. The Australian Open holder, Justine Henin-Hardenne, is injured and cannot defend her title. Also absent is her fellow Belgium, last year's runner-up, Kim Clijsters. Jennifer Capriati is missing, injured, and with ongoing questions about her health. Lindsay Davenport is trying to defy the years but is hardly in peak condition, while Serena and Venus Williams are not the forces of the recent past.

In Melbourne, I don't see victory for Davenport, the No1 seed, nor for the No2 seed, Amélie Mauresmo, who has all the tools and ability but not, I feel, the mindset to win. I don't think the No3 seed, Anastasia Myskina, has enough ability to hurt her opponents to win this time either.

Which leaves me having most faith in a trio of Russians, seeded No4, No5 and No6, headed by Maria Sharapova. I think she will have a great year, and she is my selection in Melbourne - ahead of Svetlana Kuznetsova and Elena Dementieva - but not with the same conviction as I back Federer.

Maria had a huge 2004, she is the one everyone wants to beat. Roger had a huge 2004, but right now, beating him is off most opponents' radar.
14 January 2005 19:20

violet coley
01-15-2005, 04:22 AM
Federer in the court of kings

Serving aces or serving as an ambassador for his sport, Roger Federer is a champion for the ages. Chip Le Grand reports

January 15, 2005

AN hour after toiling under the hot Melbourne sun, Roger Federer is back to immaculate.

Gone is the tennis attire, replaced by a crisp white shirt and designer jeans. Gone is the headband, the hair is freshly washed, conditioned and styled. Gone is the wristband; on Federer's wrist sits a hunk of gleaming metal that has prompted the wardrobe change -- after his post-match press conference Federer is due upstairs for a promotion for a Swiss watch-maker.

But whether upstairs or downstairs, on court or off it, Federer is at ease. Maddeningly, graciously, at ease.

If Federer defends his title at this year's Australian Open, debate will grow louder about his place in tennis history. Comparisons with Pete Sampras will abound, along with musings about Rod Laver, the last man to win a calendar Grand Slam. Already, at age 23, Federer is being spoken of as a once-in-a-generation player.

But however Federer is eventually judged against the greats in terms of titles won, there is something less tangible the young Swiss has already achieved. Since tennis became the global sporting business it is today, has anyone ever had such a complete handle on everything that goes with being the No.1 player in the world?

From the Hopman Cup in Perth to Memorial Drive in Adelaide, Sydney's Olympic Park to the sun-worn bleachers of Kooyong and Melbourne Park itself, all the talk this summer has been of Federer. Barely a day goes by when players such as Lleyton Hewitt, Andre Agassi or Andy Roddick, sporting superstars in their own right, or past greats like Laver, are not asked about Federer: how to beat him; how good he is; how their own games stack up against his. One after the other, time after time, they have publicly sung his praises.

For another player trying to prepare for a Grand Slam tournament, this might be disconcerting. Nice for a while perhaps, but eventually distracting. For Federer, accepting such acclaim is simply part of the job. No more or less difficult than compiling a staggering 92 per cent winning record, satisfying a corporate sponsor or answering the same press questions that have been posed since this time last year, when he won the Australian Open and first secured the No.1 ranking.

"That is just the way it is, you can't change it," Federer explained this week. "It is always quite normal that you are being asked about the No.1 player in the world because he sets the standard in tennis right now and right now it is me.

"I had such a great season last year. I guess I had a good season like nobody has had in 15 or 20 years, so it is normal that right away everybody compares me to the all-time greats. Now it is up to me to prove it and to be up there for a long time.

"I know how tough it is. To wake up every morning and to do it all over again, it is hard at times. You always arrive at tournaments as the huge favourite and that is not such an easy thing to handle on a daily basis. There is so much going on, much press, much attention, you are always being followed, and you have to get used to it like I did. I can handle it well luckily, so this actually gives me a good feeling for the future."

Like the fundamentals of Federer's near flawless game, this has not come by accident. Federer makes life at the top look easy, but only because he has established strict rules of engagement which govern the way he deals with sponsors and the public, opponents, an occasionally fickle sports media, and even family and friends.

Where many a top player has railed against media critics or tennis officialdom, Federer goes out of his way to ensure hostilities are restricted to the court. Where some world No.1 players have had frosty relationships with their contemporaries, Federer enjoys a cordial relationship with most players in the locker room. Where many a player has preferred to have family members in their travelling support crew, Federer likes his mother and father at home -- involved in the burgeoning Federer business, but out of the public eye.

Tim Henman played Federer at Kooyong yesterday and managed to keep the Swiss on court for only an hour before losing in straight sets. Henman is a good friend and regular practice partner and says he has detected little change in him since Federer wrested the top ranking from Roddick, his opponent in today's final at Kooyong.

"I think anybody who has known him for a long, long time would say it is the same person," Henman said. "Probably that stands out because maybe it hasn't been the same with other people in the past.

"He looks like he enjoys everything that goes with it. He obviously enjoys the success on court, but he is comfortable with the attention from the fans and the attention in his home country and I think it is a great asset because there doesn't seem like there are many things that are making him uncomfortable."

Federer's 2004 annus miraculus has made him one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. But whether it is sharing a court in Doha with a relatively unknown Spaniard or a stage in New York with United Nations boss Kofi Annan, Federer appears meticulously prepared.

On the court, this was not always the case. There was a time when Federer struggled to control his temper.

He has candidly recalled a misspent youth of smashed racquets and training camp ejections. Veteran tour observers recall a teenage Federer, in an early appearance at an ATP event in Key Biscayne, putting on a vintage display of pout and petulance in a straight-sets loss to Dane Kenneth Carlsen.

The difference with Federer is that he quickly understood such tantrums and theatrics did neither himself nor his game credit. For a year and a half he worked with a mental trainer -- "it sounds worse than it actually is," he joked -- to find the right balance.

"I try to be very consistent in the mental part of the game when I am playing because I realise that is important for me," he said. "In the past I was not behaving very well and that was making me lose matches so I had to change. But by changing that I don't think you should change your personality. You have to be comfortable with the way you act on the court.

"At one stage I was too nervous, too wild, swearing, throwing raquets, all those bad things. Then I got into a mood where I was too quiet, which was very strange for me. It was very difficult to get over that and start pumping the fist again and saying 'hey listen, I am happy with that shot'. That took me about two years where I was fighting with myself to get the attitude right on court."

From an uncertain start, Federer has also worked hard to cultivate the public image he now enjoys and amicable relationship he has with the travelling tennis press corps. Earlier in his career, Federer was frustrated by what he saw as a misrepresentation of his character and personality. More recently, he has developed a reputation as one of the tour's most accommodating players. He makes it part of his job to get along with those reporting on his sport.

"I think it is important that I enjoy working with the media," Federer said. "I see them every day and if I start fighting with them, or get in a mood not to answer their questions, this is when I can get into problems. I am who I am and I really just don't try to change for the media, because I want to stay natural."

There is a pattern here, one of a professional sportsman systematically removing any potential hurdles -- whether it be bad press, bad court behaviour or unnecessary friction with rival players -- which could otherwise make an already gruelling job more difficult.

Calendar Grand Slams and Australian Open titles notwithstanding, Federer has set himself two major goals this year: to defend his Wimbledon title and retain the world No.1 ranking.

Federer will today be joined by mentor Tony Roche, who has accepted on a part-time basis perhaps the easiest and most difficult coaching assignment in tennis.

But whatever happens over the next two weeks -- and it is hard to foresee anything but another Federer triumph on current evidence -- there is an unmistakable feeling that Federer has settled in for a long, comfortable stay at the top.

SUKTUEN
01-15-2005, 09:06 AM
Thanks :worship: :worship:

Fedex
01-15-2005, 09:25 AM
Thanks for all the articles, and there is a great article in this week's edition of 'Sports Illustrated'. Terrific read, but it will take you a good 15-20 minutes to read. I will post it when I can.

Fedex
01-15-2005, 09:40 AM
Hewitt says Federer can be beaten, and he knows how
By Julian Linden
SYDNEY, Jan 15 (Reuters) - Sydney International winner Lleyton Hewitt has rejected the notion that Roger Federer is a sure bet to win the Australian Open.
Hewitt knows better than most how good Federer is after losing their last six matches but the Australian said he knew the secret to beating Federer, although it was easier said than done.
"He's definitely the favourite, there's no doubt about that ...and someone's going to have to play extremely well to beat him," Hewitt said.
"But he's human and there are guys like (Andy) Roddick and (Marat) Safin and (Andre) Agassi in his half of the draw so if he's slightly off it's not going to be that easy for him."
Hewitt, whose losses to Federer last season included the finals of the U.S. Open and the Masters Cup, said the key to beating the Swiss was not to let him open up a big lead.
"If you look at the past where he's played his best tennis over probably the last 18 months he's been able to get off to flying starts against pretty much everyone," Hewitt said.
"So I think you need to stay with him early in matches.
Hewitt, 23, has won the U.S. Open and Wimbledon titles but has never made it beyond the fourth round at Melbourne in eight attempts.
As Australia's highest-ranked player in the tournament, which starts on Monday, the pressure is on Hewitt but he said the weight of expectation was not a burden.
"I think I've played in enough big matches -- Davis Cup semis and finals -- in Australia to be able to handle the situation," he said.
"I try to thrive on it more and use it more as a positive than a negative.
Hewitt has been in great form leading into the first grand slam of the year. He reached the quarter-finals of the Australian hardcourt championships in Adelaide last week then won the Sydney International for the fourth time in six years beating Czech qualifier Ivo Minar 7-5 6-0 in the final.
"I feel physically strong at the moment. I've come through some tough matches this week and I'm feeling confident where my game's at," he said.
"But grand slams are different as well, playing over five sets. You really just have to focus on one match at a time so that will be my mindset next week.
"Very rarely do you go through two weeks of a grand slam and every match is comfortable so it's a matter of getting through the tough matches and then trying to get on a bit of a roll."

More arrogant crap from Hewitt(what a suprise!) Its really the title that is particularly arrogant and until Hewitt starts beating Federer (which I admit may never happen again), he should not making comments such as 'Federer can be beaten, and I know how' I mean, how many straight matches has this guy lost to Federer now? Clearly, Hewitt doesn't know the 'secret' to beating Federer.

violet coley
01-15-2005, 09:46 AM
Well said, Fedex

ste
01-15-2005, 10:04 AM
Tim Henman beat Federer once last year, in Rotterdam, but lost twice, including in the US Open semi-final. He lost again to him yesterday, 6-4, 6-2, in the Kooyong Invitational. I cannot see Tim stopping Federer in a Slam. Federer said the other day that he believed Henman would win a Slam one day. All I can say to that is: "Are you not going to be at that tournament, Roger?"

. Roger had a huge 2004, but right now, beating him is off most opponents' radar.




"I think anybody who has known him for a long, long time would say it is the same person," Henman said. "Probably that stands out because maybe it hasn't been the same with other people in the past.

"He looks like he enjoys everything that goes with it. He obviously enjoys the success on court, but he is comfortable with the attention from the fans and the attention in his home country and I think it is a great asset because there doesn't seem like there are many things that are making him uncomfortable."

But whatever happens over the next two weeks -- and it is hard to foresee anything but another Federer triumph on current evidence -- there is an unmistakable feeling that Federer has settled in for a long, comfortable stay at the top.


thx for the articles!!

to be optimistic and enjoy everything you do is also a very important thing to be succesful - with enjoyment and happiness everything goes easier and motivation won't be rare - it's very very difficult to win against someone who is such in a "zone" :worship:

RonE
01-15-2005, 10:19 AM
Great articles thanks :D :wavey:

Daniel
01-15-2005, 11:15 AM
thanks ;)

babsi
01-15-2005, 01:34 PM
Thanks, all of you :)

Skyward
01-15-2005, 02:01 PM
"But he's human and there are guys like (Andy) Roddick and (Marat) Safin and (Andre) Agassi in his half of the draw so if he's slightly off it's not going to be that easy for him."


Wishful thinking, Hewitt! You have to deal with Roddick first. :lol:

Lleyton just can't shut up these days. Didn't he notice how DC comments backfired at him? :rolleyes: He is not a smart guy.

Thanks for the articles.

WyveN
01-15-2005, 03:09 PM
For Lleyton's sake he better have a more advanced strategy then "stay with him and not let him open up a lead". Of course a Federer-Hewitt match is a long way from happening.

lsy
01-15-2005, 05:12 PM
Another article from Australia media and I love the picture.

More relation to Rafter and lots of quotes from Lundgren, I wonder those are from the past or recently though.

Enjoy anyway.

================================================== ==

http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2005/01/15/1105582767152.html

Roger Federer, outside court
January 16, 2005 - 12:00AM

Countless words are used to describe his breathtaking backhand, and commentators fall over themselves to anoint him one of the all-time greats. But what is known about Roger Federer the man? Jake Niall went in search of answers.

The world's greatest tennis player does not have a manager and, in the course of 2004, when he played at a level that no champion has managed in at least two decades, he did not have a coach either.

Roger Federer follows what one ATP official described as "the Rafter model". Like Aussie Pat, Federer's family runs his affairs, rather than a slick management company. His parents, Lynette and Robert, handle the business, with his South African mother also taking care of the Roger Federer Foundation, the charity that supports disadvantaged children in her homeland.

Federer's girlfriend, the former Swiss tennis player Mirka Vavrinec, is his "personal assistant" - not only in the Les Patterson sense - and handles media requests when Federer is on tour. In practice, what this means is that Federer runs his own show and that few, if any decisions, are made without his input.

Rafter's mum ran Pat's charitable foundation, his brother was his management group and the whole operation had a relaxed, semi-formal feel - reminding us that Patrick Rafter was, in fact, a tennis player, not a corporation and did not have to consult with his shareholders or, as they now say, "stakeholders," to decide when he got up in the morning.

Federer has followed the Rafter model to the extent that he has even hired as his coach, on a part-time, ad hoc basis, the great Australian mentor Tony Roche, who performed the same job for "our Pat" when Rafter was the nation's flagship athlete and all-round good guy. From a broader perspective, Federer walks in Rafter's shoes by treating everyone - including an insatiable media - with courtesy and respect.

He is accommodating to an unusual degree for a superstar who is bracketed not so much with contemporaries Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick and Marat Safin - none of whom is within cooee right now - but with Pete Sampras, Rod Laver, Ivan Lendl, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe.

Federer is blessed to share the Rafter trait of utter normality, a state that makes him an oddity among the standard-bearers of professional tennis. Rafter and Federer are grounded, with a balanced outlook rare in a game that rewards obsession and pathological parenting.

"The parents are normal people," said Peter Lundgren, the Swedish former pro who served as Federer's coach until December 2003. "He's not spoilt. He's coming from a normal family." Lundgren, who now coaches Russian star Marat Safin, said that in some ways Federer was much like Rafter. "It's very similar. Also, Pat is a very normal guy, very nice and funny and polite all the time."

Federer speaks three languages - four if you count the Swiss variant of German - and says he thinks differently in each of them. Lundgren reckons Federer is a gifted linguist, "so talented, it's a joke", his grasp of the Swedish accent such that "you think he's actually Swedish".

As a Swiss national, he is interviewed in each of those three tongues (English, French and German) after nearly every match, a routine most sportsmen would find intolerable. Back in November, when he defeated Hewitt at Houston in a Masters Cup match that stretched to midnight, Federer stayed back completing interviews until 2.30am, repeating an entire radio interview, his last commitment, in French when the Swiss reporter's audio equipment failed to record.

Unaccustomed to a No. 1 who is polite, forthcoming and patient, the media are scratching their heads, wondering whether there was ever a dominant force in men's tennis - an undisputed benchmark - who was so easy to deal with, so unflustered, calm and decent.

"If I start fighting with them, or get in a mood not to answer their questions, this is when I can get into problems," Federer said last week, on the subject of his media policy. "I am who I am and really just don't try to change for the media."

The wolf pack has rewarded this laconic courtesy by leaving his private life alone. Not that there's much to talk about. Who wants to read an open book? With no siege mentality, no one bothers laying siege to Federer Castle. There is not much scope for tabloid invasion when the girlfriend arranges the interviews.

No.1s are not supposed to behave like this. They are meant to be difficult and suspicious, carefully managed and off-limits at the least, or just obnoxious, with the compassion of an assassin; the ironic consequence of a defensive mentality is that everyone strives to penetrate the walls that have been erected.

"He's a very good guy," said Philippe Bouin (of French sporting newspaper L'Equipe), doyen of the continental tennis writers. "That's a very unusual thing for a No.1 in the world."

Another tour regular recounts an anecdote that is instructive. In the hours after winning the US Open, Federer is on his way out of Flushing Meadows and heading back to Manhattan when a cluster of excited kids stop him for his autograph. The problem was that none of them could find a pen.

Instead of slipping into the waiting vehicle and disappearing into the night, the newly crowned champion pauses while one was found, smiles and signs.

Bouin thought that over the past 20 years or so, only phlegmatic Mats Wilander, a transitory No. 1 rather than uber champion, might have been as helpful and as friendly as Federer. The only other unfussed numero uno was Wilander's countryman, Stefan Edberg.

McEnroe and Jimmy Connors were volcanic, Sampras did not give much away and Hewitt's vexed relationship with the fourth estate and the odd official has been well covered. Moody Boris Becker had his angst, Jim Courier displayed an aggressive edge and would not suffer fools. Andre Agassi, a brat turned elder statesman, does his professional duty, but you would not call him open or accessible.

As a No. 1 about the only area in which Federer could not be considered a role model is when it comes to the concept of the tennis entourage. There are no biomechanists, hynotherapists, actors or Russian blondes in his camp.

On this Australian tour, he has a minimalist party of three - a girlfriend who doubles as media handler, his physio Pavel Kovac, and a Swiss mate, Reto Stobli, who has accompanied him at the grand slams lately. His conditioning coach was not needed, having helped Federer prepare in the fortnight he spent in Sydney before Christmas.

Lundgren thought Federer's private persona was reflected in his graceful artistry and gracious demeanor. "It just comes natural for him." Lundgren cautioned, though, that chronic winners could afford to relax. "When you start having bad months, or bad weeks, it's totally different."

Federer was not always such a gentlemanly presence on the court. In his late teens, he was apt to howl, curse and hurl his racquet. "At one stage, I was too nervous, too wild, swearing, throwing racquets, all those bad things," Federer said. Lundgren, who succeeded the late Australian, Peter Carter, as Federer's coach, told him he was "showing too much emotion".

"He was really hyper (active) when he was younger. He was incredibly hyper, he had so much energy." Lundgren recalled a Hopman Cup in Perth in which a restless Federer banged on his door at 5am, just to have a conversation.

Federer then over-corrected for his teenage aggro, turning from racquet hurler to tranquilised pacifist. "Then I got into a mood where I was too quiet. It was very difficult to get over that and start pumping the fist again," he said last week. Finally, with the aid of a mind coach, whose name he would not divulge, Federer found the winning balance between the ears.

As one blase victory follows another, it's easily forgotten that, a matter of two years ago, Federer was on the cusp of being labelled an under-achiever, whose musical tennis had never been properly expressed in the grand slam matches that count. "It was a tough time for him," said Lundgren. "He put so much pressure on himself. I told him, ‘Stop reading the papers'."

The Federer of 2004 was born in the course of Wimbledon 2003. Until then, Federer's on-court anxiety had been palpable. He was carrying a back injury and, according to Lundgren, needed a rest. Happily, the English weather intervened, granting Federer a long rain delay before the quarter-finals that enabled him to demolish Sjeng Schalken. He went on to smash Mark Philippoussis in a lopsided final.

"It was like a relief for him," said Lundgren of the Wimbledon breakthrough. "After he won Wimbledon, look at the results - it's amazing."

The self-belief he had withheld was unleashed, a torrent that has washed away Roddick, Hewitt and the rest. Now, in a neat transfer, Federer's competitors own all the anxiety. They can hope only that he will lose his mental compass, get hurt or dump tennis for soccer, or for his other great love, cars.

The unoriginal question must be asked of Lundgren: did the former coach ever think Roger the artist would become such a victory machine? "I knew he had it inside him," said the coach. "But I didn't expect it to come that quick."

yanchr
01-15-2005, 05:37 PM
Thanks all. Those are really great articles :)

Dirk
01-15-2005, 05:46 PM
Wow fantasic article. I think Martina N. was the one who gave him that champion advice in Hong Kong last year.

Yoda
01-15-2005, 07:57 PM
Great read. Thanx Isy

vene
01-15-2005, 08:50 PM
This is a funny post post from another board :haha: :haha: :

Hewitt says Federer can be beaten, and he knows how

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticl...storyID=7334817

Hewitt doesn't really provide a solution but rather diagnoses the problem.

Does he mean he consciously lets Federer get away early in matches??? That sounds like baloney.

If I were Hewitt, I would have told the press that the solution to beating Roger Federer is by sneaking up on him in the locker room before a match and flicking his power switch.

Of course, he may need to spend some time with Mirka to find out where the switch is located.

And on a related note, we all know Mirka left pro tennis to pursue her career in cybernetics.

Hopefully, you've picked up what I'm implying by now. If not... ROGER IS A ROBOT.

Don't be fooled, there is a new and improved model each and every year.

The inaugural model was the T-2001.

This prototypical cybernetic organism is loosely based on the human being Kevin Federline, current Britney Spears boytoy. This sexually appealing husk was needed in order to provide public attraction.

In order to provide the T-2001 with suffient processing power to compute unbelievable, jump out of your seat, lose control of your bladder type angles. He was engineered with an irregularly large cranial unit.

In particular, the peripheral perception unit or PPU was required to protrude out of the T-2001's forehead in order to receive spatial data of current court position and location of ball and opponent.

To portray Kevin Federline's attractive image, a protrustion in the forehead would not be acceptable. Thus Dr. Mirka implemented a primative solution. Roger must at all times wear a thick bandana on court to mask the distasteful appearance of the PPU unit.

Unfortunately, in the year 2001, the T-2001 unit had to wear the bandana at all times to mask the protrustion of the PPU unit. Luckily during this year, Roger received minimal attention from the media.

However in the following years, particular 2004, Roger was pronostigated to be in the "lime-light" of the tennis world and thus speculation would soon rise if he were to wear the bandana in all environments.

Thus, improvements and adjustments were made to the T-2001 design and programming.

Enter the T-2002 unit. This unit was introduced in the 2002 season, designed specifically to deal with the PPU ergonomical problem. Dr. Mirka was inspired by such "convertable" systems as the Enterprise-D's ability to separate into two entities: a saucer and drive section as well as the popular Knight Rider 2000, which could convert seamlessly between "Cruise Mode" and "Super Pursuit Mode." Michael Knight was her hero.

Dr. Mirka modified Roger's cranial design by implementing a similar "conversion" function. At will, Roger could now enable the Peripheral Perception Unit to protrude when needed (e.g. Game play situations) and then retract when superhuman tennis performance was not needed. Thus, his Nike Bandana concealing device could be withdrawn to avoid possible suspicion and stigmatization from the public and the press.

Aside: Through some experimentation, Roger turned off his PPU to conserve energy during the early rounds of some tournaments. As you can see from the unusual "hick-ups" in his win/loss records, he lost some matches to some pathetic no name journeymen. However, this proved to yield positively satisfying because if Roger were to execute a perfect season - his cybernetic identity would surely be investigated. This method was adapted from Roger's predecessor: "The T-500," Codename: "Bjorn Borg."

The year 2002 went by satisfactorily. During this time, the T-2002 received practical tennis guidance from respected coach, Peter Lundgren. He was selected for his lackadaisical and unsuspecting demeanor, which would serve to prevent his knowledge of Roger's true cybernetic nature.

Unfortunately, in the year 2003 BC, Lundgren began to become suspicious of Roger's unbelievable ability and started asking questions. Dr. Mirka was not impressed by Lundgren's new-found curiousity and many arguments ensued between the two.

