Roger news and articles [Archive] - Page 4 - MensTennisForums.com

Roger news and articles

Pages : 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Yoda
10-05-2004, 07:23 PM
Thanks Violet :wavey: Nice article

Seems like down to earth people :)

jtipson
10-05-2004, 07:25 PM
I just love the bit about him not listening to her when he's watching TV.
Typical bloke ;)

knight_ley
10-06-2004, 12:49 AM
awww that article was adorable! i love them together :)

lunahielo
10-06-2004, 02:47 AM
Thanks, Violet~

We love it because on long flights we are alone together. :hearts:

So sweet. :) I am sitting here smiling.
It's all good!

babsi
10-06-2004, 08:27 AM
Thanks,Violet :)
Those two are so nice and cute :) :) :)

One has to wonder what it is, that betters the chances of surivle for male humans,that is conectet to the fact, that they are not able to listen to anybody while watching tv :(

SUKTUEN
10-06-2004, 10:08 AM
Ohhhhh~~~~~ :worship:

Mirka is soooo cute~~~ :hug: She love Roger so much ~~~~ :kiss: :kiss:

It is sooo SWEET~!!!!!!!!!!!!! :hearts: :hearts:
I am so happy see them have a happy life ~~~~ :inlove: :inlove:

mitalidas
10-06-2004, 12:32 PM
I have the healthiest respect for Hewitt --and his opinions.

Hewitt: 'Genius' Federer's a class apart
TOKYO, Oct 5 (Reuters) -- All-conquering Roger Federer is on course to become the best player in history, former world number one Lleyton Hewitt said on Tuesday.

Federer has won three of the four grand slams in 2004 and this weekend in Bangkok joined Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe as the only players to win 12 consecutive finals.

"Roger's standard is pretty incredible," Hewitt told Reuters in an interview. "If you can keep doing that then you're a bit of a genius really."

Hewitt, beaten by Federer at the Australian Open and at Wimbledon as well as in last month's U.S. Open final, added: "There's no disgrace in losing to Roger Federer.

"He's easily the best player in the world at the moment. He's trying to take the game to the next level."

Hewitt paid tribute to Federer's winning 17 titles -- including four grand slams -- over the past two seasons and agreed that Federer could become the best ever.

"Only time will tell, but he's definitely got a shot at it," said Hewitt. "He's won four slams already now and he can play on all surfaces.

"The year that Roger's had this year is going to be extremely hard for anyone to try and emulate."

Hewitt compared Federer to Pete Sampras, who retired last year after winning a record 14 grand slam titles.

"Roger's got a game that's similar to Pete's was when he was at his best," said Hewitt.

"Roger is probably a better player on all four surfaces but Pete was awesome obviously, winning so many Wimbledons."

Sampras won seven Wimbledon titles but failed to win on clay at the French Open.

"Roger's been the stand-out player all year," said Hewitt, who has won four titles this year and reached the final of his last four tournaments.

"I've probably had as consistent a year as I've ever had," said Hewitt, the year-end world number one in 2001 and 2002 and still the best counter-puncher in the game.

"I lost to the eventual winner in all four majors and didn't drop a set until the final of the U.S. Open.

"I felt that, against the players that I guess aren't quite up to Roger's standard, I was dominating." :)

Hewitt won the 2001 U.S. Open and 2002 Wimbledon titles and would gladly sacrifice the number one ranking for more grand slam success.

"For me, personally, it's grand slams," said the 23-year-old from Adelaide, who won a record 25th Davis Cup singles match for Australia against Morocco last month.

"Once you've been to number one...I'm not going to go out and chase every tournament week in week out to try and get a few more points here and there."

Hewitt, in Tokyo for this week's Japan Open, vowed that he and players such as Andy Roddick, Juan Carlos Ferrero and Marat Safin would push Federer harder in 2005.

"Marat's the kind of guy who's got a lot of big weapons and so does Andy," said Hewitt, who still has a chance of sneaking past Roddick to finish the year ranked second behind Federer.

"I've obviously worked extremely hard on my game as well and Juan Carlos will be back up there as well next year. (Guillermo) Coria's up there too.

"Roger is so far ahead but we have to stay up there and that's what keeps you motivated...trying to stay with the best players."

WyveN
10-06-2004, 02:04 PM
I recall earlier in the year, Hewitt was saying there is no sign of a significant gap between Federer and the other players. Glad his changed his mind ;)

mitalidas
10-06-2004, 03:07 PM
Yeah, I recall too. Both at the AO and then at Wimbledon (in the interview he said "Hey mate, believe it or not I didnt feel I was too far from winning. If I won that fourth set who knows, I have all the momentum" or something like that).

babsi
10-06-2004, 03:34 PM
I wonder what might have let to that change of heart.
Maybe eating baegles busts your brain power :) :) :)

seriosly, I think that was very nice of him to say - respect for that !!!!!!!!

marchen
10-06-2004, 03:47 PM
I found this translation article in a Safin fan's site. It is very old (dunno if it has been posted before), but i found it very inspiring.



===============================================

L’EQUIPE MAGAZINE (France),
05/24/2003
By Jean Issartel


Frankly, I would not like to be Marat Safin, it must be very tough to have
such a big talent with such a devious/tortuous mind. Roger Federer seems to
accept more his gift, but as far as I know it has not always been the same. And
sometimes, he still lives some frustrations because of his talent” Only Mats
Wilander may feels sorry for genius.[...] Marat is his friend “one of the best”
, but Mats used to coach him and he sized up at which point Marat is a victim of
the “ exceptionally gifted complex”.


“Either Roger Federer’s sydrome is not exactly the same or he is less struck
down by the complex” And Marc Rosset knows what he is talking about and what he
is nicely making fun of. The captain of the Swiss Davis Cup team is a very good
friend of Federer and he used to coach Safin : he is also aware of the Russian’s
cerebral’s/mental’s bend/intricacies and his unbelievable potential. Wilander
knows it too : “for sure, Roger and Marat are the two most talented guys on the
tour. But their talents are totally different .

“Marat, it’s a physical gift, says Rosset. He is the prototype of the player of
the future : enough tall to serve strong and to have a good wingspread/scope but
not too tall to move well on the court; powerful to hit the ball strong but not
too powerful to be slender and fluid. In plus he has a perfect timing and a good
eye. Nobody can hit as strong as Marat. Roger is brilliant because he can invent
wonderful shots and he feels very good his game [...]. As far as I know, Nobody
has as much delicacy/finesse and good feeling as Roger. And he has those shots
... When I saw Roger practicing, I saw him making some shots that I had never
seen before. He can do all the shots in tennis and probably some others that
don’t belong to this sport ...

