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Roger news and articles

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Clara Bow
11-29-2004, 06:25 PM
For those of you who can get US Vogue the December issue (the one with Cate Blanchett on the cover) will have an article and picture about Roger in it.

Please, scan and post that... would love to see/read

I'll be more than happy to scan it for everyone. I haven't gotten the issue yet through the mail- but I should be getting it within the next couple of days. I'll post it here when I get it. I'm looking forward to the pictures!

lunahielo
11-29-2004, 09:10 PM
:confused: Oh, no! Doris, I came over here to get away from all of the delicious foods on the chat thread.....and you and Mrs. B. have great sounding and looking edibles here, too!

squirrel
11-29-2004, 09:12 PM
thanks Clara...

soonha
11-30-2004, 05:44 AM
Here's a part of Jon Wertheim's article from SI.com(http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/11/29/mailbag.1129/). Great e-mail from someone feeling the very same way with me...

================================================== =====
Finally, we generally refrain from posting rants. But this is so dead-on, we couldn't resist. Jonathan Rapkin of Fla., writes:

"Federer's win at the Masters Cup (broadcast on ESPN and ESPN2) is not even an article on the ESPN home page -- this from the network that is supposedly committed to tennis. In addition to the NBA suspension and NFL news, its headlines in order were as follows:

- Busch wins NASCAR Cup title
- Nowitzki's ankle
- Celtics snap Sonic win streak
- Five Hunters dead after Wis. treestand dispute
- UNC Stuns UConn ladies
- Georgia women's hoops
- UVA knocks off Arizona

As an avid sports fan, there are few stories bigger than the year Federer has put together. Some facts:

- 23 straight wins over top-10 players
- 13 consecutive wins in finals
- Won three of the Grand Slams this year
- 74-6 record in '04
- Won titles on all surfaces

The guy is pound for pound the most dominant athlete in the world right now; arguably more dominant than Tiger was when he was winning majors. If he stays healthy and hungry, Federer is on pace for greener pastures than Sampras. If you watch one of his matches, the commentators go out of their way to help the viewers understand that what they're seeing is something special. He's put an extra bounce in the step of (presumably) unbiased announcers every time they call his matches. Patrick McEnroe and Mary Carillo would probably pay to call his matches. He's earned so much respect and fear from his peers that it's translating into a free break of serve in the opening set each time he steps on the court.

When your significant others ask why you love sports --beyond the sheer entertainment value --it's the fact that you can potentially be a part of something special. For me, little comes close to the Broncos' Super Bowl wins, or the '96 Yankees, but watching this guy play --쟞s he hits shots that nobody else in the world can hit, as he dismantles opponents at a time when the sport is loaded with talent --feels pretty special. It continues to pain me that the general public, and moreover the majority of sportswriters, just don't get how big a story this guy is. And it's a depressing time for the sport when we've got the best athlete in the world, and we can't even market him. I wish I had the answers."

Daniel
11-30-2004, 08:26 AM
thanks soonha :D

Mrs. B
11-30-2004, 09:14 AM
that's a good one. thanks for posting, soonha.

Clara, a lot of Roger's fans who don't have access to the US mags would definitely appreciate it if you can post the writeup here.

i went to the kiosk yesterday, but the issue won't hit the stands here till next week.

soonha
11-30-2004, 09:31 PM
that's a good one. thanks for posting, soonha.

Clara, a lot of Roger's fans who don't have access to the US mags would definitely appreciate it if you can post the writeup here.

i went to the kiosk yesterday, but the issue won't hit the stands here till next week.

Mrs,B. I posted those pics yesterday at "Let's post more Roger's great pictures!!!!!! " thread. Just go and see!

squirrel
11-30-2004, 10:19 PM
in ZDF site I found a nice video of Rogi, it is in german but he looks so funny!!!
http://www.zdf.de/ZDFde/suche/1,1926,1000001,00.html
I hope you all enjoy while

lunahielo
12-01-2004, 12:35 AM
Soona, what a great article...and so true!
Thanks.
Luna~~~~~

lina_seta
12-01-2004, 01:19 AM
that article (from sooha)
:fiery: :mad: :mad:

two words... ESPN SUCKS!!
i never saw the last meaningful year-capping match of rogi-lleyton in TMC.. cuz they rather show a fifth time repetition of Guillermo Vilas' bio. :(
ESPN doesnt care about tennis... plus they made big mistakes like roger was in the blue group with andy, marat and coria! how?? :confused:

mitalidas
12-01-2004, 03:42 PM
Don't spam me, I know this is not Roger news per se. But it is news about someone close to Roger's heart.....:)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/4057435.stm

Mrs. B
12-01-2004, 05:41 PM
Don't spam me, I know this is not Roger news per se. But it is news about someone close to Roger's heart.....:)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/4057435.stm

this belongs to wta. and we don't really know if she is 'close' to Roger's heart. he has a gf and her name is Mirka. :p

mitalidas
12-01-2004, 07:09 PM
oh, but Roger definitely has had a long-term crush on martina, no doubt about that....

ste
12-01-2004, 07:13 PM
oh, but Roger definitely has had a long-term crush on martina, no doubt about that....

I am not really sure about this???!!!! :scratch:

babsi
12-01-2004, 09:49 PM
I thought this is off season,but you guys are almost as busy as during the rest of the year!
Thanks everybody :) :)

RogiFan88
12-01-2004, 09:53 PM
mitalidas, I think it was the other way around... more like Marti had a crush on Rogi, and why not?!

soonha
12-01-2004, 09:55 PM
oh, but Roger definitely has had a long-term crush on martina, no doubt about that....


What makes you think of that? I'm just curious...
Roger and Martina would have been a cute-looking couple, though, but I don't think Martina is his type of girl, esp. her personality(a little cocky and saucy, right? no?).

RonE
12-01-2004, 11:22 PM
What makes you think of that? I'm just curious...
Roger and Martina would have been a cute-looking couple, though, I don't think Martina is his type of girl, esp. her personality(a little corky and saucy, right? no?).

I still cannot forget that stunt she pulled off at RG in 99 in the final against Graf :( I think that match turned me against her for life.

Roger is just fine with Mirka- if it ain't broke don't fix it.

RogiFan88
12-02-2004, 04:09 AM
I remember that, RonE... my sentiments. Marti and Rogi are not compatible... who is w her?? She has a bf anyway...

SUKTUEN
12-02-2004, 04:26 AM
I agree Roger is love Mirka so much~~~ :couple:

not Hingis~~ I think Hingis is love Roger in the past~~ :kiss:

Mrs. B
12-02-2004, 08:31 AM
I still cannot forget that stunt she pulled off at RG in 99 in the final against Graf :( I think that match turned me against her for life.


compare that to Roger's attitude on his match against Marat at match point on that tiebreak in Houston, with the ball obviously out, did Roger have a fit? no sirree, kept his cool, and just played on...that's character. :worship:

RonE
12-02-2004, 08:48 AM
compare that to Roger's attitude on his match against Marat at match point on that tiebreak in Houston, with the ball obviously out, did Roger have a fit? no sirree, kept his cool, and just played on...that's character. :worship:

Yes that is so right! :worship: :D

Martina also had this air of arrogance and cockiness about her and Roger definitely does not. I think what you see is pretty much what you get with Roger.

ste
12-02-2004, 09:04 AM
Yes that is so right! :worship: :D

Martina also had this air of arrogance and cockiness about her and Roger definitely does not. I think what you see is pretty much what you get with Roger.

Good one Ron!!! :yeah: He stays the person he was before - no matter if on or off the court!!!

soonha
12-02-2004, 11:27 AM
I still cannot forget that stunt she pulled off at RG in 99 in the final against Graf :( I think that match turned me against her for life.

Roger is just fine with Mirka- if it ain't broke don't fix it.


What happened at RG?

marchen
12-02-2004, 01:03 PM
oh, but Roger definitely has had a long-term crush on martina, no doubt about that....


regarding the "crush"...
I have a copy of the mixed doubles final at the Hopman cup ( '01??) that Roger and Martina played together. they were really having lots of fun, laughing a lots, making jokes, always looking at each other. I've never seen Roger acts like this in the court.....;)

RonE
12-02-2004, 02:09 PM
What happened at RG?

She was questioning many calls, acting very bratty. At one point she hit a ball that was called out so she asked the chair umpire to step down from the chair and check the mark (you can do this on clay). After the umpire confirmed it was out she started screaming at her, saying it was the wrong mark. Instead of just letting it go she crossed over the net to Graf's side of the court and walked to the mark and started throwing a tantrum. This was going on for about 10 minutes!

I think she got a warning for unsportsmanlike conduct and then she broke her racquet or had a time violation (I can't remember which one it was) and was given a point penalty.

And then she tried all kinds of things to play with Graf's mind- like serve underarm at championship point which was totally legit but the crowd were so angry with her and annoyed that they really got into a frenzy.

After Graf finally won the match Martina did not even want to attend the presentation ceremony and I remember her mother walking with her back to the court while she was crying on her shoulder. That was the one moment when I actually did feel sorry for her and I have to remember that she was so young at the time and the pressure must have gotten to her. Still, her behaviour that day was quite despicable.

soonha
12-02-2004, 11:41 PM
Gee, what a behavior!

So right, Mrs. B. I can't imagine even in my dreams if Roger acts like that. One of what I admire the most is his demeanor and manner on the court. He never complains of bad calls. Instead he just shows them how good he is, with no words but a racket.

Thank you, Ron.(BTW, your kitty is so cute~ :hearts: :hearts: :kiss: )

radics
12-03-2004, 12:25 AM
She was questioning many calls, acting very bratty. At one point she hit a ball that was called out so she asked the chair umpire to step down from the chair and check the mark (you can do this on clay). After the umpire confirmed it was out she started screaming at her, saying it was the wrong mark. Instead of just letting it go she crossed over the net to Graf's side of the court and walked to the mark and started throwing a tantrum. This was going on for about 10 minutes!

I think she got a warning for unsportsmanlike conduct and then she broke her racquet or had a time violation (I can't remember which one it was) and was given a point penalty.

And then she tried all kinds of things to play with Graf's mind- like serve underarm at championship point which was totally legit but the crowd were so angry with her and annoyed that they really got into a frenzy.

After Graf finally won the match Martina did not even want to attend the presentation ceremony and I remember her mother walking with her back to the court while she was crying on her shoulder. That was the one moment when I actually did feel sorry for her and I have to remember that she was so young at the time and the pressure must have gotten to her. Still, her behaviour that day was quite despicable.


Hmmm... I'm not really happy, how "one sided" you told that story RonE. You said, you don't like Hingis, and exactly that feeling comes from your text. I don't like to excuse the behavior of Martina in any way, because she did almost everything wrong at RG 99 but i like to add something:

Maybe you didn't notice that, but have you seen, how the crowd cheered against Martina from the first secound she came on the court? It was really unfair. They whistled when Martina was serving or when she was unhappy with a linecall. I know that happens sometimes, but i've never seen it as extremly as in this final.

An other thing: Martina sat on her bench in a break and was in tears. Steffi Graf saw that exatly and what has she done? She stood up and STARTED a wave... How would you feel about that? Let me repeat: i don't like to excuse her behavior (it was so wrong), but I can understand, why Martina freaked out like she did. You should maybe handle it diffrent with 19 years, but imho she was still half a kid and would have done everything diffrent if she was in Stefi Grafs age (at that time).

Sorry about my bad english, it's not so easy, to translate your thought and feelings in a text, if you're english sucks like mine does :)

mitalidas
12-03-2004, 01:30 AM
How many of you were the picture of great behavior at 16?
Cut the woman some slack .

At 16 years of age, with the pressure of a GS final, and a 32000 hostile crowd, lets see which of you could hold up. She was fine --she honestly believed she was being jerked around, and she openly showed her emotion

mitalidas
12-03-2004, 01:49 AM
regarding the "crush"...
I have a copy of the mixed doubles final at the Hopman cup ( '01??) that Roger and Martina played together. they were really having lots of fun, laughing a lots, making jokes, always looking at each other. I've never seen Roger acts like this in the court.....;)

those are exactly the ones I have in mind
Also, Roger in an interview (pre-Mirka days) saying "...I admire her in more than one way.." and the way he said it, with twinkles in his eyes ....

but she was always running off with others--Ivo, Magnus, Lawyer man, Sergio, Stefan

RonE
12-03-2004, 12:35 PM
Hmmm... I'm not really happy, how "one sided" you told that story RonE. You said, you don't like Hingis, and exactly that feeling comes from your text. I don't like to excuse the behavior of Martina in any way, because she did almost everything wrong at RG 99 but i like to add something:

Maybe you didn't notice that, but have you seen, how the crowd cheered against Martina from the first secound she came on the court? It was really unfair. They whistled when Martina was serving or when she was unhappy with a linecall. I know that happens sometimes, but i've never seen it as extremly as in this final.

An other thing: Martina sat on her bench in a break and was in tears. Steffi Graf saw that exatly and what has she done? She stood up and STARTED a wave... How would you feel about that? Let me repeat: i don't like to excuse her behavior (it was so wrong), but I can understand, why Martina freaked out like she did. You should maybe handle it diffrent with 19 years, but imho she was still half a kid and would have done everything diffrent if she was in Stefi Grafs age (at that time).

Sorry about my bad english, it's not so easy, to translate your thought and feelings in a text, if you're english sucks like mine does :)

You are right, I admit I am bit biased and the main reason I brought the incident up was to compare it to Roger's temprament on the court- but like I said I have to remember she was very young at the time and was in effect growing up in a glass house. I can also appreciate that she was under a lot of pressure to win RG to complete her slam collection as she always got close but never quite got there. Still, it didn't leave a very good taste in my mouth much in the same way as Coria's behaviour didn't at this year's FO, but I still sympathize with both cases since the weight of expectation and pressure was so great, and so was the disappointment.

But the crowd only REALLY started getting on her back after she questioned that line call. And yes, the Parisian crowds can be very brutal with players they don't like- see Serena vs. Henin SF 2003.

You have nothing to worry about your English it is excellent ;)

WyveN
12-04-2004, 01:20 AM
Not sure if this has been posted but its a nice article.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4032315.stm

lunahielo
12-04-2004, 02:37 AM
Thank you, Wyven.
I had not seen it before. It was a very nice article. :)

Billabong
12-04-2004, 03:07 AM
I still cannot forget that stunt she pulled off at RG in 99 in the final against Graf :( I think that match turned me against her for life.

Roger is just fine with Mirka- if it ain't broke don't fix it.

I think people have to understand that she was very young then, and she really changed since then.. If you saw her in 2001-2002, she really wasn't acting bad when she was losing.. just watch the 2002 AO Final, which was probably one of her most heartbreaking losses ever, and she acted gracefully;)! Maybe she still throws her racket sometimes, but Roger can do it too and many other;)!

Billabong
12-04-2004, 03:08 AM
How many of you were the picture of great behavior at 16?
Cut the woman some slack .

At 16 years of age, with the pressure of a GS final, and a 32000 hostile crowd, lets see which of you could hold up. She was fine --she honestly believed she was being jerked around, and she openly showed her emotion

exactly:worship:

Daniel
12-04-2004, 06:59 AM
Roger :worship:

soonha
12-04-2004, 02:10 PM
This is a pretty old article from BBCwebsite. very funny....

=================================
Britain's Wimbledon champion


It's the news Henman Hill dwellers have been waiting to hear...Roger Federer is British! :eek:

Well, sort of.

Turns out the Swiss maestro's second cousin twice removed had a great uncle whose father's father's goldfish came from a pet shop in Hackney.

Actually, it's far simpler than that.

The truth is, Federer's great-great-grandmother was English - probably.

The Wimbledon champion's mum, Lynette, hails from South Africa - as did her mother and grandmother. But Mrs Federer is convinced the line can then be traced back to dear old Blighty.

She said: "I think there may have been an English great-great grandmother called Mabel in the family. I remember my mother mentioning her.

"We have always thought there was a British ancestor somewhere along the family tree."

In which case, Roger old bean, you should do the decent thing and immediately pledge your allegiance to the flag.

You'll be doing your people a favour - just think of the money they'll save on cows :lol: .

You can start by eating roast beef and fry-ups and you'll pick up the words to God Save The Queen as you go along.

Note to Swiss: You give us Roger and we'll throw in Greg Rusedski in return. We'll even get Urs Meier a job in the Premiership (not that we're desperate) :lol: .

Daniel
12-05-2004, 07:29 AM
thanks :)

Daniel
12-06-2004, 07:03 AM
Roger the great turns tennis on its head





Click to enlarge photo


Men's tennis for many years has had that element of surprise about it with anyone ranked in the top 50 or 60 more than capable of defeating a top 10 player.

There have been times in the same year when each of the four grand slam tournaments - the Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and the Us Open - have been won by four different players and that outcome wasn't be surprising, because of the quality of the best male players on the circuit.

On the other hand the women's competition in years has been dominated by the same competitors. In the late 1980s it was Steffi Graf. Monica Seles had her turn in the early 90s before her stabbing, Martina Hingis was the player to beat in the mid to late 1990s as a teenager, then it was the powerful Williams sisters, Venus and Serena, followed by the Belgian pair of Justine Henin-Hardenne and Kim Clijsters.

But now there has been a changing of the guard with the Russian revolution in full swing. After Henin-Hardenne won the Australian Open, Russian players won the other three: Anastasia Myskina triumphant at the French Open, Maria Sharapova lifting the title at Wimbledon and Svetlana Kuznetsova winning the US Open.

Throw in Elena Demetieva and Elena Bovina among others and you have a Russian dynasty of epic proportions on the cards in the future.

It's great to see women's tennis not as predictable as it used to be, but it appears men's tennis has gone in the other direction with one player at the moment, Swiss superstar Roger Federer, dominating.

After so many years of so many different players winning men's tournaments around the world, to have one man too good for everyone like Federer seems to be, usually isn't a positive for the sport.

However, I think tennis can only prosper when Federer is playing the way he is. It's fantastic to watch elite sports people ply their trade at the highest level, but it's much better than fantastic to witness an in-form Federer.

Former women's top 10 player Tracey Austin, who now works in the media, recently described Federer as at times playing tennis shots that should be deemed illegal, because they are too good for the opposition.

He seems to have so much time to play his shots and his shot selection is second to none. How good is that backhand? You could watch that all day.

His year in 2004 has been nothing short of sensational, 11 singles finals won from 11 attempts including three grand slams - the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open - along with a winning streak of 23 matches in a row between June and August.

Federer was always seen as a super talent, with doubt surfacing on his mental capacity. There have been times up until this year, when he would dominate matches early, but not finish his opponents off enabling them to fight back and win.

The 2003 Davis Cup semi-final in Melbourne was a prime example. Switzerland trailed 2-1 going into the reverse singles match against Lleyton Hewitt.

Federer won the first two sets easily. However Hewitt, with that never say die attitude, won a close third set, which seemed to sow doubts in the world number one's mind and from then on the Australian blitzed to put his country in another final.

The shoe is certainly on the other foot now with Federer trouncing Hewitt in three Grand slam tournaments in 2004 including the final of the US Open. He jumped out of the blocks and won the first set 6-0 to destroy the gritty Australian and try as he did, Hewitt wasn't allowed back in the contest by Federer, who is now extremely strong mentally.

Despite those massive defeats, Hewitt remains optimistic he will defeat Federer at their next meeting wherever that will be, but it's hard to share his optimism.

Federer just seems too good and now has the hunger. One of the greatest players of all time, Pete Sampras, recently predicted that Federer is on track to be the greatest ever.

That places pressure on Federer, but the 23-year-old now seems to have the temperament to cope with these sorts of predictions and expectations and after a short break will no doubt be keen to at least emulate his feats of this year.

We would be brave people to predict against it.

lunahielo
12-08-2004, 02:57 AM
Thanks, Daniel....*Roger the Great*~huh?
Love it! :)

babsi
12-08-2004, 08:18 AM
Thanks a bunch,Daniel :)

crimson
12-08-2004, 03:18 PM
Thanks for posting the article Daniel. :)

Some information for anyone in the UK or who has access to BBC TV: Roger is listed in the TV guide as appearing on the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards on Sunday 12 December, from 8.00-10.15pm on BBC1. For anyone who isn't familiar with it, the programme is an annual review of the year in sports; and it usually features a tennis review section. Roger appeared on it in person last year, so I think there is a good chance he will also be on it in person this year too. :)

RogiFan88
12-08-2004, 04:13 PM
COOL, Crimson... can anyone get screencaps of it to post here?

Doris Loeffel
12-08-2004, 05:55 PM
Thanks for posting the article Daniel. :)

Some information for anyone in the UK or who has access to BBC TV: Roger is listed in the TV guide as appearing on the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards on Sunday 12 December, from 8.00-10.15pm on BBC1. For anyone who isn't familiar with it, the programme is an annual review of the year in sports; and it usually features a tennis review section. Roger appeared on it in person last year, so I think there is a good chance he will also be on it in person this year too. :)


Is that show live??
Couse he will be in the Sportpanorama (18.15 h) on SF DRS 1 the very same day.

crimson
12-08-2004, 06:08 PM
Is that show live??
Couse he will be in the Sportpanorama (18.15 h) on SF DRS 1 the very same day.

Yes it's live, but some segments of it are pre-recorded. On the TV listings for the BBC show it said "those appearing include.." then a list of names including Roger' s. Maybe the BBC will interview him in advance and broadcast it in one of the pre-recorded slots? I hadn't read the thread about the other show until now so I didn't know he had other plans on that day. But whether he is actually there at the BBC show in person or not, I'm certain they will feature some kind of footage of him in the tennis review section of the show. :yeah:

lunahielo
12-09-2004, 02:17 AM
Federer in league of his own
Swiss star dominating top rivals on tour
Roger Federer's dominance has left the other top players in men's tennis without answers when facing the Swiss star, says Bud Collins of NBCSports.com.

COMMENTARY
By Bud Collins
NBC Sports

Updated: 7:41 p.m. ET Dec. 8, 2004NEW YORK -

Heading into 2005, Roger Federer finds himself astride the men's tennis world that he has pounded into a lopsided shape favoring himself. That was the message Federer all too painfully sent to the other top players over the course of the 2004 season.

Fitting finish
Federer put an exclamation point on that message at the 35th edition of the Masters, the year-end showdown for the men's tennis elite.

Pity Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio.

They were merely Roger’s seven dwarfs.

Maybe Roger, the “Basel Dazzle,” wasn’t Snow White, but he made his serfs seem lost in a blizzard.

This was the second straight year Federer closed out a season with a dazzling display of tennis at the Masters.

Two years, 10 matches, 10 wins, and so gracious.

Federer has just done everything right.

On another level
Hewitt, who finished 2004 ranked third, said it best.

“Roger has raised the bar for us over the last 18 months. Does he have any weaknesses? I don’t think so. We’ll all just have to work harder.”

It appears that the big fight in 2005 among those dwarfed will be for the No. 2 ranking, held by Roddick at the end of 2004.

That prize would guarantee a tournament’s second seed, keeping the bearer as far away as possible, for as long as possible, from the inevitably top-seeded Federer.

Hewitt would have hurdled Roddick into the No. 2 slot if he had defeated Federer in the Masters final, which the Aussie lost 6-3, 6-2.

Hewitt might have even reclaimed No. 1 except for a disruptive presence -- Federer.

“I kept bumping into Roger,” he said at year's end.

On significant occasions, too: Australian Open fourth round, Wimbledon quarterfinals, U.S. Open final, German Open semifinals, Masters round-robin phase.

Federer won six straight over Hewitt, none of them particularly close.

As for Roddick, he has to be thinking it's back to the drawing board.

The American has had his own Federer problems: 0-3 in 2004, 1-8 career.