This ultimately led to the demise of Coach Lundgren. He began to know too much and had to be terminated. This resulted in the development of the T-2004 - this unit was near perfection.

Now with prototypical self-coaching software installed in the CPU, Roger could now improve on his own without any external assistance. Dr. Mirka's fruits of her labour were finally enjoyed because of her patented self-adapting software she created with the assistance of Professior Victor Xavier Braden's marvelous book, Quick Fix Tennis, Stop Learning the Stupid and Slow Way!

The T-2004 unit could not be stopped in 2004 BC on all surfaces *except* clay.

Because Dr. Mirka insisted on Roger's knowledge of an infinite number of languages, his hard disk space was completely saturated which left no space for installing Microsoft's "Roland Garros XP" software.

ERGO, in her latest version of the Roger Federer; she has implemented a number of improvements over the previous version, including an improved, Clay Court Playing Module (CCPM). This module was ready to seize victory at the 2004 French Open, however due to severe security issues with the CCPM - use of the program was relegated to Roland Garros 2005 until numerous updates were downloaded on the RF operating system and RF service pack 2 was installed in his system.

Year-end diagnostics of 2004 revealed that Roger's "self-coaching software" was slightly overloaded. Thus coach Tony Roche was hired on an interim basis to help handle the computational load. Because of his senility, he would not be able to understand Roger's true cybernetic nature. In his hey-day, Coach Roche led Tennis Great and former world #1 Patrick Rafter to two US Open titles. This past history of Roche was ideal as, Pat Rafter was NOT a machine, he was simply superhuman in it's truest sense. (Aside: any player in the open era who had greater results than Rafter was either juiced or robotic, therefore making Patrick Rafter the greatest human player in the history of the game of Tennis)

In conclusion, the smoking new T-2005 "Tennis Terminator," codename: "Roger Federer" is now operational and has already proven successful at the ATP stop in Dubai.

However due to a program glitch, he could not get his PPU to retract before an impromptu press conference in Qutar, Dubai. Hence, Dr. Mirka quickly found a culturally suitable disguise:


http://artsweb.uwaterloo.ca/~jdu/im...erer_arab1a.JPG
Unfortunately, due to the high speed winds of the middle eastern deserts, his head piece flew up and off his forehead, revealing his PPU unit.

With world-class wit, the T-2005 was able to swindle the poor Dubaian press by persuading them that this "object" on his head was nothing out of the ordinary, but rather an expression of fan-fare for his favourite Swiss rock band, PPU.

The fortnight of the amazing Australian Open is now upon us. This tournament will prove to be no challenge for the new and improved T-2005. His engineering has become so advanced that no human will be able to stop him on any surface.

Current program executing: "Project Grand Slam (baby!!!!).exe"
Current one liner installed and ready for execution subsequently after 4th slam trophy of the year is held up over shoulders: "Watch your back Laver! Here comes your daddy!!!!"
--

APPENDIX

Tennis Terminator v.2001

Primary Objective: Allocate all resources to defeating tennis great Pete Sampras
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2002

Primary Objective: Mask Peripheral Perception Unit (PPU).
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2004

Primary Objective: To cause massive frustration to my greatest fans, Andy Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt.
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2005

Primary Objective: To capture all 4 grand slam titles
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.
Tertiary Objective: Build on current relationship with Kofi Annan and other political leaders towards my ultimate goal to rule the world.

Equipment

The Following is *TOP SECRET* and should not be discussed with anyone or distributed on some internet message board.

Roger Federer's associate in success has been his racquet. In a multi-trillion dollar contract with Wilson Sporting goods, Dr. Mirka and the Wilson Research and Design team have collaborated together to create the ultimate weapon of mass destruction.

This racq... *@%*!(%!&#$...

abnormal program termination.

... Before you go calling me crazy, let me tell you I'm up here in Canada stuck in my bed with a lovely cold virus and my laptop on a Friday night and virtually nothing to do but wait for the Aussie Open and make up really, really crazy stuff.

However, if you have any questions on the history or specifications of the Roger Federer line of cybernetic organisms, I'd be happy to answer them!

Thx,

raftermania

Mrs. B
01-15-2005, 09:56 PM
too funny! Thanks for posting, vene. Dr. Mirka :lol:

Seraphim
01-15-2005, 10:03 PM
This is a funny post post from another board :haha: :haha: :

Hewitt says Federer can be beaten, and he knows how

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticl...storyID=7334817

Hewitt doesn't really provide a solution but rather diagnoses the problem.

Does he mean he consciously lets Federer get away early in matches??? That sounds like baloney.

If I were Hewitt, I would have told the press that the solution to beating Roger Federer is by sneaking up on him in the locker room before a match and flicking his power switch.

Of course, he may need to spend some time with Mirka to find out where the switch is located.

And on a related note, we all know Mirka left pro tennis to pursue her career in cybernetics.

Hopefully, you've picked up what I'm implying by now. If not... ROGER IS A ROBOT.

Don't be fooled, there is a new and improved model each and every year.

The inaugural model was the T-2001.

This prototypical cybernetic organism is loosely based on the human being Kevin Federline, current Britney Spears boytoy. This sexually appealing husk was needed in order to provide public attraction.

In order to provide the T-2001 with suffient processing power to compute unbelievable, jump out of your seat, lose control of your bladder type angles. He was engineered with an irregularly large cranial unit.

In particular, the peripheral perception unit or PPU was required to protrude out of the T-2001's forehead in order to receive spatial data of current court position and location of ball and opponent.

To portray Kevin Federline's attractive image, a protrustion in the forehead would not be acceptable. Thus Dr. Mirka implemented a primative solution. Roger must at all times wear a thick bandana on court to mask the distasteful appearance of the PPU unit.

Unfortunately, in the year 2001, the T-2001 unit had to wear the bandana at all times to mask the protrustion of the PPU unit. Luckily during this year, Roger received minimal attention from the media.

However in the following years, particular 2004, Roger was pronostigated to be in the "lime-light" of the tennis world and thus speculation would soon rise if he were to wear the bandana in all environments.

Thus, improvements and adjustments were made to the T-2001 design and programming.

Enter the T-2002 unit. This unit was introduced in the 2002 season, designed specifically to deal with the PPU ergonomical problem. Dr. Mirka was inspired by such "convertable" systems as the Enterprise-D's ability to separate into two entities: a saucer and drive section as well as the popular Knight Rider 2000, which could convert seamlessly between "Cruise Mode" and "Super Pursuit Mode." Michael Knight was her hero.

Dr. Mirka modified Roger's cranial design by implementing a similar "conversion" function. At will, Roger could now enable the Peripheral Perception Unit to protrude when needed (e.g. Game play situations) and then retract when superhuman tennis performance was not needed. Thus, his Nike Bandana concealing device could be withdrawn to avoid possible suspicion and stigmatization from the public and the press.

Aside: Through some experimentation, Roger turned off his PPU to conserve energy during the early rounds of some tournaments. As you can see from the unusual "hick-ups" in his win/loss records, he lost some matches to some pathetic no name journeymen. However, this proved to yield positively satisfying because if Roger were to execute a perfect season - his cybernetic identity would surely be investigated. This method was adapted from Roger's predecessor: "The T-500," Codename: "Bjorn Borg."

The year 2002 went by satisfactorily. During this time, the T-2002 received practical tennis guidance from respected coach, Peter Lundgren. He was selected for his lackadaisical and unsuspecting demeanor, which would serve to prevent his knowledge of Roger's true cybernetic nature.

Unfortunately, in the year 2003 BC, Lundgren began to become suspicious of Roger's unbelievable ability and started asking questions. Dr. Mirka was not impressed by Lundgren's new-found curiousity and many arguments ensued between the two.

This ultimately led to the demise of Coach Lundgren. He began to know too much and had to be terminated. This resulted in the development of the T-2004 - this unit was near perfection.

Now with prototypical self-coaching software installed in the CPU, Roger could now improve on his own without any external assistance. Dr. Mirka's fruits of her labour were finally enjoyed because of her patented self-adapting software she created with the assistance of Professior Victor Xavier Braden's marvelous book, Quick Fix Tennis, Stop Learning the Stupid and Slow Way!

The T-2004 unit could not be stopped in 2004 BC on all surfaces *except* clay.

Because Dr. Mirka insisted on Roger's knowledge of an infinite number of languages, his hard disk space was completely saturated which left no space for installing Microsoft's "Roland Garros XP" software.

ERGO, in her latest version of the Roger Federer; she has implemented a number of improvements over the previous version, including an improved, Clay Court Playing Module (CCPM). This module was ready to seize victory at the 2004 French Open, however due to severe security issues with the CCPM - use of the program was relegated to Roland Garros 2005 until numerous updates were downloaded on the RF operating system and RF service pack 2 was installed in his system.

Year-end diagnostics of 2004 revealed that Roger's "self-coaching software" was slightly overloaded. Thus coach Tony Roche was hired on an interim basis to help handle the computational load. Because of his senility, he would not be able to understand Roger's true cybernetic nature. In his hey-day, Coach Roche led Tennis Great and former world #1 Patrick Rafter to two US Open titles. This past history of Roche was ideal as, Pat Rafter was NOT a machine, he was simply superhuman in it's truest sense. (Aside: any player in the open era who had greater results than Rafter was either juiced or robotic, therefore making Patrick Rafter the greatest human player in the history of the game of Tennis)

In conclusion, the smoking new T-2005 "Tennis Terminator," codename: "Roger Federer" is now operational and has already proven successful at the ATP stop in Dubai.

However due to a program glitch, he could not get his PPU to retract before an impromptu press conference in Qutar, Dubai. Hence, Dr. Mirka quickly found a culturally suitable disguise:


http://artsweb.uwaterloo.ca/~jdu/im...erer_arab1a.JPG
Unfortunately, due to the high speed winds of the middle eastern deserts, his head piece flew up and off his forehead, revealing his PPU unit.

With world-class wit, the T-2005 was able to swindle the poor Dubaian press by persuading them that this "object" on his head was nothing out of the ordinary, but rather an expression of fan-fare for his favourite Swiss rock band, PPU.

The fortnight of the amazing Australian Open is now upon us. This tournament will prove to be no challenge for the new and improved T-2005. His engineering has become so advanced that no human will be able to stop him on any surface.

Current program executing: "Project Grand Slam (baby!!!!).exe"
Current one liner installed and ready for execution subsequently after 4th slam trophy of the year is held up over shoulders: "Watch your back Laver! Here comes your daddy!!!!"
--

APPENDIX

Tennis Terminator v.2001

Primary Objective: Allocate all resources to defeating tennis great Pete Sampras
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2002

Primary Objective: Mask Peripheral Perception Unit (PPU).
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2004

Primary Objective: To cause massive frustration to my greatest fans, Andy Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt.
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.

Tennis Terminator v.2005

Primary Objective: To capture all 4 grand slam titles
Secondary Objective: To cause massive public confusion as to my racquet model and specifications.
Tertiary Objective: Build on current relationship with Kofi Annan and other political leaders towards my ultimate goal to rule the world.

Equipment

The Following is *TOP SECRET* and should not be discussed with anyone or distributed on some internet message board.

Roger Federer's associate in success has been his racquet. In a multi-trillion dollar contract with Wilson Sporting goods, Dr. Mirka and the Wilson Research and Design team have collaborated together to create the ultimate weapon of mass destruction.

This racq... *@%*!(%!&#$...

abnormal program termination.

... Before you go calling me crazy, let me tell you I'm up here in Canada stuck in my bed with a lovely cold virus and my laptop on a Friday night and virtually nothing to do but wait for the Aussie Open and make up really, really crazy stuff.

However, if you have any questions on the history or specifications of the Roger Federer line of cybernetic organisms, I'd be happy to answer them!

Thx,

raftermania

This was hilarious (sp)?

Mrs. B
01-15-2005, 10:04 PM
lsy, that was a good read, too. TK.

RogiFan88
01-16-2005, 03:25 AM
Just general stuff but some about ROGI:

January 14, 2005
ATP Insider - For the Week of January 10, 2005

ATP INSIDER -- Giving you an inside look into the ATP for the week of January 10, 2005

>> Photos available of these events

UP FRONT ....

->> – RAISING A RACQUET FOR UNICEF … Bidding has begun on the trio of racquets from the past three year-end World No. 1s that is being auctioned off on www.ATPtennis.com . Autographed match racquets from the top three players in the world, No. 1 Roger Federer (a Wilson racquet), No. 2 Andy Roddick (Babolat) and No. 3 Lleyton Hewitt (Yonex) will be mounted in one frame and accompanied by a letter of authenticity. The one-of-a-kind piece of tennis memorabilia is being auctioned off to benefit UNICEF's tsunami relief effort. The bidding, which is being hosted by IMG eCommerce, will continue until Jan. 28.

- - > Fifteen players went through the crowd with buckets to collect donations from the crowd at the sold out ASB Tennis Centre on Tuesday at the Heineken Open in Auckland to collect money for UNICEF's tsunami relief efforts. The effort raised NZD $11,446.55, and the New Zealand government will match that to bring the total amount raised for UNICEF to $22,893. Participating in the collection were defending champion DOMINIK HRBATY, JUAN CARLOS FERRERO, FERNANDO GONZALEZ, RAFAEL NADAL, JUAN IGNACIO CHELA, MARIANO ZABALETA, POTITO STARACE, JIM THOMAS, MICHAEL KOHLMANN, YVES ALLEGRO, JEFF COETZEE, ROBBIE KOENIG, SEBASTIAN PRIETO , PAVEL VIZNER and CYRIL SUK.

- - > In further support of the tsunami relief efforts abroad, LLEYTON HEWITT announced at the Medibank International in Sydney on Tuesday that he will auction personal RDX500 Yonex frames to the highest bidder in the stands prior to each of his matches this week and throughout the upcoming Australian Open. After his first round win over Karol Beck, the first racquet was sold for AUD $5,000, with Hewitt then matching the bid to raise AUD10,000 on the first day. On Wednedsay, the winning bid was AUD$7,000, with title sponsor Medibank tripling that to AUD$21,000, and on Thursday, the winnning bid was AUD$5,000, with Medibank tripling that figure once again. So after three days, the grand total raised so far is AUD$51,000. "The tsunami has touched many peoples lives throughout the Asia-Pacific region and the world", said Hewitt, "but no one more than the children of the countries which were impacted by this natural disaster. UNICEF is working to protect and help those children who may have been separated from their families or orphaned as a result of the tsunami and each of us should do as much as we can to support their ongoing efforts."

- - > Indian star LEANDER PAES has announced that he is to set up an orphanage in the Southern region of India for up to 1,000 children left without their families following the Tsunami disaster. Paes, who was forced to retire from the quarterfinals of the Medibank International in Sydney after injuring his left foot on Thursday, started the fund by donating all of his prize money from reaching the semifinals in Chennai last week. In Sydney on Wednesday, Paes held a dinner evening at a nearby Indian restaurant, charging AUD$100 a plate. Former Australian rugby captain Nick Farr-Jones and former Australian Test cricketer Greg Matthews attended the evening to help Paes raise AUD $15,000 for the orphanage. Paes will hold a similar event in Melbourne during next week's Australian Open.

->> – FANS FLOCK FOR FEDERER, 2005 GUIDE … A crowd gathered in Melbourne on Tuesday as World No. 1 ROGER FEDERER, fresh off another ATP tournament victory in Doha, unveiled the first available copies of the Official Guide to Professional Tennis 2005 . The new edition of the book features Federer on the cover. The winner of the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race, signed a limited number of copies of the book – the most comprehensive look at the players and statistics of the professional game – at Reader's Feast Bookstore in Melbourne. Federer, who is featured on the cover of the book, is in Melbourne ahead of next Monday's start of the Australian Open, at which he is the defending champion.

>> – TENNIS MASTERS CUP UNCOVERED AUDIENCE GROWS … Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer continues to be broadcast around the world. In the coming week, the documentary that is a behind-the-scenes look at the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup Houston, will air on Viasat Sweden on Jan. 17 at 3 p.m. This Sunday in Melbourne, a private media screening of the documentary will be held at 6 p.m. in the Arthur Streeton Auditorium at Sofitel Melbourne on 25 Collins Street. Following the screening, ATP CEO Mark Miles will be available to discuss the upcoming 2005 season, answer questions and conduct interviews. Refreshments will be served and there will be special giveaways.

- - > TOURNAMENT TALES: Photos available

IN AUCKLAND: The tournament kicked off on Sunday night with annual player party as players boarded and served as the crew on four yachts in the Hauraki Gulf. The international boat, featuring PAVEL VIZNER, PHILIPP KOHLSCHREIBER, CYRIL CUK and PETR PALA won the regatta, defeating boats with TOMMY ROBREDO, GRAYDON OLIVER and RIK DE VOEST on board.

-- > JAMES BLAKE and his coach Brian Barker demonstrated some skills and techniques to the New Zealand Coaches Association on Sunday.

-- > Defending champion DOMINIK HRBATY took part in a photo shoot with the New Zealand Herald on the rooftop of the Heritage Hotel in Auckland. Hrbaty was photographed with the diamond covered ball he received for winning the Hopman Cup for Slovakia last week in Perth.

-- > On Monday after, tennis literally stopped the traffic as JUAN CARLOS FERRERO and ROBBY GINEPRI took part in an exhibition tie-break after a net was hung across Queen Street in downtown Auckland. Several hundred spectators came out of their offices and the stores to watch the match.

-- > Doubles teams were featured in pro-ams at several clubs around Auckland on Monday evening. Doubles players GASTON ETLIS, MARTIN RODRIGUEZ, PAUL HANLEY, JORDAN KERR, JIM THOMAS, PETR PALA and JEFF COETZEE all participated in the events.

-- > Following their matches, GUILLERMO CORIA and FERNANDO GONZALEZ took part in the Mercedes-Benz Road Rally. Coria also signed autographs at the Mercedes-Benz display area.

-- > FERNANDO GONZALEZ talked tennis at the International Club Morning Tea that was held at the ASB Tennis Centre.

-- > The top junior players in New Zealand took part in a clinic along with MARIANO HOOD and MARTIN GARCIA.

-- > Several hundred youngsters took part in kids day, and they took over centre court to hit with RAFAEL NADAL, ROBBIE KOENIG, GRAYDON OLIVER and New Zealander MARK NEILSEN.

-- > New Zealand Olympians Sarah Ulmer, the cycling gold medalist and world record holder in the 3,000m individual pursuit, and Hamish Carter, the triathlon gold medalist, took in the quarterfinal action on Thursday.

IN SYDNEY: Climbing the INDESIT ATP Entry Rankings has come quite naturally to JARKKO NIEMINEN over the last couple of years, but the Finnish No. 1 reached heights of a different kind during the Medibank International in Sydney on Tuesday after taking in some of the most breathtaking views in the world. Nieminen was joined by an international news service crew to climb the Sydney Harbour Bridge, taking in the views of the famous Opera House and other parts of Sydney for more than two hours. With his feet finally back on the ground, Nieminen said: "It was spectacular, I'm very happy that I did it. They were the most amazing views. I was very surprised how easy it was to climb such a height, and I would recommend it to anyone."

-- > MARDY FISH attended the draw ceremony prior to the start of the Medibank International before going off for a spot of shopping. Fish joined Sony Ericsson WTA Tour star Anastasia Myskina at the ceremony, which was held in Sydney's Central Business District on Saturday afternoon. The American answered questions from fans about his chances in Sydney, as well as one fan who asked him if he was single. "No, I have a girlfriend and she's here with me in Sydney," said Fish, before spending the afternoon checking out the January sales while being followed by a Channel 7 TV crew.

-- > Former Australian Open champion THOMAS JOHANSSON joined local favorite WAYNE ARTHURS to take part in the Medibank International Diabetes Clinic for children. Johansson and Arthurs joined Sony Ericsson WTA Tour player Elena Dementieva to hit balls with the 15 kids, before posing for photos, answering questions and conducting television interviews. (Photos available on request from Getty Images)

-- > WAYNE ARTHURS, MARTIN DAMM, TAYLOR DENT, FELICIANO LOPEZ, WAYNE BLACK, KEVIN ULLYETT, FERNANDO VERDASCO, TODD WOODBRIDGE and MAHESH BHUPATHI were among the players taking part in Fan Fest autograph sessions during the Medibank International. The players answered questions from kids and posed for photographs before going on to the SEIKO sponsors tent for a spot of ping pong with more kids.
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/Insider_0110.asp

Daniel
01-16-2005, 09:28 AM
Thnaks Rogifan fro the article :)

lsy
01-16-2005, 12:52 PM
Is Rogi tired of winning already? :eek: ;)

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=tennisNews&storyID=7336461&section=news&src=rss/uk/tennisNews

================================================

Open-Federer wants a rivalry to push him on
Sun Jan 16, 2005 05:31 AM GMT
Printer Friendly | Email Article | RSS
By Simon Cambers
MELBOURNE, Jan 16 (Reuters) - Roger Federer won three of the four grand slams in 2004 and the world number one believes the chasing pack can lift him to even greater heights over the next couple of years.

The Swiss player, who goes into the Australian Open which starts on Monday as one of the hottest favourites in the tournament's 100-year history, has not lost to anyone inside the top 10 for more than a year.

Unlike the eras of John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg, and Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi, Federer is unrivalled at the top, with no one having been able to get the better of him on a regular basis.

With Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin trying to bridge the gap, however, Federer says a rivalry with one or more of the others could help him to improve even more.

"I'm playing so well right now but maybe a rivalry could lift my game," he said.

"If I started to lose to the number two, three, four, it would definitely be interesting."

( :smash: :smash: shut up Rogi!!! )

Last year, Federer beat Safin in the final at Melbourne Park, overcame Roddick to win Wimbledon and triumphed over Hewitt to clinch the U.S. Open.

"Lleyton, Andy and Marat all have the ability to beat anyone on a given day and win tournaments," he said.

"Every one (of them) played a grand slam final last year. I think the favourites are those three and (Andre) Agassi.


COACH ROCHE

"Agassi doesn't play as many tournaments as everyone else but he is always good at grand slams, and then you have (Tim) Henman and (Carlos) Moya."

Having gone through 2004 without a coach, Federer has teamed up with former French Open champion Tony Roche, who will work with him on a part-time basis.

Roche helped Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter to several grand slam titles and Federer said the Australian's presence gave him more confidence.

"Last year I had to fight with the expectations and the comments of people telling me that I don't have a coach, that that was a totally wrong decision, and those things put the pressure on me," he said.

"Now one year without a coach, I feel very confident. I know that I can handle it myself. Plus now with the help of Tony...things couldn't be any better."

While Federer said Roche had a tough job to improve his results, he said it would be his own fault if he faltered in the coming months.

"I think the experts, and me and Tony, we all know it's not his mistake if my ranking drops. Eventually it will drop. I can't stay number one for 50 years, you know."

( Nice Rogi, exactly what the no.1 should be, ready to take responsibility for his own career and results :yeah: )

violet coley
01-16-2005, 01:23 PM
This article is from the New York Post Online Edition


FEDERER'S FEELING GRAND

By MARC BERMAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


January 16, 2005 -- On the 100th anniversary of the Australian Open, Rod Laver has been asked to present the trophy to the men's champion in two weeks. It will be a symbolic moment if the Aussie legend presents the hardware to Roger Federer, who tomorrow launches a bid to become the first man to win The Grand Slam since Laver in 1969.

The Australian Open, whose center court is named Rod Laver Arena, annually kicks off the tennis season. It's been too long since a men's player has entered with buzz about copping all four Slams in a calendar year — the Australian, French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open.

Federer is a huge favorite in Melbourne, on a 21-match winning streak, his last loss coming Aug. 17 in the Olympics. He won three of the four Slams in 2004, dropping only the French Open on the red clay. But Federer's picturesque, all-court game makes him a contender to win a French, unlike Pete Sampras, who had no clue on the slow dirt.

Laver told The Post after Federer's 2004 Open domination last September he felt Federer, of all the players the last two decades, has the best chance to win The Slam.