Roger summarizes this ability with modesty and simplicity : “ I have a hand, and
a good hand ... And I am also fluid and relaxed on the court, maybe because of
this, people say that I am talented. It’s difficult for me to talk about hit,
but it’s true that I can do a lot of things with a racket. What people have
difficulty in understanding it’s that this talent could also be a drawback ...”

Marat Safin has other words to explain it. He talks with passion as always when
he speaks of something which really touches him ,when he talks about something
that he is burning to share or to make understand :
“But, who understand me ? How many people ? What I want, sometimes I don’t know
it myself ... that’s why I can understand that people have difficulties in
grasping me. What I want is to succeed to hit every shot as the best of all my
shots. I want to achieve my perfection. And I want it too often. That is what
wears me down, that is what drives me crazy. Nobody knows what happen in my
brain, so everybody says that I am mad. Maybe ... but me I love this game too
much, I love too much feeling that I am “in the zone”, I love feeling that I am
faithful/ that I remain true to what I have in my brain as a model. It’s so good
to feel it that I have difficulties in accepting to play under this feeling.”
As Mats Wilander explains, the problem is that “ Marat fixes the bar to high
(I don’t know if it’s correct English, but it means that Marat is a bit too
ambitious) . His reference match is his victory against Pete Sampras in the
final of the US Open 2000 and it’s impossible to have the perfection as a
model/as a reference, otherwise you feel tired, it gets on your nerves and you
lose”. “(Does it get on my nerves?) It is 1000 times worse, laughs Marat, Tennis
when it comes as I want, I adore it. But when I am not playing that well, it’s
horrible and I start to call everything into question. I told myself : “ But
shit! What am I doing here? Shit! What is my life? Look at your game, look at
what you’re doing, it’s crap!” I do suffer in those moments.”

And sometimes, when Marat is suffering, he shortens his pain. That’s get on
Mats Wilander’s nerves : “Genius as him can win 6-1 6-1 9 times in a row against
the same player and lose the 10th time because it’s a little bit more tight. Me
against the same player I won 10 times in a row and I broke him almost always at
the same moment of the match. The too much gifted players forget too much that
there is a guy in front of him, they think that they are playing golf that’s why
it surprises them when the ball comes back too often. So, they give up because
they are afraid of having to take/to stand the defeat”.


To give up in a match? Yes, it happened to Marat to lose voluntarily a match in
order to not have to assume the fact that he had been defeated. Marc Rosset
understands it, he did it before : “ Tennis is a psychological sport. Every week
you are disappointed, unless you win a tournament. The disappointment is a part
of the life of a champion and you have an other chance the week after. Me I
sometimes gave up in my matches, because when you give up it’s not a defeat,
it’s a way to keep your confidence capital.
Marat is like that too, he is temperamental, like Goran Ivanisevic. The problem
is that after the event, you start to think too much of what you did, you
remind you of all the opportunities you missed because you were too damn stupid
to fight, to accept the prospect of being defeated. Isn’t it weird to told
yourself “ I’ m going to lose because I don’t accept the prospect to be
defeated, because I am afraid of this idea, because this prospect makes me
panicking so much that it eats/that I lose all my lucidity”. To lose
intentionally in order to not being defeated ... “

This is what happened to Marat in the final of the Australian Open 2002. “Since,
swear both Rosset and Wilander, Marat became aware that it’s not a shame to be
defeated, but that it’is a shame to not fight” .
Federer is “too well educated to act like that, says Rosset, he is too honest
and to give up it’s like to lie to himself. Roger never lies”. Federer’s coach
Peter Lundgren follows Marc “Roger is a regular guy/ a good sort. He lives the
things as a normal person while he has an exceptionally gift. That was by the
way the origin of his problems. It’s tough to heard people told you, since your
childhood, ”you’re a genius”,” you’ll be the number one”. Roger is frank and
honest. He knows that he has a gift, but he wasn’t capable of standing this
pressure ... When he was a kid, he used to break rackets. Thanks to a
psychologist this kind of problem is from the past. He is on the good/right way.
He starts to be less negative , thinking more of what he succeed than of what he
failed. He is more disciplined, he really knows what he wants and what he has to
do to reach his goal ...”. Above all, he knows what he mustn’t do. According to
Marc Rosset “ sometimes Roger falls in the easy way. He dominates the match, he
controls the match but he forgets to hammer in the nail. And when the situation
turns against him, he becomes crazy. In fact, Roger has to learn to be more
nasty, to accept to make ugly matches to win. In a Grand Slam, it’s normal and
obvious to have a bad day, and this is this day which makes the difference. This
is on this day that Roger has to accept to be a normal player, a player who has
to win without exciting the crowd, without inventing shots ... I think he has
understood it and he is going to do it.”

In that case, Roger would have been right to say that “ he found himself”, that
he has ”understood that miraculous shots excite the crowd but not necessarily
help to win a match” ... In fact he stops to ruin his life, to ruin his game. He
has digested his gift and “start/get to work”. According to Rosset : “What
impressed me most in Roger it’s his physical progress. Now he can succeed
because he has the legs to express his talent. You can especially notice this
progress with his backhand, now that he moves better his backhand his better and
more dangerous. Thanks to this work and those progress Roger became stronger
mentally. Now, what he needs is to defeat Hewitt one or two times. The day he
would gave done that, he would be on the road to the number one place. And for
him it would be a straight line.”

For Marat, it seems to be more complicated And even more if he follows Rosset’s
method : “ You put Hewitt’s brain in to Marat’s body and you have the number one
in the world until 2010. Well as I know well the guy(Marat), even if the
transplant was possible, it would probably have a massive and fast rejection”.
Yes, Marat Safin is complicated. “Complicated? It’s worst than complicated, I am
Russian” Marat laughs. Rosset less, even tough ...

“Marat, if he follows through his possibilities, nobody can compete with him,
even Roger. But it depends on the desire to go to the fight that Marat will
have, maybe Marat doesn’t love the tennis enough, maybe he doesn’t want to
dominate this sport and to fall in a kind of slavery with regard to the
performance. He is Russian, and he is right in pointing this out. We must not
forget that he is Russian. The lack is inscribing in his mentality, the
deprivation of freedom too and now that he is totally free, he will never accept
to scarify a part of his total independence even if it’s in order to join the
History of the Sport. In concrete terms, even if you’re close to him, even if
totally trusts you, you can’t come to tell him “ you have to do this, you have
to work like that”. If you speak to him like this it means that you want him to
do the contrary of what you said. Unfortunately, as Marat is crafty, sometimes
he doesn’t do what you ask, but he doesn’t do totally the opposite. He hates the
obligation (I didn’t find the good translation for : “Marat, l’obligation ça le
braque” sorry). Mats Wilander knows it very well : “It seemed logical to
associate myself with Marat in order to pass/give him the qualities that I had
when I was a player : the tactic, the perseverance , the persistence. People
said that all those qualities associated with Marat’s talent would help him a
lot to achieve the highest top. It didn’t worked as it was supposed to work.
Maybe Marat needs a coach as crazy as him ... We separated ourselves admitting
failure. Two events made us become aware that our duo couldn’t work. The first
one happened when I saw him hitting a shot between his legs just after he had
been lobed at 5/4 in the last set while he could have hit a conventional shot
but a more efficient shot. I told him that I didn’t understand his behaviour and
that it was a lack of respect towards the game, toward the history of the game
and the biggest champions, towards his opponent and above all towards himself .
He answered that from his point of view it was the opposite. Then during an
other match, he tried to hit an ace on his second ball at 5/5, he missed and he
lost. That’s when I understood, and he understood it too, that it would be
better to stay the best friend of the world than to work together ... I think he
learnt 2 or 3 things with me, but I am sure that if I still have something to
bring to his game or to his man’s life it would be as a friend, not as a coach”.