But who hasn't bowed to Federer on a consistent basis?

Federer has lost only six matches while winning 74, thus batting .925, the highest winning percentage since Ivan Lendl’s .925 in 1986 and John McEnroe’s .965 in 1984.

In 2004, Federer won 11th titles, the most since Thomas Muster racked up a dozen in 1995.

Federer's degree of dominance is most impressive as he has won every one of his last 13 finals.

Chasing history
Might Federer someday eclipse Pete Sampras’ monumental record of 14 singles majors, accomplished in 13 seasons between 1990 and 2002?

Well, Sampras had won five majors at age 23.

Federer, 23, has won four, and will shoot for a fifth at the Australian Open in January.

Neither Lendl nor McEnroe won three majors in one year as Federer did in 2004 (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open).

Mats Wilander did it in 1988, but failed in the Masters, losing in the round-robin.

Of the game’s big five (the majors plus the Masters), Federer won four in 2004.

Was Federer's year the finest since Rodney (Rocket) Laver’s Grand Slam of 1969, the year before the Masters was founded?

Certainly it is since 1974 when Jimmy Connors’ won the three majors he played (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open), and abstained from the Masters.

Federer, who went 18-0 during 2004 against so-called peers in the top ten, has won 23 straight matches against those lackeys.

Safin's back
Even though Federer has zoomed to his private stratosphere, the most startling rise and recovery in 2004 was that of the “Headless Horseman,” Marat Safin.

The volatile Russian kept his wayward head glued on most of the time, and climbed 73 lengths.

At the end of 2003, Safin was No. 77 and an injured left wrist had him wondering whether he could hit a ball again.

Safin gave Federer his toughest test at the end of 2004.

In the Masters semifinals, Safin dodged seven match points and held six set points in a colossal record-equaling tiebreaker, falling, 6-3, 7-6 (20-18).

Bjorn Borg won the first tiebreaker stretching to 20-18 while making his Wimbledon debut as a 17-year-old in 1973.

His victim was Indian Premjit Lall.

Twenty years later at the U.S. Open, Goran Ivanisevic did a 20-18 job to beat Canadian Danny Nestor.

Looking ahead
Hewitt is openly revved up for the 2005 Australian Open.

He has always wanted to win his country’s title, but this one would be special as it is the 100th anniversary of the tournament.

As for Federer, he just wants to keep this up as long as he can.

That’s not very good news for the rest of the crowd, transformed to dwarfs by Federer's magical touch.

In 2005, Hewitt and the other top men must find answers for Federer’s serve, his sliced backhand, bludgeoning forehand, angled volleys and the effortless moves that quickly close openings.

Australia is known for its oysters, but the world is Federer’s tasty oyster, and it looks as though he’ll dine alone in the coming campaign.

© 2004 MSNBC Interactive

Fedex
12-09-2004, 02:20 AM
Thanks for the article, Daniel. :)

Fedex
12-09-2004, 02:21 AM
This is a pretty old article from BBCwebsite. very funny....

=================================
Britain's Wimbledon champion


It's the news Henman Hill dwellers have been waiting to hear...Roger Federer is British! :eek:

Well, sort of.

Turns out the Swiss maestro's second cousin twice removed had a great uncle whose father's father's goldfish came from a pet shop in Hackney.

Actually, it's far simpler than that.

The truth is, Federer's great-great-grandmother was English - probably.

The Wimbledon champion's mum, Lynette, hails from South Africa - as did her mother and grandmother. But Mrs Federer is convinced the line can then be traced back to dear old Blighty.

She said: "I think there may have been an English great-great grandmother called Mabel in the family. I remember my mother mentioning her.

"We have always thought there was a British ancestor somewhere along the family tree."

In which case, Roger old bean, you should do the decent thing and immediately pledge your allegiance to the flag.

You'll be doing your people a favour - just think of the money they'll save on cows :lol: .

You can start by eating roast beef and fry-ups and you'll pick up the words to God Save The Queen as you go along.

Note to Swiss: You give us Roger and we'll throw in Greg Rusedski in return. We'll even get Urs Meier a job in the Premiership (not that we're desperate) :lol: .
Lol, I remember reading this sometime after Wimbledon, and it was a good laugh.

Fedex
12-09-2004, 02:26 AM
Federer in league of his own
Swiss star dominating top rivals on tour
Roger Federer's dominance has left the other top players in men's tennis without answers when facing the Swiss star, says Bud Collins of NBCSports.com.

COMMENTARY
By Bud Collins
NBC Sports

Updated: 7:41 p.m. ET Dec. 8, 2004NEW YORK -

Heading into 2005, Roger Federer finds himself astride the men's tennis world that he has pounded into a lopsided shape favoring himself. That was the message Federer all too painfully sent to the other top players over the course of the 2004 season.

Fitting finish
Federer put an exclamation point on that message at the 35th edition of the Masters, the year-end showdown for the men's tennis elite.

Pity Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio.

They were merely Roger’s seven dwarfs.

Maybe Roger, the “Basel Dazzle,” wasn’t Snow White, but he made his serfs seem lost in a blizzard.

This was the second straight year Federer closed out a season with a dazzling display of tennis at the Masters.

Two years, 10 matches, 10 wins, and so gracious.

Federer has just done everything right.

On another level
Hewitt, who finished 2004 ranked third, said it best.

“Roger has raised the bar for us over the last 18 months. Does he have any weaknesses? I don’t think so. We’ll all just have to work harder.”

It appears that the big fight in 2005 among those dwarfed will be for the No. 2 ranking, held by Roddick at the end of 2004.

That prize would guarantee a tournament’s second seed, keeping the bearer as far away as possible, for as long as possible, from the inevitably top-seeded Federer.

Hewitt would have hurdled Roddick into the No. 2 slot if he had defeated Federer in the Masters final, which the Aussie lost 6-3, 6-2.

Hewitt might have even reclaimed No. 1 except for a disruptive presence -- Federer.

“I kept bumping into Roger,” he said at year's end.

On significant occasions, too: Australian Open fourth round, Wimbledon quarterfinals, U.S. Open final, German Open semifinals, Masters round-robin phase.

Federer won six straight over Hewitt, none of them particularly close.

As for Roddick, he has to be thinking it's back to the drawing board.

The American has had his own Federer problems: 0-3 in 2004, 1-8 career.

But who hasn't bowed to Federer on a consistent basis?

Federer has lost only six matches while winning 74, thus batting .925, the highest winning percentage since Ivan Lendl’s .925 in 1986 and John McEnroe’s .965 in 1984.

In 2004, Federer won 11th titles, the most since Thomas Muster racked up a dozen in 1995.

Federer's degree of dominance is most impressive as he has won every one of his last 13 finals.

Chasing history
Might Federer someday eclipse Pete Sampras’ monumental record of 14 singles majors, accomplished in 13 seasons between 1990 and 2002?

Well, Sampras had won five majors at age 23.

Federer, 23, has won four, and will shoot for a fifth at the Australian Open in January.

Neither Lendl nor McEnroe won three majors in one year as Federer did in 2004 (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open).

Mats Wilander did it in 1988, but failed in the Masters, losing in the round-robin.

Of the game’s big five (the majors plus the Masters), Federer won four in 2004.

Was Federer's year the finest since Rodney (Rocket) Laver’s Grand Slam of 1969, the year before the Masters was founded?

Certainly it is since 1974 when Jimmy Connors’ won the three majors he played (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open), and abstained from the Masters.

Federer, who went 18-0 during 2004 against so-called peers in the top ten, has won 23 straight matches against those lackeys.

Safin's back
Even though Federer has zoomed to his private stratosphere, the most startling rise and recovery in 2004 was that of the “Headless Horseman,” Marat Safin.

The volatile Russian kept his wayward head glued on most of the time, and climbed 73 lengths.

At the end of 2003, Safin was No. 77 and an injured left wrist had him wondering whether he could hit a ball again.

Safin gave Federer his toughest test at the end of 2004.

In the Masters semifinals, Safin dodged seven match points and held six set points in a colossal record-equaling tiebreaker, falling, 6-3, 7-6 (20-18).

Bjorn Borg won the first tiebreaker stretching to 20-18 while making his Wimbledon debut as a 17-year-old in 1973.

His victim was Indian Premjit Lall.

Twenty years later at the U.S. Open, Goran Ivanisevic did a 20-18 job to beat Canadian Danny Nestor.

Looking ahead
Hewitt is openly revved up for the 2005 Australian Open.

He has always wanted to win his country’s title, but this one would be special as it is the 100th anniversary of the tournament.

As for Federer, he just wants to keep this up as long as he can.

That’s not very good news for the rest of the crowd, transformed to dwarfs by Federer's magical touch.

In 2005, Hewitt and the other top men must find answers for Federer’s serve, his sliced backhand, bludgeoning forehand, angled volleys and the effortless moves that quickly close openings.

Australia is known for its oysters, but the world is Federer’s tasty oyster, and it looks as though he’ll dine alone in the coming campaign.

© 2004 MSNBC Interactive
Great article, that was fun to read. :)

Daniel
12-09-2004, 07:49 AM
thanks :D

Sjengster
12-09-2004, 10:45 AM
Yes it's live, but some segments of it are pre-recorded. On the TV listings for the BBC show it said "those appearing include.." then a list of names including Roger' s. Maybe the BBC will interview him in advance and broadcast it in one of the pre-recorded slots? I hadn't read the thread about the other show until now so I didn't know he had other plans on that day. But whether he is actually there at the BBC show in person or not, I'm certain they will feature some kind of footage of him in the tennis review section of the show. :yeah:

This show is a little stagey, and boy I'm looking forward to the sober recap of Henman's Wimbledon campaign, but there are a lot of pre-recorded inserts during the programme - usually when people are presented with awards, because they couldn't make it to the studio. Those awards include Foreign Sports Personality of the Year, which I'm certain Federer should get this year, although there are a couple of other contenders... Sharapova's supposed to be in it as well, and I wonder whether she'll be making a live appearance (and more importantly, will Yuri be entertaining the great and the good of British sport with his, ahem, unusual behaviour? ;) ).

*M*
12-09-2004, 03:31 PM
Pity Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio.

They were merely Roger’s seven dwarfs.
Bud always has a unique way of phrasing things. Sometimes he annoys me, but at least he's not boring. Only he could get away with wearing pink flowered pants. I also got a kick out of him calling Marat "The Headless Horseman".

Not really news, but the CBS Early Show had a segment on Dick Enberg this morning. They started the introduction, then went to a clip of Roger winning match point at the US Open! They also showed a flash of the trophy presentation. Not bad, considering they had 50 years of Dick's sports broadcasting to choose from! Unfortunately I missed the conversation, so I don't know if he actually mentioned Roger or not. I hit the Record button, and the next program started recording (one of the few things I hate about TiVo). Did anyone else catch this interview?

federer_roar
12-10-2004, 01:40 AM
Not sure whether this has been posted, they mentioned a bit the BBC show.

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/sport/articles/15201912?source=Evening%20Standard

Federer the tennis magician
By Ian Chadband, Evening Standard
9 December 2004
For this Sunday's Sports Review of the Year, the BBC has brought Tim Henman and Roger Federer together on a tennis court for a chat in which they can mull over their respective tennis seasons together. The immediate thought was that this might be a bit like asking Paul Burrell and Pavarotti to stand around on stage comparing singing voices.

Federer, though, seems such a nice bloke that when Henman confides that he'd not been happy about his performance at Wimbledon, the champion comforts him: "I think in the next years, you still have your chance to win it - definitely."

Henman, bless him, can only turn to camera with an embarrassed laugh and respond: "Did you hear that? I had to pay him a lot to say that . . ."

The point here is not to take the michael out of Henman after what was his best year. It's just that, alongside the Swiss, you could doubtless have plonked Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick or Marat Safin and have glimpsed the same whiff of an inferiority complex. For the Federer Express has made all his pretenders resemble lumbering freight trains at times this year.

There is rare quality among the obvious contenders for the BBC Overseas Sports Personality award. You couldn't argue if, say, Michael Phelps, with his six Olympic golds landed it. What about Michael Schumacher, with his utter dominance en route to a seventh Formula One drivers' title, or Vijay Singh, thanks to his record-breaking US PGA tour campaign, or Lance Armstrong, following his historic sixth Tour de France win?

Yet here's why Federer deserves to prevail. It's not just because this might have been the best season any tennis man has enjoyed since Rod Laver's Grand Slam in 1969. Three Grand Slam wins in a year - the first by any man since Mats Wilander in 1988 - plus the Masters, 11 wins in 11 finals, including consecutive trophies on grass, clay and hard courts, not to mention an unbeaten record against anyone in the world's top 10, is hard evidence.

No, the even more compelling reason to hail Federer is that he is quite simply the best thing to behold in sport today, a true artist who seems to be altering perceptions of what's possible in his game with his sublime all-court game and supreme athleticism.

He seems to have combined the vivid imagination and dazzling shotmaking of a John McEnroe with the almost robotic choice of the right option, like some latter day Bjorn Borg. Having found steel, hunger and judiciousness to go with genius, the combination seems irresistible.

With four Grand Slams to his name at 23 compared to Pete Sampras's five at the same age, the prospect of him surpassing the great American's all-time record of 14 titles does not feel outlandish, especially if he masters the French Open's red clay in a way Sampras never quite could.

But what about the Sports Personality bit? "I'm a funny guy, I'm outgoing, you can have a lot of fun with me," he has said, yet that's never really come across. Even despite the on-court blubbing after his first Wimbledon triumph, the public persona has perhaps been fairly grey.

It is interesting watching that in the Henman interview, Federer still sounds like the junior partner, a bit more shy and quiet than his mate.

In a desperate quest for colour, the best I could glean from his website is that he has a weird habit of banging his head against his pillow when sleeping, that he'd like to be James Bond in the movies and that he is a big cricket fan.

Still, forget it. The personality is all to be found in his tennis, the colour in his brush strokes on court.

Watching Schumacher's mastery ultimately leaves you cold; Federer's never does.

There's the virtuoso individuality in the one-handed shots he kept stubbornly persisting with as a kid when others urged him to switch to the double-handed backhand; there's the fearless risk-taking which reflects his bold decision to have forged this incredible season without a coach, having dumped Peter Lundgren last December.

It was Tracey Austin who suggested recently that some of

Federer's shots should be deemed illegal because they're just unplayable. Sometimes, the man himself appears to not quite to understand how he does it himself, though when asked how he returns Roddick's monster serves so apparently effortlessly, he just smiles sagely: "Magicians don't share their tricks."

Quite right too. His farewell to Henman on the film is to shrug modestly "I had a ridiculous year" as if it was a pure one-off.

Perhaps he just didn't want to crush the will of his hapless pursuers any further as he was really pondering to himself: "And for my next trick .

Daniel
12-10-2004, 08:28 AM
thnaks federer roar :)

babsi
12-10-2004, 12:14 PM
Thank you federer-roar,
nice article - but if I have to read,that Roger is boring just once more, I will start to scream.Sometimes I think they only want athlets to be "colorful",so they can than turn around and write an article criticesing them for that kind of behavior.

mitalidas
12-10-2004, 08:46 PM
Roger and the Seven Dwarfs
NEW YORK - Heading into 2005, Roger Federer finds himself astride the men's tennis world that he has pounded into a lopsided shape favoring himself. That was the message Federer all too painfully sent to the other top players over the course of the 2004 season.

Federer put an exclamation point on that message at the 35th edition of the Masters, the year-end showdown for the men's tennis elite.

Pity Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio.

They were merely Roger’s seven dwarfs. :lol:

Maybe Roger, the “Basel Dazzle,” wasn’t Snow White, but he made his serfs seem lost in a blizzard. This was the second straight year Federer closed out a season with a dazzling display of tennis at the Masters.

Two years, 10 matches, 10 wins, and so gracious.
Federer has just done everything right.

Hewitt, who finished 2004 ranked third, said it best.
“Roger has raised the bar for us over the last 18 months. Does he have any weaknesses? I don’t think so. We’ll all just have to work harder.”

It appears that the big fight in 2005 among those dwarfed will be for the No. 2 ranking, held by Roddick at the end of 2004.

That prize would guarantee a tournament’s second seed, keeping the bearer as far away as possible, for as long as possible, from the inevitably top-seeded Federer.

Hewitt would have hurdled Roddick into the No. 2 slot if he had defeated Federer in the Masters final, which the Aussie lost 6-3, 6-2.

Hewitt might have even reclaimed No. 1 except for a disruptive presence -- Federer. “I kept bumping into Roger,” he said at year's end. On significant occasions, too: Australian Open fourth round, Wimbledon quarterfinals, U.S. Open final, German Open semifinals, Masters round-robin phase.

Federer won six straight over Hewitt, none of them particularly close.

As for Roddick, he has to be thinking it's back to the drawing board.

The American has had his own Federer problems: 0-3 in 2004, 1-8 career. :devil:
But who hasn't bowed to Federer on a consistent basis?

Federer has lost only six matches while winning 74, thus batting .925, the highest winning percentage since Ivan Lendl’s .925 in 1986 and John McEnroe’s .965 in 1984.

In 2004, Federer won 11th titles, the most since Thomas Muster racked up a dozen in 1995.

Federer's degree of dominance is most impressive as he has won every one of his last 13 finals.

Might Federer someday eclipse Pete Sampras’ monumental record of 14 singles majors, accomplished in 13 seasons between 1990 and 2002?

Well, Sampras had won five majors at age 23.
Federer, 23, has won four, and will shoot for a fifth at the Australian Open in January. Neither Lendl nor McEnroe won three majors in one year as Federer did in 2004 (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open).

Mats Wilander did it in 1988, but failed in the Masters, losing in the round-robin.

Of the game’s big five (the majors plus the Masters), Federer won four in 2004.

Was Federer's year the finest since Rodney (Rocket) Laver’s Grand Slam of 1969, the year before the Masters was founded? Certainly it is since 1974 when Jimmy Connors’ won the three majors he played (Australian Open, Wimbledon, and U.S. Open), and abstained from the Masters.

Federer, who went 18-0 during 2004 against so-called peers in the top ten, has won 23 straight matches against those lackeys.

Even though Federer has zoomed to his private stratosphere, the most startling rise and recovery in 2004 was that of the “Headless Horseman,” Marat Safin. :lol: The volatile Russian kept his wayward head glued on most of the time, and climbed 73 lengths.

At the end of 2003, Safin was No. 77 and an injured left wrist had him wondering whether he could hit a ball again.

Safin gave Federer his toughest test at the end of 2004.

In the Masters semifinals, Safin dodged seven match points and held six set points in a colossal record-equaling tiebreaker, falling, 6-3, 7-6 (20-18).

Bjorn Borg won the first tiebreaker stretching to 20-18 while making his Wimbledon debut as a 17-year-old in 1973.

His victim was Indian Premjit Lall.

Twenty years later at the U.S. Open, Goran Ivanisevic did a 20-18 job to beat Canadian Danny Nestor.

Looking ahead
Hewitt is openly revved up for the 2005 Australian Open.

He has always wanted to win his country’s title, but this one would be special as it is the 100th anniversary of the tournament.

As for Federer, he just wants to keep this up as long as he can.

That’s not very good news for the rest of the crowd, transformed to dwarfs by Federer's magical touch.

In 2005, Hewitt and the other top men must find answers for Federer’s serve, his sliced backhand, bludgeoning forehand, angled volleys and the effortless moves that quickly close openings.

Australia is known for its oysters, but the world is Federer’s tasty oyster, and it looks as though he’ll dine alone in the coming campaign. YEAH :devil: :) :worship: :D

ae wowww
12-10-2004, 09:38 PM
A very interesting article I found on the Eurosport site (apologies if already posted elsewhere)

How big was Roger Federer's season? To find bigger, you have to go back to 1974 when Jimmy Connors captured three majors and 12 tour titles. But for the Swiss, who lifted his 11th trophy of 2004 at the season-ending Masters in Houston, now comes the hard part, argues James Buddell..

You really do have to look back 30 years to match Federer"s achievement.

And that takes into account stellar seasons enjoyed since by Guillermo Vilas, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Mats Wilander and Pete Sampras.

This year, Federer became the first player to win three major championships in a season since 1998. He also won eight other tour titles.

Only last week, Rod Laver - the Grand Slam winner of 1962 and 1969 - was commenting on Federer.

The Australian believes the 23-year-old could become &lsquoThe Greatest'. Note to readers: Laver doesn't dish out praise lightly.

But one season alone doth not make a legend: the history books please.

INTO THE BOOKS

Since 1974, tour 'heavyweights' have only ever enjoyed a maximum of three years of overpowering dominance.

Take Connors: the American ran the men's game in 1974-75 winning 22 titles before bowing to Vilas (16 titles in 1977) and Borg with 32 between 1977 and 79.

McEnroe racked up 54 of his 77 singles titles from 1979 to 1984, but his only true epic season was 1984 with 13 crowns and an 82-3 match record.

Lendl laid the foundation stone of dominance in the 1980s with 15 titles in 1982, but the Czech was at his best in 1986 and 1987.

Wilander enjoyed only one true dream year with three tour titles in 1988 and Courier's successes of 1992 and 1993 amounted to ten overall.

Sampras won 10 titles in 1994, but even though 22 others followed between 1995-97, including seven of his 14 majors, he never sustained consistant dominance.

While Andre Agassi was Sampras' rival in the 1990s, the Vegas Kid reaped just five titles overall in his renaissance year of 1999, when he finished as world number one.

PLAYING HIS OWN GAME

So can Federer sustain his dominance of the circuit over several years - thereby fulfilling Laver's great expectations?

That depends first on whether the competition will get in his way.

The current erratic form of his rivals, namely, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick and Marat Safin, suggests Federer is in with a shot at greatness.

But he has only won four majors to date.

For Federer, the great unknowns are the emergence of new rivals and injuries, particularly to his wrist due to a snapped forehand action.

In an era, where super-fit athletes pound the ball, to stay at the top of the game, as Borg (1976-80) and Sampras (1993-98) did is, your correspondent believes, a tougher-than-ever proposition.

But there is no doubt after last week that the Basel-born is the only player of the current generation capable of emulating Don Budge (1938) and Rod Laver (1962 and 1969) in the quest for that elusive first-ever Grand Slam of the open era.

Skyward
12-10-2004, 10:18 PM
[U][B]A [U]
Sampras won 10 titles in 1994, but even though 22 others followed between 1995-97, including seven of his 14 majors, he never sustained consistant dominance.



If Sampras did not dominate, then who did? :confused: And what about people predicting Roger's wrist injury? :rolleyes: I first heard about it right before Wimbledon final, and the timing was very strange, to say the least.

LCeh
12-10-2004, 10:25 PM
The reason it came up around the Wimbledon final was because they used a special camera that can get 1000 shots per second and slowly played his forehand motion during some previous match, and some people (not sure who, rumored to be some physiologist) said the way Roger hits the forehand puts a lot of pressure on his wrist, and that's how it got started.

I think the article was just saying nobody has completely dominated the game the way Roger did this year AND sustained it. Pete dominated for a long time, but not at the dominance Roger was this year.

mitalidas
12-11-2004, 03:27 AM
some people (not sure who, rumored to be some physiologist) said the way Roger hits the forehand puts a lot of pressure on his wrist, and that's how it got started.
.

brad gilbert, i think.... he was probably wishing he was right too
I was shouting at the TV that "roddick's one arm will fall off before anything happens to Roger's wrist"

Daniel
12-11-2004, 07:31 AM
nice articles :

Fedex
12-11-2004, 07:56 AM
The reason it came up around the Wimbledon final was because they used a special camera that can get 1000 shots per second and slowly played his forehand motion during some previous match, and some people (not sure who, rumored to be some physiologist) said the way Roger hits the forehand puts a lot of pressure on his wrist, and that's how it got started.