But yesterday before leaving for Down Under, "The Rocket" admitted a giant challenge looms.

"It's going to be very tough," Laver told The Post. "He's got to be very fortunate. For nine months, he can't be injured . . . have sickness . . . the flu. He's got to raise his game four times to the ultimate level because there's so much talent. That wears on you after a while. But Roger, he seems like a man not worried about pressure. He plays better under pressure."

Since Laver won The Slam in 1969, just two other men aside from Federer strung together three — Jimmy Connors (1974) and Mats Wilander (1988).

Neither player, though, possessed the genius of Federer, who has no weakness, his array of slices and topspins moving some to muse they've never watched a more graceful, complete player.

As John McEnroe, the last player to be hailed as a tennis artist, said recently, "He may be the greatest player of all time."

Laver said tennis will reach a higher profile if Federer takes the first two, with hype building for Wimbledon in July, climaxing with the Open in late August.

"It will create a big difference because it's something people can latch onto," said Laver, who lives in San Diego. "It will expose the sport to a lot more people and certainly will be great for the game."

In an Australian tuneup, Federer didn't drop his serve in 43 service games in winning Quatar. He's got 23 titles at age 23.

Andy Roddick is the second seed but his career is in disarray. In a stunner, he fired his reputed coach Brad Gilbert in late December. Roddick was spotted at the Knicks-Heat game in Miami earlier this month, hiding under a fishing cap.

One tennis source said Roddick wanted a "new voice," as Gilbert's overbearing personality got too much. Roddick has hired Dean Goldfine, a U.S. assistant coach for Davis Cup and Olympics.

Andre Agassi is always a threat in Australia, the only non-Aussie to win it four times. Aussie Lleyton Hewitt usually succumbs to the pressure in his homeland and Laver says the dark horse for the event is Spanish lefty Rafal Nadal, 18, who upset Roddick in Davis Cup.

The women's field has become parity-ridden. The Williams sisters, Lindsay Davenport and Russians brigade — Maria Sharapova, Open champion Svetlana Kuznetsova, Anastasia Myskina and Elena Dementieva — are all contenders.

lsy
01-16-2005, 01:24 PM
I read this from Rogi's site :

"The most “visited” player on the ATP-website (www.atptennis.com) in 2004 was Roger with a total of 2,103,686 page impressions (profile, biography, head-to-head, & points breakdown). Roddick (1,830,981), Hewitt (1,317,426), Agassi (1,067,573) and Roger were the four players to attract over 1 million page views in 2004.

ATPTennis.com had an impressive year in 2004 by registering 165,278,173 users, which represents an increase of more than 25% from 2003 (124,906,103). During 2004, ATPTennis registered back to back record breaking months with May (17,440,482 page impressions) and then July with 18,421,381. July is now the most trafficked month in the history of the website. For the first time, ATPTennis surpassed 1 million page impressions on a single day in September 13th, 2004 (Day after US Open final) with a total of 1,017,586 page views."

=========================================

Who's to say Rogi's bad for tennis??? Well at least so far he had only brought much more interests to it. That boring one sided double bagelled USO final was intriguing enough to have people jammed up ATP sites like it has never been before :lol: :worship:

Choupi
01-16-2005, 03:22 PM
I was looking for some infos and I've found this on eurosport.com. It's a short video showing some players paying tribute to Roger...thought some of you might be interested...

http://eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/playermultimedia_lng0_rub9_spo57_ven18453.shtml

ste
01-16-2005, 03:55 PM
thx vor the articles :hug:

RogiFan88
01-16-2005, 10:34 PM
Does anyone get ITALIAN VANITY FAIR??? Apparently Rogi did an interview for them recently... he says some interesting things and he will be at one of those Milan fashion shows after AO05, so keep your eye out for ROGI watching the catwalk!! Rogi likes Prada...

Yoda
01-17-2005, 12:56 AM
Thanks guys\gals for the articles.
Loved the Terminator story...heehee

fightclubber
01-17-2005, 12:59 PM
ao federer interview after def santoro

R. FEDERER/F. Santoro

6 1, 6 1, 6 2

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How would you sum that up?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it was good, good start. I think the start of the match was important for me, you know. That set the tone for the rest. And never really gave him a chance to get back into the match.
So best of five, an easy three setter sometimes they look very, very easy, but I always had the feeling I still had to play some good points to win them, especially against him. He gets back a lot of balls. But I'm happy with my performance, and that's what counts in the end.

Q. Do you think you're an even better player than you were at this time last year?
ROGER FEDERER: I had the feeling I was playing also very good at the beginning of the Australian Open last year. So I think about the same.

Q. Fabrice is a very different player to most players. Is that the kind of game where you get to try out some things you don't necessarily get to hit against other players?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I play the way I have to to win. I'm not testing out anything against him. It's a tournament which means very much to me. In practice, I can try some things if I want to do that, but not in the match.
Against Fabrice I always tend to come in a lot, you know, to make him hit the pass and not me. That has been working in the past.

Q. At one stage you appeared between shots to be practicing your defensive cricket shot. Was that the case?
ROGER FEDERER: That was the case, yeah. I got a good technique then. You saw that (smiling).

Q. Will you take in any cricket while you're here and do you know any of the Australian players?
ROGER FEDERER: I haven't actually ever played, you know, but more for fun with a racquet, never really with a bat. I don't know, get a few nice balls from some players, some real cricket players, that would be fun to see how it is for a change.

Q. The shot you played looked like a left handed...
ROGER FEDERER: Was it? I can play both sides. I have to see which one is my side. I'm not sure, actually. Baseball I play it here (smiling).

RonE
01-17-2005, 01:14 PM
Merci Choupi and Gracias Silvy :hatoff:

avocadoe
01-17-2005, 02:33 PM
woohoo, Isy's article and the Sci-Fi poster article made a great breakfast read...two parts of the same thing...I also love Roger saying that somedy his ranking will dip as he can't keep this up for 50 years, LOL thanks so much!!!

Did anyone else feel that every time the camera came to Tony Roche, he looked fidgety, or grumpy, or maybe it was just his hip. And I didn't see Mirka during the whole Santora match?

babsi
01-17-2005, 03:51 PM
Thank you for all the articles everyone :)

And Roger - I´m not that picky - I´m totally fine with your game as it is - so for me - no rivlary,thanks alot!!!!!!!

SUKTUEN
01-17-2005, 04:37 PM
Thankyou RonE :worship: :worship: :wavey:

RonE
01-17-2005, 05:42 PM
Thankyou RonE :worship: :worship: :wavey:

You're welcome :hug:

lina_seta
01-17-2005, 09:14 PM
Can roger really play with both hands? right and left???? (tennis)

soonha
01-17-2005, 11:58 PM
Did anyone else feel that every time the camera came to Tony Roche, he looked fidgety, or grumpy, or maybe it was just his hip. And I didn't see Mirka during the whole Santora match?

She was there, next to Roche.

avocadoe
01-18-2005, 01:08 AM
what happened to my avatar? I can't see it anymore :( it is back, woohoo :)

Colosseo
01-18-2005, 10:08 AM
But I can see your avatar
It's nice!
like this
http://67.19.129.138/mtf/customavatars/avatar2614_1.gif

Daniel
01-18-2005, 11:07 AM
nice pics colosseo ;)

avocadoe
01-18-2005, 01:21 PM
Maybe I should get my eyes checked, first Mirka, then my avatar :)

SUKTUEN
01-18-2005, 01:29 PM
Mirka is a beautiful lady~~

But I think she need to keep fit :devil:

fightclubber
01-18-2005, 04:09 PM
ABC NEWS ONLINE

Last Update: Tuesday, January 18, 2005. 7:16pm (AEDT)

Federer swaps tennis racquet for cricket bat
World number one and defending Australian Open champion Roger Federer swapped his racquet for a cricket bat today and showed he might have a fruitful alternative career if he ever bores of tennis.

The Swiss has spent several weeks in Australia preparing for his Melbourne title defence and began in grand style yesterday with a 6-1, 6-1, 6-2 defeat of Frenchman Fabrice Santoro.

During that match he made several practice swings which looked suspiciously like forward defensive strokes a batsman would play, suggesting that his time in sports-mad Australia was starting to leave an impression.

Intrigued by Federer's air swings, Channel Seven decided to offer him a few quick lessons on a roof-top court.

Federer struggled as he put on a pair of gloves and a batting pad but quickly showed the kind of hand-eye coordination of which any cricketer would be proud.

The winner of three grand slam titles in 2004 hit several deft cut shots, pulls and even an off-drive to tennis balls bowled to him by a reporter.

He was pleased with the way he had managed to pick up the game and wondered if Switzerland might not one day be able to challenge the likes of world champions Australia in cricket.

"You never know, we've got a sailing team. Maybe a cricket team is next," Federer said of land-locked Switzerland, which won sailing's prestigious America's Cup in 2003.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200501/s1284295.htm

fightclubber
01-18-2005, 04:11 PM
tHE HERALD SUN
19 JAN 2005
The kid to test Federer
Scott Gullan
19jan05

WITH Roger Federer's domination showing no signs of slowing, the tennis world has started to look anxiously towards the next generation for a saviour.
Pictures: Open action

Thankfully, there is a candidate on the scene and, if you listen to the good judges about 18-year-old French prodigy Gael Monfils, he is about to arrive in a hurry.
The kid is the next big thing.

Given the way he dispatched talented American Robbie Ginepri, a former top-25 baseliner, to win his first grand slam singles match on Monday, 1-6 6-3 6-4 7-6 (8-6), the hype is on the money.

Monfils, who plays Belgium's Olivier Rochus today in the second round, says that if he wasn't playing tennis he'd be dunking it in the NBA.









He looks like he belongs on a basketball court next to Kobe Bryant. The lanky physique, the swagger, the stare, the baggy shorts and gold chains all scream serious attitude. He has already drawn obvious comparisons with French champion Yannick Noah.

He was given a wildcard into the Australian Open, courtesy of his domination of the junior ranks last year where he won three of the four grand slams -- the Australian Open, French and Wimbledon -- in a breeze.

He didn't lose a set in the Australian and only one in the other two.

Already he has numerous endorsements. In Octagon, he has the same management company as Australia's Lleyton Hewitt.

Those who saw him on court 21 against Ginepri had one thought: How good is that forehand.

It seems to have its own jet-powered engine and Ginepri, who made the fourth round here last year, was left cemented to the spot as the kid unloaded to all parts of the court.

Then there is the serve -- Monfils stands at 191cm, which has a bit of Andy Roddick about it -- and has a habit of coming up big when it matters.

In the fourth set against Ginepri, he trailed 0-3 in the tiebreak before three aces and a couple of trademark forehand bombs won it 8-6.

What tops off the package is the way he stalks his prey. After a big winner, the kid will lock eyes with his opponent, take a couple of steps forward, mutter something in French and give the impression he is ready to leap the net and start swinging.

At his ATP debut in October in Mertz, Monfils reached the quarter-final by defeating Xavier Malisse and Olivier Patience before losing to countryman Richard Gasquet.

He also defeated former top-10 player Thomas Enqvist in the ATP Masters in Paris before losing a tight affair to Lleyton Hewitt in the second round.

Monfils said he felt the pressure in his first grand slam, which explained his first-set capitulation (1-6) in 20 minutes against Ginepri.

"I was too excited and not focused on my game," Monfils said.

"After that I relaxed and tried to make my game against Ginepri."

Some experts say Monfils' game could take him into the top 10 within a year and give that man Federer something to think about.


http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,11983202%255E3162,00.html

Puschkin
01-18-2005, 04:18 PM
tHE HERALD SUN
19 JAN 2005
The kid to test Federer
Some experts say Monfils' game could take him into the top 10 within a year and give that man Federer something to think about.
http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,11983202%255E3162,00.html

How to spoil a promising career? Give too much praise too early.

Mrs. B
01-18-2005, 06:28 PM
got my copy today of Sports Illustrated! :bounce:

great article!

Clara Bow
01-18-2005, 11:36 PM
got my copy today of Sports Illustrated!

great article!

Yes- it's a fabulous article isn't it? (I'm a fan of SI Price's articles in general) I'm so glad to see Sports Illustrated devote 5 or so pages to Roger. I'm going to write the editors to thank them for the article so maybe they will continue to offer insightful articles about tennis figures.

Puschkin
01-20-2005, 11:38 AM
Help, please! Can anybody post the post-match interview after the Suzuki-match, I can't find it.

Doris Loeffel
01-20-2005, 12:25 PM
Puschkin I was wondering the same thing where's the interview none of Roger and none of Suzuki that's strange...

fightclubber
01-20-2005, 12:35 PM
I found this in AO site


Suzuki's Time in the Sun
by Nick Hulett
Thursday, 20 January, 2005


Like many of the players who entered the main draw of the Centenary Australian Open via the gruelling qualifying process, Japan's Takao Suzuki has been eliminated before the end of the first week, but the 28-year-old managed to produce one of the tournament's most memorable performances so far.

At a packed Rod Laver Arena in the evening feature match on Day Three, few expected world No.1 Roger Federer would have to produce some of his scintillating best to win his 23rd-straight match and advance to the third-round.

But Suzuki, currently the top-ranked Japanese male at No.203 after enjoying a career-high ranking of No.102 in 1998, played arguably the best match of his 10-year career as he provided the 15,384-strong crowd with many thrills thanks to his chip-and-charge style of play.

And although Federer eventually progressed with a 6-3 6-4 6-4 victory, Suzuki walked off the court with his head held high as the appreciative audience gave him a standing ovation, before the Swiss spoke glowingly of his opponent's performance in the on-court interview.

After dropping the first set of the first-round of qualifying to Dutchman Matwe Middelkoop - a player ranked outside the world's top 300 - Suzuki's time at Melbourne Park looked set to be short-lived, but he rebounded strongly to win not only that encounter but his remaining two qualifying matches and then, in the main draw on Monday, stunned American Jan-Michael Gambill in straight sets on court 11.

The reward for a second-round exit at the Australian Open 2005 is AUD$28,155, meaning that after a decade on the Tour, Suzuki has finally topped the US$500,000 career-earnings mark. The runner-up at Melbourne Park this year will take home AUD$603,310, with the champion to receive twice as much as that.

By his own admission, Suzuki, who broke Federer early in the first set, showed some of the best form of his career at Melbourne Park and was still buzzing after his performance against the No.1 seed, although he explained that he never really envisaged winning the match.

"I was really happy to play against him (Federer) in centre court. Especially also I never played on night session, so it was very exciting for me and also still excited," Suzuki said.

"I'm not playing like other guys, staying the baseline. I (am) going to the net a lot."

"I broke I think in the fifth game on the first set, but I didn't feel well still on my serving. He played very good, especially passing shot."

Having battled his way through Challenger tournaments and qualifying events last year, Suzuki had his best result of 2004 at the Tokyo Outdoor in October, where he won through to the round of 16 and took world No.3 Lleyton Hewitt to three sets.

Suzuki also breezed through US Open 2004 qualifying before going down to local Paul Goldstein in the first-round at Flushing Meadows, but his performance at Melbourne Park will surely stand as one of his finest.

Suzuki had actually appeared on Rod Laver Arena once before, in the first-round of the Australian Open 1999 when he was knocked out after a five-set battle with Spaniard Alex Corretja. In six previous appearances at Grand Slam events, Suzuki had progressed past the first-round only once, when he reached the second-round at Wimbledon in 2003.

So when the dust settles on the first Grand Slam of 2005 and all the great matches, the miraculous shots and the stunning upsets have been recorded, Suzuki's straight-sets loss on the first Wednesday may very well be a distant memory, but the Japanese veteran will long remember the night when he made all those who watched - even his star opponent - stand up and take notice.

novanora
01-20-2005, 01:23 PM
Thanks for fighterclubber, nice to read. :)

I can see he prepared a lot for this match against Roger, but still surprised to see his current ranking even lower than 200. If he didn't have chance of getting this kind of draw to play against a top player, maybe we will never notice his performance, not mention those top players.

yanchr
01-20-2005, 04:17 PM
Thanks Silvy:)

I'm also looking forward to their postmatch interview. I'm waiting for the whole day, but no sign at all :( How can they steal from us the potentially interesting interviews by the two players :o

SUKTUEN
01-20-2005, 04:38 PM
Roger is honest~~

RogiFan88
01-20-2005, 05:55 PM
I got my SI too but was interrupted by the Nadal/Youzhny match they decided to show last night... vamos, Rafa!!

Anyway, so far, a fab read...

WyveN
01-20-2005, 10:59 PM
http://www.tennis.com/fitness/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=79504&itype=1209

Article about rogers fitness training

fightclubber
01-20-2005, 11:56 PM
http://www.tennis.com/fitness/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=79504&itype=1209

Article about rogers fitness training

cool one Thanks
silvy

SUKTUEN
01-21-2005, 02:07 AM
Roger articles is become more and more

SUKTUEN
01-21-2005, 02:08 AM
Roger articles is become more and more :devil:

eleven
01-21-2005, 04:31 AM
MX Sport - 'Kamikaze bid a thriller'
- Courtney Walsh

Little-known Takao Suzuki may have laid the groundwork for future opponents determined to halt the Federer Express with a thrilling display against the Swiss Star last night.

Although he did not win a set, the Japanese qulifier pushed Roger Federer all the way with kamikaze serve-volley tactics.

But Suzuki, ranked 203, sounded a warning for those keen to try a similar approach, despite 49 of his 82 winning points coming at the net. He admitted picking Federer's returns was based on guesswork.

"A few balls I guessed and I stopped the ball, but it was really tough to stop it all time." he said.

Federer's power game also saw Suzuki, 28, finish the match with an injured hand.

Puschkin
01-21-2005, 10:08 AM
This time, we get the post-match press-conference;)

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2005-01-21/200501211106299366720.html

R. FEDERER/J. Nieminen

6‑3, 5‑2 (ret.)

Q. You made a slightly hesitant start. Was that a little bit the conditions? A bit breezy down there.

ROGER FEDERER: Actually, I had the wind on my side so there you go (smiling).

Q. It was unusual. Silence in the crowd.

ROGER FEDERER: It was a little unusual, you know. At least when you get broken in the first game, you know ‑‑ in a way you have a little bit of time to get back into the match.

But I wasn't happy. That's clear. I was a little irritated after that, and just worried, you know, because I had the feeling this could be a tough match, and I knew that from the start. Then I ended up losing my first service game. That was bad.

But I bounced back and slowly really started to feel that there was a chance on his serve and this is when I really started to play better.

Q. Because of your record over the last six months or so, do you get the impression that people don't expect you to make any mistakes and are kind of shocked when you miss the kind of volley you missed in the first game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, now I start to feel, you know, at times in matches, you know, when I get broken, people are surprised. So I don't want to know how it is when I lose a set, you know. Well, I saw it in Kooyong, actually, when I lost a set to Gaudio in exhibition. They couldn't believe it.

We'll see what happens next match. But I think they so used to that I'm winning, you know, so people don't understand when I'm losing. It's not that simple.

Q. What about you? How do you react when you miss shots now?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, it's something very normal. In practice I miss sometimes shots you cannot believe. But in a match, the concentration is higher and there's something ‑‑ you're really playing for something, you know, for everything.

I don't know, it's okay. I can handle it. As long as I'm not really losing the match, losing sets, you know, that's fine. But I always want to play better than I am. ((People will call him arrogant again, I love it;)) But today I thought it was pretty okay.

Q. Did you have an inkling before the match, whatever you did this morning, in your warm‑up or anything, that you were feeling a little bit flat, that it just wasn't quite there at the start for you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no. I had the usual warm‑up. Everything was going according to plan. But, again, it's a left‑hander. You know, totally different match to the match I played before. And sometimes that just takes a little bit of ‑‑ a couple of games to get used to it. You know, I had a bad start.

But I always say important is the reaction after that. I showed it also today again, as against Suzuki, when I was down a break, that you can recover from that and end up winning the set. That's what I did. I started to play better, like I said.

But didn't feel nervous this morning or anything, no.

Q. Do you see any reason why a few years ago there were even five left‑handers in the Top 10, and now there are not almost any any more? Do you think there is a reason for that, tactically?

ROGER FEDERER: I think the parents usually teach you to write and do stuff right‑handed, I guess.

Q. That was years ago.

ROGER FEDERER: Still now, I think. It's just a normal way to be, I would guess. And it's becoming more dominant than it used to be. For me, I cannot explain. I'm not a ‑‑ some specialist, so...

Q. Have you had a chance to look at the matches of some of your main contenders? If you have, have you noticed any variation in their play that might be different to what you might have seen previously?

ROGER FEDERER: No. You know, the bottom half is very relaxing to watch because you know you're not going to play them before the finals, if you actually ever get there. So that is always nice to see the matches.

The one in your half of the draw, you know, you're more concerned about those. But I haven't seen anything new they have added to their games over the off‑season. I think, you know, everybody knows how short the off‑season is. For some who play Davis Cup finals, it's even more difficult. I think throughout the year you will maybe see some changes, but not now in the early stages.

Q. You appeared to be content to get to the net perhaps quicker in rallies than has been the norm. Is that something that Tony has said, "Get in, vary it a little"?

ROGER FEDERER: No. He didn't tell me to get in, no. I think he's happy when I vary my game. But he didn't tell me, "Come in extra against this guy," or anything.

I just had the feeling, you know, if I can play a couple of good volleys and make him feel the pressure, you know, that he really has to hit great passing shots, after a while, I just had the feeling he probably couldn't come up with all those shots on a regular basis. You know, sometimes, you know, of course I got surprised, sometimes I missed a volley. But all in all, I still had the feeling that when I was at the net, he had a lot of pressure because he was struggling to get my slice up at times. It frustrates him. I can break his rhythm like this. That was the reason why I did it.

Q. Do you think the fact ‑‑ I know you were hurt in the fall, but the fact you didn't play too much in the fall is helping you be mentally fresh down here this time of year?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I don't have that feeling. I would have preferred to play Basel and those tournaments. But I think it would have been the same no matter what. It's only two or three tournaments I would have played more.

Q. Did you ever figure out why you had that injury, what caused it or anything? Was there any explanation?

ROGER FEDERER: I was a little unlucky, I thought. You know, I had ‑‑ yeah, I was unlucky. I had a look at it with my physio, with my condition trainer, what I might have done wrong. But it was a bad movement, you know. Maybe like Jarkko today, you know, there are just things sometimes you cannot control. I could play tennis like this. You know, I was practicing till the morning itself. But then I just realized or the doctors told me this thing won't go away if you keep on playing. So I knew there was no chance for me to win the tournament. Who knows, I might have won the first round and then had to give a walkover then. But that's not what I was there for. So I'd rather take it easy and make sure I could play the Masters, actually, so that's what I did.

Q. It just happened in one quick motion in a practice session; it wasn't over time?

ROGER FEDERER: Could have been also. But I felt muscle pain in my legs, and actually it was probably more than muscle pain, because I don't have muscle pain every day.

But, yeah, I think it was just pretty unfortunate. I didn't realize it quick enough, actually, how serious it was.

^Sue^
01-21-2005, 10:32 AM
I LOVE THAT!!

RonE
01-21-2005, 01:23 PM
Thank you Puschkin :kiss:

SUKTUEN
01-21-2005, 05:24 PM
Thanks :wavey:

shina
01-22-2005, 10:25 AM
I'm not sure if this one has been posted yet...

Relaxed Federer a perfect fit for Roche
By Emma Quayle

Roger Federer's relaxed nature - more than his tennis ability - convinced Tony Roche to sign a 10-week coaching deal with the world's best player.

Roche will help the Swiss star prepare for each grand slam tournament this year, and said yesterday that while his game needed only limited tweaking, Federer wanted badly to stay ahead of the inevitable pack.

The 59-year-old, who will continue to work with Sophie Ferguson and other emerging young Australian players, coached Ivan Lendl to eight grand slam championships and guided Pat Rafter to the No.1 ranking and a pair of US Open titles.