Anyway, this is the only one method with Marat. He banishes the word “coach”
from his vocabulary. He “only listens to his friends” and he “only trusts his
friends”. He has only few friends, which is surprising for such an attractive
person. Federer is also engaging. “That’s why people are so impatient with them.
That’s why everybody want to see them on top very quickly, says Lundgren. They
have beautiful games, they are spontaneous and nice. That’s why nobody can wait
to see them being number one and number two in the world, in the final of all
the Grand Slams. But we have to give them time ... ”

The time they need to accept to be so much gifted and also to accept to not
always be perfect. On this road, Roger seems to be a little bit ahead of Marat.
Rosset dares to say that “it’s because of his education and his humility”. It’s
also because of the tragedy Roger lived when his friend and coach Peter Carter
died in a car crash last summer. This event changed Roger because ,as he said,
with the pain, a “new maturity came”. It’s cold the adulthood, simply.

lsy
10-06-2004, 04:00 PM
honest, happy boy...how sweet :hearts: Isn't it great that both his mum and gf had mentioned about how honest Rogi is?


I just love the bit about him not listening to her when he's watching TV.
Typical bloke

so true... :lol:

Hewitt really is one of the most competitive and determined player among all. The fact that he had been talking about how it's a few points here and there and he could have won for most matches vs Rogi this year (except USO) was irritating but I actually come to respect his positive attitude. Even on court, doesn't matter how bad the situation is, he still tries till the last point. Quite amazing actually in this aspect.

mitalidas
10-06-2004, 04:43 PM
Yeah, I really began to really like Hewitt at the USO trophy-time, when instead of giving the usual crap: "Roger was too good today" or something, he took time to show his admiration and said that "People don't really understand how difficult it is to do what Roger has done this year" (and with an expression that showed that he was floored). I really appreciated that in him

babsi
10-06-2004, 07:37 PM
If you inserted Hewitts brain into Marats head, that would make for a real powerful player, but that player wouldn´t beat Roger - not any more,not when he is playing at the levle he is right now!
Anyway that article is a great read.It´s nice to hear, from people who really know him well, how honest Roger is.
You can tell, by looing at him, that he is a happy guy - still good to hear from the gf

Fedex
10-07-2004, 01:05 AM
Brad always puts down one-hander players. During the Andre match he said after Andre returned a serve up the line with his backhand. "No one hander could ever do that" Guess he never saw Guga play or Rogi. :rolls: He also put down Pete and Henin. He also called Rogi (before Wimbly 03) a "poor man's sampras" and said he was "all hype and no results" this was during Wimbly 03 when Rogi came into the event with a title on every surface that year and Andy only won two and never won a master series event.
This makes me detest Brad even more :rolleyes: I hope Rogi had read those comments, prior to Wimby 03, and that angered him, and that was a mistake as Roger totally owns Andy now. Everytime Brad disses Roger, which is often, I wish I could walk up to him and remind him of his h2h record against Lendl. :rolls: :tape:

mitalidas
10-07-2004, 01:36 AM
How good Rogi must have felt during this Q and A session at the USO this year:

Q. During the break at Wimbledon, you came out so strong. In a way, do you think you outcoached your opponent's coach at that point?

ROGER FEDERER: You mean Brad (smiling)? I don't know.

I took a chance, and it worked, you know. I'm very happy about it because it was the Wimbledon final.

Q. So that's a yes?

ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling) probably.

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2004-09-11/200409111094941871304.html

Dirk
10-07-2004, 12:26 PM
Fedex, Brad said this during the early rounds at Wimbly 03. He said those comments during an Andre match there too, the ones about one handers not being able to return serves up the line. Pat, Cliff and Fowler thought Brad was crazy for saying those things about Rogi. I don't know if Rogi knows of them, maybe. I bet Fowler told him and not Cliff and Pat because they wouldn't want to anger the Ninja. Fowler doesn't give a shit and he would stir Rogi up because he covers all sports and not just tennis. So he wouldn't really care too much if it got back to Brad I don't think. Again I have no idea if Rogi knew, but I don't think he is too fond of Brad. I bet maybe Peter found out and told Rogi as well. Who knows but Brad is now eating his words. :tape: His lack of respect for traditional players (one handers) really irks me. :rolleyes:

RogiFan88
10-07-2004, 07:30 PM
ROGI on ATP show in about 30mns on tw1.at a day w Rogi and Bangkok results... all in German!!

MissPovaFan
10-07-2004, 07:48 PM
ROGI on ATP show in about 30mns on tw1.at a day w Rogi and Bangkok results... all in German!!

It was a nice article I thought - showed a lot of coverage of Federer off the court around New York and S.E. Asia.

Daniel
10-08-2004, 01:56 PM
Rogi :clap2:

lsy
10-08-2004, 02:29 PM
Someone posted the ATP show clip from ATP site :D

http://www.atptennis.com/en/tvshow/?AssetID=737

and we can watch Rogi's interview in CNN TalkAsia this week... :aparty: :yippee:....but not me... :sad:

http://edition.cnn.com/ASIA/talkasia/

RonE
10-08-2004, 02:45 PM
Isy, thanks for the links! Especially the clip it was great. :)


How good Rogi must have felt during this Q and A session at the USO this year:

Q. During the break at Wimbledon, you came out so strong. In a way, do you think you outcoached your opponent's coach at that point?

ROGER FEDERER: You mean Brad (smiling)? I don't know.

I took a chance, and it worked, you know. I'm very happy about it because it was the Wimbledon final.

Q. So that's a yes?

ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling) probably.



Priceless!!! :haha:

Hingie
10-08-2004, 06:12 PM
Roger prevented him from winning Wimbledon and Toronto. But what about other 3 Slams and 4 TMS? He can't blame Roger for everything. :singer:

Well without Roger, he'd be number 1 in the world. Plus he would have a grand slam(Wimbledon) and two more titles already. I think that it'd be a better year than last year because he would have been number 1 for the entire year.