I think the article was just saying nobody has completely dominated the game the way Roger did this year AND sustained it. Pete dominated for a long time, but not at the dominance Roger was this year.
LCeh, I love those Serena quotes, ;) they are too funny. :rolls: :haha:

ae wowww
12-11-2004, 09:21 AM
Yeah Andrew Banks was saying how he might develop a wrist injury--but playing like that all his life, it's obviously comfortable and feels right.. Or else he wouldn't play like that! For all they could know, Roger doesn't have any bones!!

Doris Loeffel
12-11-2004, 09:27 AM
This show is a little stagey, and boy I'm looking forward to the sober recap of Henman's Wimbledon campaign, but there are a lot of pre-recorded inserts during the programme - usually when people are presented with awards, because they couldn't make it to the studio. Those awards include Foreign Sports Personality of the Year, which I'm certain Federer should get this year, although there are a couple of other contenders... Sharapova's supposed to be in it as well, and I wonder whether she'll be making a live appearance (and more importantly, will Yuri be entertaining the great and the good of British sport with his, ahem, unusual behaviour? ;) ).


Hmmm I just checked the themes on Sportpanorama for this sunday and instead of Roger now there's Urs Meier listed as a guest so maybe he will be at this BBC reward ceremony....

lunahielo
12-11-2004, 05:56 PM
Originally posted byae wowww~
For all they could know, Roger doesn't have any bones!!
:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

babsi
12-11-2004, 07:08 PM
On the German official track and field side they mention,that Roger was voted world athlet of the year.
They mention it because Mrs. Jones of GB wone the womans award.
There is no other news about it yet - so I don´t know what to make of it,all I know is they wouldn´t lie.
The inter-adi is: www.leichtatletik.de
than click nwes flash

babsi
12-11-2004, 07:12 PM
Sorry,you first have to click on news,than the news flash!

User ID 4783
12-11-2004, 08:25 PM
I want to see Roger on German TV. Now :mad:

Carlita
12-11-2004, 08:34 PM
I want to see Roger on German TV. Now :mad:

Save the best for last I'm afraid..... :rolleyes:

did you see Kylie fall on her face!? :haha:

-SaFiinsBabY-
12-11-2004, 09:00 PM
I saw it ... +lol+

but Roger looks very sweet ... =)

Carlita
12-11-2004, 09:09 PM
I saw it ... +lol+

but Roger looks very sweet ... =)

so cute :hug: :kiss: shame he won the bet! hahaha, would have loved to have seen him hit snowballs!!! :lol:

User ID 4783
12-11-2004, 10:41 PM
did you see Kylie fall on her face!? :haha:
well I don't like her, so I didn't feel very sorry for her either :rolleyes:

Carlita
12-11-2004, 10:45 PM
well I don't like her, so I didn't feel very sorry for her either :rolleyes:

that's what you get if your heels are too high! :p But then again, she'd have no height at all if she didn't wear them.... :haha:

LCeh
12-11-2004, 10:58 PM
so cute :hug: :kiss: shame he won the bet! hahaha, would have loved to have seen him hit snowballs!!! :lol:

What was the bet? :D

Carlita
12-11-2004, 11:05 PM
What was the bet? :D
2 people walking over neon tubes and only 3 of them could break, had it been 4, Roger would have had to hit snowballs!

3 broke.... :rolleyes:

LCeh
12-12-2004, 12:02 AM
I see... hehe, would have been great to see Rogi hit snowballs. Too bad :(

Daniel
12-12-2004, 07:45 AM
Roger :clap2:

*M*
12-13-2004, 01:48 AM
This is from the January 2005 (The Year's Best of the Best) issue of Vanity Fair, with "Ahnold" and Maria Shriver on the cover.

Best Swinger
Roger Federer
The number that got most everyone's attention is three, as in the three tennis majors Roger Federer won in 2004: the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and the U.S. Open. No one had won three grand-slam tournaments in a calendar year since 1988. The number that gets us, though, is 18, as in the number of consecutive matches (through October) that Federer has won against Top 10 opponents. Andy Roddick, the world's No. 2 player, whom everyone had anointed the prince of tennis just a couple of years ago, has beaten him only once in nine tries. It's a dominance the men's game hasn't seen since 1984, when John McEnroe lost just 3 of 85 matches. So what does Mac think of the 23-year-old Swiss? As he watched him obliterate Lleyton Hewitt in straight sets at the U.S. Open, he deemed Federer simply "the best player I've ever laid eyes on." And you know Mac has a mirror.

Photographed by Mark Seliger in Los Angeles on September 19, 2004.

I wonder how much it took to persuade Roger to pose topless. :)

RogiFan88
12-13-2004, 02:02 AM
Lovely, Rogi!! I saw that mag but didn't bother to look at it... Arnold and Maria turned me off... hee hee!

Rogi's been posing topless since he was a teenager... one of the sketches that yinyin drew is from a topless teenage photo...

vene
12-13-2004, 02:15 AM
Thanks, M Rogi looks really yummy!

*M*
12-13-2004, 02:51 AM
Rogi's been posing topless since he was a teenager... one of the sketches that yinyin drew is from a topless teenage photo...Yeah, now that I think about it, didn't he even do a commercial clad only in a towel?

I think he looks like a prize fighter in this photo. I can imagine him wearing a big wide belt with "FEDERER" or "NO. 1" on it.

fightclubber
12-13-2004, 03:25 AM
wwwwoow Roger is getting lots of attention on USA magazines.Good for him.This might be after the Us open, for Rogi's hair. He looks great as usual. Might post this on the ´"lets post morepics" theat, dont you think?
silvy :wavey: :worship:

^Sue^
12-13-2004, 03:46 AM
Roger is getting a lot of attention nowadays....I feel glad about it!!yeah!

SUKTUEN
12-13-2004, 04:05 AM
OH MY GOD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

HE IS SOOOOOOOOOOOOO SEXY~~~~~~~~~~

Daniel
12-13-2004, 07:54 AM
OH MY GOD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

HE IS SOOOOOOOOOOOOO SEXY~~~~~~~~~~


he is yummy :drool: :D :bounce:

babsi
12-13-2004, 08:33 AM
he is yummy

like chocolate :)

Daniel
12-13-2004, 08:49 AM
mmmu can get addicted to chocolate, can u we addicted to Roger?

mmmm yes i can :lol: :bounce: :lick:

SUKTUEN
12-13-2004, 09:40 AM
Oh~~~~ :bounce:

I love chocolate so MUCH!!!!! :drool: Just like I love Roger~~~~ :lick: :lick:

babsi
12-13-2004, 01:48 PM
Thank god Roger isn´t chocolate - we would be really fat by know!

Daniel
12-14-2004, 06:24 AM
Babsi :kiss:

Roger :clap2:

avocadoe
12-14-2004, 02:25 PM
Love the Roger scan :))) made me want an avatar :))

Mrs. B
12-14-2004, 02:27 PM
Thank god Roger isn´t chocolate - we would be really fat by know!

:lol: Susanne, i'm gonna add this to my signature!

Raquel
12-15-2004, 04:48 PM
Some news regarding Tony Roche, who practiced with Roger earlier in the year. According to this Roger is very keen and would be willing to set up camp in Australia. Whether this is true or not we will wait and see. Maybe we'll know more during the Aussie season.

http://townsvillebulletin.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,7034,11703581%255E23209,00.html

Federer's sights on Roche
By Leo Schlink
16dec04

TONY Roche's decision to withdraw from a plan to revive Australian women's tennis could enable world No. 1 Roger Federer to nab the Sydney coach.

Federer has twice this season made overtures to 1966 French Open champion Roche, whose coaching skills are coveted internationally.

Federer is so eager to secure Roche's services, he is prepared to establish a training base in Australia.

Roche, John Newcombe and Mark Woodforde abandoned a proposal to overhaul the nation's women's game after a perceived rebuff from Tennis Australia.

Under the plan, Newcombe would have captained the team with Woodforde as coach and Roche in a developmental role.


But the trio scuttled the plans when tennis officials made it clear the Fed Cup position would not be part of a wider program.

Roche, who guided Australian Pat Rafter and Czechoslovakia's Ivan Lendl to the peaks of the game, was first approached by the Federer camp in January.

But the Davis Cup great was unable to give the Swiss champion a commitment to return to the circuit full-time.

Federer, however, then managed to persuade Roche to be involved in a series of private practice sessions in Dubai.

While flattered by Federer's persistence, Roche had been content to remain part of the Australian coaching scene - until now.

Federer, 23, has been playing without a coach since he split from Swede Pete Lundgren - now working with Russian Marat Safin - after winning the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston in November 2003.

His form clearly has not suffered. The right-hander has compiled an astonishing 74-6 record, with 11 singles titles, this season, crowned by triumphs at the Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open.

Federer was originally coached by South Australian Peter Carter, who was killed in a road accident in South Africa two years ago. He then hired Lundgren, who was shocked when the relationship ended at the end of last season.

Federer's management was interested in recruiting another South Australian, Darren Cahill, who was not only a great friend of Carter but whose coaching portfolio includes piloting the oldest and youngest man to the No. 1 ranking - Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt.

It is understood Federer had been monitoring Agassi's plans and when the 34-year-old recently declared he would press on for at least another season, Cahill was removed from the world No. 1's options.

Federer's performance this year has rebuffed the traditional notion that top professionals require coaching.

He has instead surrounded himself with a group of trusted allies.

Roche has been inundated with offers from foreign players since Rafter's retirement almost three years ago.

Instead Roche has involved himself in the challenge of helping nurture Australia's next crop of champions.

Mrs. B
12-15-2004, 04:53 PM
thanks, Raquel.

hmm, Roche should be honored to coach Roger. what's he waiting for? ;)

Raquel
12-15-2004, 05:04 PM
thanks, Raquel.

hmm, Roche should be honored to coach Roger. what's he waiting for? ;)
You're right Mrs B - there would be a lot of people out there who would do anything to have the chance to work with Roger. I hope Tony Roche does want to get involved because it's clear Roger likes him.

crimson
12-15-2004, 05:51 PM
Thanks for posting the article Raquel :)

I think Roche would be a great choice of coach for Roger. Roche was one of the all time great doubles players and so will have valuable advice to give Roger about his net game. And he could also be a great help to Roger in his quest to win Roland Garros: Roche won the RG singles title, and also coached Lendl to three RG titles, plus five other slams too. So he is highly accomplished as a player in his own right and as a coach too. :)

LCeh
12-15-2004, 06:02 PM
Wow, if Roger has pursued him for so long, then he must be an excellent coach. Hopefully he will accept Roger's offer soon so he can improve even more of his game.

Thanks for the article Raquel. :) :yeah:

RogiFan88
12-15-2004, 07:13 PM
Well, Rochey was Pat Rafter's coach... couldn't have been that bad... I think it w be cool for Rogi to work [even part-time] w Tony R so there can be a small link betw him and Pat, my faves!

onewoman74
12-15-2004, 07:26 PM
Great article. Does anyone know how old Roche is? I can understand he may not want to travel around. It's like "been there done that" syndrome. I hope he gives into Roger and gives it a go. Roche needs to give 100% to be part of Roger's team. That's important!!

RogiFan88
12-15-2004, 07:31 PM
Rochey's 59... I think he just doesn't really want to coach any more, that's all. But it w only be p/t anyway. Remember, Rafter did make RG SF once... think on...

onewoman74
12-15-2004, 07:55 PM
Well,according to the article Rog may head to Australia to train. Do u think that's a good idea? I just want the best for Rog.

mitalidas
12-15-2004, 09:47 PM
12/16/2004
Hare's feet and tortoise's hands?!
By Doug Browne

How many times have we heard the expression, "God works in mysterious ways?"
There's the case of the student who moves like a panther on the court but has slow moving hands, whether it's at the baseline or at the net. Let's take a closer look.

One of my favorite tennis slogans is, "No feet, no game and no future," because it explains most of the game. Clearly, if a person can't run balls down, he loses most of his matches. What if he can chase most shots with no difficulty but is unable to maneuver his hands on the grip? Yes, there's a problem, and we must try to remedy the situation.

One reason we should always respect some of the older coaching methods is that they may apply to one or two people out of 10. If a tennis player has the same grips for the baseline and the net, there's no transitioning. Conversely, if I analyze a player's forehand grips, I could argue that it would be a tall feat for him to change from baseline to the net. Moreover, when he uses a western forehand baseline grip and then moves into the net for the volley, he must radically move his hands on the grip handle. Coaches must be able to ascertain if their students can handle such dramatic changes.

However, there are many examples of tennis players who don't have to change their hands on their grips in a remarkable way but still are slow to react. Specifically, one of my students has a fabulous semi-western forehand groundstroke grip and only has to move in small increments to hit an eastern backhand. What can I do to help a player feel more comfortable with the change, albeit a small movement for his hand?

To me, this simple exercise can be done at home, and the key would be to do it everyday before playing tennis. Simply start in the ready position and simulate a forehand groundstroke. Then, quickly turn for a backhand and repeat it over and over. Usually by practicing the simple nuances of any game, players become well-adjusted and more comfortable.

The real question to ponder is how bad your student wants to make the change. A player who sincerely wants to improve will practice.

Earlier, I discussed how some players move like cats on their feet but then have lead hands. If a player is a little slower on her feet, does she automatically have fast hands? In order to answer this question properly, I would have to survey thousands of players. With at least a 4.0 or higher player, I would venture to guess that she would have fast hands if she wasn't the quickest with her feet. It's funny how things work out in life.

For instance, Pete Sampras had one of the greatest serves of all time and a pretty lethal forehand but not the biggest backhand. Michael Chang had the patience to win the French Open with his amazingly quick feet but didn't have a big serve or volley. Chris Evert never missed a groundstroke but didn't have much of a serve, and so on. Roger Federer intrigues me because he appears to have it all. Does he have a weakness? Is it possible that Federer has both lightning quick feet and hands?

Personally, if I had a choice, I would prefer quick feet and slower hands. Being able to shag down ball after ball, will usually bring a win because most people just fade away as the point continues. If you want to keep improving your hand-speed, do the simple exercises at home and watch the steady improvement.

Doug Browne is the Hideaway Beach Director of Tennis and the Community Tennis Association President. Doug and his wife Leslie have enjoyed teaching players of all abilities at Hideaway Beach for over a decade. He can be reached by e-mail at DBrowne912@
aol.com.

lsy
12-16-2004, 11:00 AM
I'm going to need some time to read back all the articles :o

I got the vogue mag during my holiday, and of course the only article I had read so far is Rogi's. Won't expect much from a fashion mag but some part were funny. Don't know if anybody had scanned the vogue article here, if not here's some of it :

"And as far as wardrobe goes, she had changed his life - even talked him out of dyeing his hair red.
"when we met, my wardrobe was...not exploding, but it was quite full," she says,"And he had -
"two jeans," Roger interrupts
"Two jeans and these blue sweaters," Mirka says, " And I started to buy him clothes. I try to read all the fashion magazines, but I really try to be - "
"up-to-date" Roger says
"Up-to-date, yeah, I'm not like following - "
"The trends," Roger offers.
"The trends. I'm not all trends. I rather like timeless..."

:lol:

and it talked about rogi's hero growing up was Michael Jordan :
"the man who made it all look easy and then, after the big point, just smiled. Picture the young Swiss teen on a basketball court in Basel, wearing the following, according to Roger :"Jeans too big, shirts too big, and a cap, of course." Picture him trying to be like Mike. "Jordan for me was always the absolute superstar," Roger says. "I've always liked the way he was on the court, his whole style."

Also talked about Roger seeing tennis's past as perharps the best of tennis times, somewhere in the time of Bjorn Borg, which he envies the old tennis life, stories of players hanging out together, maybe even being friends.

But of course if articles written from tennis experts are always full of errors, you can expect that from fashion mag, it talked about Rogi had no coach, and he fired him last year, around the time he suffered a first-round loss in straight sets in FO :rolleyes: :o

avocadoe
12-16-2004, 01:53 PM
thanks for the vogue chat...I may pick up a copy if it is still in stock, otherwise I'll look forward to the next doctors office waiting room :)

babsi
12-16-2004, 02:04 PM
I hope it is still in stock - so you are not forced to become sick!

Raquel
12-16-2004, 11:11 PM
My German is not great but I just about know enough to know that Roger and Kelly Holmes have been named European Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year by European journalists. Congrats to both - especially Roger! :)

http://de.sports.yahoo.com/041216/14/2t96.html

Federer und Holmes Europas Sportler des Jahres
Do 16 Dez, 23:15 Uhr

(sid) Große Ehre für Tennis-Profi Roger Federer (Schweiz) und Leichtathletin Kelly Holmes (Großbritannien): Die beiden Athleten wurden als Europas Sportler des Jahres 2004 ausgezeichnet. Das ergab die Wahl der Vereinigung der europäischen Sportjournalisten (UEPS).

Federer holte in diesem Jahr elf Turniersiege, darunter die bei den Grand Slams in Melbourne, Wimbledon und New York. Der 23-Jährige entschied auch das Saisonfinale beim Masters Cup in Houston für sich. Auf den zweiten Platz kam der siebenmalige Formel-1-Weltmeister und Vorjahressieger Michael Schumacher vor dem polnischen Geher-Olympiasieger Robert Korzeniowski.

Die zweifache Olympiasiegerin Holmes, in Athen Doublegewinnerin über 800 und 1500m, setzte sich vor Stabhochsprung-Olympiasiegerin Jelena Isinbajewa (Russland) und Schwimmerin Inge de Bruijn (Niederlande) durch.

babsi
12-17-2004, 09:15 AM
Great news,thank you Raquel :)

Daniel
12-17-2004, 11:05 AM
Well done Roger :D

lsy
12-17-2004, 11:18 AM
Another award Rogi :yeah: and thanks Raquel.

I know some of you don't visit Rogi's site but among the thousands new threads created daily, you can actually find something good there...i.e. if you have the time like I do now ;)

Whistelway posted some clips of Rogi FH and BH, and one comparing the speed of Rogis Fh vs Hewitt, i thought it was amazing to see the huge difference there, not just the speed but also the wrist work on Rogi's :eek:

http://www.rogerfederer.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=2256

yanchr
12-17-2004, 11:37 AM
Thanks all for the articles :) I'm waiting for the upcoming awards one after another :D

lsy, miss you :hug:

lsy
12-17-2004, 11:46 AM
Laura :eek: you're still alive? :eek:

Been a long time since we last talked ;)

Mrs. B
12-17-2004, 11:48 AM
My German is not great but I just about know enough to know that Roger and Kelly Holmes have been named European Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year by European journalists. Congrats to both - especially Roger! :)

http://de.sports.yahoo.com/041216/14/2t96.html

Federer und Holmes Europas Sportler des Jahres
Do 16 Dez, 23:15 Uhr

(sid) Große Ehre für Tennis-Profi Roger Federer (Schweiz) und Leichtathletin Kelly Holmes (Großbritannien): Die beiden Athleten wurden als Europas Sportler des Jahres 2004 ausgezeichnet. Das ergab die Wahl der Vereinigung der europäischen Sportjournalisten (UEPS).

Federer holte in diesem Jahr elf Turniersiege, darunter die bei den Grand Slams in Melbourne, Wimbledon und New York. Der 23-Jährige entschied auch das Saisonfinale beim Masters Cup in Houston für sich. Auf den zweiten Platz kam der siebenmalige Formel-1-Weltmeister und Vorjahressieger Michael Schumacher vor dem polnischen Geher-Olympiasieger Robert Korzeniowski.

Die zweifache Olympiasiegerin Holmes, in Athen Doublegewinnerin über 800 und 1500m, setzte sich vor Stabhochsprung-Olympiasiegerin Jelena Isinbajewa (Russland) und Schwimmerin Inge de Bruijn (Niederlande) durch.

wow, another accolade for our hero. :worship:

LCeh
12-18-2004, 07:04 AM
Thanks a lot lsy for the link. Those clips were very interesting indeed. I also posted it in GM.

Mrs. B
12-18-2004, 11:03 AM
This is happenin' tonight, folks!


The best Swiss sportsmen and -women of the year will be awarded the «Credit Suisse Sports Awards» this Saturday. The show will be broadcast live on Swiss TV.

Who will succeed to the throne after Roger and Simone Niggli-Luder (Several gold medals in orienteering)? The question will be answered on Saturday evening in Bern. While the Swiss spectators can vote for their personal favourite Roger will certainly be amongst the hottest candidates after his great performances this year. So does Simone Niggli-Luder, by the way, after winning the short distance orienteering world championship yet again this year. The best coach, newcomer, team and handicapped sportsmen and –women will also be honoured on the occasion.

yanchr
12-18-2004, 11:19 AM
For Swiss, who is to vote for except Roger ;)

Thanks Mrs. B for the info :D but Roger won't be there will he?

Daniel
12-18-2004, 11:55 AM
Thanks Mrs B

lsy
12-18-2004, 01:10 PM
Interesting article, talked about things to improve on Rogi's game too.

So where is Rogi now exactly? Still back home or in Sydney?

====================================
http://www.theage.com.au/news/Breaking-News/Federer-hunting-down-Roche/2004/12/18/1103312781802.html?oneclick=true

Federer 'hunting down Roche'
December 18, 2004 - 7:49PM

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The Australian tennis community is in a state of intrigue and fascination amid heightened speculation that world No.1 Roger Federer is in town nutting out a coaching deal with Tony Roche.

Roche, the former long-time mentor to world No.1s Ivan Lendl and Patrick Rafter, has been in Federer's sights all year with the Australian coaching great even meeting the Swiss maestro overseas for two secret sessions.

It's believed Roche's aversion to regular overseas travel has prevented Federer from nabbing the Davis Cup great from under the noses of Tennis Australia.

But that could all change with rumours of a compromise persisting and climaxing with talk of Federer being in Sydney at Roche's home.

Even if the 23-year-old is still on the other side of the globe, speculation won't go away.

Australian Davis Cup winner and respected commentator John Alexander - among others in tennis circles - admitted he'd heard Federer was in the country.

"It would be an interesting development and it's interesting because Andy Roddick is also looking for a coach, and probably Tony would have been looking at either of them," Alexander said.

Advertisement
Advertisement"It's a bit of a shame for Australian tennis."

While Federer has swept all before him in 2004, snaring three of the four grand slams and racking up a phenomenal 74-6 win-loss record, Alexander still believed Roche could bring even more to his brilliant game.

"I think what he did with Ivan Lendl was keep him on the straight and narrow. A big part of coaching is knowing when to say nothing and probably assist in the analysing in the opposition and just keep a real close eye on his game to maintain it, maybe lean him slightly in certain directions.

"He influenced Ivan Lendl into being a more all-court player. He may not actually have ever completed the job but it was a great awareness that Ivan had to be more than just a solid baseliner and he did, under Tony's influence, take more mid-court balls and come to the net."

It's a frightening prospect for Federer's rivals, but Alexander said the runaway world No.1 could advance even further ahead under Roche's guidance.

"I think there's an awful lot of opportunity for Roger, who relies a great deal on his shotmaking, to play a bit more positionally-smart tennis," he said.

"There's all sorts of serves that he hits and remains on the baseline and they get looped back and he ends up being well behind the baseline.

"If you're serve and volleying more often, those balls would be easy, shoulder-height volleys that he could knock off, and also when he hits telling groundstrokes, he's slow to take advantage.

"He's getting away with it at the moment because there's a gap between him and the players beneath him.

"But when players start to challenge him, he needs to tighten up in that area.

"When there's only a point here or there in matches and your opponent is nipping at your heels and you're relying on your hitting and you're having an off day with it, you are going to lose."

Alexander said there were weaknesses in Federer's game - which Roche could iron out - that his challengers hadn't scrutinised enough because of the Swiss's enormous success and unrivalled shotmaking.