"I don't think anything's missing. Roger's a very complete tennis player and he's No.1 at the moment and at the top of the tree, but he knows that everybody's after him and that you've got to keep improving," Roche said yesterday.

"I don't think you can afford to sit back and say, 'I've achieved this and I'm happy with where I'm at.' You can always improve and I think that's where he's at right now.

"We had a meeting and talked it over, and he's a very laid-back person and I like working with people like that.
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"I was lucky. A lot of people had the wrong impression, I think, of Ivan Lendl but he had a great personality and I enjoyed that and everybody knows Pat's personality and what he was like. It's nice to work with nice people and we haven't been together too long, but I certainly like what I see."

Roche had been been pursued by Federer since the Swiss champion split with former coach Peter Lundgren at the end of 2003, but knocked back an initial offer to work with him because he did not want to spend too much time on the road. He said to keep Federer in top spot was as big a challenge for him as it was for the 23-year-old, and that relationship was a fairly casual one that would concentrate on getting him ready for each major tournament.

"It's a relationship where when Roger's got particular weeks that he wants to work on his game, then he'll give me a call and we'll get together. I'm not going to be travelling an awful lot," Roche said.

"It will just be little things here and there, but it's more coming into an event - what surface you're playing on, what you'll be using a lot more - and trying to gear your preparation around that.

"It's always a challenge. It's changing at a great pace, the men's game, and you've sort of got to keep up with things."

http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Relaxed-Federer-a-perfect-fit-for-Roche/2005/01/21/1106110946267.html

Daniel
01-22-2005, 12:05 PM
Thansk shina :)

lsy
01-22-2005, 01:20 PM
Guess who's in the AO final???

:banana: Rogi and Pete!!! :banana:

:lol: Even on paper it looks an amazing match and best thing is it's a match that both wins :bounce:

================================================== =
http://www.smh.com.au/news/Tennis/The-return-of-the-king/2005/01/22/1106334264556.html

The return of the king
January 23, 2005
The Sun-Herald

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In the rush to proclaim King Roger, many have forgotten that until recently, Pete Sampras ruled the tennis world. Here, Rohit Brijnath conjures up the Australian Open final we'd love to see.

In the locker room, a temporary peace sits between them. Presence is acknowledged, but it is not a day of saying much, and they sit like silent knights before this conclusive joust. It is the morning of the Australian Open final, the wind blows, the sun burns, but they're not particularly attentive. The conditions don't interest them, only each other.

On court their dissimilarities will soon be evident, for one man's tennis sounds like martial music, the other's like a hymn. But as men, too, they are set apart. Says that Boston bard, Bud Collins: "Pete is self-contained, a room-service guy, [he] maintains his own mystique. Roger is more cosmopolitan, he's European and speaks three-four languages."

Sampras shrugs those doorway-sized shoulders and pushes the doorway open into his zone. "With Pete you can feel his intensity," says Patrick McEnroe. "Federer, it seems like nothing bothers him."

Physically, the American is more imposing, but he does not look to exude any particular threat, says Jim Courier, who has inhabited the locker room with him in the moments before grand slam finals. "He never really worried about intimidating except on court. For Pete, it all about between the lines."

Advertisement
AdvertisementBoth men heft their bags and walk out - Sampras is in white, Federer in red. They understand the occasion, they accord each other respect, they are alive to knowledge that only their best game will do today.

Sampras is absent of fuss, even his ball bounce is restricted to just one before he unveils his serve, a stroke that carries with it more than a passing resemblance to a guillotine. The American will start quicker, most say. He is a player of early statements.

As Federer crouches at the other end, Sampras might unleash "two first serves", says Courier. McEnroe concurs. "Pete always comes out hard. Against Cedric Pioline (US Open final, 1993) his first serve was at 210kmh or so, and later he said: 'I just wanted to let him know I was coming'." Federer is more dominant when he gets his teeth in a match.

Federer takes a while to adjust to this pace. Former Davis Cup star John Alexander sees "Roger conceding early service games", and Sampras shuts him out of the first set.

Breakpoints come and go and both are good at saving them. The American saves one with a forehand on the dead run like a whiplash, the Swiss salvages another with a half-volley backhand flick with the ball behind his body. Sampras punches a volley into an unreachable corner, Federer caresses one to an acute angle.

His dextrous wrist, alive with all manner of devils, conjures up a lob but only Sampras, on springed feet, can reach it. Balls are lasered at each other's backhand, but as Courier says: "Pete's backhand is attackable and Federer's is not."

Almost nothing separates them, and at a changeover a commentator quotes former Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic: "Maybe the toughest player I ever played is Pete because he is guy that gives you only one or two chances per match and if you don't take those chances, you're finished. But I still think Federer is the biggest talent from all the players I played."

Federer takes the second set by threading two passing shots off either flank. Sampras, with a rattle of volleys, takes the third. The Swiss threads a backhand down the line for the fourth, and the match is poised.

Where grass and the faster US Open court fed his game, here the more sluggish pace and elevated bounce at Rod Laver Arena is amputating a small part of the American's threat. Sampras does not want to rally here, but the Swiss is spoilt for choice. He is, as McEnroe explains, "the best offensive and defensive player I've seen".

Federer begins, for McEnroe at least, to pick Sampras apart, and the longer it gets the worse it becomes, as Lleyton Hewitt might testify after the US Open final last year.

In reality, into which we must slip only briefly, Sampras stands alone as the modern God, Zeus in long, white shorts. We are prone to genuflect now before Federer, whose completeness is dazzling, yet we stand unsure about whether his journey will take him to 14 slams and six years as No.1. Whatever the fictional end to this match, the jury, bewitched perhaps, is still out on the Swiss.

As Courier insists: "They're very similar in one respect. Both have an extra gear when they need it. They are the two best big match players I have ever seen."

Sampras, whose five-set record in slams is 29-9, fingers sweat off his brow; Federer, with a 6-3 record, reaffixes his headband. Somehow, for this athletic ballet, seven sets appears more appropriate, and then, abruptly, it is over, the result coming swiftly for some, slower for others.

For McEnroe, a commanding Federer runs away with the fifth; for Courier, the Swiss rules on this particular court, but by the slimmest of margins. Alexander goes for the American and Collins also backs Sampras, both of them by an eyelash.

Later that day, a statistician points out to whoever cares that each one won the same number of points.

asotgod
01-22-2005, 03:29 PM
Isy, good job. I was just about posting the article.

asotgod
01-22-2005, 03:34 PM
If you go through the Australian Age link, you will get the same article. Beneath the article you will see a 'Related' article showing the comparisons between Roger and Pete both in accomplishments and in their tools. The article is titled 'Court of Dreams' and the link is

http://www.theage.com.au/news/TennisFeatures/Court-of-dreams/2005/01/22/1106334264728.html

asotgod
01-22-2005, 03:44 PM
This is the link for the 'Related article' on Roger and Pete

http://www.theage.com.au/media/2005/01/22/1106334264827.html

Fedex
01-22-2005, 10:30 PM
I got my SI too but was interrupted by the Nadal/Youzhny match they decided to show last night... vamos, Rafa!!

Anyway, so far, a fab read...
Yes, it was a terrific read, and I wish there was some way I could post it here. I guess the only advice is to buy the magazine.

Fedex
01-22-2005, 10:33 PM
Guess who's in the AO final???

:banana: Rogi and Pete!!! :banana:

:lol: Even on paper it looks an amazing match and best thing is it's a match that both wins :bounce:

================================================== =
http://www.smh.com.au/news/Tennis/The-return-of-the-king/2005/01/22/1106334264556.html

The return of the king
January 23, 2005
The Sun-Herald

Page Tools
Email to a friend Printer format
In the rush to proclaim King Roger, many have forgotten that until recently, Pete Sampras ruled the tennis world. Here, Rohit Brijnath conjures up the Australian Open final we'd love to see.

In the locker room, a temporary peace sits between them. Presence is acknowledged, but it is not a day of saying much, and they sit like silent knights before this conclusive joust. It is the morning of the Australian Open final, the wind blows, the sun burns, but they're not particularly attentive. The conditions don't interest them, only each other.

On court their dissimilarities will soon be evident, for one man's tennis sounds like martial music, the other's like a hymn. But as men, too, they are set apart. Says that Boston bard, Bud Collins: "Pete is self-contained, a room-service guy, [he] maintains his own mystique. Roger is more cosmopolitan, he's European and speaks three-four languages."

Sampras shrugs those doorway-sized shoulders and pushes the doorway open into his zone. "With Pete you can feel his intensity," says Patrick McEnroe. "Federer, it seems like nothing bothers him."

Physically, the American is more imposing, but he does not look to exude any particular threat, says Jim Courier, who has inhabited the locker room with him in the moments before grand slam finals. "He never really worried about intimidating except on court. For Pete, it all about between the lines."

Advertisement
AdvertisementBoth men heft their bags and walk out - Sampras is in white, Federer in red. They understand the occasion, they accord each other respect, they are alive to knowledge that only their best game will do today.

Sampras is absent of fuss, even his ball bounce is restricted to just one before he unveils his serve, a stroke that carries with it more than a passing resemblance to a guillotine. The American will start quicker, most say. He is a player of early statements.

As Federer crouches at the other end, Sampras might unleash "two first serves", says Courier. McEnroe concurs. "Pete always comes out hard. Against Cedric Pioline (US Open final, 1993) his first serve was at 210kmh or so, and later he said: 'I just wanted to let him know I was coming'." Federer is more dominant when he gets his teeth in a match.

Federer takes a while to adjust to this pace. Former Davis Cup star John Alexander sees "Roger conceding early service games", and Sampras shuts him out of the first set.

Breakpoints come and go and both are good at saving them. The American saves one with a forehand on the dead run like a whiplash, the Swiss salvages another with a half-volley backhand flick with the ball behind his body. Sampras punches a volley into an unreachable corner, Federer caresses one to an acute angle.

His dextrous wrist, alive with all manner of devils, conjures up a lob but only Sampras, on springed feet, can reach it. Balls are lasered at each other's backhand, but as Courier says: "Pete's backhand is attackable and Federer's is not."

Almost nothing separates them, and at a changeover a commentator quotes former Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic: "Maybe the toughest player I ever played is Pete because he is guy that gives you only one or two chances per match and if you don't take those chances, you're finished. But I still think Federer is the biggest talent from all the players I played."

Federer takes the second set by threading two passing shots off either flank. Sampras, with a rattle of volleys, takes the third. The Swiss threads a backhand down the line for the fourth, and the match is poised.

Where grass and the faster US Open court fed his game, here the more sluggish pace and elevated bounce at Rod Laver Arena is amputating a small part of the American's threat. Sampras does not want to rally here, but the Swiss is spoilt for choice. He is, as McEnroe explains, "the best offensive and defensive player I've seen".

Federer begins, for McEnroe at least, to pick Sampras apart, and the longer it gets the worse it becomes, as Lleyton Hewitt might testify after the US Open final last year.

In reality, into which we must slip only briefly, Sampras stands alone as the modern God, Zeus in long, white shorts. We are prone to genuflect now before Federer, whose completeness is dazzling, yet we stand unsure about whether his journey will take him to 14 slams and six years as No.1. Whatever the fictional end to this match, the jury, bewitched perhaps, is still out on the Swiss.

As Courier insists: "They're very similar in one respect. Both have an extra gear when they need it. They are the two best big match players I have ever seen."

Sampras, whose five-set record in slams is 29-9, fingers sweat off his brow; Federer, with a 6-3 record, reaffixes his headband. Somehow, for this athletic ballet, seven sets appears more appropriate, and then, abruptly, it is over, the result coming swiftly for some, slower for others.

For McEnroe, a commanding Federer runs away with the fifth; for Courier, the Swiss rules on this particular court, but by the slimmest of margins. Alexander goes for the American and Collins also backs Sampras, both of them by an eyelash.

Later that day, a statistician points out to whoever cares that each one won the same number of points.
Thanks for the article.

mitalidas
01-23-2005, 12:42 AM
Even Federer needs a guiding hand at times
By John McEnroe
(Filed: 23/01/2005)



If Tony Roche does for Roger Federer what he did for Ivan Lendl, they might as well hand him the Grand Slam right now, if not this year then next. I still have nightmares about the influence the wily old Australian had on my great rival of the Eighties. Roche took Lendl to the next stage of his development where he took over the No 1 ranking from me. Federer is already at that stage but a bit of fine-tuning never did anyone any harm.

Some people may be surprised that the world's No 1 has considered it necessary to hire a coach after going the whole of last year without one and yet still managed to win three Slam titles. He was so eager to prove that he could get by without a coach last year that it worked to his benefit, but I think he recognises this is an historic opportunity and wants to give himself every opportunity of seizing it.

It's a riskier proposition to go about it by yourself and it helps to have someone around you to keep pushing you along, otherwise you may lose sight of how hard you need to work. When the game comes as easily as it does to Federer, it's just possible he could become a little lazy.

Obviously there are no weaknesses in Federer's game, but it's fair to say that he is more comfortable at the baseline than at the net. Interestingly, Roche is one of the great volleyers of all time. He had the prototypical backhand volley – the greatest I ever saw in a left-hander – which he put to emphatic use in his legendary doubles partnership with John Newcombe. So from that standpoint alone, it's a smart move by Federer.

While the offer to Roche was clearly flattering it's not the easiest situation for him to walk into. In fact, it's almost a no-win situation in as much as there's not a lot of scope for improvement in Federer's game; it's already as near to perfection as it's humanly possible to get. And if the Swiss doesn't keep on winning, Roche, rightly or wrongly, will be blamed. The upside of it is that the guy is so talented it would be amazing if he didn't win many more Slams.

While he is not a man who seeks the spotlight, Roche still has a lot of pride, as I was reminded of when I played alongside him in a doubles match against Andre Agassi and my idol Rod Laver at Newport last summer. 'Rocket' is no longer as fit as Roche who took great delight in putting the ball just out of the reach of his old rival. It's fun to see the old guys because they never lose that competitive-ness. When Laver won the Grand Slam in 1969 he beat Roche in the final of the US Open. Nine years later I lost to Roche in the final of the first professional tournament I ever played, at Queen's.

With or without a coach, though, Federer takes some beating. In fact, I can't see anyone beating him unless he's off his game. If I had to face him I think I'd play it a la Lleyton Hewitt – with a lot of intensity. I'd try to fire up the crowd and bring them into it. He obviously doesn't get rattled easily so you would have to keep yourself highly motivated for every single point – and it probably still wouldn't be enough. People with power, like Andy Roddick and Marat Safin, are always going to give him more trouble than the touch players. Agassi, with the strength of his ground strokes and hand-eye co-ordination to rival that of Federer, is another one. The American veteran did really well against Federer at the US Open and still pulled up short, but then the Swiss was on his game that day. Young Joachim Johansson, with whom I practised at the Royal Albert Hall in December, has a huge game but again, he would still need to catch Federer on an off-day to beat him.

I like the way Safin has been conserving himself at this year's Australian Open and if he gets to meet Federer in the semi-finals he may have more steam than he had in last year's final against him. The big Russian plays Olivier Rochus this morning, which will be a test of his new-found resolve under Federer's old coach, Peter Lundgren. Impatience is Safin's Achilles' heel and the little Belgian knows just how to exhaust it, running everything down and generally getting the crowd on his side.

I always confuse Olivier with his brother Christophe – if anyone knows the difference please give me a call – but I know both have given Safin problems in their time. Olivier – I think – is the one who took him to five sets at Roland Garros three years ago before beating him at Wimbledon. If Safin can get past this particular irritant he could be on course for a semi-final re-run against Federer.

In the other half of the draw I have seen nothing to suggest that Roddick and Hewitt won't contest the second semi-final, particularly now that Tim Henman, something of a Slam semi-final specialist these days, is out of the running. The American would no doubt love to wipe from memory his embarrassing capitulation against Hewitt in the Masters Cup at Houston in November, but there's no guarantee that the Aussie will get that far. After all, he's been found wanting here before and he's in a tougher quarter than Roddick. That said, I like the look of his potential match-ups, first against the passionate Spaniard Rafael Nadal (Hewitt wouldn't let him off the hook the way Mikhail Youzhny did in round two) and then against either David Nalbandian or Guillermo Coria. You have to love Hewitt's intensity, which could take him all the way to the final, but belated Australia Day celebrations could still end up around a coach rather than a player.

Dirk
01-23-2005, 06:36 AM
Great article and I agree Roche will help him with his volleys and his chip and charge game.

SUKTUEN
01-23-2005, 08:26 AM
Thanks~~ :worship:

Daniel
01-23-2005, 11:31 AM
very nice aerticle thanks :)

Daniel
01-23-2005, 11:34 AM
MELBOURNE (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer kept his Australian Open (news - web sites) title defense on track with a commanding 6-2 6-2 7-6 win over talented Cypriot qualifier Marcos Baghdatis Sunday to set up a quarter-final against Andre Agassi.



Federer fought off the exuberant Baghdatis, who was playing in his first Australian Open, in 103 minutes to set up an intriguing battle against four-time Australian champion and eighth seed Agassi, who beat big-serving 11th seed Joachim Johansson of Sweden 6-7 7-6 7-6 6-4.


Federer bristled when asked if he thought he was playing well enough to beat 34-year-old Agassi, the oldest player in the tournament.


"He's not as good he was when he was at the top of the rankings, otherwise he would be there. Fortunately I'm there," Federer said.


Like Federer, Agassi has also been in rich form and had not dropped a set until his match with Johansson. But world number one Federer said the American would have to be at his very best to beat him.


"I think he has to raise his game, not me," he said.


The unpredictable Baghdatis won a set against Federer when they met in the second round of the U.S. Open (news - web sites) last year.


He had a chance to repeat that when he hit a string of audacious passing shots in the third set to force the tiebreaker, where he grabbed a 3-0 lead, before Federer hit back to claim the decider 7-4.


"He got fired up and played some fantastic forehands," Federer said. "I'm very happy, I saved a lot of energy. The tournament almost starts now for me," he said.


Federer remains a strong favorite to defend his title despite facing Agassi, who won the title on his first appearance in 1995 and again in 2000, 2001 and 2003.


"Agassi will be a tough one. It will be fantastic to play Andre here," Federer said.


World number 155 Baghdatis was the first Cypriot to reach the fourth round of a grand slam since tennis turned professional in 1968.


"I wanted to play, to show that I could do it, but I was a bit stressed out," the 19-year-old said of his slow start.


"I'm pretty happy with myself," said the Cypriot, who upset 13th seed Tommy Robredo of Spain in the third round.

babsi
01-23-2005, 12:26 PM
Thank you,Daniel :)

Fedex
01-23-2005, 03:11 PM
Thanks for the article, Daniel. :)

fightclubber
01-23-2005, 03:35 PM
After match interview

R. FEDERER/M. Baghdatis

6 2, 6 2, 7 6

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. You had a little fun with the possible castration shot, but you didn't make the shot. Do you remember that?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, the one around the no, the one between the legs this time?

Q. Yes.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it was a pity. I could have hit it differently, but I thought, "Why not?" I saw Andy made it, so I thought I had to try it as well. I hardly ever do it in a match situation. Almost made it.

Q. How did you like the Greek chorus?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I wasn't sure if I was leading actually, you know, because they sang along like they were winning, you know. I always had to check the score and make sure that I was actually winning.
But when I looked at the score board, I was always pretty happy, so.

Q. You possibly might have to play Agassi next. Assuming you do play Agassi, do you think your game at the moment, you're at a level to beat him, considering how well he played the other night?
ROGER FEDERER: I hope so. I mean, I don't know why you ask me a question like this. I think I've proven myself in the past, and I know my game's good enough, you know. Also on my day where I'm not playing perfect, I know I can beat him. He's not as good as he was when he was at the top of the ranking, otherwise he would be there. Fortunately, I'm there.
I think he has to raise his game, not me.

Q. When you got into the tiebreaker, were you thinking about the US Open, which was the last time apparently you lost a tiebreaker?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Because, yeah, he came again. Just before the break, he got fired up and played some fantastic forehands. That's exactly what happened also at the US Open. But just there, you know, there was more pressure because it was the second set. Here it was a third set and I was already leading two sets to love. So for me it was okay.
But I was worried, 3 Love down, you know, I think two mini breaks. I'm happy I came back there and saved maybe crucial energy.

Q. Chela got fined $2,000 US for spitting in yesterday's game with Hewitt. What do you think about that sort of fine for that sort of incident?
ROGER FEDERER: Didn't see it.

Q. Didn't see it at all?
ROGER FEDERER: I didn't see it at all. I just heard. The papers say it all.
It depends how close he spat (smiling). I don't know. I mean, we hardly ever get that in tennis, so it's tough. I don't know what the rule says. I don't do it. He can be fined $10,000, I don't care.
But I think, you know, there should be a fine. We see it in soccer sometimes. It's not something very nice, so I'm happy he gets fined and things like this don't belong on a tennis court.

Q. Hewitt gets himself obviously very fired up on the court. Do you think that plays a part in how maybe Chela reacted?
ROGER FEDERER: Maybe, yeah (smiling).
I don't know. I didn't see the match, luckily. I mean, it definitely plays a role. But I don't think you should go that extreme, you know.

Q. How important is it when you are playing Hewitt that you keep your cool? I mean, how important is it to his game, that ability that he seems to have to get on his opponents and irritate them?
ROGER FEDERER: I mean, totally different players have different characters. Different characters need different motivation, you know. So Hewitt, he needs his screaming. Other guys, they need the peace. Sometimes they like to get into each other's faces, you know, that they play better.
So you just have to don't really have to care too much about what your opponent does. You know, I think it shouldn't influence you that much that you lose your mind.

Q. Is it difficult when you're out there and things get tight? When you prepare to play a guy like Hewitt, do you have to set out from the outset, "I'm not going to buy into any of that stuff going on on the other side of the net," because you can lose your own game?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I'm at the point where I just focus on my own game. Definitely, you know, tactics and everything, I analyze that. But whatever he does, you know, for me it doesn't play a big role.
I turn around very quickly. You know, I see maybe one quarter of what my opponents do, you know, which is good. So I really just focus on myself.

Q. Was there a time when you were disturbed by opponents' antics?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, in the beginning. Yeah, you know, you have a look. You're like, "Why are you showing me your fist? Did I do something to you?" You take it very how do you say? personal. That's not what you should do.
It's a match, of course, you know. Sometimes it's difficult to separate match, on court, off court. But I'm at the point where, you know, whoever does on the court, he's like that. Off court, he might be all right, so.
What matters to me is how they are off court and not really on court.

Q. You said Andre is going to have to really raise his game to beat you. What do you expect him to try to do?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, first he has to win, so let's wait about that first. He has a tough opponent.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about what Tony Roche is bringing to your game?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, we just started, so didn't have too much time. But I'm having a good time with him, like I said. I think it's just important to get new information. You know, so far I'm happy I coped well with it because very quickly, you know, it can influence your mental part I think in tennis and you try maybe what you have worked on, and in the end end up losing. And that's not what I'm really working for with Tony.
I'm hoping just to improve my game, also if it's just little things. I'm not going to start serve volleying first and second serve. That's not why I got him as a coach. I think the next couple of months will show. I think now also here he sees all my matches live, and we can go from here.

Q. Happy with how this first week has brought you into the second week? Went pretty smoothly.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, I'm very happy. I saved a lot of energy. I'm really like tournament almost starts now, you know, for me, which is very good. I played a lot of all the matches on Laver now. Probably will keep on doing that. I'm looking forward to tough matches coming up now. You know, no matter Johansson or Agassi, it will be a tough one. It would be fantastic to play Andre here.
But I try to look at the big picture and try to defend my title. Andre or Johansson are in my path, and I hope I can beat them.

Q. Hewitt says the court is too slow. What's your version of this court?
ROGER FEDERER: I think it's similar to last year. I don't remember too many guys making a big deal out of it last year. A little bit quicker, I don't mind. So as long as you don't change it, you know, to the extreme where basically there's no more rallies, you know, just because it's so quick, I think then we have a problem. But it could be a bit quicker. But the way it's now, I think we're seeing great rallies.