LCeh
10-09-2004, 03:57 AM
BTW, to anyone who can't see the clip from the site, try this link:

mms://wm.atptennis-global.speedera.net/wm.atptennis-global/Federer_story_high.wmv

ytben
10-09-2004, 03:11 PM
Just saw Rogi in CNN TalkAsia, he looks great! :D Some highlight when he met Juliette for the first time too :lol:

WyveN
10-09-2004, 03:28 PM
I saw that to Yt, nice interview.

lsy
10-09-2004, 04:02 PM
:banana: :banana: :banana:

I caught the Rogi interview on TalkAsia too!!! Totally unexpected as I have to be out whole day but we ended up at friend's place for movie and I suddenly realised it's just the right time for the repeat TalkAsia, I forced everybody to pause the movie and watch Rogi's interview with me for half an hour :rocker: :rocker:

Rogi... :hearts: :hearts: he looked great but I ended up telling all my friends about how great this guy is, how amazing his tennis is, how he moves like a ballerina on court, why he has a cow, how he kept bagelling other top players.....yeah...basically I ended up talking more than listening to Rogi's interview :o But it's all worthwhile, one friend who's very casual tennis fan said he definitely needs to pay more attention to Rogi and the other girl friend think he's so sweet and cute :hearts: :lol: (These 2 will get extra xmas presents from me this year ;) )

He talked about Lundgren and how they had become too good friends to maintain coach/players r'ships...and when Lorraine mentioned about the other woman in his life, I thought she meant his mum but instead it's Juliette.... :haha: :tape: Not a very insightful interview but still good to watch!

babsi
10-09-2004, 07:44 PM
Way to go Isy :) :) :)
Just talk everybody into beeing a Roger fan.
They will thank you for it later, when they truly come to know him.He makes live so much more fun:) - ok, that is, if you don´t mind haveing stomach cramps every time he is playing :(

Skyward
10-10-2004, 02:18 AM
I don't know if it has been posted before. Nice summary

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2004/federer_roll.asp



FEDERER CHASING HISTORY
Ponte Vedra Beach, United States October 4, 2004
Federer Continues on Historical Roll


© Getty Images
After his dominating performance at the US Open, Roger Federer Roger Federer continues to write his name into the history books after clinching his 10 th title of the season at the Thailand Open in Bangkok today. By defeating Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0 in the final of the Thailand Open, Federer becomes the first player to win 10 titles in a season since Thomas Muster won 12 in 1995. He also won his 12 th straight final, joining Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe as the only players to achieve that feat in the past 25 years.

Since the beginning of 2003, Federer has won a stunning 17 titles. He also has won 18 consecutive matches against Top 10 players, including 13 in 2004.

He now turns his focus to creating more history at the upcoming ATP Masters Series events in Madrid and Paris. At ATP Masters Madrid (starting October 18) and the BNP Paribas Masters in Paris (starting November 1), Federer will strive to become the first player to win four ATP Masters Series titles in the one year since the premier series was established in 1990. After winning his third Grand Slam title of the season at the US Open, it was announced that Federer had won the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race, marking the earliest a player had ever locked up the year-end World No. 1 title.

Here is a statistical look at Federer's outstanding season on the 2004 ATP circuit:

MOST FINALS WON IN SUCCESSION
By winning the Thailand Open, Federer won his 12 th straight final dating back to Vienna 2003. Only two other players have won 12 finals in a row in the past 25 years -- Bjorn Borg (1979-80) and John McEnroe (1984-85). Here are the players who have won at least 10 consecutive finals going back to 1979:

Consecutive Finals Won Years
Roger Federer 12 2003-04
John McEnroe 12 1984-85
Bjorn Borg 12 1979-80
Thomas Muster 11 1994-95
Jose-Luis Clerc 11 1980-81
Lleyton Hewitt 10 2001-02
Tim Mayotte 10 1986-88
Ivan Lendl 10 1985-86
John McEnroe 10 1980-81
Thomas Muster 10 1995-97


THE FEDERER FINALS STREAK
Here is a look at Federer's 12 finals won in succession (on three different surfaces) going back to last year:


Tournament Surface Opponent Score
2004
Bangkok Hard d. Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0
US Open Hard d. Lleyton Hewitt 6-0, 7-6, 6-0
AMS Toronto Hard d. Andy Roddick 7-5, 6-3
Gstaad Clay d. Igor Andreev 6-2, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3
Wimbledon Grass d. Andy Roddick 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4
Halle Grass d. Mardy Fish 6-0, 6-3
AMS Hamburg Clay d. Guillermo Coria 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3
AMS Indian Wells Hard d. Tim Henman 6-3, 6-3
Dubai Hard d. Feliciano Lopez 4-6, 6-1, 6-2
Australian Open Hard d. Marat Safin 7-6, 6-4, 6-2
2003
Masters Cup-Houston Hard d. Andre Agassi 6-3, 6-0, 6-4
Vienna (I) Hard d. Carlos Moya 6-3, 6-3, 6-3

(I) Indoor

DOUBLE FIGURE TITLES WON
Federer is the first player to win 10 titles in a season since Thomas Muster won 12 in 1995. (Guillermo Vilas won an Open Era-record 16 titles in 1977.) Here are the players who have won at least 10 titles in a season since 1984:

Player No. Year
John McEnroe 13 1984
Thomas Muster 12 1995
Ivan Lendl 11 1985
Roger Federer 10 2004
Pete Sampras 10 1994
Ivan Lendl 10 1989

INDESIT ATP RACE WINNERS
Federer's new tally of 1117 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points already is a record since the Race began in 2000. Here's how his mark compares with previous year-end totals:

Year Player Year-end Points Total
2004 Roger Federer *1,117
2003 Andy Roddick 907
2002 Lleyton Hewitt 873
2001 Lleyton Hewitt 897
2000 Gustavo Kuerten 839

*as of October 4, 2004.