"It would be something to be diligent about and get some good practices in now and I think that's where Tony is probably appreciated," Alexander said.

"Tony is of that vintage where there was a great awareness of tactical and positional play, more so than some of the gurus of late who think it's just a ball-hitting exercise and not tennis playing.

"The difference between hitting tennis balls and playing tennis is bringing your brain to the game.

"That's where Tony could help."

Tennis Australia spokesman John Lindsay had also heard of the Federer rumours and said he would be "fascinated" to learn more.

Federer has been without a coach since splitting with Swede Peter Lundgren at the end of last year.

He was previously coached by South Australian Peter Carter, who died in a car crash in South Africa two years ago.

lsy
12-18-2004, 01:37 PM
Two other similar articles posted in Rogi's site except one talk about : Rogi's staying Roche's home in Sydney now and the other : Federer arrived in Australia last week telling well-wishers at Sydney airport he was here to acclimatise ahead of his bid to win a third consecutive grand slam title

:haha:

all the speculation...where's our own spy? ;)

avocadoe
12-18-2004, 01:59 PM
that would be exciting to have Roche working with Roger, even if only part time. That could be good. I'd like to see Roger use the serve/volley option more...2005, so close and yet so far :)

lsy
12-18-2004, 02:18 PM
that would be exciting to have Roche working with Roger, even if only part time. That could be good. I'd like to see Roger use the serve/volley option more...2005, so close and yet so far :)

Not that far really...time flies past too quickly

I love your avatar btw ;)

To you tennis experts out there, how true is the following statement actually? True Rogi doesn't s/v all the time, but how often do we see him being pushed way behind the baseline?

"There's all sorts of serves that he hits and remains on the baseline and they get looped back and he ends up being well behind the baseline.

"If you're serve and volleying more often, those balls would be easy, shoulder-height volleys that he could knock off, and also when he hits telling groundstrokes, he's slow to take advantage."

RogiFan88
12-18-2004, 04:50 PM
well, usually these kinds of rumours turn out to be true, I think and I w be happy for Rochey and Rogi to work together p/t!!

I hope Rogi wins the CSui award again -- he has to cos he outdid himself this year!

RonE
12-18-2004, 06:28 PM
It's an interesting statement he makes and John Alexander has a very good analytical eye so there must be some grain of truth to what he said.

During the heat of the match when watching Rogi play it is difficult as a fan to make those distinctions but one match it rang true was during his match against Roddick at Wimbledon where many times he got weaker replies after serving yet opted to stay at the baseline and trade groundstrokes instead of coming in.

It is true he is also slow sometimes to realize he had made a good opening with a telling shot and reacts a little late but his ability to improvise on those shots is what usually keeps him in good stead in these situations. Pete Sampras was a little similair in that regard- often he would hit a huge serve and stroll his way to the net instead of really closing in a la Edberg and Rafter and finishing the volley off. That often resulted in him having to hit the volley up over below the height of the net or half-volleying it which would set the point up for the opponent to make the passing shot.

Mrs. B
12-18-2004, 09:10 PM
Wooohoooo!!!! Roger is once again THE Swiss Sportsman of the Year! :banana: Claro!!!

:bounce:

RogiFan88
12-19-2004, 03:14 AM
YAY ROGI! Thanks for the good news, Mrs B! ;)

ytben
12-19-2004, 05:08 AM
:aparty: Thanks for the news Mrs. B! :D So only a pre recorded video for his acceptance speech I suppose?

yanchr
12-19-2004, 09:28 AM
Wooohoooo!!!! Roger is once again THE Swiss Sportsman of the Year! :banana: Claro!!!

:bounce:
:banana::inlove: Where is champagne :bounce:
Guess what, this appeared in our noon sports news here :bounce: :angel:

lsy
12-19-2004, 09:31 AM
:banana::inlove: Where is champagne :bounce:
Guess what, this appeared in our noon sports news here :bounce: :angel:

:eek: you and I appear at the same time :lol:

on star sports laura?

Mrs. B
12-19-2004, 09:41 AM
:aparty: Thanks for the news Mrs. B! :D So only a pre recorded video for his acceptance speech I suppose?

hi, ytben! if you check the other thread, you'll see that Roger was broadcasted live via satellite in Sydney, and that was really sweet, he was standing close to the water, with the Harbor Bridge and the Opera house behind him, the water and sky looking very blue. His mom picked up his trophy on stage. Both his parents were in Bern. His dad looked a little tearful there when Roger was announced as the winner.
:)

lsy
12-19-2004, 09:45 AM
hi, ytben! if you check the other thread, you'll see that Roger was broadcasted live via satellite in Sydney, and that was really sweet, he was standing close to the water, with the Harbor Bridge and the Opera house behind him, the water and sky looking very blue. His mom picked up his trophy on stage. Both his parents were in Bern. His dad looked a little tearful there when Roger was announced as the winner.
:)

:hug: aawww...really? I knew his dad just have that "fake" fierce look ;)

I want to be in Sydney now :bigcry:

Mrs. B
12-19-2004, 09:51 AM
LOL, lsy. His dad's cool. It's just those eyebrows. Roger prolly will look like him when he's older! :lol:

i want to be in Sydney too. or KL. ;)

lsy
12-19-2004, 09:57 AM
LOL, lsy. His dad's cool. It's just those eyebrows. Roger prolly will look like him when he's older! :lol:

i want to be in Sydney too. or KL. ;)

oh pls Eva...you don't want to be in KL...it's hot, rains, traffic jam...and I'm dreadful of going back to work tomorrow :bigcry:

:unsure:...Rogi looks cuter but his dad is very comical too :hug:

Mrs. B
12-19-2004, 10:01 AM
Corinna, it's too cold here (snowed again last night) that i'd rather be anywhere in the tropics, i'll take the rain, humidity, traffic jams...;)

i'm sure getting back to work won't be so dreadful. you got aircon, right?

lsy
12-19-2004, 10:09 AM
Corinna, it's too cold here (snowed again last night) that i'd rather be anywhere in the tropics, i'll take the rain, humidity, traffic jams...;)

i'm sure getting back to work won't be so dreadful. you got aircon, right?

:bigcry: and I will be 'locked" in that aircon room from day to night again :sobbing: :sad:

I'll take a white christmans over anything ;)

WINGYEE
12-19-2004, 10:24 AM
Federer signs up Roche

Federer signs up Roche
By John Thirsk
19dec04
WORLD No.1 Roger Federer will link with tennis legend Tony Roche to launch his assault on back-to-back titles in the Australian Open next month.

There is even speculation that the preparation of Federer, 23, has already started in Sydney after secretly flying in from Europe.

The practice sessions will be off limits, but it is understood Federer will train either at Homebush, where he won the 2002 international tournament, the White City complex, or at a private court on the North Shore.

There is no access to the backyard court which is protected by electronic gates and a 10-metre high wall.

The coaching arrangement between Roche and Federer is a personal matter, with Roche recently describing Federer as the best player he has seen since the great Rod Laver.

Roche refused to comment on whether Federer had already arrived or was scheduled to fly in after spending Christmas with his family in Switzerland.

Those close to Roche say it is unlikely he'll take on a full-time role with Federer.

"I think it's a one-off deal because Tony is in Australia and Roger is aiming for consecutive championships," a source told The Sunday Telegraph. "If Tony is available during grand slam time, then maybe it could happen again."

A winning Davis Cup player and coach, Roche won the French Open, reached the Wimbledon and US Open finals and won five Wimbledon doubles titles with John Newcombe.

yanchr
12-19-2004, 10:34 AM
:eek: you and I appear at the same time :lol:

on star sports laura?

:eek: :eek: A disaster isn't it :devil:

Of course not... :rolleyes:

yanchr
12-19-2004, 10:49 AM
hi, ytben! if you check the other thread, you'll see that Roger was broadcasted live via satellite in Sydney, and that was really sweet, he was standing close to the water, with the Harbor Bridge and the Opera house behind him, the water and sky looking very blue. His mom picked up his trophy on stage. Both his parents were in Bern.
Thanks Mrs. B for the detailed description :D
His dad looked a little tearful there when Roger was announced as the winner. :)
I now found another resemblance between Roger and his Dad, besides the nose ;) It must be touching :)

lsy
12-19-2004, 11:04 AM
:eek: :eek: A disaster isn't it :devil:

Of course not... :rolleyes:

I knew star sports won't be so good to me :rolleyes:

I think Rogi is comical like his dad too ;)

yanchr
12-19-2004, 11:10 AM
lsy :smash: in what way is Roger comical :mad: But his dad, yes ;)

ytben
12-19-2004, 01:17 PM
hi, ytben! if you check the other thread, you'll see that Roger was broadcasted live via satellite in Sydney, and that was really sweet, he was standing close to the water, with the Harbor Bridge and the Opera house behind him, the water and sky looking very blue. His mom picked up his trophy on stage. Both his parents were in Bern. His dad looked a little tearful there when Roger was announced as the winner.
:)

Thanks for the details Mrs. B :D Yes I have seen the piccies just now, but haven't gotten around to check out the video yet. It is really sweet to know his dad's reaction over Rogi's achievement :D

Yes I agree Mrs. B it is the brow and the mustache that gives out fierce look at first glance. But when you look closer and see the twinkling eyes I always think he will make a great santa claus ;)

ytben
12-19-2004, 01:23 PM
:banana::inlove: Where is champagne :bounce:
Guess what, this appeared in our noon sports news here :bounce: :angel:

You got highlight of the award ceremony in your local news then? So lucky. Mine only has badminton badminton and badminton.

SUKTUEN
12-19-2004, 01:49 PM
Congrat Roger!!!!!!!!!!!

YOU ARE THE BEST!!!!!!!!!!!! :bounce: :bounce:

avocadoe
12-19-2004, 01:50 PM
..."The practice sessions will be off limits, but it is understood Federer will train either at Homebush, where he won the 2002 international tournament, the White City complex, or at a private court on the North Shore.

There is no access to the backyard court which is protected by electronic gates and a 10-metre high wall... "

I hope the court he practices on his that high bouncing rebound ace, so he can get used to that. Glad they are looking after his safety :)

fedsfan1
12-19-2004, 02:08 PM
I like the idea of Rog with Roche, even if only on a part time basis. Maybe the deal will be only for the 4 majors, which would mean Roche wouldn't have to travel that much.

babsi
12-19-2004, 08:17 PM
Thank you Mrs.B for the information on Rogers award win :)

Hope Roche can devote as much time as possible to Roger,but I´ve read,that he has a sore hipp and from peronal wittness I know ,that it is very painful - makes it almost impossible to travle - smal wonder he doesn´t want to travle on a consitant basis.

Dirk
12-19-2004, 08:54 PM
Roger looks just like his dad. His sister looks more like the mother. I wish I could see the video. Is it on a site. I think even part-time at the slams would be great for Rogi and the off court training in the post season. Rogi can grow from that.

Daniel
12-20-2004, 10:59 AM
thanks :)

ste
12-20-2004, 01:49 PM
thx for the news!!!

very appreciated :hug:

Daniel
12-20-2004, 03:49 PM
ur welcome STe :kiss:

Mrs. B
12-20-2004, 10:48 PM
Eggy posted this at GM but it definitely belongs here! Spasiba, Eggy!

By Richard Evans
12/21/2004

http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tenni...8&bannerregion=

His mother had just started working in the credentials office at the tournament; so there was no problem when Lynette Federer suggested her son join the ballboys team for the Swiss Indoors at the St. Jakobhalle in Basel in 1990.

"I was 9 and I was really nervous," said the boy who has grown into the best tennis player in the world. Smiling at the memory, Roger Federer was all dressed up in his smart business suit at this year’s tournament, greeting sponsors and VIP visitors with his understated charm. "It was a big deal for me to find myself out there on the Centre Court with all these players I had been reading about and seen on television. I think one of my first matches was ballboying for Michael Stich. He was a great player, but I think I was just concentrating on picking the ball up cleanly!"

Given his natural hand-eye coordination, that was never going to be a problem, and just eight years later, the next generation was ballboying for Federer when he made his debut at his hometown tournament.

"It is so strange,” said Roger Brennwald, who has built the Davidoff Swiss Indoors into one of the most established and best-run events on the ATP calendar. "For years, I had been worrying about trying to lure the world’s best players to my tournament, and now the very best is the little chap who grew up down the road and used to practice for hours on our outdoor courts! I don’t have to look so far anymore."

Except for, unhappily, this year, when Federer tore a thigh muscle in training and had to disappoint his army of Swiss fans by pulling out. But even that calamity had its silver lining. The reaction of the Basel public proved that Brennwald’s event is bigger than one player, bigger even than a local superstar. Because even those seats that had not been sold in advance were mostly filled right through the evening sessions and at the weekend, when Jiri Novak of the Czech Republic came through to win the title with a five-set victory over Argentina’s David Nalbandian. And Federer, by his regular daily attendance, proved that he is already attuned to the idea that his duties as a leading personality in his sport do not end at the baseline. On the final day, he spent the entire afternoon, before and after the final, chatting with Brennwald’s most important customers and having photographs taken with everyone who asked. To the delight, not to say the amazement of, those in the press room, this attitude extends to Federer’s relationship with the media. Always affable and available after his matches, Federer slides easily between French, German, Swiss-German and English in his interviews and rarely turns down a legitimate request.

"Why should I?" he asks. "I see most of you guys practically every day on the tour; so it is no problem for me to spend an hour talking to you, especially if it helps publicize the sport. And, anyway, I think some of you are pretty funny!"

To that, most of us say "Bravo!" and hope that it will last. Happily, there is every sign that it will because this is one young man who has been brought up with both feet on the ground in the time-honored Swiss tradition. For that, you can thank his father, Robert, while his mother has probably been more responsible for encouraging the flair that is so evident in his game and the worldly view that is now shaping his off-court activities.

Lynette is South African and met Roger’s father when they were both working for a pharmaceutical company. It is probably fair to say that had both of Roger’s parents been Swiss, he would not have found it so easy to break out of the closed club atmosphere that exists in cities such as Basel.

"People tend to be too protective here," Mrs. Federer said, chatting amid the throng of guests who were taking their leave after the final. She is a small, neat, attractively coiffed woman who gives absolutely no sign of being carried away by the fame and fortune that has descended on her family as a result of her son being able to hit a tennis ball with such style. "When it became obvious that there was no one good enough at our club in Roger’s age group for him to play with, we sent him off to other places so that he could have as wide a range of opponents as possible."

The intimation was that this had gone against the grain for some of the club members, but the Federers’ refusal to buckle under murmurs of disapproval quickly paid off for their boy, whose shining talent soon became obvious as he moved through the junior ranks. But no matter how liberal were their plans for him, bad behavior was not tolerated, and when Roger started throwing racquets and bursting into tears after a defeat, he was told in no uncertain terms that this was not the way to behave. Bjorn Borg went through a similar stage in his early teens and then emerged as the ice-cold Swedish machine. Federer will never be quite like that, but after all those missed opportunities when people, somewhat prematurely, started doubting his ability to win big titles, he is now mature enough to say, "I am actually quite calm inside. Once I feel good on the court, once I am sure what’s going on, I don’t think about going crazy anymore. It never crosses my mind. Obviously, in tough situations, I put on a little bit of a poker face. I cannot start having wobbly legs at break point. You have to get your act together."

Some act. And it is still not the finished article, although at home among his own people, as well as in the tennis capitals of the world, this young man is looking like a very assured and sophisticated 23-year-old. Basel is a bustling city of tree lined avenues with trams and the Rhine running through it. The border with France sits on the western edge of town, but it was not until Federer was 14 that he started speaking the language. "I always spoke English to him at home," explains Lynette, "and he was being taught in Swiss-German at school. But as soon as we sent him off to train in a French-speaking part of the country, he picked up French pretty quickly."

Despite a relatively low-key personality, this linguistic talent will soon start to enhance Federer’s fame on the international stage. Being just as much at ease on a German or French chat show as he is on David Letterman is a huge advantage if you are selling the game, and although large tracts of the tennis world are Spanish speaking, there is no doubt that the refusal of Gaston Gaudio and Guillermo Coria, the Argentine champion and runner up at Roland Garros, to speak English in interviews is restricting the spread of their popularity, quite apart from reducing their earning power.

But for Federer, of course, a multi-lingual facility is almost essential because Switzerland is a nation of three languages — Italian being the third — and he would not be as popular as he is if he only spoke one. And how popular is that?

"As popular as anyone in the history of Swiss sport,” says Bernhard Schaer of the Swiss radio station DRS "As soon as he won Wimbledon, people realized that all the talk about him being great was probably true, and since then, he has gone on proving it. Now he is as big as any skier or soccer player. Perhaps Silvano Beltrametti, our champion skier whose career was ended after a bad accident at Val d’Isere three years ago, was the last sportsperson to be such a popular figure."

And as one strains to think of too many famous Swiss currently making headlines in other fields of endeavor, it is safe to say that, like Boris Becker in Germany in the 1990s, Federer is among the top two or three most recognized people in the whole country. That does not mean, however, that Federer will become idolized in the same puppy-dog manner as Becker, when, for years, a remarkably wide range of Germans of all ages fawned in front of their hero. The Swiss tend to get less carried away and will make their appreciation known in a more sedate fashion.

But there is no doubt that this appreciation of Federer as a very special young man will grow as his influence spreads far beyond the tennis court. Schaer points to the fact that the way Federer conducts himself reflects a good upbringing. "You can always tell," he says. "A good education shines through."

Mr. and Mrs. Federer can step forward and take credit for that, but although Lynette is now deeply involved in her son’s life off the court, neither mother nor father could be accused of falling victim to the pushy parent syndrome.

"We have always tried to be straight with people, and we try to stay out of the way," says Lynette. "We are not the kind of parents who are always there, hanging over the railings."

This is not to say that she holds back with her opinions about what should happen to maximize the gift of Roger’s arrival on the Swiss tennis scene. "The Swiss federation should do more to capitalize on what is happening with tennis in this country as a result of Roger’s success. Now is the moment."

Mother and son have certainly wasted no time in ensuring that others benefit from the player’s success. A few months ago, the Roger Federer Foundation came into being with the specific purpose of helping underprivileged children in South Africa. The poor township of New Brighton in Port Elizabeth has been targeted, with 30 children being offered schooling, clothes and two meals a day. In association with the South African charity IMBEWU (a southern Africa word for “seed”), arrangements have been made for Swiss nationals to travel to Port Elizabeth and spend between three and six months there, helping local workers and getting to know their "adopted" children. The Foundation also pays the salary of two social workers to oversee an operation that Lynette hopes will grow with time.

"Roger was very keen to do something for kids in my home country," Lynette says with a hint of pride. "He has been down there and will be making more trips in the future to see how we can develop the Foundation."

Federer, of course, is not alone in giving something back. Andre Agassi, Todd Martin, Martina Navratilova, Pam Shriver, MaliVai Washington, Yannick Noah and Jim Courier head a long list of players who have set up a variety of programs to help those less-blessed than themselves, but few got started as early as Federer. Perhaps Noah is the most obvious exception, but he, too, had a mother who was prepared to take charge of a project and is still the driving force behind Les Enfants de la Terre. Inevitably, as his fame mounts, so the demands become more arduous. Sooner or later, a personality, be it in sports or entertainment, is going to make decisions about his career that will leave some people disappointed. Federer has just done that, informing the Swiss Federation that he will not be playing Davis Cup in 2005 so that he can concentrate on maintaining his No. 1 ranking while attempting to add the French Open to his growing collection of Grand Slam tournament titles.

There is little doubt that the futility of trying to win Davis Cup World Group matches with colleagues who are simply not in that league played a part in Federer’s thinking, and for the sake of the Davis Cup, it is to be hoped Switzerland unearths some young talent in the near future so that the world No. 1 might think it worth his time and effort. Like John McEnroe, Federer has never been one to shun the team concept in sports.

"Roger used to be just as upset if his soccer team lost as he was when he was beaten in a singles match at tennis,” says Lynette. "I suppose he takes after me in that respect. My South African upbringing embraced the culture of team sports, and so even though I ran for myself at track and field, I was also running for my athletics club."

This suggests Federer will be back in Swiss colors someday, but in the meantime, he will simply try to become the best tennis player possible and the thought of further improvement should send shudders down his opponents’ spines. As his extraordinary year of achievement came to a final, thrilling climax at the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, the outstanding question concerned the continued absence of a coach. Ever since the breakup with Peter Lundgren a year ago, Federer
has been without one, relying for assistance on tour from his physical trainer and his longtime girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, the former player who handles his social commitments with sponsors such as Maurice Lacroix watches and Swiss Airlines.

Once it became obvious that Andre Agassi intended to continue on a full schedule in the coming year — thus ruling out the possibility of Darren Cahill becoming available — Federer turned to Tony Roche, and the pair did spend a brief period training together. However, it is doubtful whether the Australian, who guided Patrick Rafter to the top of the rankings, would want to return to a full-time role on the circuit.

So, deceptively perhaps, Federer will head into the new year under his own steam, which, as journalist John Roberts wrote in the London Independent, is not as simple as it looks. "Watching Federer play tennis," Roberts wrote, "can be like watching a swan gliding serenely over water — it is easy to forget how much hectic activity may be taking place beneath the surface."

Win or lose in 2005 — and don’t bet on the second option — it will be a privilege to watch this gifted player lift the game of tennis to an art form in the coming months. But Mom is not getting carried away. "It is wonderful to hear people talk about Roger possibly becoming the greatest player of all time," says Lynette. "But it is results that count."
__________________

RogiFan88
12-20-2004, 10:52 PM
Yeah, it does belong here -- lovely article about a lovely boy and his family! Finally got the VF mag and I have to say that Rogi looks even better in the REAL pic than he does in the virtual one... beauty!!

fedsfan1
12-21-2004, 01:35 AM
Thanks for posting this , Mrs. B!

Since I haven't been following his career for that long, its nice to read about his childhood, his early years in tennis as a ballboy & all the stuff never really mentioned in most articles. His parents must be really proud of him --they deserve a lot of credit for turning out such a nice young man & a pretty good tennis player, too!! ;)

Can't wait for 2005 to start!!!

federer_roar
12-21-2004, 05:37 AM
Thanks Mr.B. for posting. It's an excellent one.

fightclubber
12-21-2004, 12:46 PM
SUPERB AS ALL YOU POSTED.
THANKS GRACIAS,
SILVY :)

avocadoe
12-21-2004, 01:32 PM
his South African foundation sounds awesome :) why would the Clubs not want him to seek approptiate competition as a boy?

lsy
12-21-2004, 03:37 PM
I haven't had time to read back what had been posted, so if this is duplicate, then sorry ;)

ANOTHER AWARD FOR ROGI!!!

This time is against all sportsman of the world, and not just in field of tennis...and it's voted by sports editor and jounalists from all over the world :yeah: :worship:

============================================

POLL-Federer aces Reuters sportsman of the year poll
Tue Dec 21, 2004 11:59 AM GMT

By Natalie Harrison
LONDON, Dec 21 (Reuters) - World tennis number one Roger Federer has been voted Reuters sportsman of 2004 after winning three grand slam tournaments this year.

Thirty-three sports editors and journalists in over 20 countries nominated up to three leading sportsmen of this year. Each first place choice was awarded three points, second place got two points and third place received one point.

Swiss Federer, who topped the poll with 53 points out of a possible total of 99, became the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three of the four grand slam events -- the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open -- in a calendar year.

"Three slams, plus the Masters, and already one of the finest players to ever hold a racket," said Ondrej Foltin at The Herald Sun in Melbourne.

Described as "the best tennis player the world has ever seen" by one journalist, Federer was also unbeaten against players in the top 10, matched Pete Sampras' 23-match winning streak and set a record of 13 consecutive wins in finals.