Q. Moderate, would you say?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, we don't have those quick courts any more like in the past. Like when I came on tour, there was a few quick ones around. Now it seems everything has slowed down so much. This is like a regular hard court.

Q. Courier asked you on the court about the tsunami relief effort you did at Nike yesterday. Are you impressed with how the tennis community has come together on this or do you think there's not enough being done yet?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I think every player wants to help, you know. We're all trying to do something. I also spoke to Horst Klosterkemper and asked him if maybe we should do something before Indian Wells or Miami, maybe a match, just where all the top guys, you know, they appear on the court, and all what the ticket and sales, that goes also away, because I think that's missing a little bit in the game of tennis, and I would be very happy to do it.
We gave stuff, you know, to auction it off. I think we are all trying our best. Important is what the top guys do especially because they are in the limelight, and I think they have really shown that they do care very much.

Q. On Hewitt, would you like to see him tone down his on court antics at all?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I understand him. Geez, he's in Australia, you know. He wants to win this tournament so badly, and he's showing it. He wants people to feel it.
So, I mean, you know, what is 'tone it down'? Three c'mons less per match? That's not going to make the difference, so. I mean, we all agree. I mean, he's fine the way he is.

Q. What do you think about the possible return of Martina Hingis?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I would like to see her coming back. I thought she never comes back. But now I think this is for a good cause. I might even see her winning the tournament, so we'll see what happens, right?

Q. Can I just clarify, when you said earlier in your career some opponents might have got under your skin, were you talking specifically about Lleyton or just players in general?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I had many, many opponents. Because when you start and you're young, all the players, they take advantage of it. You know, they take toilet breaks, change their stuff for 10 minutes, they don't watch the clock, you know, the umpires. There's just so much going on.
Now, you know, that I'm playing on centre court and I'm No. 1 in the world, they don't try the stuff any more because they know in the end it comes down to tennis, not these little tricks. But in the beginning, you have to go through that and you have to experience this. And sometimes you lose your mind on such things because you can't control those, you know. And then, again, you know, you have people getting in your face just the way they act.
But now nothing of that is bothering me, and that's why I'm a better player.

Q. Has Lleyton ever annoyed you on the court?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, we had all these tough matches, you know, in the past. He won too many of those. So, yeah, he did annoy me (smiling).

SUKTUEN
01-24-2005, 02:29 AM
Roger is very concident~~

federer_roar
01-24-2005, 02:51 AM
A Video clip Federer no more overawed by Agassi. Pls bear with me if it's been posted.
http://www.eurosport.com/imgbk/tennis/all/small_md-i171663.jpg

SUKTUEN
01-24-2005, 06:14 AM
THE picture is so small~!!!! But thanks

mitalidas
01-24-2005, 08:42 PM
"Federer talks trash ahead of Agassi match"

is the title of this STUPID AMERICAN BIASED piece
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6861672/

Jimena
01-25-2005, 12:19 AM
"Federer talks trash ahead of Agassi match"

is the title of this STUPID AMERICAN BIASED piece
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6861672/

:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

The article itself is not that bad, but the headline is just plain stupid.

The Bud Collins article, though, made me mad: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6861876/

Agassi also brings incredible serenity to the court — he’s definitely happy. He has learned throughout his career how to approach matches, especially big ones, with a very even temperament. He doesn't let anything happening on the periphery of a match bother him at anytime.

Contrast that to Federer, who after being surprisingly taken to a tiebreaker in the third set of his fourth-round, straight-set win over teenage qualifier Marcos Baghdatis got testy with the media.

I mean, I love Agassi. But one of his weaknesses is staying mentally strong when his opponent is making him play out of his comfort zone. Sampras did that to him, Rafter did it, and Roger's doing it to him. Agassi simply get's outplayed or makes uncharacteristic errors at the most inopportune times in those matches. He double faults serving at 5-6, he misses easy shots and volleys, he makes a questionable shot selection. All of those are mental errors. That's why Sampras was able to beat him more often than not in the big matches, and that's why Roger beat him the last two times they played.

Oh, and Baghdatis is not simply a "teenage qualifier". He's a former junior world #1, with fantastic shot making ability, who won the junior Oz Open and took a set off of Roger at the US Open.

I dislike journalists that fit the "facts" to the story they want to tell. Bud, I thought you were better than that. :(

Oh and this:
As for Federer, he’s cruising on confidence, and why not? Last year he won three of the four majors — the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, becoming the first man to win three of the four majors in one year since Mats Wilander did so in 1988. So why wouldn't Federer think he owns the men's game?

Does Roger think he owns the men's game? Didn't he hire Roache precisely because he knows he needs to keep getting better and better? Thank you, Bud, for your fantastic insight into Roger's mind. :rolleyes:

:mad: :mad: :mad:

Shy
01-25-2005, 12:22 AM
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

The article itself is not that bad, but the headline is just plain stupid.
Whathever catch attention, I guess.

sol
01-25-2005, 12:24 AM
http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,12042269-23869,00.html



Roger vs Andre: one for the ages
By Patrick Miles
January 25, 2005

ANDRE AGASSI says he is nervous before every match, but there might be more than the usual flutter tonight when he takes on top seed Roger Federer for a place in the last four of the men's singles.

At risk of seeming ghoulish, the patrons fortunate enough to be in Rod Laver Arena could be witnessing the American's last match in Australia. Defeat for Agassi could hasten his decision to retire at the end of this season.

So expect more than the usual flourish after the match - should the Swiss be victorious - from the man who bows and blows a kiss to all four sides of the court.

The latest American world No.1, Andy Roddick, who reached the quarter-finals with a straight-sets win over Germany's Philipp Kohlschreiber yesterday, takes reports of his compatriot's retirement with a grain of salt.

"It's not going to be surprising two years from now if he's still here winning matches," Roddick said of the 34-year-old.

"People have been talking about 'it could be his last' since before I was on tour. I've come to just really expect it."

Roddick, who is seeded to face Federer in the final, is one of many relishing the prospect of the veteran baseliner, winner of eight Grand Slam titles, versus the 23-year-old genius all-rounder, winner of four.

"Andre has been able to give Roger probably his best matches over the last year or so," Roddick said. "I think Roger has gotten him a couple of times, but they've always been pretty close and gone the distance.

"I'm as excited as the next person. I'm still a big tennis fan, so I'm excited to watch it, that's for sure."

Agassi has played 52 matches at the Australian Open and lost to only four men. Two of them, the French Open champions Michael Chang and Alberto Berasategui, are long since retired.

The others are fellow American Vincent Spadea and, last year, Marat Safin, whose five-setter against Agassi in the semi-finals left the Russian spent for Federer.

Federer's win-loss record at Melbourne Park stands at 21-4 over five visits, including last year's unstoppable march to the title.

Their head-to-head record is 4-3 in favour of the Swiss but he has won the past four times, including a quarter-final at last year's US Open.

Roddick believes the keys for Agassi lie in his return game and his past experiences on the final Sunday.

"I think he gets inside the court a little bit more, he takes away Roger's time a little bit," Roddick said.

"But that being said, Roger still won the last couple.

"But also, obviously, the occasion is not going to get to Andre. He's been there; he's pretty much accomplished everything there is to accomplish in this sport."

So a mouth-watering match-up has occurred in the quarters, a place where, in the past, Agassi would not have expected to be the underdog.

"I suppose it was a matter of time," Agassi said.

"Roger's earned the respect he deserves. I want to make him go out there and prove it to me again. That's what it's about.

"So whatever the seedings are, whatever the expectations are, it's more important being the favourite when the tournament's over with."

Neither player has a weakness but Federer has more strengths, including, it has to be said, greater foot speed compared with the older man.

The champion, who holds three of the four Grand Slam singles titles, has every right to be confident, and it was his refreshing grasp of reality rather than arrogance that prompted Federer to say: "I think I've proven myself in the past, and I know my game's good enough.

"Also, on my day where I'm not playing perfect, I know I can beat him.

"He's not as good as he was when he was at the top of the rankings, otherwise he would be there. Fortunately, I'm there.

"I think he has to raise his game, not me."

lsy
01-25-2005, 04:25 AM
"Federer talks trash ahead of Agassi match"

is the title of this STUPID AMERICAN BIASED piece
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6861672/

So I suppose perharps Roger really is going to make it big now in US...you know they love this type of "trash" talking :haha:

But seriously you can see the difference, so far articles I had read elsewhere, yes they quoted Rogi but they would also put in the original question and why was he fired up suddenly, but this particular one you posted just quoted him and gave it a stupid title :rolleyes: But why am I not surprised considering it's source.

SUKTUEN
01-25-2005, 06:15 AM
Many people said Aggaiss can bear Roger~!~
Come On Roger ~~!!!!!!!!!!!!! FIGHT!!!!

MissMoJo
01-25-2005, 06:25 AM
:rolleyes:
It's also sad that people are buying into this in GM, with at least three threads dedicated to how arrogant he is for that interview.

Hi Sol :wavey: You're on my contact list now too, hope we can chat sometime

SUKTUEN
01-25-2005, 06:31 AM
Because Roger is angry for the questiion from the reporter~~

mitalidas
01-25-2005, 03:10 PM
Nice piece:

Federer in class of his own
Will we see Andre Agassi again? It's not the pertinent question today because even if he did return to the scene of so much glory, one doubts that the Agassi of 2006 would pose much of a threat to Roger Federer. Then again, the same might be said of 127 others.

When Federer warned us all that it was Andre who would have to "raise his game" and that he could sink Agassi without even resorting to his best, it sounded a touch brash, bordering on disrespectful to a champion who'd been winning titles before little Roger had even picked up a racquet.

But Federer wasn't adding arrogance to his astonishing repertoire. He was just telling a blunt truth, without bothering with Swiss diplomacy. He was talking fact, not trash.

Agassi's former coach, Brad Gilbert, had been hopeful just before the match, convincing himself Andre could "pull a rabbit out of the hat tonight". But a single, lonely rabbit would not have been enough - Agassi needed a warren of them to have a prayer against a guy with more shots in the holster than Jesse James.

Agassi was off to see the Wizard, armed only with the best return in the game's recent history. That famous return had enabled him to survive Joachim Johansson's 51 aces, but for Federer, Andre needed more - and, at nearly 35, he wasn't about to develop a Pete Sampras serve, or a Pat Rafter volley to support that return.

The Agassi return, one of the wonders of tennis, was made to look outdated, a technology that had been surpassed and abruptly rendered obsolete. Andre was stuck with a typewriter, while Roger surfed the internet. It was, in that sense, truly a battle between a champion of the '90s and the flagship of the noughties.

In fairness to Agassi, Federer, without a defeat since the Olympics, has made all the top players look like Luddites.

Agassi must tire of comparisons between Federer and his ancient rival Sampras, as much as playing Federer. Last night, he was the end of a Samprasian exhibition of serving - and, as with pistol Pete, it was not so much the number of aces (22, half of them in the first set), or unplayable near aces that Roger belted down, it was the moments when they were produced.

I would suggest that his next opponents don't look to me for advice. ANDRE AGASSIFederer aced Agassi four times in what was the most pivotal game in the match, the ninth of the first set. On the handful of occasions when Agassi held 0-30 on Federer's serve, there was a horrible predictability to the Swiss response: 200 km/h or thereabouts, down the middle, or somewhere else where Andre's racquet wasn't.

Amazingly, Federer thought that, by pinning him to the baseline for decent stretches, Agassi had not allowed him to play "my regular game". In the words of John McEnroe, also now the subject of endless comparisons with Federer (for art rather than effectiveness), Roger, you cannot be serious.

There was a hint of sadness about Agassi later, as though the great returner was suddenly aware of his limitations in a way that he hadn't been before the match. He wasn't entirely downcast, finding the black humour that was appropriate to the circumstances.

Asked if he had advice for Federer's forthcoming opponents/victims, Agassi, as deft with words as a racquet, said dryly: "I would suggest that his next opponents don't look to me for advice. That would be my advice."

When Federer and Agassi shook hands at the end that came sooner than millions wished, Federer told the senior citizen he enjoyed playing him and he hoped there were more meetings. "That makes one of us," Agassi replied.

Andre, as ever, was ready with the reply. But against a younger genius of even greater gifts, a slick return couldn't get it done.


http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Federer-in-a-class-of-his-own/2005/01/25/1106415601812.html#

RogiFan88
01-25-2005, 06:36 PM
For French-speakers:

FEDERER, LA PERFECTION SUISSE
Par Sophie DORGAN

Le choc entre Andre Agassi et Roger Federer a tourné à la démonstration suisse. Le numéro un mondial a frisé la perfection pour dominer en trois petits sets l'Américain. En demi-finale, il rencontrera le Russe Marat Safin, impérial en trois manches face au Slovaque Dominik Hrbaty.

Roger Federer éblouissant

Quand Roger Federer touche à la perfection, il ne reste qu'une solution : admirer et applaudir. Contre Andre Agassi, le Suisse a joué un récital sans fausse note. Avec une facilité toujours aussi déconcertante, il a alterné le meilleur et l'excellence pendant trois sets (6-3, 6-4, 6-4). Pourtant l'Américain n'a pas démérité, mais le numéro 1 mondial s'est tout simplement montré au-delà de tous les superlatifs. La fin du premier set illustre bien cette force tranquille. Le Suisse sert pour la première manche à (5-3), Andre Agassi met la pression et obtient deux balles de break. Résultat : deux aces dont l'un sur une seconde balle pour conclure sur un revers décroisé gagnant en demi-volée !

Le quadruple champion de l'Open d'Australie peut alors attendre une baisse de régime. Elle ne viendra jamais. Vif, précif et calme, le Suisse breake dès l'entrée du 2e set et poursuit sa démonstration pour finir sur un nouveau revers décroisé gagnant. Du fond de court, à la volée (13 volées gagnantes sur 19 montées), au service (22 aces), il a survolé la rencontre. Rien n'a semblé l'atteindre. Dans la troisième manche, il a, de nouveau, pris l'engagement adverse dès l'entame pour répéter le scénario du set précédent et décrocher sa 26e victoire consécutive. Qui pourra faire tomber le monument ? Lui-même et peut-être un grand Marat Safin en demi-finale.

Marat Safin déroule

Après un excellent parcours, Dominik Hrbaty (n°20) a trouvé sa limite sur le court central couvert en raison du soleil brûlant. Le courage, la résistance physique et la volonté du Slovaque n'ont pas pesé très lourd (6-2, 6-4, 6-2) face au talent de Marat Safin (n°4). Concentré et régulier (33 points gagnants pour 21 fautes directes), le Russe a déroulé en exploitant au maximum les failles adverses, notamment au service (44% de réussite en première balle). Tout en puissance, le numéro 4 mondial a baladé son adversaire avant de décocher un grand revers ou coup droit ou tout simplement de claquer un ace (14 au total) et n'a pas hésité à agresser Dominik Hrbaty dès le retour pour accrocher deux breaks sur deux tentatives lors du premier set.

A (6-2, 4-0), le jeu s'est légèrement rééquilibré à cause d'une petite déconcentration du quatrième mondial. Plus percutant au service et surtout plus offensif avec cinq montées gagnantes, le Slovaque a réussi à inquiéter le Russe et à le breaker pour la seule fois du match. Mais cet éclair a rapidement été éteint par la capacité de Marat Safin à hausser le niveau de son tennis pour s'envoler lors du troisième set. Mais au prochain tour, l'Everest "suisse" se dresse sur sa route. Attention au manque d'oxygène...

A RETENIR
FEDERER SATISFAIT
«J'ai dû batailler pour gagner le premier set. J'ai bien commencé chaque set. C'est ce qui a fait la différence. J'ai servi parfaitement pendant tout le match, c'est peut-être ce qui m'a fait gagné. Je crois que Safin joue de nouveau bien. Je m'attends à un match plus dur (que contre Agassi). Il a un meilleur service. Ca rendra les breaks plus difficiles. »

AGASSI ADMIRATIF
«J'ai été dominé. Il a été trop bon. Il a servi près des lignes, je n'ai pas pu bien retourner, ça lui a donné beaucoup de points gratuits. Il fait tout bien et beaucoup de choses magnifiquement: son coup droit est un des meilleurs, il bouge très bien, il renvoie beaucoup de balles, il sert très bien... Je conseillerai à son prochain adversaire de ne pas s'inspirer de ce que j'ai fait ce soir. J'ai perdu mon service tôt dans chaque set. C'était tendre le bâton pour me faire battre. Je n'ai eu que ce que je méritais. Son service et ses déplacements se sont beaucoup améliorés depuis quelque temps. Il rend le court plus petit.»

http://www.lequipe.fr/Tennis/AUS_2005_H_2501.html

onewoman74
01-25-2005, 07:23 PM
Does anyone have a link to last weeks SI article on Roger? Did anyone post it or do I have to find the issue at my doctor's office?

Thanks!

dewolv
01-25-2005, 08:06 PM
Does anyone have a link to last weeks SI article on Roger? Did anyone post it or do I have to find the issue at my doctor's office?

Thanks!


I'm afraid you are going to have to find it in the doc's
office.The SI website only offers a brief snippet.

onewoman74
01-25-2005, 10:19 PM
thanks...off to the office I go

mitalidas
01-26-2005, 12:00 AM
There was a time when Roger Federer's opponents had just the faintest chance of beating him, but when the world No 1 made an appointment with his barber early in the new year, he eradicated the one single flaw in his game. Now that the Ena Sharples bun has gone, and a bad hair day has been eliminated from the equation, there is no hope for anyone. :lol:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2005/01/26/stjohn26.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/01/26/ixtenn.html

*M*
01-26-2005, 12:15 AM
Someone on another discussion board transcribed the oncourt interview Roger did with Jim Courier right after the match:

JC: Roger talk about playing Andre Agassi, one of the great champions in the game of tennis. He has been so dominant here on this court. What did you feel like you had to do to take him out of his game tonight?
RF: Well, first of all, a good start to the match always helps especially against Andre and I think I really served well the whole match and you know, he never broke me. (applause) And I think from the baseline it was very clear who was the better man. So I had to serve better to stay in the match and took my chances. I always stayed ahead so it was fantastic.
JC: Are you saying that he was the better man at the baseline?
RF: I think so, yeah.
JC: I wonder what Andre would say, you were mighty impressive today. The numbers don't reflect that. The thing that impressed us the most watching this match was your clutch serving. Whenever he got up love-30, you just seem to come up time and time again the right serve. Is there a mindset that you use when you get to that moment? Or is just natural?
RF: I just hope that I make my first serve. Um. (laughter) I have no secrets you know. I just walk up to the line and say, where is my safest serve, where is he going to guess where I'm going. You know, it's like roulette, you know. I have no idea. I just pick the right numbers (laughs).
JC: No, no, I'm not buying that. Just because the players are home listening, you can tell us, no one's listening. What's the secret? No secret?
RF: Well, love-30 always wide and 15-30 wide as well. (laughter) Next time you play me you know where I'm going (laughs).
JC: Okay, let me pull my book out. I'll remember that. Roger you're on a ridiculous streak right now-- you haven't lost to a player ranked in the top 10 in 24 occasions (wild cheering). It's absurd.
RF: I didn't even think of that actually today, so.
JC: Sorry. It will happen again you'll play Marat Safin next round. So you might-
RF: It can be broken. The streak can be broken though, so we'll see.
JC: But another streak was broken today as well. You won your 26th consecutive match on tour and let me tell you why this is one of the greatest days of your life because you were tied with the great champion at 25 for a streak. Do you know who that was?
RF: (smiling, looks to crowd. A few people yell out "Courier!". Laughs). Was it you or what?
JC: Correct, sir! You are correct. (cheering and applause)
RF: When was that?
JC: That was in uh 1992. You were about 3 years old. (laughter)
RF: That's why I don't remember. (laughs)
JC: Shocking. Well talk about Safin in the next round. You're obviously playing very, very well. You stepped up your game tonight. Uh, he played very well today. Did you get to see him play at all?
RF: I was warming up, driving from the hotel here. So I just got some pieces of the match but uh I think they were playing indoors. I saw the shadows on the court in my hotel when I was watching the match on TV. I thought it was raining, so then I figured out the heat factor actually played a role here. It's fantastic to play him again here Rod laver arena after last year's final where I was a little tired. Anyways it was a great match and I'm really looking forward to playing him again.
JC: Okay. Well, let's prognosticate a bit for tomorrow here, that means you pick the winners. So, Lleyton Hewitt versus David Nalbandian. Who do you think is gonna win that one?
RF: Why are you putting me on the spot?
JC: Because I can.
RF: You can, alright. (laughs) Uh, I pick uh.....I pick (brief, dramatic pause) Lleyton. (cheering)
JC: A very, very wise man. (laughter)
RF: I want to live tonight, so.
JC: And how about Roddick and Davydenko in the other quarterfinal?
RF: Well I think the favorite's more obvious there. So, I would have to go with Roddick. (applause)
JC: And your match against Safin?
RF: Well that's in two days. So you talked about tomorrow? So we're not playing tomorrow, so (laughs).
JC: Well, always a clutch player. Roger Federer through to the semi-finals. Once again here.

MissMoJo
01-26-2005, 12:29 AM
Thanks *M*, ESPN never sticks around for the post match interview :(

lunahielo
01-26-2005, 12:41 AM
Thanks *M*~~neat interview! :)

sol
01-26-2005, 01:06 AM
:worship:

Open-Federer humbles Agassi to reach semi-finals

MELBOURNE, Jan 25 (Reuters) - Defending champion Roger Federer humbled four-times winner Andre Agassi 6-3 6-4 6-4 on Tuesday to keep up his stunning grand slam record and reach the semi-finals of the Australian Open.

The Swiss world number one won a surprisingly one-sided match on Rod Laver Arena in 99 minutes after dominating the American with his impenetrable serve and winning virtually every key point in a nerveless performance.

Eighth seed Agassi was not far from his best but Federer was able to grab one service break in each of the three sets and successfully fought off the few challenges the 34-year-old American was able to mount.

Federer won three of the four grand slams last year and is bidding to become the first man since Pete Sampras in 1993/1994 to win three consecutive grand slam events.

He will play fourth seed Marat Safin of Russia in the semi-finals in a repeat of last year's final here.


http://www.gotennis.com/Photos/2005-01-25T114535Z_01_MEL74D_RTRIDSP_1_SPORT-TENNIS.jpg
Top seed Switzerland?s Roger Federer serves to eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. during their quarter-final match at the 2005 Australian Open in Melbourne tennis, January 25, 2005. Federer demolished Agassi 6-3 6-4 6-4 on Tuesday to reach the semi-finals of the Australian Open with a performance sure to strike fear into his remaining opponents. REUTERS/Adrees Latif


http://www.gotennis.com/Photos/2005-01-25T114112Z_01_MEL115D_RTRIDSP_1_SPORT-TENNIS-OPEN.jpg
Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland (R) is interviewed by former tennis great Jim Courier of the U.S. after his quarter-final win against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won the match 6-3 6-4 6-4, breaking Courier's record from 1992 of 25 consecutive wins. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland picks up a moth from the court during his quarter-final victory over eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won 6-3 6-4 6-4. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates his quarter-final victory over eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won 6-3 6-4 6-4. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates his quarter-final victory over eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won 6-3 6-4 6-4. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland changes his shirt between games during his quarter-final match against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won 6-3 6-4 6-4. REUTERS/Stuart Milligan


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland returns a forehand to eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. during their quarter-final match at the 2005 Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer defeated Agassi in straight sets 6-3 6-4 6-4 to advance to the semi-finals. REUTERS/Adrees Latif


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates his win in his quarter-final match against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. Federer won the match 6-3 6-4 6-4. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland and eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. leave the court together after their quarter-final match at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/Stuart Milligan


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer serves in quarter-final action against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer during his quarter-final against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer in quarter-final action against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer in quarter-final reacts to a point won against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer in quarter-final action against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005. REUTERS/David Gray


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Top seed Switzerland's Roger Federer serves in quarter-final action against eighth seed Andre Agassi of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne January 25, 2005.REUTERS/Steve Crisp



Andre Agassi's advice for Roger Federer's next rival: Don't ask me

John Pye
Canadian Press

January 25, 2005

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/cp/tennis/20050125/k012509a.jpg

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) - Roger Federer is playing so perfectly right now that he made Andre Agassi look average.