YEAR-END INDESIT ATP ENTRY RANKING – With a current total of 6760 points, Federer is looking to finish the year with the highest number of points since the ATP began in 1990, although the points breakdown changed slightly in 2000 (Andy Roddick finished with the highest number of points since 2000 with 4,535). Here are the highest point totals:

Year Player Points
2004 Roger Federer *6,760
1994 Pete Sampras 5,097
1999 Andre Agassi 5,048
1996 Pete Sampras 4,865
1995 Pete Sampras 4,842
1997 Pete Sampras 4,547

* As of 6,760

WIN-LOSS LEADERS (SINCE 1990) - With 69 wins already in 2004, Federer is on course to record the highest number of wins since the ATP circuit began in 1990. Here is a look at the year-end win-loss leaders since then:

Year Player W-L
1995 Thomas Muster 86-18
1993 Andre Agassi 83-15
2001 Lleyton Hewitt 80-18
1996 Yevgeny Kafelnikov 80-25
2003 Roger Federer 78-17



PERCENTAGE WIN-LOSS LEADERS (SINCE 1990) – With a 69-6 record in 2004, Federer has a 92.0 percent win-loss record. He could finish the season with the highest win-loss percentage since the ATP began in 1990. Here is a look at the players with the highest year-end percentage:

Year Player W-L %
2004 Roger Federer *69-6 .920
1995 Andre Agassi 73-9 .890
1994 Pete Sampras 65-11 .871
1996 Pete Sampras 55-12 .855
1993 Pete Sampras 83-15 .847
1999 Stefan Edberg 70-14 .833
1999 Pete Sampras 40-8 .833

* As of October 3

FIRST TO FOUR - Federer is looking to become the first player to win four ATP Masters Series shields in one season. Here is a look at the players to have won three in a year since the series began in 1990:

Year Player AMS Titles
2004 Roger Federer Indian Wells, Hamburg, Toronto
2002 Andre Agassi Miami, Rome, Madrid
1998 Marcelo Rios Indian Wells, Miami, Rome
1995 Andre Agassi Miami, Montreal, Cincinnati
1995 Thomas Muster Monte Carlo, Rome, Essen*
1994 Pete Sampras Indian Wells, Miami, Rome
1990 Stefan Edberg Indian Wells, Cincinnati, Paris

*Held in Essen for one year before moving to Stuttgart in 1996

Mrs. B
10-10-2004, 07:33 AM
Roja rocks! :banana:

yanchr
10-10-2004, 02:57 PM
Not a very insightful interview...
Me think so too :tape: Not sth new and fresh :tape: I was thinking that these questions must have been asked for numerous times that Roger must have had enough chances to get pracitce for every one;)

But watching Roger alone even without him saying anything is good for me :D

Daniel
10-10-2004, 03:41 PM
Roger :bounce: :)

mitalidas
10-13-2004, 10:49 AM
Who would you pick to win between the Federer of today and the Pete Sampras of his vintage years, when he was No. 1 for six years in a row?
-- Franklyn Ajaye, Melbourne, Australia

Good question. It would be nice to know the surface, but I have to go with Sampras. We can go through this exercise of Federer moves better, but Sampras probably serves better, etc. But here's the X factor for me: Sampras was mentally indomitable during the "vintage years." He would get in a big match and then simply elevate his game as high as it needed to go. Federer, of course, has made rapid progress in this department. He has won every final he's played this year and is undefeated against the top 10. But, remember, it was only 16 months ago he lost in the first round of a Major to Luis Horna. If Federer keeps up this clutch play for a few more years, we reserve the right to change our answer.


Which players on the men's side do you foresee as Federer's next big rivals? Are there also some future studs coming out of the junior ranks?
-- Jeff Beacham, Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Federer? Rivals? I wrote in Sports Illustrated that Federer is rivaled by the rest of the field, the way a chainsaw is rivaled by a tree. Who knows, if he gets in a bit of a slump that next tier -- Roddick, Hewitt, Agassi, maybe Rafael Nadal and a healthy Ferrero -- could mount a challenge. But part of what has made this run so awe-inspiring is his ability to humiliate even the most game opponents. Serving Hewitt a double-bagel in a Grand Slam final? Come on, mate.

As for the juniors there are a lot of intriguing prospects, including Gael Monfils, who came one bad knee away from winning the junior Grand Slam. Watching him play reminded me of watching AAU summer tournaments: tons of mistakes, comical inconsistency, questionable shot selection and grasp of tactics. But he had enough obvious ability and raw talent you know you'll be seeing a lot more of him in the future.



From: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/10/11/mailbag.1011/index.html

WyveN
10-13-2004, 02:47 PM
Federer? Rivals? I wrote in Sports Illustrated that Federer is rivaled by the rest of the field, the way a chainsaw is rivaled by a tree.

:haha: Loved this bit.

babsi
10-13-2004, 04:25 PM
there aren´t any duck-trees or are there?
and what about potato -trees?

mitalidas
10-13-2004, 04:42 PM
im happy to see wertheim write like this (the responses are his), but i'm very suspicious of him. he was a Rogi-sceptic for years, and even at the AO and W this year, he predicted (wrongly of course) that Rogi would not win it

and babsi, i must ask, who is the potato? i see this on other forums and i dont know. I also have never figured out why roddick is known as duck (i always supposed that Dick would be more approrpriate :) )

lsy
10-13-2004, 04:51 PM
Federer? Rivals? I wrote in Sports Illustrated that Federer is rivaled by the rest of the field, the way a chainsaw is rivaled by a tree.

:haha: :haha: Really very funny indeed.

Potato is Hewitt, though I have absolutely no idea why is that so? :shrug:

Yoda
10-13-2004, 09:34 PM
im happy to see wertheim write like this (the responses are his), but i'm very suspicious of him. he was a Rogi-sceptic for years, and even at the AO and W this year, he predicted (wrongly of course) that Rogi would not win it

and babsi, i must ask, who is the potato? i see this on other forums and i dont know. I also have never figured out why roddick is known as duck (i always supposed that Dick would be more approrpriate :) )

Roddick supposedly looks like a duck and Hewitt is a potatoe head (I think) :)

Fedex
10-13-2004, 10:15 PM
He actually wrote a good article, for once. Though I disagree, about Sampras. If Federer was in 'vintage' form, against Pete at his best, I still honestly think Rogi could destroy him as well, like he does to todays top players. His game was not as well rounded as some people like to think. I'd actually much prefer a Federer-Borg or Federer-Laver match, then Federer-Sampras. Overall, Rogi is much more talented than Sampras ever was, BUT Sampras was a warrior mentally, so that is a factor, but then again, Federer is no slouch there either.

Fedex
10-13-2004, 10:18 PM
:haha: :haha: Really very funny indeed.

Potato is Hewitt, though I have absolutely no idea why is that so? :shrug:
You've been here long enough to know why hewitt's Potato. ;)

*M*
10-14-2004, 12:06 AM
and babsi, i must ask, who is the potato? i see this on other forums and i dont know. I also have never figured out why roddick is known as duck (i always supposed that Dick would be more approrpriate :) )
Watch Andy the next time he serves (esp when he's on the far end of the court). He always pauses and sticks his butt way out before he whacks the ball. I suppose the bill on his baseball cap is a little like a duck bill too. Others may have their own reason for calling him Duck, but that's my interpretation of the nickname.

Potato, though, I need explained to me as well. :)

mitalidas
10-14-2004, 12:14 AM
If Federer was in 'vintage' form, against Pete at his best, I still honestly think Rogi could destroy him.