And all this achieved without a coach.

"If you win only one grand slam you're a candidate but if you win three in a year with technical tennis and not power tennis you deserve to be the best sportsman of the year," said Valentijn Driessen at De Telegraaf in The Netherlands.


PHELPS SECOND

Swimmer Michael Phelps beat Moroccan athlete Hicham El Guerrouj and cyclist Lance Armstrong to claim second place in the poll which was carried out between December 15-20.

Topping the medal winners' table at this year's Olympics, with six golds and two bronzes -- matching Soviet gymnast Alexander Dityatin's 1980 record for the most medals at one Games -- helped secure Phelps' place as runner up with 32 points.

"What more do you want from a sportsman?" asked Juhani Heikkila at Finnish News Agency STT.

The American fell short of the seven gold medals won by Mark Spitz in Munich in 1972 but at 19, he has plenty of time to achieve this goal.

Last year's Reuters poll winner and six-times Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong took third place with 26 points.

"It's hard to see his record in the Tour ever being equalled, far less beaten," said Stuart Bathgate at The Scotsman.

El Guerrouj's two gold medal wins in the summer Games for the 1,500 and 5,000 metres events, also made him a firm favourite with 24 points.

"For me, he (El Guerrouj) is the best athlete in history" said Angel Cabeza at Marca.

Seven-times Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher and golfer Vijay Singh, who became the first player to earn more than $10 million in a single campaign, also scored highly, gaining 22 and 20 points respectively.

(additional reporting by Toni Vorobyova in London)

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=tennisNews&storyID=7148368

federer_roar
12-22-2004, 01:37 AM
Hi Corinna, :wavey: thanks for posting the article. Starting off the holiday season, Roger's really wrapping up all those awards... :)

Billabong
12-22-2004, 04:36 AM
:yeah:

Fedex
12-22-2004, 10:21 PM
I'm not sure if this article has been posted already, but I'll post it anyway. Here's a short article from atptennis.com.

The Federer Factor

December 20, 2004
Can Anyone Challenge Federer in 2005?
So dominant was Roger Federer in 2004 that it is difficult to imagine any player challenging him for the No. 1 ranking in 2005. But history suggests that it is difficult to follow up on such a standout season. Just three other players have won three or more Grand Slam titles in one season during the Open era: Mats Wilander (who won three Grand Slams in 1988), Jimmy Connors (3 in 1974) and Rod Laver (who completed his second Grand Slam in 1969). No one among that star trio won a Grand Slam title the following year.

Wilander’s triumph in the 1988 US Open final was his last appearance in a Grand Slam final. Laver, who was 31 when he became the only player in history to complete the Grand Slam twice, advanced to the quarterfinals of a major just once more.

Jimmy Connors in 1974 completed the Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open sweep 30 years before Federer repeated the feat this season. Connors failed to win a Grand Slam title the following year (he finished runner-up in the same Grand Slam finals) but he went on to win another five Grand Slam titles during his career and still holds an ATP-record 109 career tournament titles.

Federer will be hoping next season to become the first player since Tony Trabert in 1955 to win his first five Grand Slam titles. He will also try to become the first player since Ivan Lendl (1985-87) to win three consecutive Tennis Masters Cup titles.

So what will 2005 bring: more Federer dominance or will the long list of ATP stars rise to meet Federer’s challenge? World No. 2 Andy Roddick is determined to reclaim the year-end World No. 1 ranking he surrendered to the Swiss this year. Fiesty Aussie Lleyton Hewitt has vowed to raise his game to challenge Federer after six straight losses in 2004. Marat Safin is back to his best form and is a player with the firepower to trade blows with Federer.

Spaniard Carlos Moya has been to No. 1 before and is playing some of the best tennis of his career. Argentines Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian, who have produced big results on multiple surfaces, are also in the hunt.

Which player, or players, can challenge Federer for the No. 1 ranking next season and why? Send your thoughts to content@atptennis.com and we’ll publish a cross section of the answers.

Fedex
12-22-2004, 10:31 PM
I'm not sure, I have mixed feelings about the article. I personally believe Federer will continue his dominance in 05, but no he will not be as dominate. Who are they kidding though?? Do they really think that Hewitt and Roddick will really be able to seriously challenge Rogi next year? Just look at the recent head to head records. And I personally dont think Hewitt deserves to have his picture on the atp site, (concerning this article of who will be able to challenge Federer). I mean the guy has lost to Rogi 6 straight times, and I dont think, unless Federer basically makes unforced errors the whole match will Hewitt have a chance at beating Federer; his game just matches up too well with Federer's, plus, Federer is always on the 'Hewitt hunt', always very motivated to beat him every time. Another thing I love is how they always say "Roddick will be looking to reclaim his number 1 ranking" :lol: :lol: I mean how long was it actually his?? Only a few weeks, most of them during the off season, and he was a bit lucky to get to number one, anyway.

Daniel
12-23-2004, 04:09 AM
Thanks for the arcticle :)

avocadoe
12-23-2004, 02:44 PM
Good points Fedex. The real challengers may be surprises, a Nalbandian redux, or a Berdych or Nadal rampage. But I am thinking maybe, not to jinx anyone, Roger is going to do some big time stats this year, and maybe have a Spanish dropper before the French Open :) Or so I hope :) :)

Carlita
12-23-2004, 09:05 PM
I think the only player to beat Roger is Roger himself! Maybe Moya, seeing he was the only one giving him troubles in Houston. Then there is Nadal......he doesn't fear anyone I think!! :lol: Still, it will be tough! If Roger stays healthy and focussed, he's gonna be soooo hard to beat!

Stay brilliant Roger!!! See ya in Rotterdam!!!

Dirk
12-23-2004, 09:29 PM
Andy is a joke. I bet he will be saying how he wants to win back his US OPEN TITLE!?!?!?!?!?!!? :cuckoo: I bet the ducks wouldn't raise a peep if Andy had won the Wimbly final and Rogi said "I hope to win my Wimbledon crown back next year" :rolleyes:

Mrs. B
12-26-2004, 09:15 AM
there is a great article on Roger at the Sonntags Zeitung here, too bad you can't open it online. It's also a bit long (covers the whole front page on the Focus section) so it might not be too easy to scan it here.
:sad:

Daniel
12-26-2004, 10:04 AM
Andy is a jelous duck :p

Roger :bounce:

squirrel
12-26-2004, 11:01 AM
mrs. B, please translate it for us!!!!!!

Fergie
12-26-2004, 01:31 PM
Thanks for the last articles :yeah:

lsy
12-26-2004, 03:20 PM
Is Rogi's "domination" in 2004 really bad for the game as some would claim? So far past weeks, I had read articles everywhere over the wolrd had his name mentioned for his achievement this year, on their annual sports review out of so many other sports :yeah:

Here's just one of them which I thought make some really good points (don't read too much into that title though ;) )

================================================== ====

On the couch / Sports `non-personalities' of the year

By Jerrold Kessel

"Man of the match." What an irritating misconception of team sports. Trying to single out one player from a combined performance is to inject an alien element into team sports. Since, however, it has become so pervasive, the only way around it is to deliberately shy away from sportsmen and women who play within a team and to declare them ineligible for the accolade of Sports Personality of the Year.

Now right there, there's another term that grates on the sporting ear. Personality. Is this how we should regard our champions - the only ones who endear themselves to us are those with "personality"? What we're after in our stadiums are achievers, gracious and elegant achievers.

Of course, all sport watchers want drama, human drama, but only when it's integral to the contest, not because someone is creating a "show." The yardstick of a champion is that they're the best, and that they behave best when they are proving that they are the best. :worship: (I couldn't agree more)

The two guys who get my vote for having consistently offered enormous viewing pleasure during the past 12 months are tennis supremo Roger Federer and golf maestro Retief Goosen.

The 23 year-old Swiss compiled a stunning record in 2004, winning three of the four Grand Slams, collecting 11 titles, and losing only six matches in all. That drew a compliment from the former world's No.1 Pete Sampras, who told the French sports paper L'Equipe: "I think he can dominate tennis for as long as I did."

Sampras, who won 14 Grand Slams and was the world's top player for six consecutive years, said, "We have the same temperament: He makes playing look easy, he can do just about anything he wants with a racket, and he dominates everyone as I did several years before."

Where Federer already outshines Sampras is in not minding anonymity. In September at Flushing Meadow, he told a European TV commentator just how much he likes to play in the U.S., simply because he's so rarely noticed off court. No intrusions from the paparazzi or ardent admirers helps reduce on-court pressure on him to deliver on expectations.

If American sports fans don't really want stars who are not so exuberant on-court and virtually incognito off-court, and continue to seek out the controversial, the drama kings and queens as their most beloved sports stars, no wonder they haven't taken massively to golf's Mr. Unflappable.

Meanwhile, the man originally from Pietersburg, South Africa crept quietly in and conquered the U.S. Open.

He was at it again earlier this month shrugging off ice-man allegations and that he is a "colorless personality," as all the other big names crumbled under a redesigned Gary Player course in his home country. At Sun City, Goosen romped away with the $1.2 million top prize to take the culminating challenge event on the annual golf calendar.

Unswayable in his commitment he may be. But in beating the best in the game by remaining "cool" in the old sense of the word, Goosen was being real cool in controlling pent-up tension. He very nearly quit the tournament just before it was about to tee off when his three-week-old infant daughter was rushed to the hospital. His wife convinced him to play on. His reward: The gosling is fine and gets a fine end-of-year present from a really cool dad.

Forget about prizes, forget about displays of emotion. A man with a golf swing so stunning in its simplicity, so smooth that it outdoes any baby's bottom, deserves every bit of attention and every bit of gratitude that we viewers can afford to accord him.

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/515645.html

Fedex
12-27-2004, 09:03 PM
Thanks for the article, lsy.

Fedex
12-27-2004, 11:06 PM
Here's an interesting excerpt from today's ATP Tennis site.

Andy After Answers

World No. 2 Andy Roddick has the firepower to bring any opponent to their knees, but in 2004 it was not enough to conquer INDESIT ATP 2004 Race winner Roger Federer. What can Roddick do to stop the Federer Express in 2005 and improve his 1-8 career record against the No.1? Which other players can challenge the sublime Swiss?

Share you're thoughts on this, lol.

ste
12-28-2004, 08:14 AM
thx for all the articles! :wavey:

^Sue^
12-28-2004, 10:26 AM
Told you guys ....i think Roger Federer definitely can beat the hell out of Roddick in 2005!!lol lol

Fergie
12-28-2004, 01:14 PM
Here's an interesting excerpt from today's ATP Tennis site.

Andy After Answers

World No. 2 Andy Roddick has the firepower to bring any opponent to their knees, but in 2004 it was not enough to conquer INDESIT ATP 2004 Race winner Roger Federer. What can Roddick do to stop the Federer Express in 2005 and improve his 1-8 career record against the No.1? Which other players can challenge the sublime Swiss?

Share you're thoughts on this, lol.
Andy will lose with Roger over and over again the next year :lol:

fightclubber
12-28-2004, 08:32 PM
there is a great article on Roger at the Sonntags Zeitung here, too bad you can't open it online. It's also a bit long (covers the whole front page on the Focus section) so it might not be too easy to scan it here.
:sad:
scan it in parts and I can join it, if you want ( send it to fightclubber@yahoo.com )

RogiFan88
12-28-2004, 09:34 PM
Behind the scenes at Flushing Meadows

September 2004. New York. Roger Federer becomes the first man in the Open Era to win his first four Grand Slam finals as he overwhelms 2001 winner Lleyton Hewitt, 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-0 at the US Open. Gregory Lanzenberg was there to witness the preparation of one very cool customer.



LTA turn to Connors


FEDERER: THE SECRET OF SUCCESS

One of the (many) reasons world number one Roger Federer had such a dominant 2004 was his relaxed manner: smiling before each match, joking on the practice courts, playing video games... but let me tell you, one hour before his semi-final encounter with Tim Henman, it was no more Mr Nice Guy.

Federer was already into his match, tight-lipped and visibly playing out the points in his head.

When the match started, the 23-year old knew what he had to do on the court. It wasn't the joking, but his intense concentration that enabled him to block out the stress.

After the match it took Federer a good hour to enter the press conference room. By that time, Mr Nice Guy was back sharing his emotions with reporters in three different languages; German, English and French. Pretty impressive stuff.


...

http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/e6214/sport_lng0_spo57_evt6214_sto669431.shtml

Fedex
12-29-2004, 05:36 AM
Andy will lose with Roger over and over again the next year :lol:
What esle is new?? :)

Daniel
12-29-2004, 07:31 AM
that andy thinks he can beat Roger :lol: :p

ste
12-29-2004, 09:26 AM
that andy thinks he can beat Roger :lol: :p

perhaps he has to encourage himself by saying such silly things.... ;)

Puschkin
12-29-2004, 02:50 PM
Roger Federer
"Peerless" is a word that probably gets bandied about too much in sports. But Federer literally had no equals in 2004. He won three Majors in a single year (something a fair player named Sampras never managed to accomplish during his gilded career); he won multiple titles on each of the Major surfaces; he never lost in a final; he went undefeated against other top 10 opponents. He did it all without the benefit of a coach. And for good measure, through it all, Federer was never anything less than a gentleman.

Full article: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/magazine/specials/sports_year/ups_and_downs/tennis/

ste
12-29-2004, 03:22 PM
Roger Federer
"Peerless" is a word that probably gets bandied about too much in sports. But Federer literally had no equals in 2004. He won three Majors in a single year (something a fair player named Sampras never managed to accomplish during his gilded career); he won multiple titles on each of the Major surfaces; he never lost in a final; he went undefeated against other top 10 opponents. He did it all without the benefit of a coach. And for good measure, through it all, Federer was never anything less than a gentleman.

Full article: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/magazine/specials/sports_year/ups_and_downs/tennis/

summary:

Roger is simply the best... :worship:

Daniel
12-29-2004, 04:28 PM
Roger, u rule :worship: :yeah:

Skyward
12-30-2004, 06:29 AM
From Tennis Magazine

by Stephen Tignor

Men's player of the year


Roger Federer


There are not many compliments left to give. Whether it was Mary Carillo likening him to a jazz virtuoso or John McEnroe confessing " he plays the way I dreamed of playing," 2004 was the year of superlatives for Roger Federer. The world No.1 even got into the act himself. When asked to name his favorite player to watch, he answered, naturally, Roger Federer.
Of course, any modesty from the 23-year old Swiss would have would have sounded hopelessly false last season. He dominated like few men have in the Open era. Not only was he the first ATP player in 16 years to win three major titles, he locked up the No.1 ranking earlier than any player since the tour's computer rankings began in 1973 and became the first player since Pete Sampas in 1997 to earn more than 6 million. And he did it all with the most aesthetically pleasing game that tennis has seen since- well, since the sport began.( How's that for the compliment?)
" I never had a feeling where I thought ,' I'm mot hitting the ball fine'". That's how Federer , in his casually confident way described his play in the year's first big event, the Australian Open. It may have been the understatement of the year. Federer was at his artistic best Down Under, toying with field on his way to the title. And while he wasn't always as spectacular, he hit the ball just fine all year, on all surfaces, against all top players. He trounced the game's best clay -courter, Coria, on the Hamburg dirt, made the tactical moves needed to thwart Roddick's grass- court assault at Wimbledon, and soared over Hewitt on the hard courts at Falshing Meadows.
His one slip came at the French Open-literally. Federer had trouble with his footing in a third round loss to Gustavo Kuerten. but his response provided another example of why he represents the sport so well." I put it down to his good performance,"he said of Kuerten.Then Federer added something you don't often hear from athlets who have just been soundly beaten." It was nice to play him."That's one more thing to love about Federer. Even as he dominates this grueling one -on-one sport , he does it innocently.

Mrs. B
12-30-2004, 09:05 AM
"That's one more thing to love about Federer. Even as he dominates this grueling one -on-one sport , he does it innocently.

jawohl! :lol:

^Sue^
12-30-2004, 11:16 AM
somebody says Roger is on steriods, i am so worry!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Is it real??
I DEFINETELY THINK IT'S UNTRUE AT ALL, RUBBISH NEWS!!!!!

Puschkin
12-30-2004, 02:50 PM
More to come next year, warns Federer

Published: Thursday, 30 December, 2004, 11:26 AM Doha Time

By Anil John
ROGER Federer, who brushed aside all opposition this year with almost careless disdain, yesterday signalled his intention to continue his dominance going into the new season.
The 23-year-old Swiss maestro landed in Doha a good five days before the January 3-8 million dollar ExxonMobil Qatar Open, indicating how seriously he wanted to kick off the new season in style.
“Obviously the year’s first tournament is very important from my point of view because the expectations from me are very high,” the world number one said in a brief meeting with the press at the Doha International Airport.
“I am happy to be in Doha and I hope I have a successful week,” he added.
Federer, who couldn’t go beyond the quarterfinals at the Qatar Open when he was first here in 2003, losing to American Jan-Michael Gambill, has arrived this time on the back of a sensational run that had commentators stumped for superlatives.
The easy-going Swiss racked up no less than 11 consecutive titles this year with his brand of sublime, unhurried tennis, including the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open.
Going back to 2003 he has won 13 titles in a row, beating the mark of 12 held by legends such as John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg.
Federer, who was beaten in only six of 80 matches he played this year, is also the first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three Grand Slam titles in a year, capping the season with a brilliant show at the season-ending Masters in Houston.
In Doha he is expected to have a smooth ride although players like Argentine Gaston Gaudio - who won the French Open to prevent a Federer Grand Slam sweep - and former champs Frenchman Fabrice Santoro and Moroccan Younes El Aynaoui can be expected to pull off an upset.
Austrian Stefan Koubek, who won the event in 2002, however will miss the event with a dope suspension, something which Federer said was a sensitive issue and needed to be handled carefully.
“There is no place for drugs in our sport but almost all players who have tested positive so far have denied doping, so we have to be careful about how we go about pursuing such cases,” said Federer.
The Swiss ace said he took good care about his diet and never had any problems being tested for doping.
“I have been tested many times and never had any problems but the players should themselves be careful about what they are eating or drinking.”
Koubek, ranked 60 in the world, has said he was given the banned substance triamcinolon acetonid as an injection for a wrist injury.
Earlier this year Briton Greg Rusedski escaped a ban after testing positive for nandrolone after proving that contaminated supplements provided by the men’s ATP Tour were responsible.
Rusedski will be the lone Briton taking part in next week’s Qatar Open after Tim Henman backed out to be with his pregnant wife.
Federer, meanwhile, also expressed his sadness at the saga of death and destruction caused by tsunami waves in Asia.
“The catastrophe in Asia is a big shock to me,” Federer said on his website rogerfederer.com.
“I have developed a strong relation with Asia and earlier this year I had the privilege of winning the Thailand Open as well as spending a magnificent holiday in Maldives for the second time.
“I have also been to Phuket.”
Federer, who runs the Roger Federer Foundation for kids in South Africa, said he found it hard to imagine how people affected by the tsunami would be able to cope with the disaster.
“I wish all those suffering and left homeless would find the necessary strength to get over this dreadful situation.”
Federer was received at the airport by Qatar Tennis Federation president Sheikh Mohammed bin Faleh al-Thani, tournament director Ayman Azmi and other local officials.

http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=20678&version=1&template_id=49&parent_id=29

knight_ley
12-30-2004, 09:53 PM
great articles everyone! thanks!

fightclubber
12-30-2004, 10:50 PM
Heres and article I really like from ESPN deportes latin america
I will use a tranlator to translate the text,cos ITS too much...... anyway, heres in spanish
Todos quieren frenar a Federer



El suizo afronta el 2005 con un desafío muy interesante y emotivo


Federer brilló en el 2004 y quiere seguir igual (AP)BUENOS AIRES (ESPNdeportes.com) -- ¿Quién podrá frenar a Roger Federer? ¿Habrá alguien en condiciones de hacerlo? ¿Será porque el suizo baje un poco su nivel o alguien lo conseguirá aún si él continúa tan efectivo, vistoso y contundente como en el 2004? Las preguntas se multiplican. Y parece poco probable que alguien pueda detener a este genio del tenis.
El gran interrogante es ver qué pasará con los rivales, si alguno de los perseguidores podrá levantar tanto para poner en apuros a Federer. Sin dudas, el desafío es mayúsculo. Cada uno, con su estilo y sus preferencias, buscará afirmarse sobre todo en el aspecto anímico para no tener tantos baches y así estar más al acecho.

Y la proeza que pretenden los Roddick, los Hewitt, los Safin, los Moyá, los Henman, los Coria... se complica porque el suizo es un todoterreno, que se desenvuelve bárbaro en cualquier superficie. Es un superdotado que hace todo fácil y, lo que toca, lo convierte en triunfo. Es tan completo que no tiene puntos débiles: eso complica aún más a los adversarios.

Como si fuera poco, no sólo gana, sino que también es lindo verlo jugar. Lo clásico de su tenis lo hace especial. Y su vocación ofensiva le agrega esa dosis de audacia y agresividad tan valorada como a la vez no siempre vista por otros colegas, más allá de que la mayoría busca ser más potente y adaptarse a los tiempos que corren.

El Federer actual, que mejoró mucho su revés (el golpe más forzado por sus rivales) y creció en confianza con respecto a la versión de sus inicios como profesional, va en camino de ser uno de los grandes de la historia. De hecho, a los 23 años ya ganó cuatro Grand Slam y dos Masters, con el agregado de que en el 2004 consiguió cuatro de esos seis títulos.

Repasemos algunas marcas, que lo visten de cuerpo entero: esta temporada obtuvo 11 torneos, lleva 13 finales ganadas al hilo (en total apenas cedió cuatro sets), arrastra 23 victorias seguidas contra los top-ten y en cuatro años ya se adjudicó 22 certámenes. Además, resulta increíble que, al no ser un jugador experimentado, de más de 30 años, siga dando cátedra sin tener entrenador.

Eso confirma su clase, su raza de campeón. El coach, en el tenis, cumple la función lógica y primordial de asesorar técnica y tácticamente a su dirigido y además colabora al facilitarle su organización del calendario, en cada torneo, en cada día, en cada entrenamiento. Pese a no contar con esa ayuda, el suizo igualmente sabe cómo jugar y resolver sus inconvenientes, cuando los tiene, claro.

Más allá de ser bastante frío y poco tribunero, lo que lo asemeja mucho con Pete Sampras, también cuenta con un esquema similar al del estadounidense, ya que se apoya en el saque y la derecha. Eso lo convierte en la envidia de todos. Pero la diferencia, a esta altura, es que Federer ya hizo más ruido que el récordman del tenis sobre polvo de ladrillo.

TAMBIÉN APUNTA A BRILLAR EN ARCILLA
Ahí, precisamente, está planteado uno de sus principales objetivos para el 2005. Dijo que pretende revalidar el título de Wimbledon y terminar otra vez primero en el ránking de la ATP. Pero el mayor reto será conseguir la única corona de Grand Slam que le falta: Roland Garros. Ya festejó en Hamburgo y superó a rivales de primera línea en esa cancha, como Coria, Moyá y Gaudio.

Aunque es sabido que para obtener el Mundial de polvo de ladrillo hay que resistir física y mentalmente a verdaderas batallas al mejor de cinco sets. Ahí la cuestión cambia. Ese karma ya lo vivieron otros grandes de los últimos 35 años que fueron especialistas en superficies rápidas y no triunfaron en París, como los Sampras, los McEnroe, los Connors, los Becker y los Edberg.

La clave para Federer en el Abierto de Francia, donde en seis participaciones nunca superó los cuartos de final y tres veces fue eliminado en la primera rueda, pasa por hacerse de la paciencia suficiente. No apurarse a definir puntos largos y en momentos decisivos será fundamental, porque es ahí donde suelen mostrar la hilacha los que no se criaron en arcilla.