Defending champion Federer beat the eight-time major winner 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 Tuesday in the Australian Open quarter-finals, taking the punch right out of the best counter-puncher on the circuit. Federer, from Switzerland, hit 22 aces and extended his winning streak to 26 matches. He's also won 24 in a row against opponents ranked in the top 10.

"He just outplayed me," Agassi said. "He was too good. I would suggest to his next opponent that he doesn't look to me for advice."

That would be fourth-seeded Marat Safin, who lost to Federer in last year's Australian Open final and will face him this year in the semifinals. Safin, from Russia, ousted No. 20 Dominik Hrbaty of Slovakia 6-2, 6-4, 6-2 and will be far fresher against Federer than in 2004, when the Russian had spent more than 18 hours on court through six matches.

The other men's quarter-finals are No. 2 Andy Roddick of the U.S., vs. No. 26 Nikolay Davydenko of Russia, and No. 3 Lleyton Hewitt of Australia vs. No. 9 David Nalbandian of Argentina.

Agassi, who withstood a record 51 aces by Joachim Johansson in the fourth round, had some answers for Federer's serve. But eventually the relentless forehands and half-volleys that Federer peppered from all parts of the court were simply too much.

"I came with high expectations. I wanted tonight to be memorable, but it's one I'd probably prefer to forget," Agassi said. "I never got my teeth into it, and when I don't get my teeth into a match, I can look pretty ordinary."

Federer mesmerized the 15,351 fans at Rod Laver Arena with his array of shots, an eerie hush hanging over the usually vocal pro-Agassi crowd.

Rare shouts of "Come on, Andre!" replaced the roars that normally echo around the stadium when Agassi is pounding winners from the baseline.

There was no high drama, nothing like the U.S. Open quarter-final last September, when Federer won a five-set epic that spanned two days because of a rain delay and ended in high winds.

Federer easily dispatched the 34-year-old Agassi this time, improving to 5-3 head-to-head.

Federer broke Agassi in the sixth game, then saved four break points while serving for the set. A third ace in that game gave Federer his third set point, and he took a service return from Agassi and turned it into a backhand winner down the line on the next point to seal it.

"I have no secrets," Federer said. "It's like roulette. I always pick the right numbers."

He broke Agassi in the opening games of the second and third sets.

"I always got the good start into each set so I think that made a difference," Federer said. "I could play with the confidence; he couldn't really. So that allowed me to take chances.

"I served perfectly - he never broke me. So I think that's what made me win."

Even Federer was amazed to learn he'd lost only seven points in his last eight service games, calling that "very surprising - especially against Andre."

Federer's 11 titles in 2004 included three Grand Slam events, making him the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win a trio of majors in a season. Now he's trying to become the first to win three straight Slams since Pete Sampras added the 1994 Australian Open to his wins at the Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 1993


Federer Demolishes Agassi at Australian Open

Tue Jan 25, 1:43 PM ET Sports - Reuters

By Julian Linden

MELBOURNE, Australia (Reuters) - Roger Federer (news) demolished Andre Agassi, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 on Tuesday to reach the semi-finals of the Australian Open (news - web sites) with a performance sure to strike fear into his remaining opponents.

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The Swiss top seed lived up to his billing as the world's best player, dominating the American with his impenetrable serve and winning virtually every key point in a nerveless performance.

"I played a fantastic match today to win in straight sets. For me it was a perfect match," defending champion Federer said.

"I think it needs such a good performance to beat Andre so convincing."

Agassi, a four-times winner of the Australian Open, conceded that Federer had been too good for him.

"He plays the game beautifully. The expectation for him to be one of the greats is certainly understandable," Agassi said.

"I'd suggest his next opponent doesn't come to me for advice on how to beat him."

Federer, chasing his third grand slam in a row, plays Safin next in a repeat of last year's final after the Russian defeated 20th seed Dominik Hrbaty (news) of Slovakia 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.


He outplayed me says Agassi after Federer masterclass

Tue Jan 25, 9:39 AM ET U.S. National - AFP


MELBOURNE, Australia (AFP) - Andre Agassi admitted he had been completely outplayed after being dumped out of the Australian Open, by world number one Roger Federer


The 34-year-old eight-time grand slam winner was left shellshocked by Federer, who highlighted his dominance of the men's game with a clinical 6-3, 6-4, 6-4, victory.


Agassi said he had paid the price for having his serve broken early in each set, and once trailing had always been struggling to get back in the match.


"I dropped my serve early in set. I mean, you're just asking for pain. And I felt like I got what I deserved in that regard," Agassi said.


"He just outplayed me .. It was too good."


Agassi refused to speculate on whether he would be back in Melbourne for another crack at the Australian title, which he first won in 1995 and effectively annexed between 2000-2001 and 2003.


"It's disappointing," Agassi said. "I've spent a lot of years coming down here and having some real memorable matches and leaving with the trophy. I'd wanted tonight to be memorable but it's one I'd probably prefer to forget."


Asked if he knew whether he would return next year, Agassi was non-committal. "No. That would be my plan, but a year's a long time," he said.


Agassi was reluctant to get drawn into making comparisons between Federer and some of the tennis legends that have crossed his path in a career spanning 20 years.

"It's not really something that's fair to do, to compare sort of greats," said Agassi. "Everybody brings their own strengths and weaknesses to the table.

"But he plays the game beautifully. The expectation for him to be one of the greats is certainly understandable."

Agassi could offer no advice to fellow professionals trying to work out a means of beating Federer.

"I would suggest that his next opponents don't look to me for advice," Agassi said ruefully. "That would be my advice

mitalidas
01-26-2005, 02:08 AM
The only surprise on the night that Roger Federer sent Andre Agassi, the four times Australian Open champion, stumbling a little closer to retirement was that he refused to give an interview to the Japanese television station Wowow. :lol: The world No1 is renowned for rarely turning down media requests. Maybe he felt he had served up enough wow for one night.

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1398550,00.html

Billabong
01-26-2005, 02:09 AM
Thanks guys:D!

SUKTUEN
01-26-2005, 02:10 AM
Thankyou Sol~~

The post is wonderful~~

papa_papped_a_lop
01-26-2005, 06:05 AM
Roger Federer
Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Transcribed Interview

R. FEDERER/A. Agassi

6 3, 6 4, 6 4

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Agassi said that he was outplayed. Do you have the same feeling, and how does it feel, if so?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I thought I started well. First service game was perfect, you know. I got the first break, which was important. Then I had to really battle hard, you know, to win the first set. Couple of breakpoints where I served well. And from then on, I had the feeling I really started to pick up even more with my serve.
You know, I always got the good start into each set so I think that made a difference. I after could play with the confidence; he couldn't really. So that allowed me to take chances. I served through the whole match perfectly. So I think that's what made me win the match today.

Q. Did you enjoy yourself out there today?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought I really had to concentrate very hard today, which maybe at times didn't allow me really to enjoy too much. But it's always a pleasure to play against Andre, and I think that's clear.

Q. It was not a hostile crowd, but it was certainly an Andre crowd. Does that affect you? Do you hear them?
ROGER FEDERER: I definitely hear them. I also felt they were on Andre's side, which is totally normal. He won the tournament many more times than me. He's been here for ages, you know. They wanted him to come back into the match, which is normal as well. So for this reason, I wasn't surprised at all.

Q. Can you play any better than that?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's tough to say, you know. Andre takes it away from you, the way he hits so hard from the baseline. So you can't really create the points like you want to. But, you know, I try to go against it. And again, you know, it came down to the way I served, which in the end decided how I played from the baseline.

Q. After he had the last chance, had a breakpoint in the fourth game, you lost on your serve only I think seven points in eight games. Is that surprising to you?
ROGER FEDERER: Yes, yes. It's very surprising. As surprising as the way I closed out the match at the US Open, also, where it was extremely windy and I was really struggling with my serve. Through the fourth set and the fifth set I think I barely lost a few points. So, again, there it was similar.

Q. Is it a test to play against Andre? Does that make you concentrate all the time?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, because, you know, he's one of the best returners of all time. You know you just miss a couple of first serves and he doesn't just put the return back into play, but he really hits it hard down the baseline. So every time I've got a difficult half volley to play, and if you're, you know, a little un confident and you're not really too much in the mood to play rallies, you know, that puts an unbelievable amount of pressure on you. So I always try to have a good start to each service game. That's I think what made the difference in the end.

Q. Only time when you didn't put the first serve in was the end of the first set. Were you feeling more pressure, or there was other reasons?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think just missing a first serve once in a while is no problem. So if you talk about that, you know, my life's doing just fine.

Q. Who do you feel are your toughest opponents at this time?
ROGER FEDERER: You mean in a tournament?

Q. Yeah, just in general.
ROGER FEDERER: So far I've played or...?

Q. Yeah, just going on.
ROGER FEDERER: Look at the rankings or...?

Q. I mean, for you.
ROGER FEDERER: Who's my toughest opponent?

Q. Yes.
ROGER FEDERER: It's hard to say because my record speaks for itself right now, the way I've beaten all the Top 10 players, you know, so regular. So it makes it hard to obviously pick one. I have the feeling Safin is playing really good. You know, the other Top 10 guys, you always know on a given day they can upset you any time.
So I'm really looking forward to the contest with Safin, you know. I have the feeling he's playing good again and he had a great finish last year, good start again. So it's going to be a really hard match.

Q. Did you have a feeling that anybody can beat you?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I always have the feeling. Everybody knows how quickly matches can turn around. And for this reason I was happy to win the first set. That kind of gave me just a little bit of cushion. I didn't expect to start like I had into the second set, but I had it in the end. Again, if you don't serve it out and you find yourself at 5 All, again, it's a different match.
I didn't allow anything off that. For this reason, for me it was a perfect match. But I know that matches can turn around very quickly.

Q. Can you think of any other match in the past that you feel that you felt so good about yourself?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, like I said, you know, I served really well. He hit extremely hard from the baseline. So for this reason I couldn't play my regular game from the baseline. I just tried to counterpunch, you know, whatever was coming from Andre. This didn't really allow me to play my game. Only when I can really play my game I'm at my best.
But, again, I played a fantastic match today to win in straight sets. I think it needs such a good performance to beat Andre so convincing.

Q. Do you think Safin will offer you more problems than Andre did tonight?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I expect a tougher match, that's clear. I always expect five setters, or being down breaks or, you know, worst case scenario. And for this reason, I expect a tougher match.

Q. Does he have different weapons to attack you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's got the bigger serve. That's going to make it maybe more difficult maybe to break. But, again, we only will see after the match what happened.
I think also the record here for him speaks for itself, how much he likes this surface. Of course, it's an even more interesting match just because of who's coaching him. But I'm happy I'm through that, that I played him, I got that match away in Houston. So for this reason I can really concentrate on the match itself and not thinking about who's sitting in his corner, you know.
But I expect a tough one, yeah. That's clear. He's playing well. He had good matches so far.

Q. You seem to be a silent man on court. Do you listen to Andreas Vollenweider, famous Swiss musician?
ROGER FEDERER: Who?

Q. Do you listen to Andreas Vollenweider?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't. I never heard of him. I'm an international man. I like Switzerland, but...

Q. Safin played extremely well under the closed roof. Do you think that it's a better case for you if the roof is open or closed or doesn't matter?
ROGER FEDERER: I expect open roof. It's an outdoor tournament. So otherwise you shouldn't don't have to travel down here, you know, to play.
But, yeah, I mean, it's maybe harder for him, you know, if it's outdoors again, it's windy, to get the rhythm back. But definitely gave him a great rhythm to play indoors, you know, no wind. But it was very similar for me tonight, you know, was very calm winds. It was really perfect conditions to play. The only thing that changed was the sky going from blue to black, you know.
So I don't know if we play in the night or not, but it's going to be interesting.

babsi
01-26-2005, 07:50 AM
Thank you to all for your posts :)

Rommella
01-26-2005, 10:46 AM
Finally, somebody from the American sports press who thinks fair about Roger's "trash talk":

Monday, Jan. 24th, Noon: He’s only human…or is he?
Roger Federer has become famous, and justifiably so, as a gentle, introspective warrior--the modest champion floating on a soft, pale-blue cloud of security and genius high above the battleground where mere blood-drenched mortals like Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt are eviscerating each other. So it’s kind of refreshing to see Boy Roger’s hackles go up now and then, as they did when he was asked about his pending quarterfinal clash with Agassi:

Q. What do you think of your game at the moment? You’re at a level to beat him [Agassi], considering how well he played the other night?
ROGER FEDERER: I hope so. I mean, I don’t know why you ask me a question like this. I think I’ve proven myself in the past, and I know my game’s good enough, you know. Also on my day where I’m not playing perfect, I know I can beat him. He’s not as good as he was when he was at the top of the ranking, otherwise he would be there. Fortunately, I’m there. I think he has to raise his game, not me.

Ouch!

But lest you think Roger’s morphed overnight into a defensive prima donna (in other words, like any of a number of Spanish players), consider the reasonable dissertation he delivered on the challenge of dealing with aggressively emotional players (in other words, jerks) like, say, Hewitt:

Yeah, in the beginning [of my career], you know…you’re like, “Why are you showing me your fist? Did I do something to you?” You take it very--how do you say?--personal. That’s not what you should do. It’s a match, of course...Sometimes it’s difficult to separate the on-court from the off-court. But I’m at the point where, you know, whoever does [something like that] on the court, he’s like that. Off court, he might be all right, so, what matters to me is how they are off-court and not really [what happens] on court.

Even more tellingly, Federer had this to say about Hewitt:

I mean, I understand him. Geez, he’s in Australia, you know. He wants to win this tournament so badly, and he’s showing it. He wants people to feel it. So, I mean, you know, what is “tone it down”? Three c’mons less per match? That’s not going to make the difference, so. I mean, we all agree. I mean, he’s fine the way he is.

And this may help explain why Federer can deal with every kind of head case or nut job the game throws his way:

When you start and you’re young, all the players, they take advantage. You know, they take toilet breaks, change their stuff for 10 minutes, the umpires, you know, they don’t watch the clock. There’s just so much going on. Now that I’m playing on Centre Court and I’m No. 1 in the world, they don’t try the stuff anymore because they know in the end it comes down to tennis, not these little tricks. But in the beginning, you have to go through that and you have to experience it. And sometimes you lose your mind on such things because you can’t control those. And then, again, you know, you have people getting in your face just the way they act. But now nothing of that is bothering me, and that’s why I’m a better player.

So here’s what I take away from that. You want to lift yourself up above the fray? You want to develop an immune system that no jerk with self-esteem issues or toilet-training–related discipline problems can break down?

It’s easy, just get to No. 1 in the world, with nobody within shouting distance. Be Roger Federer.

http:\\www.tennis.com/custompage/default.sps?iType=2919&icustompageid=13033

Daniel
01-26-2005, 10:54 AM
very nice article . i like it :yeah:

thanks

Daniel
01-26-2005, 11:44 AM
Safin's dilemma: how to stop the runaway Federer Express

Tue Jan 25,11:46 PM ET Top Stories - AFP



MELBOURNE, Australia (AFP) - Marat Safin knows how to beat Mr Invincible Roger Federer in their semi-final tomorrow at the Australian Open (news - web sites), it's just that he has to execute the game plan.


AFP Photo



The Swiss master left nobody in any doubt he is the man to beat in the year's first grand slam tournament with a masterclass straight sets victory over four-time champion Andre Agassi in their quarter-final Tuesday.


Federer was at another level to the ageing eight-times grand slam champion in an all-too-brief 99 minutes. Now it's Safin's turn to try and stop the runaway 'Federer Express'.


Two-times Australian finalist Safin has the big serves and groundstrokes to match it with Federer, but the Swiss ace hasn't lost to a top-ten player in 24 matches since October 2003.


"Everybody knows basically how to play against Roger, but nobody can manage him to get any closer to that, even get into the three or five sets to make him at least be even," Safin said after beating quarter-final opponent Dominik Hrbaty.


"It's like he's just toying with everybody."


The maverick Russian lost to Federer in last year's Australian final in three sets after an opening set tiebreaker, but Safin pushed the world number one to the limit in their semi-final at the ATP Masters Cup in Houston last November.


Federer denied Safin on six set points but needed eight match points of his own before escaping with a tension-packed 6-3, 7-6 (20/18) triumph.


"The tie-breaker was very special," Federer said. "I've never played a tie-breaker like it. That was really fun, going back and forth, all big points, match points, set points, and the level of play was high too. We were pushing each other to the limits."


Safin recalled: "In the tiebreaker I had so many chances. It was great quality. I really I played well. I don't regret at all that I lost, but I also proved to myself that I was really close.


"You start to learn little bit more (about Federer). You start to look what he likes, what he doesn't like, what you can do against him.


"I really felt that I can give him trouble. Because last year, not many people could give him trouble.


"Whenever he was playing well, there is nobody even had a chance. So for me, it was great to see that I have a chance (in Houston)."


So it's little wonder that Federer ranks Safin's challenge above those of the other top-tenners.


"I have the feeling Safin is playing really good. So I'm really looking forward to the contest with Safin," Federer said.


"He's got the bigger serve and that's going to make it more difficult to break.


"His record here speaks for itself and how much he likes this surface."





Adding spice to the contest is that Safin has hired Federer's ex-coach Peter Lundgren, while Federer, after going through last year coachless, has employed Australian Tony Roche, the former mentor of world number ones Ivan Lendl and Patrick Rafter.

"Of course, it's an even more interesting match just because of who's coaching him," Federer said.

"But I'm happy I'm through that, that I played him, I got that match away in Houston. So for this reason I can really concentrate on the match itself and not thinking about who's sitting in his corner."

Overall, Federer leads Safin 6-1, with the only loss coming in Moscow in 2002.

SUKTUEN
01-26-2005, 02:31 PM
Thanks ~~ I must improve my English

Doris Loeffel
01-26-2005, 05:11 PM
Thanks guys

SUKTUEN
01-27-2005, 09:40 AM
I am nervous~~

Daniel
01-27-2005, 11:00 AM
me too , Roger win pleaseeeeeee :worship:

Puschkin
01-27-2005, 03:37 PM
"I live my whole life with pressure, so this is nothing different," Federer said.

"It's always going to hurt, no matter how great the match was but at least you can leave the place feeling good about yourself because I thought I gave it all I had."

First words from Roger, full article:http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=sportsNews&storyID=2005-01-27T153359Z_01_CHA749399_RTRUKOC_0_TENNIS-OPEN-SAFIN.xml

ytben
01-27-2005, 03:48 PM
Thanks Puschkin. Rogi :hug: he really should feel good and proud of himself.

avocadoe
01-27-2005, 04:38 PM
thanks for the words...good to hear him, even briefly...the interview should be out soon. Does anyone know when he hurt his back and received treatment?

fightclubber
01-27-2005, 04:48 PM
Roger is still our CHAMPION
I cannot wait to see rogers newsletter on his site. Id love to heard what he wants to tell us. For me was a problem with his service and I really regret it cos he served so well against Andre.
Anyway, this will help him to try to improve. Lets see if hell stay in australia to go on his training with Roche or hell go back to switzerland.
Anyone has any kind of news?
Wjat about press conferences? Marat and Roger? Still none of them at the AO site. And the courrier interview? Or courier only interview the winners?

Silvy

SUKTUEN
01-27-2005, 05:07 PM
ROGER ~~~ take a good rest~~We wait for you~~

tschaeggy
01-27-2005, 09:13 PM
http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/e7184/sport_lng0_spo57_evt7184_sto680262.shtml
i don't know, if the video works for you? i couldn't open it?

tschaeggy
01-27-2005, 09:14 PM
Roger, have a good rest, come home to switzerland, enjoy a little bit of snow and come back with new energy!!!

tschaeggy
01-27-2005, 09:19 PM
another interview, but it's in german! sorry i can't translate it, but there will come more interviews soon i think!
http://www2.sfdrs.ch/sport/artikel.php?catid=sporttennisartikel&docid=20050127_05

Whistleway
01-27-2005, 10:13 PM
even ao.com website has not have fed-safin interview. i wonder why?

avocadoe
01-28-2005, 12:33 AM
I feel a little better after watching some of the match. There were key points that Roger would normally win that he donated, shanks, df's. There was the problem with the running forehands that followed Marat pulling him wide to the backhand, but other than that, and that's a biggie, the play from Roger was brilliant, as always, a struggle since Marat was sharp and has vvv heavy strokes, but masterful on Roger's part, many many many oh mys, breathtaking, you have to kiddding no one can do that. So it is disappointing but he didn't disappear at all. He wasn't as the commentators sometimes say, "another player than the Roger we know." That's one of my pet peeve phrases. THE INTERVIEW probably isn't up because the match occured on 1/28, and they don't have a 1/29 until todays matches are over. Anyway, that's my thought.

vene
01-28-2005, 01:12 AM
According to the NYTimes, Peter Lundgren was a major factor:
A big serve is a vital ingredient for those who wish to knock Federer off his pedestal, but it is usually not enough because of the quality of Federer's returning. Safin needed everything at his disposal: from his aggressive, deep returns that kept Federer on his back foot; to his bold groundstrokes, to his improved fitness and volleys; to his new coach Peter Lundgren.

Lundgren, who coached Federer for four years before being dismissed at the end of 2003, has plenty of inside information on the Swiss champion. He was in the stands in Houston in November when Federer defeated Safin in the semifinals of the Masters Cup in another terrific match, which Federer won by taking the second-set tiebreaker 20-18. But he had an even better time in the stands today.

"Sure it helps," said Safin's agent, Gerard Tsobanian. "When Federer started to drop off, Peter was telling us it was because his feet were hurting. He knew when Roger would hit certain shots; when he'd take risks. He knew when he faced break point where he'd serve. He was doing a running commentary for us throughout the match."

Congrats to Marat and Roger for a great match!

fightclubber
01-28-2005, 01:28 AM
http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/e7184/sport_lng0_spo57_evt7184_sto680262.shtml
i don't know, if the video works for you? i couldn't open it?


I saw it a couple of hours ago
IF you mean this one:

Safin snaps Federer streaks.
its a long video with all the womena semifainals and rogis and marat one. Only clippings from the matches... nothing great

silvy :wavey:

Daniel
01-28-2005, 11:07 AM
Roger, i love youu :o :worship: :smooch: :hug:

federer_roar
01-28-2005, 11:35 AM
The interview is out from AO site.

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2005-01-27/200501271106836148063.html

fightclubber
01-28-2005, 11:56 AM
M. SAFIN/R. Federer

5‑7, 6‑4, 5‑7, 7‑6, 9‑7

Q. How bad was your elbow and back bothering you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, back was no problem. Just had a nerve going all the way to my finger. On forehands, you know, especially at the end of the fourth. So just said if you've got a chance to have treatment, why not take it? It did help actually. It was better in the fifth.

But what was bothering me the most was my blister on my foot. I had that from almost from the second set on. That was actually bothering me the most.

Q. Is there any sort of consolation in the disappointment that you've been involved in such a match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I haven't been involved in too many of such great matches. You know, I played my last five‑setter must have been here against Hewitt maybe in the Davis Cup. I'm not sure.

It's really unfortunate. You know, I thought I played, under the circumstances, really well. Yeah, a point here and there changed the match. So that was a pity. But at least I gave it a fight, you know.

Q. Did you think when you kept saving match points that it was going to turn for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I had chances in the fifth. I had breakpoints and Love‑30s. Of course, you know, when he was serving for the match, I wasn't feeling overconfident.