Yeah, agreed -- even before he got to his full form he took out Pete (although Pete was at the beginning of the end). I love that W-2001, watched it so many times. Its heartbreaking also, Pete is almost in tears, Rogi *is* in tears (of joy) :)

ytben
10-14-2004, 02:12 AM
I think it has something to do with Zhenya's quote for DC against Australia, where he said the surface has so much bumps it looks like a potato field.

:haha: *M* your description is priceless

WyveN
10-14-2004, 02:15 AM
Kafelnikov did call the court a potato field and after Hewitt beat him I think he said something like "if we played on a potato field then I handled it like a potato"

Daniel
10-14-2004, 10:54 AM
lol nice article :)

lsy
10-14-2004, 04:28 PM
:haha: :haha: thanks Ytben, Wyven

Honestly Fedex, it's only now I know why Hewitt is called "potato", is this nickname from MTF posters again?

*M*
10-14-2004, 07:55 PM
Kafelnikov did call the court a potato field and after Hewitt beat him I think he said something like "if we played on a potato field then I handled it like a potato"
Thanks for the explanation. I thought maybe he was called potato because he had a bad complexion. ;)

mitalidas
10-15-2004, 11:57 AM
Finally, the update by brad gilbert has appeared on his webpage. False praise or not, he has written well about "Club Fed" (how I hate that name for Rogi) in the Scraps Ranking

Appropriately, he has suddenly made winning the Davis Cup a big deal, so that "Junior" can shine at least somewhere this year ;)

http://www.bradgilberttennis.com/index2.html

Fedex
10-15-2004, 11:18 PM
Kafelnikov did call the court a potato field and after Hewitt beat him I think he said something like "if we played on a potato field then I handled it like a potato"
:lol: I never knew that. What match was this??

Fedex
10-15-2004, 11:23 PM
Finally, the update by brad gilbert has appeared on his webpage. False praise or not, he has written well about "Club Fed" (how I hate that name for Rogi) in the Scraps Ranking

Appropriately, he has suddenly made winning the Davis Cup a big deal, so that "Junior" can shine at least somewhere this year ;)

http://www.bradgilberttennis.com/index2.html
Brad seriously has his head up his ass (what else is new?) if he thinks they'll win Davis Cup. I dont like those names, either. 'Club Fed' and 'Junior' are just plain annoying. I heard enough of Brad saying 'Club Fed' this and that at Wimbledon, particularly before the Wimbledon final, and other tournements, I dont really want to hear it again! Just my personal bias ofcourse. ;)

mitalidas
10-16-2004, 01:24 AM
'Club Fed' and 'Junior' are just plain annoying. I heard enough of Brad saying 'Club Fed' this and that at Wimbledon, particularly before the Wimbledon final, and other tournements, I dont really want to hear it again! Just my personal bias ofcourse. ;)

if it stuck, you'd have to become ClubFedex, and that would also suck! :)

this must be the worst of brad's coaching years ever, especially that one person dominates and it isnt Jr.

Fedex
10-16-2004, 02:50 AM
ClubFedex!! :haha: :rolls: Perhaps I should change my name to 'ClubFedex'. :p ;)

knight_ley
10-16-2004, 04:26 AM
What does Club Fed mean anyways? I know that might sound like a dumb ass question but like it annoys me that he calls Fed that and I dont even know why, maybe just cuz he has an idiot nickname for him.... But I didn't konw if there was soemthign behind it that y'all don't like it either, or if its just that same reason I dont.

Daniel
10-16-2004, 08:43 AM
I have no idea, Club Fed maybe is a club for Federer Fans :o :p
I dont care how he calls Roger, as lons as Rogi keeps winning :D

WyveN
10-16-2004, 09:09 AM
:lol: I never knew that. What match was this??

1999 I think. Kafelnikov came to Australia and talked very arrogantly how he is going to thrash Hewitt and Arthurs on this potato field court, unfortunately he got beaten comfortably in both matches :o

mitalidas
10-17-2004, 12:55 AM
What does Club Fed mean anyways? I know that might sound like a dumb ass question but like it annoys me that he calls Fed that and I dont even know why, maybe just cuz he has an idiot nickname for him.... But I didn't konw if there was soemthign behind it that y'all don't like it either, or if its just that same reason I dont.

Its a take on "Club Med" which is a popular travel group that arranges trips to the Mexico area , in other words Americans will recognize it as a "Clever" twist on a well known phrase and think Brad is so clever, and funny, and cute, and OH SHUT UP BRAD :(

Daniel
10-17-2004, 10:04 AM
oh yeah Shut up BRad, :fiery:

stupid american

knight_ley
10-17-2004, 05:37 PM
hey! not all of us are stupid! some of us are on your side! i think he's an ass as well... and i cannot stand Roddick... which is not easy being a tennis fan here and not liking Roddick and loving Federer...... ugh.... it sucks sometimes

mitalidas
10-17-2004, 07:58 PM
I think that's what Daniel was saying. That is Brad is a stupid american, the rest of us are just.... er, well, Americans. Nice Americans

mitalidas
10-17-2004, 07:59 PM
I think that's what Daniel was saying. That is Brad is a stupid american, you know qualifying American with the appropriate adjective meant for BG. Rhe rest of us are just.... er, well, Americans. Nice Americans ;)

Yoda
10-17-2004, 09:28 PM
Have any of you NICE :wavey: americans seen a live match in the US between Fedman and say Roddick or Agassi.
Were you uneasy supporting the enemy?

I'm waiting for a Federer vs Henman Wimby match so I can walk in with the swiss flag painted on my face :devil:

lunahielo
10-17-2004, 10:07 PM
From Yoda~
Have any of you NICE americans seen a live match in the US between Fedman and say Roddick or Agassi.
Were you uneasy supporting the enemy?
As far as I am concerned, Roddick is the enemy (everything I despise in a person) :( ~Agassi is OK, and he has been around a long time~guess that would count for something,
But, I have supported and do support Federer against them, or anyone else! :)
If I am ever lucky enough to see him play in person, there will be a Swiss flag on my face, too! I have no problem with that.

I'm waiting for a Federer vs Henman Wimby match so I can walk in with the swiss flag painted on my face :D :haha:

mitalidas
10-17-2004, 10:55 PM
Have any of you NICE :wavey: americans seen a live match in the US between Fedman and say Roddick or Agassi.
Were you uneasy supporting the enemy
I'm waiting for a Federer vs Henman Wimby match so I can walk in with the swiss flag painted on my face :devil:

i saw rogi v/s the Hen at USO this year
I felt so bad for Hen getting whipped around like that, that I had to start cheering for him at the end.

But no, never seen Rogi against the yankees

knight_ley
10-18-2004, 01:55 AM
Have any of you NICE :wavey: americans seen a live match in the US between Fedman and say Roddick or Agassi.
Were you uneasy supporting the enemy?