Fantástico en el juego ofensivo, el suizo debe mantener la calma cuando el de enfrente, sobre todo si son argentinos y españoles, le plantean extensos peloteos desde el fondo. El sabe que tiene armas, en especial el drive, para intentar una resolución rápida, por potencia y ángulos, pero no caer mucho en esa tentación le dará más resultado.

Ya dejó en claro que sabe moverse en arcilla, aunque sobre ese piso tiene pocos encuentros de largo aliento encima. Igual, se lo vio tranquilo y con ganas de encontrarle más la vuelta, algo que no siempre ocurrió con anteriores figuras. Eso también evidencia su intención de hacer historia en Roland Garros, lo que podría marcar un plus en su ya magnífica carrera.

Por lo tanto, Federer es consciente de que puede llegar algún día a ganar el Grand Slam completo. Sólo dos varones, el estadounidense Donald Budge, en 1938, y el australiano Rod Laver, en 1962 y 1969, pudieron coronarse en los cuatro torneos más importantes del mundo en la misma temporada. Ahora todos se disputan en distintas superficies, lo que lo hace aún más difícil todavía.

Sin dudas, el suizo, que le lleva casi el doble de puntos a Roddick en la clasificación, mantendrá el primer puesto siempre y cuando recupere la mayor parte de los puntos conseguidos en el 2004. Justamente, casi todas las unidades las logró en canchas rápidas y entonces, si levanta el trofeo de Roland Garros, podría otorgarle un plus decisivo.

La lucha por la cima se decidirá, como ocurre en general en un circuito plagado de superficies rápidas, en los grandes torneos que se realizan en cemento, carpeta sintética y césped. Por eso, continuar firme fuera de la arcilla resultará vital y, a su vez, mejorar en polvo de ladrillo le reportaría una confianza extra frente a sus principales enemigos.

Es cierto que puede sentir presión, ya que defiende muchos títulos y puntos, pero también ratificó su estirpe ganadora y cuenta con variantes para desequilibrar en todos lados. Si continúa su arremetida del final de año, Marat Safin parece ser su gran rival. El ruso, inestable en el rubro anímico, se mostró más afianzado y también es un todoterreno.

Así las cosas, Federer afronta un 2005 en el que pretenderá continuar con su excelente nivel. Ahora todos lo quieren destronar y eso generará un incentivo mayor para seguir el tenis bien de cerca. Vale la pena no perderse una lucha que promete ser emocionante, sumamente atractiva.



Gustavo Goitía es editor de ESPNdeportes.com. Es periodista especializado en tenis desde 1989, y se desempeñó como redactor en los diarios La Nación, Clarín y en el deportivo Olé, todos de Buenos Aires; además fue comentarista en el canal TyC Sports. Consulta su archivo de columnas.




:wavey:

fightclubber
12-30-2004, 10:52 PM
and here the translation (I made some changes cos the translation suck but my english is not the best)
I think you will understand.
I really like the article and I say its quite a truth what he writes ( to my point of view) ... will love your thoughts. :worship:
silvy

All want to stop Federer

The Swiss confronts the 2005 with a very interesting and touching challenge Federer shone in the 2004 and wants to go on equal . Who will be able to stop Roger Federer? Will be somebody in conditions for doing it? It will be because the Swiss lowers a little his level or somebody will still obtain it even if he continues so effective, showy and forceful like in the 2004? The questions are multiplied. And it seems not very probable that somebody can stop to this genius of tennis. The great question is to see what will happen with the rivals, if some of the pursuers will be able to raise so much their levels to put Federer in an unconfortable position

Without doubts, the challenge is BIG. Each one, with its style and its preferences, will look for to affirm mainly in the psychic aspect to avoid holes on their game and thus to be more on the lookout.

And the objetives tha will try the Roddicks, the Hewitts, the Safins, the Moyás, the Henmans, the Corias... will be hard because the Swiss is a "todoterreno" ( plays well in all surfaces ), that shows he is a maestro in any surface. He is so complete that does all easy all that he touches, turns into triumph. He is so complete that he does not have weak points: that complicate still more to the adversaries.
Besides that, he not only wins, but that also is so pretty to see him playing. The classic thing of his tennis makes him special. And its offensive vocation adds that dose to him of boldness and aggressiveness so valued as simultaneously not always well seen by other colleagues, beyond which the majority looks for to be more powerful and to adapt to the times that run. The present Federer, that improved so much his backhand (the move more forced by its rivals) and grew in confidence compare to the version of its beginnings as professional, goes in a way of being one of the great ones of history. In fact, the 23 four years already won 4 Grand Slam and two Masters, with the aggregate (add on) that in the 2004 he obtained four of those six titles.

Let us review some marks, that dress his whole body: this season he obtained 11 matches, won 13 finalswithout loose ( all together he just lost 4 sets), it has 23 victories followed against top-ten players and in four years already won 22 contests. In addition, it is incredible that, not being an experienced player, of more than 30 years, continues giving "lessons" without having a trainer. That confirms his class, his race of champion.
Coachs, in tennis, acts as the logical and fundamental advise for technique and tactical direction and in addition the organization of the calendar and collaborates facilitating each match, every day, each training. In spite of not having that help, the Swiss also knows how to play and how to solve his disadvantages, when he knows them, clearly.

Beyond being enough cold and just a bit demostrative, which resembles much with Pete Sampras, also he counts on a schedule similar to the American, since he leans on the serve and the right hand. That turns him the envy of the rest. But the difference, at this moment , is that Federer already made more noise than they récordman of tennis on clay - dust.

ALSO HE WANTS TO SHINE IN THE CLAY,
indeed, IT´S one of his main objectives for the 2005. He said that he will try to revalidate the title of Wimbledon and to finish againnumber 1 in ránking of the ATP. But the greater challenge will be to obtain the only crown of Grand Slam that he miss: Roland Garros. He won in Hamburg and already left behind rivals especialist on that field, like Coria, Moyá and Gaudio. Although it is known that to obtain the World-championship ón clay -dust it is necessary to resist physical and mentally to the best one of five sets . There the question changes. That karma was already lived by other great ones on the last the 35 years that were specialistic in fast surfaces and they did not survived in Paris, like the Sampras, the McEnroe, the Connors, the Becker and the Edberg. The key for Federer in the French Open , that from six time he had participated never passed the quarterfinals and three times he was eliminated in the first round, has to be patience . Not to hurry to define long points and at decisive moments will be fundamental, because it is there where usually show the weak points those that did not grow up in clay.

Fantastic in the offensive game, the Swiss must maintain the calm when the rivals, mainly if they are Argentine and Spanish, play long points from the backpart (bottom) . He knows that he has weapons , in special the drive, to try a fast resolution, with power and angles, but he may not fall in that temptation and will get better results. He already let it clear that he knows to move in clay, although on that floor has few encounter of long breath raises. Also we saw him more calmed and with more desire to find the game on clay, something that not always happened with previous figures. That also demonstrates his intention to make history in Roland Garros, which could already mark an extra in its magnificent race.

Therefore, Federer is conscious that he can someday get the 4 Grand complete Slam. Only two men, the American Donald Budge, in 1938, and the Australian Rod Laver, in 1962 and 1969, could be crown in the four more important matches of the world in the same season. Now all are disputed in different surfaces, which makes it still morehard yet . Without doubts, the Swiss, that he almost has the double of points of Roddick in the classification, will hold the number one's position in ranks as long as he recovers most of the points obtained in the 2004. Exactly, almost all the units were won in fast fields and then, if he can raises the trophy of Roland Garros, it could grant a decisive extra to him. The fight by the top will be decided, as it happens in general in a plagued circuit of fast surfaces, in the great matches that are made in cement, synthetic folder and turf. For that reason, to continue firm outside the clay will be vital and, as well, to improve in clay dust would report an extra confidence to play his main enemies. It is certain that he can feel pressure, since he is defending many titles and points, but also ratified his winning abilities and he counts with enought variants to unbalance in all sides.

If continues the attack of the end of year, Marat Safin seems to be its great rival. The Russian, unstable in the psychic heading, was more solid and also it is a todoterreno (good player in all surfaces) .

Besides , Federer will face a 2005 in which he will try to continue with his excellent level. Now the rest wants to take his crown and that will generate a greater incentive to follow tennis by close. It is worthy not to loose any fight that promises to be exciting, extremely attractive.


Gustavo Goitía is publisher of ESPNdeportes.com. Is journalist specialized in tennis from 1989, and the Nation evolved like editor in newspapers, Bugler and in the sport Olé, all of Buenos Aires; in addition she was commentator in the channel TyC Sports. It consults his file of columns.

heres the URL ( warn in spanish) jus in case....
http://espndeportes.espn.go.com/story?id=289991#

Silvy

fightclubber
12-31-2004, 05:37 AM
One more from reuters

DOHA, Qatar (AP) - Roger Federer won 11 singles titles this year, including three of the four Grand Slam events. He wants to do at least as well next season.

"I want to repeat or better my performances of 2004 in the new season," Federer said Thursday. "If I perform well at the start of the new season, I will be able to retain my top ranking, something that is very important to me now."
The first stop for the Swiss star is the $1 million Qatar Open, but he's already thinking about winning a third straight Wimbledon championship.

"Wimbledon is one Grand Slam which is very close to my heart," said Federer, who won his first major at the All England Club in 2003. "Playing well on grass and winning the Grand Slam in London is what I want to do in 2005.

"Before I became a pro, I won the junior Wimbledon title in 1998 and after that my desire to become a champion in London turned into a major career ambition."

But to get the season started on a positive note, Federer is hoping to improve on his quarterfinal showing at Doha last year.

Federer, who has won 14 consecutive tournament finals, plans to keep playing without a coach until he finds the right person.

"Every player knows his requirements on and off the field. I know mine, too. Some players improve their game having their fathers to help them out, some adjust well having a dependable physio or a supportive girlfriend. In my case, my physio and girlfriend were the ones of immense help to me throughout 2004," Federer said.

"If I find somebody who can analyze my game properly, then I wouldn't mind hiring a coach in the near future. However, I may not go for a full-time coach."

Federer had words of praise for Andre Agassi, an eight-time major winner who's 34.

"He may not be as young as many of us, but I know from my matches against him that he remains a major threat on a tennis court," Federer said. "I am looking forward to playing him again."

Daniel
12-31-2004, 09:24 AM
nice article :D

lsy
12-31-2004, 07:06 PM
and here the translation (I made some changes cos the translation suck but my english is not the best)
I think you will understand.
I really like the article and I say its quite a truth what he writes ( to my point of view) ... will love your thoughts. :worship:
silvy


Thanks very much silvy :hug:

I'm too sleepy to read now but will do first thing tomorrow morning...first goal to accomplish in 2005 : read back all those articles posted here past 2 months ;) :o

Daniel
01-01-2005, 07:11 AM
Silvy :kiss: :hug:

ste
01-01-2005, 03:08 PM
and here the translation (I made some changes cos the translation suck but my english is not the best)
I think you will understand.
I really like the article and I say its quite a truth what he writes ( to my point of view) ... will love your thoughts. :worship:
silvy


you're english is great!
thx silvy!!! :hug:

knight_ley
01-01-2005, 07:03 PM
great articles guys!!!! thanks!!!! :)

Fedex
01-02-2005, 06:15 AM
But to get the season started on a positive note, Federer is hoping to improve on his quarterfinal showing at Doha last year.


What are they talking about? Federer did not even play Doha last year; they must be talking about his results in 03.

Fedex
01-02-2005, 06:21 AM
and here the translation (I made some changes cos the translation suck but my english is not the best)
I think you will understand.
I really like the article and I say its quite a truth what he writes ( to my point of view) ... will love your thoughts. :worship:
silvy

All want to stop Federer

The Swiss confronts the 2005 with a very interesting and touching challenge Federer shone in the 2004 and wants to go on equal . Who will be able to stop Roger Federer? Will be somebody in conditions for doing it? It will be because the Swiss lowers a little his level or somebody will still obtain it even if he continues so effective, showy and forceful like in the 2004? The questions are multiplied. And it seems not very probable that somebody can stop to this genius of tennis. The great question is to see what will happen with the rivals, if some of the pursuers will be able to raise so much their levels to put Federer in an unconfortable position

Without doubts, the challenge is BIG. Each one, with its style and its preferences, will look for to affirm mainly in the psychic aspect to avoid holes on their game and thus to be more on the lookout.

And the objetives tha will try the Roddicks, the Hewitts, the Safins, the Moyás, the Henmans, the Corias... will be hard because the Swiss is a "todoterreno" ( plays well in all surfaces ), that shows he is a maestro in any surface. He is so complete that does all easy all that he touches, turns into triumph. He is so complete that he does not have weak points: that complicate still more to the adversaries.
Besides that, he not only wins, but that also is so pretty to see him playing. The classic thing of his tennis makes him special. And its offensive vocation adds that dose to him of boldness and aggressiveness so valued as simultaneously not always well seen by other colleagues, beyond which the majority looks for to be more powerful and to adapt to the times that run. The present Federer, that improved so much his backhand (the move more forced by its rivals) and grew in confidence compare to the version of its beginnings as professional, goes in a way of being one of the great ones of history. In fact, the 23 four years already won 4 Grand Slam and two Masters, with the aggregate (add on) that in the 2004 he obtained four of those six titles.

Let us review some marks, that dress his whole body: this season he obtained 11 matches, won 13 finalswithout loose ( all together he just lost 4 sets), it has 23 victories followed against top-ten players and in four years already won 22 contests. In addition, it is incredible that, not being an experienced player, of more than 30 years, continues giving "lessons" without having a trainer. That confirms his class, his race of champion.
Coachs, in tennis, acts as the logical and fundamental advise for technique and tactical direction and in addition the organization of the calendar and collaborates facilitating each match, every day, each training. In spite of not having that help, the Swiss also knows how to play and how to solve his disadvantages, when he knows them, clearly.

Beyond being enough cold and just a bit demostrative, which resembles much with Pete Sampras, also he counts on a schedule similar to the American, since he leans on the serve and the right hand. That turns him the envy of the rest. But the difference, at this moment , is that Federer already made more noise than they récordman of tennis on clay - dust.

ALSO HE WANTS TO SHINE IN THE CLAY,
indeed, IT´S one of his main objectives for the 2005. He said that he will try to revalidate the title of Wimbledon and to finish againnumber 1 in ránking of the ATP. But the greater challenge will be to obtain the only crown of Grand Slam that he miss: Roland Garros. He won in Hamburg and already left behind rivals especialist on that field, like Coria, Moyá and Gaudio. Although it is known that to obtain the World-championship ón clay -dust it is necessary to resist physical and mentally to the best one of five sets . There the question changes. That karma was already lived by other great ones on the last the 35 years that were specialistic in fast surfaces and they did not survived in Paris, like the Sampras, the McEnroe, the Connors, the Becker and the Edberg. The key for Federer in the French Open , that from six time he had participated never passed the quarterfinals and three times he was eliminated in the first round, has to be patience . Not to hurry to define long points and at decisive moments will be fundamental, because it is there where usually show the weak points those that did not grow up in clay.

Fantastic in the offensive game, the Swiss must maintain the calm when the rivals, mainly if they are Argentine and Spanish, play long points from the backpart (bottom) . He knows that he has weapons , in special the drive, to try a fast resolution, with power and angles, but he may not fall in that temptation and will get better results. He already let it clear that he knows to move in clay, although on that floor has few encounter of long breath raises. Also we saw him more calmed and with more desire to find the game on clay, something that not always happened with previous figures. That also demonstrates his intention to make history in Roland Garros, which could already mark an extra in its magnificent race.

Therefore, Federer is conscious that he can someday get the 4 Grand complete Slam. Only two men, the American Donald Budge, in 1938, and the Australian Rod Laver, in 1962 and 1969, could be crown in the four more important matches of the world in the same season. Now all are disputed in different surfaces, which makes it still morehard yet . Without doubts, the Swiss, that he almost has the double of points of Roddick in the classification, will hold the number one's position in ranks as long as he recovers most of the points obtained in the 2004. Exactly, almost all the units were won in fast fields and then, if he can raises the trophy of Roland Garros, it could grant a decisive extra to him. The fight by the top will be decided, as it happens in general in a plagued circuit of fast surfaces, in the great matches that are made in cement, synthetic folder and turf. For that reason, to continue firm outside the clay will be vital and, as well, to improve in clay dust would report an extra confidence to play his main enemies. It is certain that he can feel pressure, since he is defending many titles and points, but also ratified his winning abilities and he counts with enought variants to unbalance in all sides.

If continues the attack of the end of year, Marat Safin seems to be its great rival. The Russian, unstable in the psychic heading, was more solid and also it is a todoterreno (good player in all surfaces) .

Besides , Federer will face a 2005 in which he will try to continue with his excellent level. Now the rest wants to take his crown and that will generate a greater incentive to follow tennis by close. It is worthy not to loose any fight that promises to be exciting, extremely attractive.


Gustavo Goitía is publisher of ESPNdeportes.com. Is journalist specialized in tennis from 1989, and the Nation evolved like editor in newspapers, Bugler and in the sport Olé, all of Buenos Aires; in addition she was commentator in the channel TyC Sports. It consults his file of columns.

heres the URL ( warn in spanish) jus in case....
http://espndeportes.espn.go.com/story?id=289991#

Silvy
Thanks for posting this, and that was an excellent article.

Fedex
01-02-2005, 06:36 AM
This is not an article about Federer, but nonetheless an interesting one. It came from the bbc site.


Hewitt wants faster Aussie courts

Lleyton Hewitt believes the slow pace of the Melbourne Park courts is hindering domestic hopes of winning the Australian Open tournament.

Hewitt, Australia's top-ranked tennis player at number three in the world, has never got beyond the fourth round.

He said: "It's the Australian Open's business how they want the court.

"I know the US Open would be going up to (Andy) Roddick and (Andre) Agassi and asking them what kind of surface they want and how quick they want it."

Hewitt, who won won the US Open in 2001 and Wimbledon in 2002, added the Australian Open's courts were "probably a lot slower" than they were five years ago.

Aiming to become the first Australian to win the national title since Mark Edmondson in 1976, Hewitt insisted he did not feel any additional pressure to win his native tournament.

"Over the last few years the focus has just been on Mark Philippoussis and myself anyway.

"There's always going to be a lot of pressure, ever since I've probably started and especially since I've been at the top of the game, playing in your home Grand Slam, so there's not a whole lot I can do about that."

Fedex
01-02-2005, 06:38 AM
I find it interesting that Hewitt wants the courts faster?? The slow pace of the rebound ace courts suits his game perfectly, and if the courts were made faster, woulden't that hurt Hewitt against the big hitters, like Federer and Roddick for example?? :confused:
The slower the court is, the better it is for his game, imo.

babsi
01-02-2005, 04:40 PM
Thank you, silvy and Fedex,Pushkin :) :):)

Fedex - you are right, Hewitt statment doesn´t make much sense - maybe he wants people not to think, the courts at AO are that slow, on perpose, to favor him .... anyway the slow court favors him and he has to know it!

RogiFan88
01-02-2005, 06:11 PM
NEWS
December 31, 2004
ATP Documentary Set to Usher in the New Year
Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer an insider’s peek at the sport, its premier players and the circuit finale

© Getty Images
Unprecedented player access, unique camerawork and a director’s fresh perspective on professional tennis highlight the ATP documentary, Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer, set to air today and throughout the weekend in the U.K, Australia and Asia.
Presented by ATP Premium Partner Mercedes-Benz, Facing Federer is a compelling look at the personalities and events surrounding the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup, the prestigious $4.45 million tournament circuit finale won by Roger Federer.

The documentary, produced by TPL for the ATP, will air on Sky Sports 3 in Britain on New Year’s Eve, December 31, at 8 p.m. Sky Sports will broadcast the documentary six times on December 31 and January 1 on Sky Sports 3, Sky Sports 2 and Sky Sports Xtra. On January 1, the documentary will be seen via ESPN Star Sports throughout South East Asia at 7 p.m. HKT and in India at 7.30 p.m. HKT, and on Fox Sports Australia, which also will present an encore presentation on January 2.

ESPN International (Latin America and New Zealand), SportTV (Brazil) and BBTV (Thailand) are among other leading broadcasters who will show the documentary in early 2005. Broadcast dates for the North America premiere as well as additional showings in Europe and other parts of the world will be announced at a later date. Please check local listings for exact dates and times.

“Facing Federer presents a raw, intimate view of the professional tennis circuit as never seen before,” said David Higdon, the film’s Executive Producer for the ATP. “We went into Houston hoping to showcase a side of tennis seen by a rare few, and that’s exactly what we got. Director Chris Reynolds’ approach was to be a fly on the wall, and as a filmmaker who had never previously worked in sports, much less pro tennis, the film is fresh, innovative and compelling thanks to his vision and the unprecedented access provided by the sport’s stars.”

Facing Federer not only features the eight elite ATP players who qualified for the prestigious season finale—Federer, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, Carlos Moya, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio—but also the fans, journalists, photographers, umpires, organizers and others at the tournament.

Federer opens his private locker room to the cameras, and the documentary also features a rare interview with Federer’s girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec, who speaks about her role in Roger’s off-court affairs. “The documentary is in large part a tribute to the level of excellence that Roger has achieved over this past year,” Higdon says. “It captures the acceptance among the world’s best players that one man currently sits on top of the mountain, and what they all are doing to try to solve the riddle of how to knock him down.”

Among the other highlights of the documentary:

Despite two losses to Federer at the tournament, Hewitt exposes his warrior mentality, passion for the game and candidly discusses the challenges that he faces;
The frustration expressed in both images and words by the ultra-competitive Roddick after he loses the last 20 points of his semifinal match against Hewitt;
Marat Safin’s engaging personality and off-court antics provide an interesting juxtaposition to his status as one of the most feared players on the circuit;
Tim Henman, the tournament’s “elder statesman,” reveals the less-than-serious side of his personality rarely seen in public.
The personal quests of Carlos Moya, Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio to overcome injuries and self-doubt as they play on a court surface more suited to their competitors. Coria’s commitment to be a part of the tournament despite an extended injury layoff is a particularly compelling aspect of the film.

In March 2005, there will be a special DVD release packed with bonus features including outtakes, the thrilling 20-18 tie-break between Federer and Safin during their semifinal match, and an exclusive locker room interview with Federer immediately following his victory. Pre-orders for the DVD will be available soon via ATPtennis.com.
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2004/documentary_release.asp

RogiFan88
01-02-2005, 06:19 PM
2004 tennis belonged to Federer
Sat Jan 1, 2005 05:45 AM ET


By Martyn Herman
LONDON (Reuters) - Roger Federer staged a single-handed takeover of men's tennis in 2004. In the women's game the Russians seized control.

Anastasia Myskina fired the first salvo for Russia at Roland Garros in June, becoming the first woman from her country to win a grand slam title.

Four weeks later Siberian-born teenager Maria Sharapova demolished Serena Williams to win Wimbledon and in September Svetlana Kuznetsova powered to victory at the U.S. Open.

As the year drew to a close, Myskina inspired Russia to their first Fed Cup title against France in Moscow.

Federer's emergence to fill the vacuum left by the retirement of Pete Sampras stamped an indelible mark on the year.

The Swiss, who has a steely core to compliment an unrivalled arsenal of weapons, captivated fans across the globe as he racked up a 74-6 singles record.

By winning the Australian and U.S. Opens, and retaining his Wimbledon crown in between, he became the first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three grand slam titles in a year.

He was unbeaten against players in the top 10, matched Sampras's 23-match winning streak and set a record of 13 consecutive wins in finals -- not bad considering he does not even have a coach.