I was ‑‑ I surprised myself by coming back, you know, because I had all these problems, you know, and he has a great serve and a great game. Well, he was obviously more fresh than me, so I thought there was probably no way coming back. Had the feeling like he gave me a second chance, you know, and almost took it.

It's really a pity. I mean, I had my chances, but he didn't allow me to take them. But I was closer in the fourth than in the fifth, so.

Q. On your own match point, did you have other options or was that kind of like a last‑ditch attempt?

ROGER FEDERER: You mean the serve and volley?

Q. When you went through the legs.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I thought I would have lost the point anyway. He came up with a good shot, you know, to lob me. Got to have some guts to do that, so it's well done.

Q. There's been so much expectation on you the last couple of months. Did you feel the pressure out there of expectation or were you able to block that out?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I live my whole life with pressure, so this is nothing different, you know. I thought, you know, it was a match like every other match. You know, he's one of the best players in the world. I like to play against him just because of the way he is on the court. In the past we had some good matches. I was just, you know, hoping to win it, you know, like every other match.

But I didn't feel extra pressure. Maybe at times you think, "Oh, I have to defend my title and I'm battling to get to the finals." But that's ‑‑ you know, I just told myself I'm going to try everything tonight, you know, to get the two days off and then try to be fit for the finals. That's not going to happen, so...

Q. Given how inconsistent he can be at times, unpredictable, was there a part of you at any point that was thinking that maybe he was going to lose his nerve?

ROGER FEDERER: Who are you talking about, him?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought, you know, his serve was consistent. You know, he hardly served any double‑faults, you know. When he needed his first serve, you know, he got it. So that's just the way he plays. He's got great returns, but even though I thought I battled them off quite well, you know.

I mean, I got what I expected. So it was no surprise.

Q. Was there any sense at all, even though it's just one match, that he's a mentally tougher opponent than perhaps the Marat Safin you played previously?

ROGER FEDERER: No. No. I mean, played him in Houston and Dubai and here last year. I know him like this. You know, he's still sometimes lose his mind, but I think he needs that, you know. And I totally understand him. And for this reason, no, I don't think he changed much, no.

Q. Considering how close you came, does this hurt more than other losses?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, of course. You know, it was losing by having match point, it's always going to hurt, no matter how great the match was.

But, you know, at least you can leave the place feeling good about yourself because I thought I gave it all I had, and that's all I got. He was the better player in the end, you know, because we don't have ties or draws in tennis. So the winner is the better man, and that's him.

Of course, you know, I'm hoping for a rematch so I can beat him again. But, you know, it was a thrill actually to be a part of it, that's very clear.

Q. When did you start to feel your arm hurting?

ROGER FEDERER: At the end of the fourth.

Q. Have you had that problem before?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, one time.

Q. How long ago?

ROGER FEDERER: Like a year ago.

Q. What is it exactly? A nerve pinched?

ROGER FEDERER: I'm not an expert. I don't know. As long as it only comes in five‑setters, that's okay, you know.

Q. Do you feel that maybe your serve let you down a little bit today?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. No. I had a couple ‑‑ yeah, it was a pity. I think it was in the second set when he broke me or something, you know, I had game point and I should have won the point and I didn't. You know, that gave him a chance.

But, no, I thought the serve was good. I was happy with it.

Q. Jim Courier was repeating in his commentary during all your easy matches on the way to the semifinals that it would be interesting to see you under the pressure finally. Do you think maybe the lack of tight matches was a factor today?

ROGER FEDERER: Everything can be a factor, you know, in such a circumstance. But who knows what would have happened if I had played five sets before against Agassi. "If, if, if." We don't know what would have happened.

You've got to take what is there. It's very clear I haven't played any five‑setters. But, you know, I can practice five‑setters in practice forever. Once it comes down to the match, it's how you react to it. I tried everything I could, you know, under the circumstances, but I don't agree totally with what people say sometimes.

Q. Do you plan on taking any time off to rest this elbow?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this is going to be gone tomorrow, you know. That was just in the heat of the moment, I guess. So I'm not going to play any tennis anyway for the next few days. When I play again, you know, that's not going to be bothering me. It's not an injury; it's just a thing that was bothering me. So I'm not worried about that coming back for the next match or anything ‑ at least yet, so that's a good sign.

Q. With today's match, but also what you were seeing from Marat in the tournament, also Lleyton and Andy, do you have any sense that the other top men have really come back from the break very fit, very strong, and everybody has been putting in perhaps even more than they have previously to reach that standard that has been set by you last year?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, we don't know what they did. We only hear what they do. What they really do we don't know. We'll never find out. That's a secret. Like you have no idea what I did in December. So I think that will always stay a secret, and that's the way it should be because every player needs different practice. You know, some need eight hours, some need two hours, some need none ‑ which I don't agree with.

No, I mean, I'm very happy to see that all four guys again were in the semis, you know, like in Houston. For this reason it's an exciting tournament, exciting future for tennis, for the men's game especially. Looking forward to maintain my No. 1 ranking in the future and beat them again.

SUKTUEN
01-28-2005, 01:15 PM
Roger you are so great :worship: :worship: :worship:

avocadoe
01-28-2005, 02:54 PM
the interview was a good one, just our Roger, thoughtful and feeling, and genuine.

lilianspring
01-29-2005, 04:22 AM
Now I could come here to read something on internet.
Rogi,you will be better after losing this match.
We all trust you.

Daniel
01-29-2005, 08:59 AM
Roger get better , :smooch:

nice interview :)

Daniel
01-29-2005, 09:23 AM
Federer's streak ends at 26 wins
Former U.S. Open champ Safin knocks off Swiss star in Australian semifinals.


Marat Safin reacts during a tense moment in Thursday's Australian Open semifinal match with Roger Federer.
Mark Baker / the Associated Press

By John Pye
Associated Press

Melbourne, Australia — Roger Federer was on his hands and knees, his racket gone after he tumbled chasing a shot.
All he could do was watch as Marat Safin tapped a gentle forehand into an open court to cap a thrilling 4?-hour Australian Open semifinal and end the top-ranked Federer's 26-match winning streak Thursday.

Safin fended off a match point in the fourth set, then needed seven match points of his own before pulling off a 5-7, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (8-6), 9-7 upset of defending champion Federer and advancing to his third Australian final in four years.

"It's always going to hurt, no matter how great the match was," Federer said. "But at least you can leave the place feeling good about yourself, because I gave it all I had."

The fourth-seeded Safin next meets No. 2 Andy Roddick or No. 3 Lleyton Hewitt, whose semifinal is today.

The women's final is set, featuring past champions Serena Williams and Lindsay Davenport. Williams' 2-6, 7-5, 8-6 victory over Maria Sharapova in a rematch of last year's Wimbledon final produced about as much drama as Federer-Safin.

Williams saved three match points, then leaped three times after ending it with a winner.

The top-ranked Davenport, who contemplated retiring in 2004, came back to beat No. 19 Nathalie Dechy of France 2-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4. Davenport also reached the doubles final, pairing with Corina Morariu to face Svetlana Kuznetsova and Alicia Molik for that title.

With Federer trailing 8-7 in the fifth set and serving on match point, he lunged to retrieve a deep shot wide to his forehand side. He swatted back a desperation shot, but slipped and dropped his racket. Safin converted the putaway.

"It's like a brain fight. ... It's more mental than physical against Roger," said Safin, who smashed his racket to the court two points before he lost the third set and later belted a ball into the stands.

The mercurial Russian, whose lone major title came at the 2000 U.S. Open, showed that it is possible to frustrate Federer. The Swiss star won four of the previous six Slams, three in 2004.

While Safin kept his temper in check just enough, Federer had some rare moments of anger, yelling at himself, screaming after missing an attempted shot between his legs on his only match point and later spiking his racket.

Federer needed treatment on his shoulder and elbow at the end of the fourth set and during the fifth. He said he had a tender nerve running down his arm to his fingers, but it was more a nuisance than a problem.

Federer didn't drop a set in five previous matches and had only served six double-faults. He'd reached that number of double-faults by the third set against Safin and finished with eight.

Federer last lost in August at the Olympics. This defeat also ended streaks of 24 straight wins against top 10 opponents and 19 in a row at majors.

"It was one of the toughest matches of my life. I need time to recover," Safin said. "Five sets is a kind of lottery. Anything can happen."

That was the case with Sharapova-Williams, too.

"It definitely lived up to expectations," said Williams, who won her 13th straight match at Melbourne Park.

She took the title in 2003, overcoming match points against Kim Clijsters in the semifinals, then wasn't able to defend it last year because of a slow recovery from left knee surgery.

Serena Williams lost to Sharapova in a lopsided final at the All England Club in July, then again in the final at the season-ending tour championships.

And down a set — and later, down match points — in the semifinals Wednesday, Williams might have questioned herself.

Instead, she came all the way back, even though Sharapova served for the match at 5-4 in each of the last two sets.

"I was battling Maria and myself," Williams said, noting her 53 unforced errors.

The intensity of Sharapova's shrieks and Williams' grunts increased with nearly every point down the stretch. Both players showed jitters at times, and both also hit great shots under pressure.

"I played from my heart. I didn't take my chances," Sharapova said, adding: "There's nothing negative: I'm 17 years old and I've made it to the semifinals. I'm sad; it's a tough one to lose. But I've got a long way ahead of me."

squirrel
01-29-2005, 03:19 PM
very good and sweet article for those who understand some french http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadactu/actu_suisse/edito_28.01.05_roger.html

squirrel
01-29-2005, 03:33 PM
and what about of this serena's words? she looks just a fan like we are!!! may be she is in love with rogi? she has good taste for tennis, anyway....http://www.telegraphindia.com/1050129/asp/sports/story_4310464.asp

Dana
01-29-2005, 04:00 PM
very good and sweet article for those who understand some french http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadactu/actu_suisse/edito_28.01.05_roger.html
Yes, a very nice and sweet comment written by Roger Jaunin, a journlaist who knows Roger very well (he wrote the French book about Roger). What is nice to know too is that Roger will read that comment for sure!

Here is a translation. Jaunin writes very well in French with a very nice style and it's not easy to keep all the subtleties in the translation...
--------

Roger defeated? And so what?

Comments by Roger Jaunin

Tennis today has a lot of chance. An enormous chance. The one, initially, to have a champion of the caliber of Roger Federer, and also, the one to be able to count on an opposition which the defeat, yesterday, of the world number one should reinstall in the role which belongs to him.

Federer lost is not a small thing. And it's heartbroken, late in the night, that Roger left the stadium where, just twelve months ago, he "seized the power". But - sorry! - quite as true that it can hurt Roger, this accident in his path was written. Programmed for where nor when, we didn't know, but inevitable.

No champion, as good as he is, never crossed the years without a hitch. And it is so much better like that, since the spirit of the sport holds in the emotion, and there is no such emotion when everything is written in advance.

Roger Federer will recover from this defeat, it is certain. Because he is intelligent, and that he will be able to learn the lessons from what occurred yesterday evening on the Central Court in Melbourne, he will return more stronger. And because he is among those who do not give up - and he has still proven that throughout this anthology match -, he will have in heart to show that, even beaten - once, only one, should it be pointed out? -, he remains the boss.

That "the others" take the occasion to raise their level, that they feel grow, like one says, some wings, that finally they feel this truth which wants that all is possible, all that can only make the happiness of the amateurs of the game in general, of tennis in particular.

Roger Federer is a player, he knows the rules of the game, he accepted them for a long time. If not, he would not be... the best player of the world, no?"

SUKTUEN
01-29-2005, 04:07 PM
thanks

ytben
01-29-2005, 04:11 PM
Thanks for translating it Dana. You're a gem :kiss: I hope Rogi will read it.

babsi
01-29-2005, 04:13 PM
Mr. Jaunin is a very smart man -even if he stated the obviose,many haven´t :)

Thank you Dana for posting :) :)

lsy
01-29-2005, 04:22 PM
Roger Federer will recover from this defeat, it is certain. Because he is intelligent, and that he will be able to learn the lessons from what occurred yesterday evening on the Central Court in Melbourne, he will return more stronger. And because he is among those who do not give up - and he has still proven that throughout this anthology match -, he will have in heart to show that, even beaten - once, only one, should it be pointed out? -, he remains the boss.



Thanks Squirrel and Dana...FINALLY I read one article that's giving some due to Roger :yeah:

Yes Rogi will just take the positive out of this loss no doubt and he certainly showed lots of courage and characters in that match.

yanchr
01-29-2005, 04:23 PM
Thanks Dana. I think the arthur is right.

Dana
01-29-2005, 04:30 PM
Here's the translation of a little interview Roger gave to Roger Jaunin, after his match against Safin. I'm sure Roger Jaunin was a good support for Roger in those moments... http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadsport/sport_divers/_j_aurais_aime_ne.html

As usual, Roger sounds so cute and speaks the truth...

"I would have liked to never to never stop winning" Roger Federer

ROGER JAUNIN - MELBOURNE

Roger Federer, you often specified that it did not seem "normal for you" that you win all your matches and all the tournaments in which you take part. Now, and once the disappointment passed, this defeat will relieve you of a weight, won't it?

For the moment, I do not see things like that. And what matters, right now, it's the disappointment to have lost. To tell the truth, I like to win, win and win gain. I like to set for myself high goals, to try to beat records... (smile.) I would have liked to never stop winning until the moment when I will take my retirement...

Can the fact of being able to say that this match was a big, an enormous match, that you were part of it, very as much as Marat Safin, all that somewhat decrease your disappointment?

Yes... and no. I believe indeed that we played a match of a rare quality, of a rare intensity too. Now, I lost it and that changes all. Today, it is me who left the court beaten, and, consequently, it is impossible for me to be satisfied. Or even simply pleased!

We saw you receiving treatments. What was it exactly? And did it bother you, affect your game?

In fact, I entered the court while having problems with my left foot. There, they were blisters... I tried to play in such a way that Marat does not realize that, but I was bothered in my movement, thus, I could not strike as much as I would have liked my forehand down the line. Anyway, against this kind of problem there is strictly nothing to do... if not tighten the teeth.

And the intervention of the physio, at the beginning of the fifth set?

I felt a pain in the right hand. It was as if a nerve had been blocked. There, yes, it was bothering...

Do you think that this defeat, the first since an half-eternity, will give ideas to your best opponents? What, to some extent, do they stop regarding you as invincible?

(Smile.) The time will say how they will react... What is sure, it is that as well Marat as Lleyton (Hewitt) or Andy (Roddick) remain and will remain most dangerous for me. Now, it is up to me to do even more and better....

Shy
01-29-2005, 04:34 PM
Home boy's mental edge will prevail where Federer failed
Marat Safin, who beat the world No 1 in an epic semi-final, will succumb to the Australian favourite in tomorrow's men's singles' final, writes Nick Bollettieri
29 January 2005


I believe Marat Safin edged past Roger Federer in their epic semi-final match because Roger was psychologically unsettled, but I also think Safin could lose to Lleyton Hewitt in tomorrow's final for similar reasons.

First, let's put Federer's defeat in context. It doesn't change his status as the world's best. He's still has all the tools to be the best ever. But no man can win every single time he plays. Nobody. As Greg Norman said a few years back, when asked to explain why he'd made a blooper at the Masters: "We're all human beings and we're all subject to human error."

Amen to that, and the world of sport would be a duller place if it wasn't so.

So why did Federer go down, albeit in an incredible, battle where it took a whole bunch of unconverted match points before he was finally broken? For my money, the decisive factor was captured in one glance that Roger shot up at the coach's box during the match. It was a glance at Safin's coach, Peter Lundgren. And who used to be Federer's coach? Lundgren.

In a tight, physical, skilful, wilful match, the margin of victory and loss always had the potential to be paper thin. And for me, somewhere in Federer's head was the notion: "Look, there's Peter, he helped make me the player I am. Now he's with the other guy, and he's making him a helluva player too."

In many years on the front line in this game, I've seen and experienced the power of the mind in sport. The psychology involved in facing an opponent who's now using your old coach is powerful. I remember after I split with Andre Agassi, I was working with Boris Becker and they met in competition. Andre shot me a glance like Roger shot at Lundgren. And then he beat the crap out of Becker. He wanted it so badly to show me.

Roger is motivated in different ways. On this occasion, I think he was unsettled, rather than riled.

How will Federer respond to defeat? I believe positively. I still think he'll win 95 per cent of the time. But everyone's gunning for him.

Everyone is being forced to raise their standards. And for tennis, that can only be a good thing. The result is matches like the semi-final: great spectacles, great rivalries.

So to Hewitt, who beat Andy Roddick yesterday to reach a Slam final on home turf. Roddick and Safin are both big servers, but just because Hewitt handled Roddick doesn't mean he'll handle Safin.

Roddick was undermined by his forehand, which went down the tubes.

However, Hewitt might well have that mental edge because he's using the circumstances at his disposal to full effect to get inside his opponents' heads. It goes without saying that he's playing well, looks fit and looks hungry. But he's also orchestrating the crowd behind him. He's cheering at opponent's mistakes, which isn't ethical but it messes with the other guy's head. The crowd - especially his core of yellow-shirted, cheerleader buddies - are responding supportively.

Every pump of his fist is another signal for more noise. The word in Melbourne is he's actually paying for those guys to be there. But heck, what's the price of a few seats for his mates when they're helping him so much?

This edge could be the key to beating Safin, a normally fragile mental character who opponents have relied on to break upstairs at some stage. He's matured, and not broken down in this tournament, yet.

Shy
01-29-2005, 04:35 PM
Do you think that this defeat, the first since an half-eternity, will give ideas to your best opponents? What, to some extent, do they stop regarding you as invincible?

(Smile.) The time will say how they will react... What is sure, it is that as well Marat as Lleyton (Hewitt) or Andy (Roddick) remain and will remain most dangerous for me. Now, it is up to me to do even more and better....
That is the attidude that will make him achieve more.

SUKTUEN
01-29-2005, 04:49 PM
thanks~~Roger you aright that is good~~

I am glad of that :D :D :D :wavey:

yanchr
01-29-2005, 04:51 PM
Here's the translation of a little interview Roger gave to Roger Jaunin, after his match against Safin. I'm sure Roger Jaunin was a good support for Roger in those moments... http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadsport/sport_divers/_j_aurais_aime_ne.html

As usual, Roger sounds so cute and speaks the truth...

"I would have liked to never to never stop winning" Roger Federer

ROGER JAUNIN - MELBOURNE

Roger Federer, you often specified that it did not seem "normal for you" that you win all your matches and all the tournaments in which you take part. Now, and once the disappointment passed, this defeat will relieve you of a weight, won't it?

For the moment, I do not see things like that. And what matters, right now, it's the disappointment to have lost. To tell the truth, I like to win, win and win gain. I like to set for myself high goals, to try to beat records... (smile.) I would have liked to never stop winning until the moment when I will take my retirement...

Can the fact of being able to say that this match was a big, an enormous match, that you were part of it, very as much as Marat Safin, all that somewhat decrease your disappointment?

Yes... and no. I believe indeed that we played a match of a rare quality, of a rare intensity too. Now, I lost it and that changes all. Today, it is me who left the court beaten, and, consequently, it is impossible for me to be satisfied. Or even simply pleased!

We saw you receiving treatments. What was it exactly? And did it bother you, affect your game?

In fact, I entered the court while having problems with my left foot. There, they were blisters... I tried to play in such a way that Marat does not realize that, but I was bothered in my movement, thus, I could not strike as much as I would have liked my forehand down the line. Anyway, against this kind of problem there is strictly nothing to do... if not tighten the teeth.

And the intervention of the physio, at the beginning of the fifth set?

I felt a pain in the right hand. It was as if a nerve had been blocked. There, yes, it was bothering...

Do you think that this defeat, the first since an half-eternity, will give ideas to your best opponents? What, to some extent, do they stop regarding you as invincible?

(Smile.) The time will say how they will react... What is sure, it is that as well Marat as Lleyton (Hewitt) or Andy (Roddick) remain and will remain most dangerous for me. Now, it is up to me to do even more and better....
Dana, great thanks for this interview. Roger told his heart to his close friend.

:sad::sad: I didn't realize how much effort Roger had put in the match while having to struggling with all the problems...he must be tightening his teeth hard in that 5th set :sad::sad::bigcry::bigcry:

Poor Rogi :sad::hug:

SUKTUEN
01-29-2005, 04:59 PM
Roger will become more strong after that :)

babsi
01-29-2005, 05:31 PM
Thank you again Dana :)

Poor,poor Roger - it´s very hard to think off all the problems he faced - poor guy.
For me Roger is family - can´t stand the thought off him being hurt and than being hurt,because he was hurt.

I´m not a big fan off Nick Bolletterie,but he isn´t dumb - I really think he is heads on with his obervesion about the Roger-Lundgren realtionship.
In Housten Roger was really bothered,that he couldn´t brake Marat´s serve in the first game of the second set - very other match he would have told himself- better times next time baby - not there.You could just feel the added tension thoughout the match.
Roger said before the match that he was happy that he had the first match with Peter in Safin´s corner out off the way - the issue wasn´t finished with the Housten win - maybe it is now,with the feared lose behind him.
Pressur on the tennis side off things dosesn´t bother him - but on the human side they do - he is very senstive in that regard.

gogo_guga
01-29-2005, 05:51 PM
All I have to say about Roger is that he is all class! I thought he handled himself extremely elegantly at the press conference :)
To me, that is a clear indication that his maturity and personality will enable him to put this defeat behind, and come back stronger than ever.

vene
01-29-2005, 08:15 PM
NYTimes:
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Published: January 28, 2005









MELBOURNE, Australia, Friday, Jan. 28 - Roger Federer hobbled down the hallway in the depths of Rod Laver Arena early Friday with his head bowed, his feet bare and his Grand Slam in ruins before he could even finish laying the foundation.

Winning all four of tennis's major events in the same year was always a long shot, but Federer, who won all but one of them in 2004, clearly had the momentum, the mystique and the variety of tools to give it a run.

But he will have to wait until next January in Melbourne to start building again. The year's first Grand Slam title is going to one of the three men who have been chasing him with little success for the past 18 months, and, after Marat Safin's performance against Federer in a 4-hour-28-minute semifinal, it would be no surprise if Safin finally gets the chance to hold up the Australian Open trophy.

In a tournament full of marathon matches and epic final sets, Safin's 5-7, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (9), 9-7 victory over Federer, tennis's undisputed heavyweight champion, was the most compelling yet, because of the quality of shot making routinely on display and the difficulty of the task at hand.

Federer, who held a 6-1 career edge on Safin and routed him in last year's Australian Open final, was not at his best or his healthiest. He had blisters on the bottom of his left foot before the match and required treatment before the fifth set for nerve discomfort in the index finger of his right hand. But even slightly diminished, Federer is still the most confident, versatile and breathtaking player in tennis. And though Safin started the match on a big-hitting, serve-pounding mission, he still lost the first set and still had to save a match point at 5-6 in the fourth-set tie breaker with a lunging, last-chance lob that Federer reached but could not return with a trick shot between his legs.

It was only then that Safin was in position to deliver the first genuine blow in months to Federer's aura of invincibility, although it took him quite a bit longer than he would have liked to deliver it.

When Safin had his first match point, at 5-4 in the fifth set, it was still Thursday night and still his 25th birthday. By the time he had his seventh and final match point, it was 24 minutes past midnight on Friday. In his younger days, this much delayed gratification would have sent him into a racket-smashing, oath-delivering rage. Safin kept tightening up when it came time for his hard-earned reward and Federer kept swinging away through the pain, but Safin managed to keep the majority of his cool and, at last, take just the right risk at just the right time.

"To be honest, I couldn't make all those match points because psychologically I had on the other side of the net Roger Federer," Safin said. "No matter how many match points you have, you have to really win it."