I'm waiting for a Federer vs Henman Wimby match so I can walk in with the swiss flag painted on my face :devil:


I haven't seen Federer vs. either yet, but I've seen Federer a few times. I am hoping to see Federer vs. Roddick at a tourny this summer cuz I would love to see Federer hand Roddick a beating in person, plus I'd be there with my Swiss flag and my Swiss flag shirt. I don't even care. I hate Roddick with every bone in my body. I respect him, but his game is one dimensional and he is so unbelievably overrated here in the States. It's sickening. I have full respect for Agassi and he's a great person (I've had the pleasure of meeting him) so I have nothing against him at all. But yea, when either is playing Federer they are the enemy :)

knight_ley
10-18-2004, 01:56 AM
I'm waiting for a Federer vs Henman Wimby match so I can walk in with the swiss flag painted on my face :devil:

Hahahaha! I'm moving to England (sheffield to be exact) next year so you would have company at Wimbly if I'm there!!!!!!! ;)

Daniel
10-18-2004, 11:05 AM
Hello Mitalidas and simpleternity :wavey:

yep i was talking aobut Brad, he is stupid :fiery:

mitalidas
10-19-2004, 12:48 AM
Gruezi Daniel

More Brad-isms....

(wertheim's mailbag)
1) If you're Brad Gilbert, what are you telling Andy Roddick he needs to work on to match up with Roger Federer? 2 -- Michael Patterson, Burbank, Calif.

If I'm Gilbert I'm telling Roddick that "Roger Federer is a year older than you are and, in theory, will be out of tennis a year before you." Just kidding. I tell Roddick: A) To work Federer's backhand. As with Sampras, it is the weaker wing. B) Junk it up a little bit. Roddick tends to fall in love with a strategy -- set up the point with a big forehand; pass crosscourt, etc. It would be nice to see him show Federer a variety of styles just to keep the champ off balance. C) And serve like you've never served before.

Side note: There is a Nike poster near my apartment with a portrait of Federer and text reading, I love windy conditions. I love heat. I love swirling winds. I always get a kick out of this because it is patently false. Like any perfectionist, Federer likes the conditions to be ideal. When the court plays at a different speed than he had anticipated, Federer notices. When the balls don't bounce quite right, he notices. When fans move behind the baseline, he notices. I wonder how long it will be before a particularly resourceful opponent tries to get in his head. Put another way: Federer would have been a prime target for McEnroe's antics. If the rest of the field gets really desperate, I wonder if they will resort to gamesmanship. (Federer, unfortunately, is such a nice guy that any player resorting to psychological warfare would take a public relations hit.)


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/10/18/mailbag.1018/index.html

Yoda
10-19-2004, 12:58 AM
Hahahaha! I'm moving to England (sheffield to be exact) next year so you would have company at Wimbly if I'm there!!!!!!! ;)

Ok, you can join me on Henman Hill (a popular place for Henman supporters in Wimby) with pony-tail and ninja bandanna heehee :devil:

Billabong
10-19-2004, 01:51 AM
Brad:rolleyes:!

knight_ley
10-19-2004, 02:53 AM
Ok, you can join me on Henman Hill (a popular place for Henman supporters in Wimby) with pony-tail and ninja bandanna heehee :devil:

I'M THERE!!! Especially since I now have very little good will towards Henman since my Kiefer busted his wrist from when Henman jammed him at the USO this year..... :( Anything I can do to NOT support him, I will do... especially when it means support Federer :devil:

mitalidas
10-24-2004, 07:13 PM
Will be interesting if marat becomes Rogi's main rival in 05, with PL in the marat camp

Excerpt:
Safin credits much of his improvement to Peter Lundgren, Roger Federer's former coach, who he has been working with since April this year.

"He explains things, he teaches, he tries to explain why, how and what you have to do to reach the goal. He knows the main things that only a professional coach knows," he said.

lunahielo
10-24-2004, 09:32 PM
His (Marat) playing has certainly improved..IMHO~
I think he and Roger could possibly have a true rivalry.

RogiFan88
10-25-2004, 02:02 AM
Now THERE'S a more interesting rivalry, like that of Rogi and Juanqui also!

mitalidas
10-26-2004, 12:57 AM
A little bit of Rogi-bashing by Tiriac (pissed off that RF didnt play Madrid), but otherwise a nice piece:

The greatest player ever? That is the one title Federer never sought
The world No 1 remains calm on the inside as expectations about him soar.
John Roberts
26 October 2004


Andre Agassi says it. Tim Henman says it. Every leading tennis player knows it. Looking after No 1 is the only way to stay healthy.

Roger Federer looked after No 1 last week and missed the Madrid Masters, one of the nine major events on the ATP Tour. Having already qualified for next month's Masters Cup in Houston, and being guaranteed to finish the year as world No 1 after winning three of the four Grand Slam singles titles, Federer sent his apologies to Madrid and explained that he needed to rest his mind and body between engagements before competing in Basle this week.

He hopes to win his 13th final in a row and his first title in his home town tournament, where he used to be a ballboy. He also has a commitment to his Swiss sponsors.

Ion Tiriac, who owns the Madrid tournament, was not impressed, particularly since he had already lost the three players ranked immediately below Federer in the rankings, Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Guillermo Coria.

"I appreciate the honesty of Federer, who, as a shot-maker, is the best player I ever saw in my life," said Tiriac, who has been the manager of Ilie Nastase, Guillermo Vilas, Boris Becker and Goran Ivanisevic. "He says, 'I am tired'. Why is he tired? He should not play so much before a tournament like Madrid. And now he plays in Basle. That is his home. He should play. But something is wrong.

"[Michael] Schumacher didn't stop after six races when he was world F1 champion. I think a tennis player who makes five, six, seven, eight, 10 million dollars a year should have the decency to make his programme and give back something to the game."

Tiriac advocates that any player who does not fulfil his Masters Series commitments should not be allowed to play in the Masters Cup. But he cannot imagine the ATP, who run the men's tour, taking such strong measures.

"Unfortunately, I don't believe they are going to do the surgery. They might do an aspirin here, an aspirin there to change it."

The 23-year-old Federer has reached the point where he cannot please everybody. Missing the Madrid tournament may be only the start of his readjustments to alleviate the demands on his time, on and off the court. The tennis calendar is suffocating, and, in spite of endless talk of change, there are few signs that the sport's various governing bodies are ready to alter the schedule and do some serious pruning.

Federer, in common with the most successful players of the open era before him - Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras, Agassi - will plan his year in order to peak at the four Grand Slam championships. To mark his triumphs this year at the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open, Federer's shirt, shorts, headband and racket have been put on display at the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island.

On this site after the US Open, Nick Bollettieri, Agassi's former coach, hailed Federer as the greatest talent tennis has seen. And yet, before he won Wimbledon last year, some observers questioned whether he had the nerve to win a Grand Slam title.