The year was just weeks old when Federer dethroned Andy Roddick as world number one by marching to the Australian Open title against Marat Safin.

The 24-year-old then won tournaments in Dubai, Hamburg and Halle before breezing into an eagerly-awaited final against Roddick at Wimbledon.

On a rain-hit Centre Court defending champion Federer was briefly knocked out of his stride before he delved into his bag of tricks to win in four sets.

HOME ADVANTAGE

Further wins in the finals of the Toronto Masters and Bangkok gave Federer an 8-1 lead over the American by the year-end as talk of a Sampras/Agassi style rivalry proved premature.

Even with home advantage at Flushing Meadows, defending champion Roddick failed to land a telling blow on Federer, although this time it had nothing to do with the Swiss.

After steaming to the quarter-finals like an express train, Roddick's run came to a shuddering halt against giant Swedish ace-machine Joachim Johansson.

Federer ended home favourite Andre Agassi's dream of a ninth grand slam title in the last eight, before clinching his first U.S. Open title with an awe-inspiring 6-0 7-6 6-0 defeat of Lleyton Hewitt.

While Federer's season concluded with another masterclass against Hewitt to win the Masters Cup in Houston, Roddick was left licking his wounds after defeat by Carlos Moya handed Spain their second Davis Cup title in a frenzied Seville.

South Americans scooped the remaining honours, Argentine Gaston Gaudio breaking the heart of compatriot Guillermo Coria at Roland Garros, winning a rollercoaster final in five sets as Coria's nerves and body failed him.

Nicolas Massu became a national hero, teaming up with compatriot Fernando Gonzalez to win the doubles in Athens and claim Chile's first Olympic gold medal.

Less than 24 hours later Massu beat American Mardy Fish in another marathon contest to add the singles title.

The women's season began in predictable fashion when Justine Henin-Hardenne beat fellow Belgian Kim Clijsters to win the Australian Open and confirm her number one ranking.

However, apart from an Olympic gold medal, the year turned sour for Henin-Hardenne as illness and injury took their toll.

RUSSIAN TIDE

By the time she lost the top ranking at the U.S. Open the Russian tide was proving unstoppable, with even the Williams sisters being swept aside.

Myskina's 6-1 6-2 victory over compatriot Elena Dementieva in the French Open final was a non-event for the fans, but it was a watershed for Russian tennis with thousands waiting to greet the winner on her return to Moscow.

Normal service appeared to have been resumed at Wimbledon where defending champion Serena Williams powered to the final for the loss of just one set.

However she was comprehensively outplayed by the dazzling, 17-year-old Sharapova in the final as the aura that had surrounded her in the previous two years faded.

American veteran Lindsay Davenport rolled back the years to capture four consecutive titles on American hardcourts during a run of 22 victories.

That run fuelled her rise to the world number one spot for the sixth time, although it was halted by yet another Russian in the semi-finals of the U.S. Open.

The 19-year-old Kuznetsova burst from the shadow of Myskina and Sharapova to beat Dementieva in the final, making it the first time since 1979 that three women from the same country had won grand slam titles in the same year.

With seven Russians ending 2004 in the top 15, next year could follow a similar pattern although there are already rumblings of a tennis uprising in China.

Li Ting and Sun Tiantian won gold for China in the Olympic doubles tournament and the development of tennis in the world's most populous country's will be watched with interest.
http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?type=sportsNews&storyID=646971

RogiFan88
01-02-2005, 06:21 PM
ha ha

Here’s a few resolutions for the New Year

Andy Roddick finally beats Roger Federer, in table tennis.

*M*
01-02-2005, 07:11 PM
NEWS
December 31, 2004
ATP Documentary Set to Usher in the New Year
Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer an insider’s peek at the sport, its premier players and the circuit finale

<snip>
I love the way they subtitled the program "Facing Federer". I'm really looking forward to getting the DVD and seeing all of the behind-the-scenes footage.

Fedex
01-02-2005, 08:22 PM
Thanks for all those articles, Rogifan.

RogiNie
01-02-2005, 09:40 PM
ha ha

Here’s a few resolutions for the New Year

Andy Roddick finally beats Roger Federer, in table tennis.


:haha: :D

Fedex
01-02-2005, 10:09 PM
That is funny, lol. :lol:

SUKTUEN
01-03-2005, 03:46 AM
I like Roddick~~ And Love Roger the most~~ :devil:

Action Jackson
01-03-2005, 09:11 AM
http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11951&bannerregion=

Federer, Gaudio Ride The Dunes In Doha

By Brad Falkner
01/02/2005

Roger Federer and Gaston Gaudio got dusted today. The two men who teamed to sweep the four Grand Slam titles last year, started the new year with new titles.


The top-ranked Federer and 10th-ranked Gaudio became honorary sheiks for the day — or more precisely, about 20 minutes during today’s promotional appearance in Doha for this week’s Qatar ExxonMobil Open.

Members of the media shook off jet lag and tagged along with the pair. Federer traded his classic Nike headband and Gaudio replaced his customary baseball cap for similar white kaffiyehs, the cloth headdress worn by Arab men.

The reigning Roland Garros champion and the men who collected the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open crowns took us on a trip to a place called "The In-Land Sea", which is about a 45-minute car ride from the Doha tournament site. Imagine the desert embracing the beautiful aqua-blue water and the sea spilling onto the sand and you get an idea for how captivating the Qatari coastline appears.

It looked like an Oasis, but might well have been called "Club Fed" as Federer was having a blast riding around in the sand on a 4 x 4 like a college kid enjoying his first day of spring break.

Before the two Grand Slam champions, clad completely in white, posed together for photos, the pair were hot-rodding up and down the desert dunes on the 4 x 4 like a couple of X-game all stars.

Federer, who is known for leaving opponents in the dust on court, And Gaudio, who feels most at home on the dirt, were spraying sand everywhere as they fish-tailed down the dunes. Gaudio even caught some air — soaring higher even then his victory leap at Roland Garros. After their joy-riding they got regal and donned their thobes (the white outfits) and spent time posing in a tent and on the dunes. Federer even delivered few serves into the desert dunes. It was a mellow late-morning trip with everyone — players, media and staff — in good spirits. The weather, which had been cold here the last week, was a spectacular 24 Celsius. Gauido was accompanied by his brother and Roger was with his girlfriend, Mirka. I got to ride out to the site with the Gaudio brothers and we rapped for a bit in Spanish. The soft-spoken Gaudio was polite and looking forward to seeing the sights.

Action Jackson
01-03-2005, 09:25 AM
http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=21146&version=1&template_id=49&parent_id=29

Federer looks sure bet for Doha title
Published: Monday, 3 January, 2005, 12:01 PM Doha Time

By Anil John
The 2005 ATP season kicks off today with the focus entirely on an easy-going Swiss sensation whose worldwide exploits last year have already fetched him a secure place in the pantheon of tennis legends.

Worshipped by fans and respected even by his foes, Roger Federer could walk away from the game at age 23 and still be talked of with awe several decades from now owing largely to an extraordinary 2004 that brought him 11 titles and comparisons with the best in history.

With Pete Sampras having retired and Andre Agassi bound to walk into the sunset soon, Federer is tipped to be the next czar of tennis whose rule could turn a new page in history and inspire future generations of players.

Federer, who takes on Spaniard David Ferrer in today’s first round of the million dollar ExxonMobil Qatar Open at Doha’s Khalifa Complex, is keen to win in Qatar where he first played in early 2003 only to be beaten by American Jan-Michael Gambill in the quarterfinals.

“Hopefully I’ll better that record and win the title here because this is a place I love,” the world’s top ranked player said.

Federer emphasised he wanted to hit his stride early in the season so that he could make a winning start in order to live up to the high standards expected of him.
“Last year I was lucky to find my rhythm early and it helped me win the Australian Open and in Dubai and Indian Wells to set the tone for the rest for the season,” said the top seed.

Federer’s dominance in 2004 was such that Andy Roddick, considered one of the fastest servers in the modern game, was found wanting in all three finals they played.
The most notable of those clashes came when the Swiss ace came from a set behind to beat Roddick to claim his second straight crown at Wimbledon, a tournament he cherishes most and hopes to win for the third year in a row.

“With all its tradition and culture it’s a tournament close to my heart and one of my goals for this year to win Wimbledon for the third time in succession.”

Federer also outclassed Lleyton Hewitt, beating the fiery Aussie in all their six matches last year and even put it past Andre Agassi when they met two times - at Indian Wells and the US Open.

However, it is Agassi, 35, who Federer considers as a major obstacle in his path to further glory this year.

“Andre is still a force to reckon with because he is fit and doesn’t play much, but when he plays he gives it his best shot and you can never afford to relax,” Federer said.

But with Roddick having declined to play in Qatar this time after being ousted in the second round last year and Hewitt and Agassi finetuning their preparations for the Australian Open elsewhere, Federer’s closest rival according to the Qatar Open seedings is the Argentine Gaston Gaudio who won the French Open for his only title last year.

Gaudio’s unexpected victory boosted his rankings and helped him finish 10th in the ATP Race Position, but Federer has come out an easy winner in all their five clashes in the past. (It should be 4 meetings are 2 weren't easy)

The Qatar Open, however, has not proved to be a happy hunting ground for top seeded players with only Stefan Edberg managing to win the title as the most favoured player in 1995.

Federer, however, would have to be wary of some good slow-courters who have excelled over the years in Doha and one of them is Frenchman Fabrice Santoro who won here in 2000 after ending up as the runner-up in 1998.

The Geneva-based Santoro last year created a record when he defeated compatriot Arnaud Clement at the French Open, the match taking six hours and 33 minutes spread over two days. It was the longest game in the history of tennis with Santoro winning 6-4,6-3,6-7, 3-6, 16-14, pointing to the extraordinary stamina the little Frenchman possesses.

Another player who could pose a threat is the Spanish 18-year-old Rafael Nadal who helped his country win the Davis Cup with a sensational victory over Roddick.
However, the match of the tournament could come as early as the second round where Federer is expected to run into Greg Rusedski, who was absolved in a doping case which saw his ranking plummet to 166.

But the Briton picked his game up in the latter part of the year, winning in Newport and entering the final in Moscow to end the year in the 48th position.

The 31-year-old clashes with the Czech Republic’s Jan Hernych in the first round in his quest to crack the top 10, his cherished goal for the year

RonE
01-03-2005, 03:58 PM
Nice articles, thank you George.

Doris Loeffel
01-03-2005, 04:17 PM
Thanks GWH

RogiNie
01-03-2005, 04:45 PM
thnx, and roger is on the road for the title....

fightclubber
01-04-2005, 02:17 AM
SOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Roche will train/ is training ROGER!

silvy :wavey: :wavey: :wavey: :wavey: :wavey: :wavey:


Rusedski to face Federer in Qatar


Greg Rusedski began his 2005 campaign with victory over Jan Hernych at the Qatar Open, and the Briton next faces world number one Roger Federer.
The British number two battled past his Czech opponent 6-3 7-5 to set up the daunting second-round encounter.

Federer was below his best but still thrashed David Ferrer of Spain 6-1 6-1.

Sixth seed Ivan Ljubicic eased past qualifier Stanislas Wawrinka 6-3 6-4, and seventh seed Feliciano Lopez beat Filippo Volandri 7-5 6-3.

"I'm still excited about 2005," said Rusedski. "It is great to be healthy. I worked very hard during the off-season and it's paying off."

Federer never found top gear against Ferrer and slammed his racket into the ground in frustration at one point, but was always in command of the match.

And the Swiss star made a surprise announcement afterwards when he revealed that Australian Tony Roche will work as his coach for 10 weeks of the year.

"It's good to know that there will be help there because I need someone to analyse and help improve my game," said Federer.

"I have no clue what I would do (without him). It's a relief that there will be help at times when I want it."

Roche had originally turned down the offer because of the travelling involved, and the arrangement will last for just one year for the time being.

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4143541.stm

Published: 2005/01/03 15:40:47 GMT

yanchr
01-04-2005, 04:05 AM
Thanks silvy:wavey: Roger finally got what he wants :) I hope it works out for him.

lsy
01-04-2005, 09:41 AM
Federer Finds A Coach In Roche


Photo By Paul Zimmer By Brad Falkner
01/04/2005

Roger Federer has an appreciation for the classics. The Swiss stylist who plays traditional tennis in elegantly explosive fashion has hired a classic coach — International Tennis Hall of Fame member Tony Roche — to serve as his new coaching consultant.


The top-ranked Swiss confirmed he will be working with the Aussie coaching legend on a limited basis throughout the year.

"It's going to be very little (time together on tour), if you only count the practice weeks and some preparation week for the tournaments," Federer told a small group of international journalists in today's roundtable interview. "He's not going to fly from Australia for three days somewhere around the world. It's not going to be much; maybe we'll play it by ear and say 'OK, now I have more time, now I have less time.' I have no idea (the exact length of time we will work together) it's just good for me to know that I have somebody if I would call him. For me that is a big relief to carry me through this next year. I asked him what he wants me to call him he said 'Anything is fine.' He's sort of a consultant, maybe a coach when he's with me and when he's not there with me he's my friend. "

The 23-year-old Federer, who has played without a coach since parting company with Peter Lundgren in December of 2003, had been trying to coax Roche into accepting a full-time coaching post for the past six months. But Roche, who reportedly suffers from chronic arthritic hip pain and is also active working with talented Australian juniors, is not interested in traveling full time so the pair agreed to a part-time position.

The four-time Grand Slam champion trained with Roche last month in preparation for the 2005 season and is pleased with the progress he's seen in his game and the friendship he's forged with Roche.

"I asked him at the middle of last year if he wanted to work with me, but he couldn't do it, he had too many obligations," Federer said. "He was always following me, at times we spoke. Then we saw each other in Dubai. He knows as well what is right and wrong. I think that is one of the reasons in Dubai that he told me that he does want to do it (be the coach), but that I could come to Australia for preparation. He thought maybe 'What else can I teach this guy?' or 'I'm happy with my life right now, I don't need this.' I think he likes me very much as well and I like him. Maybe he thought about it during this time from Dubai until now in Sydney (and) he thought 'Maybe I can give Roger just a few weeks.' He's happy with that and I'm happy to work with him(and that) we found an agreement."

The 59-year-old Roche, who previously coached Ivan Lendl and Patrick Rafter to Grand Slam titles and the top spot in the world rankings, is one of the world's most highly-respected coaches. Shortly before his induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Lendl praised Roche as a key component to his championship success in an interview with Tennis Week. Another left-handed Hall of Famer, John McEnroe, has called Roche's backhand volley "one of the best in the history of tennis."

Champions ranging from Guillermo Vilas to Patrick Rafter have sought out Roche's counsel. Clearly, Federer is confident Roche can help him refine his transition game and his volley. While the two-time Wimbledon winner can dominant a match from virtually any position on the court, he is sometimes prone to passive play from the baseline before suddenly seizing complete command of a point on the strength of his sledgehammer forehand. Hiring Roche is a sign Federer is actively seeking to avoid any complacency in his game by taking his skills to the front court and giving himself even more options on the court.

"It's a very professional decision and it just shows also how well I want to win this year," Federer said. "We've been working on a few things. I think it's important that he really teaches me also how to, maybe, volley well. I know I can volley — I haven’t won Wimbledon just out of the blue. I think him working with Pat (Rafter) and himself being so good at the net that he can teach me a few things there, and that should give me a few more options. It's more about that than totally changing my game because I can't do that at 23 anymore. And I'm quite happy with the situation right now being number one in the world, so there not too much I would change, I think that would be the wrong approach and we both agree on that." :yeah: Rogi! He really seems to know exactly what he needs and doesn't needs.

Coaching Federer presents a unique challenge to any coach: the four-time Grand Slam champion is one of the most gifted players of the Open era with a work ethic and desire to excel that matches his prodigious talent, but any coach who takes the job will be judged against Federer's monumental 2004 season in which he posted a 74-6 record, captured 11 tournament titles without losing a final and swept three of the four majors with triumphs at the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open — all while playing without a coach. Federer, who successfully defended his Tennis Masters Cup crown in November, did not lose a match to a top 10 opponent, scoring 23 consecutive victories over top 10 foes.

The allure of working with one of the most talented players in history — combined with the classic qualities of Federer's game — were enough to persuade Roche to accept the post.

"I think he can relate to the way I play. I've always said I that I have all of the generations a little bit on my side because I play that one handed backhand and that classic style," Federer said. "I think that they like to see that it still actually exists and that you can not only win, but almost dominate the game with that style still. It's not that far away from Lendl and Rafter. That whole thing probably makes it easier for him. If he would have to coach a guy who just plays baseline who's got totally different potential than me would have been difficult for him. (let's wait and see who will be the first to jump and say FEDERER IS ARROGANT :lol: ) I think the thing that's important is that we get along well off of the court. For me it was important to meet him first as a person, not just meeting him on the court professionally."

Throughout his rise to the top of the world rankings, Federer has surrounded himself with a trusted support team that includes his parents and his girlfriend, Mirka. Federer is a champion who plays his best tennis on feel and will approach his new partnership with Roche the same way.

"I'm a well prepared man, very organized thanks to lovely girlfriend (Mirka). (Mirka really has nth to worry about...her hair, looks or weights, Rogi just adores her :hearts: ) I have to make sure that my life is fine," Federer said. "He'll know in time when I will need him. I can't tell you exactly when yet. The program might always vary; playing well, playing bad. Especially with the with Grand Slams, you know how it is, if you lose first round or lose the tournament it's a big difference. You always have to take best case and worst case scenarios. That's life."

The Tennis Channel's Brad Falkner is in Doha to cover the Qatar ExxonMobil Open for the second consecutive year and will file occasional stories for this web site. Please email any questions for Brad to this site.

http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11957&bannerregion=

======================================

This article clear up quite a bit of the whole coaching matters :) I'm really glad to see how focus and determined Rogi is to have another great year :yeah:

lsy
01-04-2005, 10:02 AM
This article is posted by Sadie on Rogi's site. Good one.
===============================================

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2005/01/04/stfede04.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/01/04/ixtenn.html

Greater expectations for Federer
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 04/01/2005)

In the music industry they call it "difficult second album syndrome", when the band are asked to come back and improve on greatness, singing a little more in tune, a few more hits. Roger Federer won three of the four Grand Slam titles last year, and if he does not achieve a calendar sweep this season, won't some put his 2005 down as a failure? Federer could not control his laughter.

He did not laugh because he believes four from four is totally out of the question (far from it), but he finds it incredible that, aged 23, the possibility of a Grand Slam is being discussed as if it will be a formality for him. "I find it funny when people say that I am definitely going to do the Grand Slam," the Swiss said, "as it is such an incredible thing to do and people seem to suggest that it will be easy." (:lol: so true Rogi)


Driven to succeed: Roger Federer travels by limousine the day after his victory in the US Open

But Federer also said, and he sounded very convincing, that he is under "no pressure at all" to achieve the Grand Slam. He has two main ambitions this season: to remain world No 1 and to win a third Wimbledon title, three in a row. Despite the clamour for history this year, Federer has not listed the Grand Slam as a target. "But if it happens, it happens, and I'll be the happiest man in the world," he said.

'Mr Modesty' is not one for pre-season bombast and grand predictions. "I don't feel any pressure from anyone to do it, even when so many people say that I can do it, as I've set my own targets that I want to achieve. There's a lot to defend, starting at the Australian Open. I'm not going to change my targets because people are desperate for me to do the Grand Slam," he said. :yeah:

The difficulty for Federer is that he has such style and grace that he made striking a tennis ball look so easy last year. "People don't realise how hard I had to work last year to win three out of four, and I'll have to work even harder if I'm to win four this season," he said. (EXACTLY!!! So many tend to overlook the work he needs to put in)

Federer won the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open last season, the first man to collect three majors in a year since Mats Wilander in 1988. Only two men have previously achieved the Grand Slam; the American Don Budge in 1938 and Australian Rod Laver, who managed it twice, in 1962 and 1969. "If you look at history,'' Federer said, "you will see that a Grand Slam is almost impossible to achieve."

Laver is still known as 'The Greatest', but he confessed recently in a Daily Telegraph interview that he would "be honoured to even be compared to Roger", that Federer was "such an unbelievable talent" and "could be the greatest tennis player of all time". Federer, who has four Grand Slams to Laver's 11, said that he took great encouragement from the comments.

"Someone showed me what Laver had said in your article and I could not stop smiling when I read it. I was stunned," Federer said. "It's incredible for someone of that stature, with that incredible record, to be saying such nice things about you, especially as we have never met before. It would be fantastic to get the chance to meet him and have a chat."

Federer admitted that he would need a little luck on his quest. "I would have to have eight amazing weeks during the four Grand Slam titles. I would need eight weeks without injury, without sickness, without personal problems, without any distractions at all. That would be a very good run," he said.

If he were to do the Grand Slam, the biggest test would come at the second of the four, the French Open in May. Federer has yet to do his talent justice on the red clay of Paris – last year he was floored in the third round, in straight sets, by Brazil's Gustavo Kuerten. But Federer is becoming more comfortable on clay with every season and last year won Hamburg, the final warm-up event for Roland Garros.

Federer is a confidence player, and if he feels comfortable with the way he is sliding and striking on the red stuff, the Grand Slam will definitely be on. "It hasn't worked out for me in Paris, but I know that I can play well on clay and it's possible for me to win it. Do I have to concentrate more on the French Open than the others? I'm not sure. I had a good preparation last year and it didn't do so good," he said. ( :o just hope for a better luck in draw this year, Rogi ;) )

Grand Plan
Australian Open (Jan 17-30) Surface: hard: Holder: Roger Federer
'I want to get the year off to a good start, and I'm confident as I'm hitting the ball well at the moment.'


French Open (May 23-June 5) Surface: clay: Holder: Gaston Gaudio
'It has not worked out for me here, but I know that I can play well on clay and it's possible for me to win it.'

Wimbledon (June 20-July 3) Surface: grass: Holder: Roger Federer
'The best tournament in the world, and this is my priority of the four Grand Slams.'

US Open (Aug 29-Sept 11) Surface: hard: Holder: Roger Federer
'I am determined to defend all three of my Grand Slam titles, but I could even win my fourth Grand Slam title of the year here.'

Wimbledon remains the biggest prize. "I think that Wimbledon is just the greatest tournament in the world, and it is the priority of the four Grand Slam titles," Federer said. "I want to defend all three of my Grand Slam titles, but the one which would mean the most to me is Wimbledon."

He spoke of his "happy memories" on the Centre Court grass. It was there in 2003 that Federer first won a Grand Slam title, dropping to his knees before leaning so far back that you worried about breaking bones. Then Sue Barker made him cry. It was more than pure joy, it was the end of all the talk that Federer's resolve did not match his physical talents, that he did not have the required mental software to win a Grand Slam title. Strange to recall, these days.

Federer is more than happy with a small entourage of girlfriend (Mirka Vavrinec, a former player and now his personal assistant) and physiotherapist. He does not need or want a full-time coach, even if some of the Australian press had it that Tony Roche, a former Wimbledon finalist, rejected Federer's offer of a full-time role. Federer said that he is "not looking for a full-time coach at the moment". And anyway, he would have known that Roche has a sore hip and is reluctant to travel on the tour again. But Federer, who has been without a full-time hired help since splitting with Peter Lundgren more than a year ago, did confirm that he will use Roche as a coaching consultant. They had a few days together in Australia before Federer moved his practice sessions to the Gulf, first to Dubai and then Doha.

"Tony is a great guy and someone that I've always looked up to, even though we're separated by a couple of generations," Federer said. "I was pleased that he could give up his time to work with me but he is not going to be a full-time coach. Tony and I will work together again in the preparation weeks before tournaments and, hopefully, during the off-season again."