Safin's favorite shot has long been his two-handed backhand, and though he had misfired with it on match points Nos. 2 and 5, he went for it down the line with all his considerable might on No. 7. Federer lunged to his right and fell as he hit his forehand, letting go of his racket. The shot still crossed the net, and though it was hardly unthinkable at this slightly surreal stage that the specter of Federer would help Safin find a way to dump his easy forehand in the net, he knocked it into the open court and celebrated by leaning wearily on the net with his hands as Federer collected himself and his things and trudged forward for a handshake that turned into an embrace.

Federer had won 26 straight matches since losing in the Summer Olympics last year. He had won 24 straight matches against members of the top 10 and had not lost a set in a Grand Slam tournament since the quarterfinals of last year's United States Open. But all those streaks are now history, and the only ones with a chance at a Grand Slam this season, besides Safin, are Andy Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt, who will play in the second semifinal here Friday night.

"Losing by having a match point, it's always going to hurt, no matter how great the match was," Federer said. "But at least you can leave the place feeling good about yourself, because I thought I gave it all I had."

There were plenty of surprises in this match, which was played on a higher plane than the tennis on display elsewhere in Melbourne Park over the last 10 days. But in the end, what won it for Safin was a little bit of luck and a whole lot of clutch serving. Time and again, he dodged trouble with a service winner or an ace that exceeded 120 miles an hour.

A big serve is a vital ingredient for those who wish to knock Federer off his pedestal, but it is usually not enough because of the quality of his returns. Safin needed everything at his disposal: aggressive, deep returns that kept Federer on his back foot; bold groundstrokes; improved fitness and volleys; and a new coach, Peter Lundgren.

Lundgren, who coached Federer for four years before being dismissed at the end of 2003, has plenty of inside information. He was in the stands in Houston in November when Federer defeated Safin in the semifinals of the Masters Cup in another terrific match, which Federer won by taking the second-set tie breaker, 20-18. But Lundgren had an even better time in the stands Thursday.

"Sure it helps," said Safin's agent, Gerard Tsobanian. "When Federer started to drop off, Peter was telling us it was because his feet were hurting. He knew when Roger would hit certain shots, when he'd take risks. He knew, when he faced break point, where he'd serve. He was doing a running commentary for us throughout the match."

Daniel
01-30-2005, 11:43 AM
thnaks vene :D

avocadoe
01-30-2005, 09:57 PM
Babsi, I agree with you in your comment about Roger and Peter, and tensions there involved. He'll work it out, but it is there. Maybe Marat winning the AO, and being the spoiler for Roger's 4 in a year bid this year, will feel like enough good to him. I am imagining Roger felt a bit of guilt at taking leave of Peter, and then, doing so well himself afterwards. Maybe this levels that field. I hope so. I also felt Roger was a bit troubled by all the media stuff about his/their expectations, and the opposite, like implying HE had to raise his game to play AA. Roger needs to feel in charge of his expectations, and performs best when he feels he is fulfilling them for himself, not others. He'll figure a way to get back to that. Letting Roche in may be a good thing for his game, but again, it is NEW, and hard to integrate a whole new personality, a person with expectations, too, into the scene. Feel better Roger, looking forward to years of YOU!!!

Daniel
01-31-2005, 09:05 AM
nice post avocadoe :)

Puschkin
01-31-2005, 09:23 AM
[QUOTE=Dana]Here's the translation of a little interview Roger gave to Roger Jaunin, after his match against Safin.

To tell the truth, I like to win, win and win again. I like to set for myself high goals, to try to beat records... (smile.) I would have liked to never stop winning until the moment when I will take my retirement...

Today, it is me who left the court beaten, and, consequently, it is impossible for me to be satisfied. Or even simply pleased!

Now, it is up to me to do even more and better....
[QUOTE]

Thanks Dana for translating this. It says it all, watch out Misters Safin, Hewitt and whatever your names are!

Daniel
01-31-2005, 09:30 AM
Vandals play while Federer licks wounds

The Big Russian against the Little Larrikin - it could be quite a final, says Jon Henderson

Sunday January 30, 2005
The Observer

If the music did not quite die, it certainly changed with Roger Federer's semi-final defeat - and we were left with today's heavy metal men's final between Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt.
A little ungenerous to Safin it may be, but it is a final that can be characterised as the vandals making merry in the absence of the man who would reclaim the game's cultured heritage.

Safin's play is not in fact without sophistication. He deploys his immense power with more subtlety than most. In the end, though, it was the sustained violence of his hitting that broke Federer. The world number one may still play a brand of tennis that everyone else on the circuit can only aspire to, but against Safin last Thursday his game and his body gave way under the might of the Russian's challenge.

Sophistication is not a charge that can be levelled at Hewitt's game, which is as pretty as a pub brawl (which is what he seemed to be trying to emulate with his belligerent quarter-final performance against David Nalbandian, the Argentine later making the nicely understated observation that Hewitt 'is not a gentleman').

Ever since the spread of new racket technology in the 1970s, professional tennis - the men's game in particular - has been subject to a reductive process to the point where we now have what has been called a 'world style'. It is a style without the nuance of the old wooden-racket era, a style with all-court possibilities, but based firmly on power and the ability to keep on trading solid ground strokes.

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Hewitt has reduced this process still further, scorning the all-court option and focusing exclusively on wearing down opponents from the back of the court. A lightweight among behemoths, he can do it effectively because he is quick of foot, sharp of eye, sure of hand and utterly, utterly determined to stay in a rally longer than the other guy. It may be aesthetically unsatisfying, but it is an approach that produces compelling contests with opponents put under extreme psychological pressure.

Some, inevitably, cope better than others with the infuriating little larrikin. Nalbandian came close to cracking, so too did his compatriot Juan Ignacio Chela, who incurred a £1,000 fine a week ago after he became so upset by Hewitt's vein-popping cries of 'C'mon' that he spat in Hewitt's direction as the players changed ends. The particular 'C'mon' that was the tipping point for Chela came when the Argentine missed an easy volley. Chela said he hated the way Hewitt celebrated. Hewitt won in four sets and moved on without a scintilla of regret over the way he had behaved.

Safin has a famously fragile temperament. On this day of his third Australian Open final in four years - he was runner-up in 2004 and 2002 - it is worth remembering he is the only person to have been deemed guilty of 'tanking' a match - that's throwing, to you and me - in a grand slam, and the incident happened at Melbourne Park. He copped a $2,000 fine after losing to Grant Stafford, a limited South African player, in straight sets. At one point, he apparently caught a valid serve by Stafford and tossed the ball back to him.

The evidence is, though, that he self-combusts; there is no blue touchpaper to which someone else can apply a flame. In fact he seems pretty impervious to outside pyrotechnics, and when he is at peace with himself and at one with his game he is capable of almost anything - even beating Federer.

If he does - as he should - pull it off this morning, in what is likely to be a red-blooded contest in front of a crowd who are partial to a little raw competitiveness, the only surprise will be that it has taken him so long to add to his first grand-slam title won in New York five years ago.

babsi
01-31-2005, 11:49 AM
The emperor has to keep those vandals in check!

Thanks for posting ,Daniel :)

SUKTUEN
01-31-2005, 03:48 PM
thanks Daniel

Jimena
01-31-2005, 09:18 PM
From Wertheim's column:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/01/31/wertheim.aussiemail/index.html

1. We began the tournament wondering if a male player could be the first man to win the Grand Slam since Rod Laver. After Marat Safin's poised run in Melbourne, maybe it's still a valid question.

That bugs me. But a part of me wants people to hype Marat as a GS threat so that he gets the pressure and not Roger. :devil: I told you people that I could be a spiteful little wench. :D

But this...

8. Obviously, it was a disappointing result for Federer, but here's food for thought: He far from his best against the second-most talented player in tennis. And he came within a point -- literally within inches -- of winning. Also, here's some testament to Federer's elite status: He loses 9-7 in the fifth set to the mountainously talented Safin and the headlines tell us he is "stunned in a huge upset."

... I kind of liked.

TenHound
01-31-2005, 09:43 PM
The press just needs something to talk about. All of us who saw Marat match in Houston knew that he was back & to me at least had at least a 50-50 chance of defeating Roger in Aus. You'd have to be brain dead not to know the key rivalry at top of men's tennis is Roger-Marat & Safin-Safin!!

But did everyone check the match stats? Roger actually won 7 more points in the match than Marat. To me that suggests the crucial role played by the inside information provided by Peter, as clearly it was, as Rog said, a few key points that made the difference. I trust everyone read -in Chris Clarey's NYT art. & L'Equipe art. trans. by someone on Marat's website- about Marat's agent running around locker room environs after the match bragging about all the key details that Peter was able to provide about Roger...where Rog would serve on break point, etc. etc.

Let's hope that got back to Rog & he is able to adjust.

laselva
01-31-2005, 11:21 PM
The press just needs something to talk about. All of us who saw Marat match in Houston knew that he was back & to me at least had at least a 50-50 chance of defeating Roger in Aus. You'd have to be brain dead not to know the key rivalry at top of men's tennis is Roger-Marat & Safin-Safin!!
Then I am brain dead 'cause I fail to see what Safin-Safin rivalry is. :p I was worried about Roger-Safin match, but I gave Roger 60-40 chance at least. The tie break in Houston didnt tell me that much considering how many unforced errors prolong the match (besides the bad call and the Lundgren fact). But the fact that Roger-Safin matchs decided by many tie break sets even before Houston tells Safin's service game is still quite difficult for Roger to break. Right now I am not sure how this is going to turn out, rivalry or not...

But did everyone check the match stats? Roger actually won 7 more points in the match than Marat. To me that suggests the crucial role played by the inside information provided by Peter, as clearly it was, as Rog said, a few key points that made the difference. I trust everyone read -in Chris Clarey's NYT art. & L'Equipe art. trans. by someone on Marat's website- about Marat's agent running around locker room environs after the match bragging about all the key details that Peter was able to provide about Roger...where Rog would serve on break point, etc. etc.
You should have put Warning ( ;) ) for people who are still pissed off at Lundgren and at people around Marat repeating how Lungdren knew blah, blah about Federer's blah, blah. I am mad, AGAIN. I guess it was after all his job and that but still...a bit mad.


Let's hope that got back to Rog & he is able to adjust.
:clap2: I hope so!

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 01:36 AM
From Wertheim's column:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/01/31/wertheim.aussiemail/index.html



That bugs me. But a part of me wants people to hype Marat as a GS threat so that he gets the pressure and not Roger. :devil: I told you people that I could be a spiteful little wench. :D

But this...



... I kind of liked.

Hola, Jimena! [eres de Cuba?]

Your 2nd quote was interesting and sth I definitely thought about, esp after finally watching part of that amazing match [it bugs me that we only got to see the end of the 3rd set fr 5-4 and none of the 1st set that Rogi won but not much we can do about it].

Anyway, I think journalists and "haters" as everyone likes to call people these days, both were dying to see what they consider the "downfall" of Federer after being SOOOOOO bored of watching him win "every" title last year. [if Rogi winning bores them SOOOO much, why do they bother watching... but I digress...].

So now they got what they wanted... finally someone [and I'm glad to say it was Marat, whom I consider v talented, if somewhat a tortured genius and I do actually like his flaky personality, being an Aquarian like him] beat the "unbeatable" Roger Federer! So why don't they stop complaining???

I'm SOOO bored of these people saying how unbeatable Rogi is [nobody is unbeatable, not even the all-time great Pete Sampras] and now they're wondering if this one loss will truly spell his fall fr grace so to speak.

It's all SOOOO tiresome :rolleyes:

Marat played brilliant tennis [and yes, he did make errors and he did smash his racquet, but that's just Marat] and that brilliant tennis beat Rogi. It took him 5 long sets and 4-1/2 hrs to do it, pushing Rogi beyond his comfort zone, making him hurt physically, like we've rarely seen him, as he put himself under enormous pressure to defend his title [and perhaps the 100th anniversary and acquiring Rochey had sth to do w it]. Rogi never played his best tennis this year at the AO... he struggled fr R1 right up to the SF.

That SF was THE best match of the AO and that was due to some fabulous tennis fr both players... it even had big emotions fr Rogi, whom most feel has no emotion [whatever].

Rogi managed to make the SF, which is fine by me, because I believe that defending Wimby is far more important to ROGI... he downplays RG altho again the press won't let him off the hook for that slam this year [I personally think he's not yet ready to win it but hey, if he surprised us all and won it, I'd be the first to celebrate -- I want Rogi to win a French title, whether RG, MCarlo or Paris-Bercy]...

It will be interesting to see if Marat gets hyped now that he has come back and is a force [I like him to be there where he belongs -- now if only Juanqui could do the same... I'm dreaming there tho :sad: ].

Don't worry about secretly wanting Marat to feel the pressure... fans of other players have been wanting [and getting] that for Rogi!! :p So will people start asking if Marat can win the GS?? He's the only one who can now this year -- at least THAT pressure is off Rogi -- not that it was truly there [cos nobody can win it anyway].

My Q is: when Lleyton was "dominating" for 2 yrs, did everyone HATE him so much and get bored of him winning?? Cos he sure did... and what if it's Marat [or Pandy or anyone else... Baghdatis, Ancic... ] winning everything -- will everyone hate them too???

Yep, I missed Rogi in the Final as well... time for Lleyton to take a little break... he looked knackered out there.

One ironic thing: before Marat won AO, players were afraid of Rogi... ha ha, now they also have Marat to be afraid of... more than they bargained for!!! ;) :p

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 01:40 AM
I think Rogi's loss was somewhat overstated and exaggerated in some of the articles that I saw... whatever.

Molodetz, Marat!

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 01:42 AM
Look on the bright side, surely every time Rogi and Marat meet, Marat cannot possibly play as brilliantly as he did v. Rogi... but you never know... perhaps Marat has grown up now...

RogiFan88
02-01-2005, 01:45 AM
Just recuperate Rogi... keep fit, that's important [and I feel that that was a factor in his loss]! I've never seen Rogi w so many physical probs... not good!! Do not go 5 sets for one thing and if you do, be fit enough to win them...

Marat beating Rogi may be a blessing in disguise... a wakeup call for Rogi...

Dirk
02-01-2005, 02:31 AM
ROGER DIDN'T LOSE THAT MATCH DUE TO TUCKING OUT. YOU DON'T LOSE 7-9 IN THE 5th SET BECAUSE YOU GET TIRED. ROGER LOST BECAUSE SAFFY PLAYED BETTER LATE IN THAT SET.


Roger is very fit and if he was not then 04 wouldn't exist. He lost due to foot blisters, nerve pain and Saffy's play. Peter wasn't a factor at all. If not for Roger's condition coming into the match it would have been over in 3 sets. Go ahead let Peter think he is useful, because soon Roger will go back to owning Saffy just like he did before this match. I think it's :lol: that Marat needs Roger to have mulitple physical problems in order to just BARELY SCRAP BY.

Dana
02-01-2005, 03:07 AM
This is a translation of a small article written by Roger Jaunin (the journalist who knows Roger well). A very different sound from what we can read these days in the press about Safin victory. Ironic, sarcastic, bitter? http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadsport/sport_divers/a__pl_.html

As soon said... (Title impossible to translate! It a little play on words which only make sense in French...)

To "PL"

Roger Jaunin

One quintal of bonhomie, good-naturedness... The bag of the champion on the shoulder, the trophy of the winner nested in the left arm hollow, a cuddly toy - a kangaroo, inevitably - in the right hand... Peter Lundgren has the eyes which sparkle. And perhaps even bead a little, who knows... This success of Marat Safin, it is a little, much, his own. Last year, it was in Sweden, with his family, where he followed the Australian Open and the victory of the one who was not anymore his pupil, Roger Federer. And, there, here he is enjoying. He does not say "revenge", Peter Lundgren. He says that "it is life", and that "stories end, others start... and(that it is very well like that".

This evening, this night, he will drink some beers in company of "his" champion the Australian Open... and the pack, the crowd - "My family", said Safin -, pleasant young ladies just arriving from Moscow and which now cackle, prattle in front of the door of the lockeroom.

At the stadium microphone, Marat Safin said simply: "I thank my coach", and Peter Lundgren - "PL" for the friends - furtively wiped his eyes.

The light of the spotlights, undoubtedly...

And it will be all for this year.

Jimena
02-01-2005, 03:08 AM
Hola, Jimena! [eres de Cuba?]

No. Soy de Puerto Rico... La bandera se parece a la de Cuba: tienen el mismo diseño, pero con los colores invertidos. Creo que Daniel tiene la de Cuba debajo de su nombre...

It will be interesting to see if Marat gets hyped now that he has come back and is a force [I like him to be there where he belongs -- now if only Juanqui could do the same... I'm dreaming there tho :sad: ].

I don't think Marat will be as hyped as Roger, though I hope he is. I doubt it, because he just hasn't proven in his career that he can sustain a high level of play for a long time. So people don't really expect excellence from him, after expecting it for so many years and being disappointed. Don't get me wrong, I'm happy that it was Marat and no one else who beat Roger and I'm glad he won the title that was frankly overdue. BUT, Roger's my favorite player and I have never been a fan of any other player the way I am a fan of Roger's. And I have to take care of my fave. So I say, let's hype Marat so there's less pressure on Roger and then Roger gets annoyed and wins everything in sight. :p

I'm so greedy! :o

I also want Juan Carlos to come back to the elite level. Why do you think that's impossible?

My Q is: when Lleyton was "dominating" for 2 yrs, did everyone HATE him so much and get bored of him winning?? Cos he sure did... and what if it's Marat [or Pandy or anyone else... Baghdatis, Ancic... ] winning everything -- will everyone hate them too???

The thing is that Hewitt never really dominated. He only won one GS title per year he was year-end #1. That doesn't come close to what Roger did (thank goodness!). During that time, no other player really rose to the challenge. You had two years when 4 different players won the GS titles, and the ones who should've really been challenging for #1 those years (Marat and Guga :inlove: , IMHO) were having too much fun, having major confidence issues, were bitten by the injury bug or having hip operations, changing coaches repeatedly, etc. Hewitt was never really loved, I think. But he wasn't dominating enough for people to say that tennis was boring because of it. Again, JMO.

I remember that people were saying that tennis was boring at the time because of the parity. Anyone could win at any given time, so rivalries were not developed, the stories that came out of GS play were not that great, etc. That's what I remember hearing. Ironic, isn't it? I guess people are always going to find something to complain about.

Anyway, I think that people that are not fans of a certain player are going to be saying that tennis is boring if that particular player dominates. It doesn't matter that the tennis being played is breathtaking (Roger's), or that watching this player move is pure joy (Roger), or that he might be a unique talent that comes along once in a blue moon (guess who? ;) )

:wavey:

Puschkin
02-01-2005, 09:07 AM
But did everyone check the match stats? Roger actually won 7 more points in the match than Marat. To me that suggests the crucial role played by the inside information provided by Peter, as clearly it was, as Rog said, a few key points that made the difference.


You are right in pointing out the stats, it was a very close match and whoever finally wins it deserves it. Even if one might not like it. But I don't get the argument why these close points are attributed to Lundgren knowing Roger. Lundgren did a lot for Marat such as raising his confidence, etc... but insider information on a few close points :confused:

As for the media, just don't take them too seriously, they do always need stories, and when they don't have one, they make one up. As much as I like Marat and appreciate his performance at AO, but him winning the grand slam is a joke.

And finally to Jimena: I also belong to the group wanting Juan-Carlos Ferrero fully competitive again :)

Daniel
02-01-2005, 10:10 AM
indeed Puschkin, Marat won coz he played much better than Roger and Lleyton but to me he did not deserve to win the AO.

Puschkin
02-01-2005, 10:17 AM
indeed Puschkin, Marat won coz he played much better than Roger and Lleyton but to me he did not deserve to win the AO.

Why not? :confused:

But as I said before, he did not play much better, he won the important points and therfore he deserved to win the tourney.

Daniel
02-01-2005, 10:25 AM
coz his career has been up and down
he is such a talented player but did not have the merit comng to the AO to win it.

fightclubber
02-01-2005, 11:17 AM
Hola, Jimena! [eres de Cuba?]

Your 2nd quote was interesting and sth I definitely thought about, esp after finally watching part of that amazing match [it bugs me that we only got to see the end of the 3rd set fr 5-4 and none of the 1st set that Rogi won but not much we can do about it].

Anyway, I think journalists and "haters" as everyone likes to call people these days, both were dying to see what they consider the "downfall" of Federer after being SOOOOOO bored of watching him win "every" title last year. [if Rogi winning bores them SOOOO much, why do they bother watching... but I digress...].

So now they got what they wanted... finally someone [and I'm glad to say it was Marat, whom I consider v talented, if somewhat a tortured genius and I do actually like his flaky personality, being an Aquarian like him] beat the "unbeatable" Roger Federer! So why don't they stop complaining???

I'm SOOO bored of these people saying how unbeatable Rogi is [nobody is unbeatable, not even the all-time great Pete Sampras] and now they're wondering if this one loss will truly spell his fall fr grace so to speak.

It's all SOOOO tiresome :rolleyes:

Marat played brilliant tennis [and yes, he did make errors and he did smash his racquet, but that's just Marat] and that brilliant tennis beat Rogi. It took him 5 long sets and 4-1/2 hrs to do it, pushing Rogi beyond his comfort zone, making him hurt physically, like we've rarely seen him, as he put himself under enormous pressure to defend his title [and perhaps the 100th anniversary and acquiring Rochey had sth to do w it]. Rogi never played his best tennis this year at the AO... he struggled fr R1 right up to the SF.

That SF was THE best match of the AO and that was due to some fabulous tennis fr both players... it even had big emotions fr Rogi, whom most feel has no emotion [whatever].

Rogi managed to make the SF, which is fine by me, because I believe that defending Wimby is far more important to ROGI... he downplays RG altho again the press won't let him off the hook for that slam this year [I personally think he's not yet ready to win it but hey, if he surprised us all and won it, I'd be the first to celebrate -- I want Rogi to win a French title, whether RG, MCarlo or Paris-Bercy]...

It will be interesting to see if Marat gets hyped now that he has come back and is a force [I like him to be there where he belongs -- now if only Juanqui could do the same... I'm dreaming there tho :sad: ].

Don't worry about secretly wanting Marat to feel the pressure... fans of other players have been wanting [and getting] that for Rogi!! :p So will people start asking if Marat can win the GS?? He's the only one who can now this year -- at least THAT pressure is off Rogi -- not that it was truly there [cos nobody can win it anyway].

My Q is: when Lleyton was "dominating" for 2 yrs, did everyone HATE him so much and get bored of him winning?? Cos he sure did... and what if it's Marat [or Pandy or anyone else... Baghdatis, Ancic... ] winning everything -- will everyone hate them too???

Yep, I missed Rogi in the Final as well... time for Lleyton to take a little break... he looked knackered out there.

One ironic thing: before Marat won AO, players were afraid of Rogi... ha ha, now they also have Marat to be afraid of... more than they bargained for!!! ;) :p

I realy like your analysis. Really, Im agreed in 80 percent.
Roger lost to a MARAT in better conditions, not only physical but mentally.Besides his injuries, , no matter what they were or are... ROGER GAVE "THE" FIGHT. But Marat was superior.
Two things they said here in latin america on the transmition ( live). Javier FRANA, ex tennis player and now part of ESPN, said, something like " I DO NOT SEE FEDERER AS CONFORTABLE AS IN OTHER GAMES", And it was at the first or second set ( half of it) do not remember. IT MADE NO SENSE to me at that time but later... when Roger asked for assistance... I said, my GOD this FRANA knew him well.
Other thing I liked was at the last set. When Roger started to give FIGHT. At a GREAT POINT I think Roger went to the net he said something like " HAAA HAA HE WONT GIVE IT EASY; HE IS FIGHTING HARD, HE WONT GIVE THIS MACTH FOR FREE."
And, I have to admit at the end of set 4 I thought Roger was " done". So Im proud he fight so much, so well, with the RF spirit. Was enoght? Was not? Do not know, BUT also have to say, MARAT played very well, So aplausses to both.
Silvy