Despite his achievements in 2004, Federer was not entirely satisfied last year that he had enough time to work on improving his game. He and wants to find more practice weeks this year. "Last season was impossible. I went from tournament to tournament to tournament, and then I had to rest, so I didn't feel that I had as much time on the practice court as I would have wanted and that was frustrating," he said.

"Practice is a must. If you don't practise, then you won't improve. You'll stay in the same place and the other players will catch you up," Federer said. "I'm determined to stay ahead of the rest." :worship: :worship:

Ominous for the rest, and Federer knows that if he wins four Grand Slam titles this season, next year his public will probably demand a fifth.Roger Federer's :lol:

Mrs. B
01-04-2005, 10:14 AM
Thanks, lsy!

Nice of Roger to acknowledge Mirka. and i hope he gets to meet Laver soon. :)

RonE
01-04-2005, 11:31 AM
Thanks lsy, great articles :yeah:

fightclubber
01-04-2005, 12:47 PM
thanks for the articles. Silvy

avocadoe
01-04-2005, 12:59 PM
great reads, Isy, and thanks...Roger sounds very good. I especially like how he is looking for options, not big dramatic changes, to a game that is so effective. I also like the way he views practice, knowing it is serious business and necessary. I love his laughter at the beginning of the second interview when the Grand Slam media bait is played :) and Mirka is golden, happy to hear her appreciated!

babsi
01-04-2005, 01:04 PM
Thank you Isy :)

yanchr
01-04-2005, 01:57 PM
Great articles simyee :yeah: I'm so impressed by how determined Roger is to stay top of his game and the world of tennis for long. And though not announced by words, it's quite obvious that Roger WANTS to win RG, even the Grand Slam, maybe this year.

-----US Open (Aug 29-Sept 11) Surface: hard: Holder: Roger Federer
'I am determined to defend all three of my Grand Slam titles, but I could even win my fourth Grand Slam title of the year here.'-----obvious enough

Roger, I wish you realize it :)

Skyward
01-04-2005, 02:45 PM
Thanks Isy :)

Puschkin
01-04-2005, 03:03 PM
And though not announced by words, it's quite obvious that Roger WANTS to win RG, even the Grand Slam, maybe this year.

-----US Open (Aug 29-Sept 11) Surface: hard: Holder: Roger Federer
'I am determined to defend all three of my Grand Slam titles, but I could even win my fourth Grand Slam title of the year here.'-----obvious enough

Roger, I wish you realize it :)

I totally agree with your views about RG and you are probably right about the GS as well. But let us prefer not to understand Roger's hints, better for him and us;)

Whistleway
01-04-2005, 03:51 PM
Thanks Isy. Roger has got a daunting '05 ahead.

RogiNie
01-04-2005, 06:44 PM
Thanx for the article Isy

I like this sentence:


He spoke of his "happy memories" on the Centre Court grass. It was there in 2003 that Federer first won a Grand Slam title, dropping to his knees before leaning so far back that you worried about breaking bones.

:lol:

babsi
01-04-2005, 08:55 PM
Sometimes I hate the media for putting those ridicilus expectations into peoples minds - can´t they just wait until someone won the first 3 GS events before they start there hype mashine (and even that, would only hinder a positive result).
But that way they get to sell two storys,because when the poor guy fails they have someone to beat up.
As for Roger - i think he is a bit torn between dream and reallity - I hope he is able to sorte things out for himself.

Daniel
01-05-2005, 10:48 AM
nice articles :D

Mrs. B
01-05-2005, 03:29 PM
Dominant force

After proving in 2003 that he could become a real force in the game, the Swiss showed last year that he had the tools to become one of the all-time greats, if not the greatest.

He suffered only six defeats in 80 matches and notched up 11 tournaments including three grand slam titles (Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open) and the end-of-season Masters Cup.

His victories at Wimbledon, Gstaad and Toronto matched Bjorn Borg’s 1979 achievement in winning consecutive trophies on grass, clay and hard courts.

“I will have trouble repeating such a year,” admitted Federer.

Unfortunately for his rivals, the Basel-born player looks more than capable of a repeat performance.

“Federer can do anything. He is even capable of winning on water,” commented Ilie Nastase, the former Romanian world number one. :lol:
---------

too lazy to post the whole article. pretty much repetitive of what's mostly been posted here anyway. :o

RogiFan88
01-05-2005, 07:55 PM
Federer scores master coach
January 5, 2005

PAT Rafter has predicted Roger Federer will become an even better player after convincing reluctant Tony Roche to accept a consultancy role as his coach.

A day after declaring he would go it alone without a mentor in 2005, world champion Federer has landed one of the biggest prizes in tennis – and could now become even more potent, according to Rafter.

Roche, who guided both Rafter and Ivan Lendl to the No. 1 mark and multiple grand slam titles, will be in Federer's corner for at least 10 weeks, starting at the Australian Open in 12 days.


While Rafter believes Lleyton Hewitt will add to his seven wins over Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open winner Federer, he expects the Swiss genius to take his immaculate game to still loftier levels under Roche.

"The scary thing is that Rochey will be able to tighten up a few little things in Roger's game and make him an even better player," former world No. 1 and dual US Open champion Rafter said.

"I've never seen a player hit the ball better than Roger. He's the most complete player I've seen – which is not to say Lleyton can't beat him because we all know what a great player Lleyton is.

"It's a huge feather in Rochey's cap and shows how much respect there is out there for him.

"Roger's always liked Tony. A lot of players have tried to hire Rochey as their coach and this shows how much Tony thinks of Roger."

While refusing to make a full-time return to the international circuit, Roche has committed to a well-spaced 10-week roster.

"It's good to know there will be help there because I need someone to analyse and help improve my game," Federer said.

"I have no clue what I would do [without him]. It's a relief there will be help at times when I want it."

Roche, 59, has rejected huge offers from Pete Sampras, Marat Safin and Anna Kournikova since Rafter retired three years ago.


Federer, winner of 11 titles last season without a coach, will use the Sydneysider to prepare for the majors, particularly the French Open – the only major the right-hander is yet to win.

The publicity-shy New South Welshman has been in Federer's sights ever since Federer dumped Swede Peter Lundgren at the end of his breakthrough 2003 season.

Federer knows Roche from his days with South Australian mentor Peter Carter, and from spending time around Australian players.

He was Hewitt's doubles partner in the pair's formative years and has always gravitated to the Australian corner of the locker-room.

Federer invited Roche to Dubai, where he is now based, in October for practice sessions, but failed to convince the former Australian Davis Cup coach to enlist.

Then Federer flew to Sydney a week before Christmas to practise with Roche, but Roche again knocked back a full-time role.

Roche has no desire to travel as much as he did with Rafter, Lendl and Kiwi Wimbledon finalist Chris Lewis. He has been plagued by hip soreness and wants to spend his time in Sydney for family reasons.

Rafter will not be involved with Federer, despite rumours the Queenslander would aid Roche as a hitting partner.

Roche is believed to have told Federer he was prepared to consult to the runaway world No. 1 – if Federer would travel to Australia.
http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au/story.jsp?sectionid=1264&storyid=2465385

RogiFan88
01-05-2005, 07:56 PM
Cool comments fr a cool guy, Pat! Thanks, mate!

fightclubber
01-05-2005, 09:00 PM
Interesting...

Federer invited Roche to Dubai, where he is now based, in October for practice sessions, but failed to convince the former Australian Davis Cup coach to enlist.[B][U]

GUYS Is Roger based in Dubai???
Really¨¨¨¨???

LCeh
01-05-2005, 09:07 PM
Thanks a lot for the article RF! Great to see how much confidence Pat has for Roche. :yeah:

Dirk
01-05-2005, 09:17 PM
I think he trains there for the hot summer hardcourt events. He wants to get use to the conditions and weather for Oz and such. I am sure he will either be in Swiss or Aussie training for the clay season.

RogiFan88
01-05-2005, 09:34 PM
I think Rogi WAS based in Dubai at the time. And yes, LCeh, it's wonderful to hear such praise fr one of the best players and people, Pat! Great to see such mutual respect amongst players past and present.

*M*
01-06-2005, 12:17 AM
Interesting, I didn't know Roger and Lleyton used to be doubles partners. I hope he doesn't get too tired flying to Australia to see Roche. It's seems so far from everything. I wonder how often Lleyton actually gets home. These tennis players have it rough with all of the travel they have to do. I guess it provides incentive to win, though, so they don't have to turn around and go home after the first round.

Maybe Roger should establish a home or base on every continent!

onewoman74
01-06-2005, 12:23 AM
Roche, 59, has rejected huge offers from Pete Sampras, Marat Safin and Anna Kournikova since Rafter retired three years ago.

Wow, I did not know so many players past and present were gunning for Roche.

I still love Pat Rafter. Too bad he's not part of the equation. Pat has amazing volley skills.

fightclubber
01-06-2005, 03:22 AM
Federer fires into Qatar quarters
World number one Roger Federer raced into the quarter-finals of the $1.3 million Qatar Open overnight, downing Greg Rusedski 6-3, 6-4 in the second round.

Apart from his big first serve, Rusedski failed to mount any real challenge and Federer cruised through in less than an hour.

The Briton fired three aces in the first set, but Federer broke him as early as the second game and Rusedski had no answer to some blistering ground strokes and fluent backhands.

"It was a good day out there for me. But I know I can play better that I did today," Federer said.

"The important thing is that I didn't lose my serve. I took the opportunities that came my way and I felt quite comfortable on this surface."
Federer now plays another left-hander, Felciano Lopez of Spain, who beat Italy's Uros Vico 6-2, 7-6.

Rusedski said he was not disappointed to lose to the world's number one player.

"Now I move on to Australia where I plan to play in a couple of tournaments before the Australian Open," he said.

The best match of the day was an all-French affair between the experienced Fabrice Santoro and rising force Gael Monfils, who beat second seed Gaston Gaudio of Argentina on Tuesday.

Santoro, the 2000 Doha champion, saved a match point before edging past Monfils 6-2, 4-6, 7-5 in two hours and 39 minutes.

Monfils needed medical attention after tumbling and injuring his right thigh towards the end of the match and Santoro served out for victory.

-Reuters

http://www.abc.net.au/sport/content/200501/s1277289.htm

silvy

Clara Bow
01-06-2005, 06:15 AM
Waaay back about a month ago I said that I would post the article on Roger in the December issue of US Vogue when I got it. Do you all still need it?

Must apologize for the delay- but between traveling for the holidays (and bowl games), work craziness, seminar papers, and whatnot- I haven't been able to come to this site since early December.

I will be happy to type up the article sometime within the next three or four days if you guys need it. I should also be able to scan it at work for the pictures - but may not be able to scan until Monday -because I have to do it when no one else is there. ;)

Sorry for the delay- and if the article has been posted- sorry for not catching that.

squirrel
01-06-2005, 10:57 AM
Waaay back about a month ago I said that I would post the article on Roger in the December issue of US Vogue when I got it. Do you all still need it?

Must apologize for the delay- but between traveling for the holidays (and bowl games), work craziness, seminar papers, and whatnot- I haven't been able to come to this site since early December.

I will be happy to type up the article sometime within the next three or four days if you guys need it. I should also be able to scan it at work for the pictures - but may not be able to scan until Monday -because I have to do it when no one else is there. ;)

Sorry for the delay- and if the article has been posted- sorry for not catching that.

Yes, I want!!!!! :worship: :worship:

avocadoe
01-06-2005, 11:33 AM
Me too :) I looked for it but couldn't find it, boohoo.

fightclubber
01-06-2005, 11:58 AM
Waaay back about a month ago I said that I would post the article on Roger in the December issue of US Vogue when I got it. Do you all still need it?

Must apologize for the delay- but between traveling for the holidays (and bowl games), work craziness, seminar papers, and whatnot- I haven't been able to come to this site since early December.

I will be happy to type up the article sometime within the next three or four days if you guys need it. I should also be able to scan it at work for the pictures - but may not be able to scan until Monday -because I have to do it when no one else is there. ;)

Sorry for the delay- and if the article has been posted- sorry for not catching that.

Hi clara, the vogue pics are on the lets post roger pics section, BUT IF anyone wants, I have them done at a good quality. So if you can scan something, maybe you can scan a different magazine so will have somehtign new..

KIsses

silvy
:wavey: :rolleyes:

Clara Bow
01-06-2005, 07:27 PM
Okay- so I will type up the text of the Vogue article in the next three days or so. (Darn Lexis Nexis for not having Vogue as one of its resources.) Looks like you guys don't need the pics since they are in another thread.

vene
01-06-2005, 09:16 PM
Happy new year everyone!

From Tennisweek (Wow!):
Master And Commander: Roger Rolls To Doha Final Four


Photo By: Tonelli/Zimmer By Brad Falkner
01/07/2005

Like a world class champion chess player Roger Federer has mastered all the right moves.營n his 6-1, 6-2 quarterfinal conquest of Feliciano Lopez at the Qatar ExxonMobil Open in Doha today, it took less than an hour for the stylish Swiss to declare check mate.



Federer, who has not surrendered a set in his three tournament victories, seems destined for the Doha final. He will face Nikolay Davydenko for a place in the final. The eighth-seeded Russian upset third-seeded Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.

The other semifinal pits former French Open champion Albert Costa against Ivan Ljubicic. The sixth-seeded Ljubicic scored a 6-2, 6-7(3), 6-3 victory over Rafael Nadal, who was clad in white shorts so long they resembled pants. Costa held a 6-2, 3-0 lead over Santoro when the the spin doctor, feeling the fatigue of his draining battle with Gael Monfils last night, retired.

The world number one is typically generous in sharing his thoughts with the media in our post-match press conferences, but Federer was downright stingy in his service games today, surrendering only two points on his serve during the first set.營n his three matches he has faced a mere three break points.

Opponents feel they have a better chance of playing leap-frog with a camel than of breaking Federer's serve.

"I got off to a good start and I really served well like usual when I play him," Federer said.?Again I just concentrated on not losing my serve.營t was very satisfying, my performance was good."

The top seed's return game is far from ailing as he punished the left-handed Lopez with four service breaks in this lopsided match.燜ederer's aura of invincibility leaves his opponents with the feeling that he is playing mind games.

"Mentally he's very strong now he knows that he can do anything on the tennis court," Lopez said.? "Roger is playing unbelievable every shot he is trying he is making.燳ou can do what ever you want and then you lose as well. This is why it is so difficult to play against Roger.燞e's doing everything good he is serving unbelievable, returning, (making) the volleys, (playing well from) the baseline, everything.燛very shot he tries, the ball goes in. There is nobody else like him."

Federer's gift for the game goes beyond the smoothness of his strokes and the panache that he imparts on the most impossible of shots.營t is his knack for knowing precisely the right shot, spin, and pace for every ball that lands on his side of the court, that is the true genius of this man.牋

The seventh-seeded Spaniard spoke like a man convinced Federer's closest competitors are the top tennis immortals.

"I've played against all the other guys, Agassi, Safin, and Roddick.燜rom my point of view Roger is better," Lopez said.?Technically, he's for sure the best player in the world. If he continues on this way he will be the best player ever, he will win everything that he wants to win.燨nce he gets the opportunity then he starts playing unbelievable and there is nothing that you can do."

The four-time Grand Slam champion displayed his brilliance on several occasions thought the 51- minute encounter.燞e is one of only a handful of players in the game that make the most taxing of shots appear routine. In the fifth game of the second set, on the full run, pulled well wide of the doubles alley Federer laced a forehand up the line for a clean winner and game point. In those times, it seems Federer's shot-making skill is limitless.

"If I'm continuing to play really well then I can come up with some really great shots, like the forehand up the line, or one of the last backhands I hit in the last game," Federer said.?It was an entertaining match I thought. Right now let's hope I can keep the level that I played with all of last year.營f I can do that then I think I'm going to finish pretty good this year."

And if he sustains tonight's level, he will make quick work of many more opponents who face him.

Quarterfinal results:

(8) Nikolay Davydenko (RUS) def. (3) Sebastien Grosjean (FRA) 2-6, 6-3, 6-2
(1) Roger Federer (SUI) def. (7) Feliciano Lopez (ESP) 6-1, 6-2
Albert Costa (ESP) def. Fabrice Santoro (FRA) 6-2, 3-0 retired (fatigue)
(6) Ivan Ljubicic (CRO) def. Rafael Nadal (ESP) 6-2, 6-7(3), 6-3


The Tennis Channel's Brad Falkner is in Doha to cover the Qatar ExxonMobil Open for the second consecutive year and will file occasional stories for this web site. Please email any questions for Brad to this site.

Mrs. B
01-06-2005, 09:34 PM
Thanks, vene! :wavey:

RogiFan88
01-06-2005, 10:09 PM
Federer moves sweetly into Qatar last four
01-06-2005, 20h03

Karim Jaafar - (AFP)
DOHA (AFP) - Roger Federer continued his spectacular run of success as he clinched his 19th victory in a row, and his 44th in 46 matches, with an easy 6-1, 6-2 win against Feliciano Lopez which carried him to the semi-finals of the Qatar Open.

Federer's success against the most successful left-hander on the tour was improbably quick even by his own exceptional standards, lasting only 51 minutes and reducing his talented opponent's game to fretful confusion.

So fluent was Federer on his once slightly weaker backhand wing, so easy was his court coverage and so comfortable his stroke preparation that Lopez increasingly felt under pressure to attempt more.

Mistakes, unsurprisingly, followed.

The seventh-seeded Spaniard won his opening service game but then dropped serve twice in a row.

When he did so for a third time at 1-1 in the second set, in a game in which he put a smash into the net from only eight feet away, he match ran away from him.

It was easy to sympathise for almost the only unforced error that Federer made was to bounce the ball on his shoe while preparing and seeing it roll away into the clutches of a ball boy.

"It's fantastic when you hit one of those backhands like I did in the final game," admitted Federer.

"But I don't want to say I am improving already this year. The off season was very short and I hope I can find time during this year to work on my fitness. I didn't really have time for that in the off season."

Federer, who in 2004 became the first man for 16 years to win three Grand Slams titles, and who won a record 13 titles in one year, now looks headed for the 23rd of his career.

He next plays improving Russian, Nikolay Davydenko, who appears to have gained still further in mental strength since saving three match points to win the Kremlin Cup in Moscow in October, and this time made another dramatic recovery.

The sixth-seeded Ukrainian-born player recovered from within a point of going a set and 0-4 down to Sebastian Grosjean, the third-seeded Frenchman, before winning 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.

The other semi-final is between Ivan Ljubicic, last year's runner-up from Croatia, and Albert Costa, the former French Open champion from Spain.

Ljubicic, so often a resolute campaigner, overcame a tricky wind on an outside court and the burgeoning talent of Rafael Nadal, Spain's 18-year-old Davis Cup hero, to win 6-2, 6-7 (3/7), 6-3.

Costa came through when Fabrice Santoro retired at a set and 0-3 down in the second.

The former champion from France had pulled a thigh muscle in his marathon win on Wednesday against his 18-year-old compatriot Gael Monfils.
Copyright © 2004 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AFP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Agence France Presse.
http://www.turkishpress.com/sports/news.asp?id=050106200305.tsch3jar.xml

lunahielo
01-07-2005, 01:36 AM
Opponents feel they have a better chance of playing leap-frog with a camel than of breaking Federer's serve. :lol: :rolls: :rolls:

Thanks for the articles, vene and RogiFan~~

Some nice words from Lopez about Roger. :)

WyveN
01-07-2005, 06:31 AM
It was easy to sympathise for almost the only unforced error that Federer made was to bounce the ball on his shoe while preparing and seeing it roll away into the clutches of a ball boy.


:haha:



"But I don't want to say I am improving already this year. The off season was very short and I hope I can find time during this year to work on my fitness. I didn't really have time for that in the off season."


hopefully this doesnt become a issue.

avocadoe
01-07-2005, 01:58 PM
:haha:




hopefully this doesnt become a issue.
right. Everyone was talking about new muscle but I thought his body looked a spot heavier, nothing to worry, just a little fuller faced, as if he'd been eating well, and not training as much. He'd gotten quite thin, even for him, by the end of the year. Is Roger playing next week? or is it a week off before AO? His win yesterday was terrif, such a thrill!!!! :)

fightclubber
01-07-2005, 02:35 PM
Hell be playing at Kooyong
see this part

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=23101

anyway , here the info

silvy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ROGER FEDERER

ANDY RODDICK

TIM HENMAN

ANDRE AGASSI

DAVID NALBANDIAN

GASTON GAUDIO

NICOLAS MASSU

PARADORN SRICHAPHAN

The field is set for the 2005 KOOYONG CLASSIC.


Triple 2004 Grand Slam winner, current Masters Champion and world no. 1, ROGER FEDERER (SUI), heads the elite eight-man line-up.

Federer will use his three Kooyong matches as preparation to defend his 04 Australian Open title. Apart from his other Grand Slam victories at Wimbledon and the US Open, Federer has won seven additional titles this year - Indian Wells Tennis Masters Series, Bangkok, Montreal/Toronto, Halle, Hamburg TMS, Dubai and Gstaad.

American ANDY RODDICK (USA - ranked 2) returns to Kooyong after competing for the first time last January. Roddick has had a solid year winning four tournaments - Miami TMS, London/Queens Club, San Jose and Indianapolis.

Brit TIM HENMAN (GBR - 7) returns to Kooyong for the second time. He made a strong recovery from shoulder surgery last year to climb back into the top ten and make the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston this week. He was a finalist at Indian Wells TMS and semi-finalist at Roland Garros, Rotterdam, US Open and Doha.

ANDRE AGASSI (USA - 8) will make a record eighth Kooyong appearance. He has played the event seven times, winning on three occasions, after each of which he went on to win the Australian Open. He has had a solid year, with one win in Cincinatti TMS and semi-final appearances in Indian Wells TMS, Washington, San Jose and the Australian Open.

Last January's winner over Andre Agassi, DAVID NALBANDIAN (ARG - 9), is keen to return to Kooyong to defend his title. Nalbandian was a semi-finalist at Roland Garros and finalist at the Rome Master Series tournament.

French Open winner GASTON GAUDIO (ARG - 10 ) will be a first time Kooyong participant. Gaudio is playing in the Tennis Masters Cup this week and was a finalist in Stuttgart, Barcelona, Kitzbuhel and Bastad this year.

NICOLAS MASSU (CHI - 18) will be welcomed to Kooyong for the first time after Gold Medal wins in both singles and doubles this year at the Athens Olympics. He won in Kitzbuhel and participated in the World Teams Championships' victory in Dusseldorf.

Popular Thai PARADORN SRICHAPHAN (THA - 27) will also make his Kooyong debut after working his way up the rankings this year. He was a winner at Nottingham, finalist in Chennai and semi-finalist in Bangkok, Long Island and Beijing.

The KOOYONG CLASSIC will take place from Wednesday, January 12 to Saturday, January 15. Four matches will be played on the Wednesday, three on both Thursday and Friday, with the two finals on Saturday. Play starts at 11.00 am Wednesday to Friday and 1.30 pm on Saturday.

The Classic has formed a partnership with TENNIS VICTORIA and the two parties have been working closely throughout the year. Tennis Victoria will have a presence at Kooyong throughout the four days.

"This is probably our best field ever" said Tournament Director, Colin Stubs. "I will be delighted and privileged to welcome the above eight players to Kooyong next January. It's great that Andre, Roger, Andy, David and Tim have decided to return. They will be strongly supported by our new-comers Gaston Gaudio, Nicolas Massu and Paradorn Srichaphan" he added.

The event will be nationally televised by the Seven Network.

Kooyong Classic tickets are available from Ticketmaster7 on 1300 136122 or online

http://www.kooyongltc.com.au/