"Things have changed a little bit over a year," Federer says. "After the [2003] French Open, where I lost in the first round, I was sitting in the press room trying to explain why and telling people to relax a little bit, and trying not to put too much pressure on myself. Here we are, six Grand Slams later, I have four of them, plus the Masters Cup, and in other Masters Series events I have four titles. Now suddenly I will be the greatest player ever. It's quite a contrast.

"In the beginning of my pro career, I didn't play so well in the finals. I always had the feeling that the other guys were playing unbelievably, and I could not do much about it. Suddenly, I started winning and turning the tide."

Numbers, however, tell only a fraction of the story. It is not only what Federer does, but also the way that he does it. He was first attracted to football before finding his niche in tennis, so it should come as no surprise that the 23-year-old Swiss admires the consummate skills of Real Madrid's French genius, Zinedine Zidane. Watching Federer play tennis can be like watching a swan glide serenely over water - it is easy to forget how much hectic activity may be taking place beneath the surface. So does the apparent ease of Federer's expertise in an individual sport demanding mental and physical strength and the stamina to cope with almost constant intercontinental travel and training for tournaments hide inner stress?

"I am actually quite calm inside, I have to say. Once I feel good on the court, when I'm sure about what's going on, I don't think about going crazy any more - losing my mind doesn't even come into my mind. The way I am on the court is also the way I feel inside, usually. Obviously, sometimes in tough situations I put on a little bit of a poker face. I cannot start having wobbly legs at break point. You have to get your act together."

How would he set his standard for being the best ever - by winning a certain number of Grand Slams, or by being No 1 for a number of years, or by playing at a consistently high level?

"I didn't say 'I want to be the best ever'. People are saying I have the chance to be. I'm conscious of that now, having won four slams at 23 years old. Hopefully, I'll stay healthy, so I can continue to compete, because this is what I love doing. If I break records, that's fantastic, but if it doesn't happen, that's OK."

Since winning his first Grand Slam title at Wimbledon last year, Federer has prospered without a coach. "I like to be in control of what's going on and I like to be independent," he says. "My parents and my coaches throughout my career have brought me up so that I can travel on my own. I felt like I needed that sense of self-reliance, because you never know what is going to happen."

Dynamic dozen: Federer's 12 successive final triumphs

Roger Federer - the winner of 21 singles titles - has triumphed in 12 consecutive finals, a feat matched only by Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe since tennis went open in 1968.

Federer's winning sequence:

2003

Vienna October, beat Carlos Moya in final, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.

The Masters Cup, Houston November, beat Andre Agassi in final, 6-3, 6-0, 6-4.

2004

The Australian Open January, beat Marat Safin in final, 7-6, 6-4, 6-2.

Dubai March, beat Feliciano Lopez in final, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2.

The Indian Wells Masters March, beat Tim Henman in final, 6-3, 6-3.

The Hamburg Masters May, beat Guillermo Coria in final, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.

Halle June, beat Mardy Fish in final, 6-0, 6-3.

Wimbledon July, beat Andy Roddick in final, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4.

Gstaad July, beat Igor Andreev in final, 6-2, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3.

The Canadian Masters July, beat Andy Roddick in final, 7-5, 6-3.

The US Open September, beat Lleyton Hewitt in final, 6-0, 7-6, 6-0.

Bangkok October, beat Andy Roddick in final, 6-4, 6-0.

Daniel
10-26-2004, 06:38 AM
nice article :)

RonE
10-26-2004, 09:00 AM
Thanks for the article :D

Yes, it is very true that you can't please everyone all the time. Roger is only human, not a machine. He should put his health before the whims of tournaments directors. Slaughtering the goose that lays the golden eggs means no more golden eggs. I hope people like Tiriac will realise that someday :rolleyes:

Billabong
10-26-2004, 10:53 AM
thanks:D!

lunahielo
10-29-2004, 11:44 PM
I just found this article. I am glad he's not going to play in Paris.

Injured Federer confirms Paris no-show

World number one Roger Federer has confirmed he will not take part in next week's $A4.18 million Paris Masters after failing to recover from a thigh injury.

The Swiss ace, the winner of Wimbledon and the Australian and US Opens this season, tore a muscle in his left thigh while practising for the Basel tournament on Monday.

He still hopes to recover in time for the season-ending Masters Cup in Houston from November 15-21.

Argentina's world number five Guillermo Coria and Spanish world number 30 Juan Carlos Ferrero were also missing when the draw for the Paris Masters was made on Friday.

Coria, who has not played since July, has a shoulder injury while Ferrero has opted to concentrate on the build-up to Spain's Davis Cup final against the United States in December.

In Federer's absence, world number two Andy Roddick is top seed with Australia's Lleyton Hewitt seeded number two.

Britain's Tim Henman, the defending champion, is seeded three.

Federer said he was frustrated with the injury.

"I actually trained very moderately these last few days," the Swiss star said.

"I think the muscle injury is rather the result of overload throughout the entire season."

So far in 2004, Federer has played 75 singles, winning 69 of them.

Daniel
10-30-2004, 07:11 AM
thanls lunahielo :)

lsy
10-30-2004, 07:56 AM
From ATP insider news :
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2004/Insider_oct25.asp

IN BASEL: Before having to withdraw from his home event, the Davidoff Swiss Indoors, with a left thigh muscle tear, ROGER FEDERER made an appearance on Germany's biggest sports show, ZDF SportStudio. After speaking about his great year, including three Grand Slams and seven other titles, Federer picked his own perfume, “RF – Feel the touch,” in a blind test involving three other fragrances, launched by other sports stars. The showed aired prime-time on Saturday evening.

-- > ROGER FEDERER and NICOLAS MASSU attended the draw ceremony of the Davidoff Swiss Indoors at the Town Hall in Basel. Aired live on local television, Tele Basel, the players drew and were interviewed inside the famous building, which dates back to the early 16th century. Federer was also presented the 2003 ATPtennis.com Fan Favorite Award during the ceremony. He was voted the favorite by the fans and ATPtennis.com users, and received a trophy from Waterford Crystal.

They finally presented him the award :eek: :eek:

-- > ROGER FEDERER received the Swiss Tennis Player of the Year award on Tuesday evening at the Davidoff Swiss Indoors for the sixth consecutive year.

-- > STEFAN KOUBEK and ROMAN VALENT played a show match at the traditional Kids Day in front of more than 1,000 children at the Davidoff Swiss Indoors. During the 60-minute demonstration they had a prominent umpire in injured World No. 1 ROGER FEDERER. Federer served as chair and line umpire and lined up with Koubek to sign autographs for all the kids after the event.

-- > ROGER FEDERER, RAINER SCHUETTLER, JUAN IGNACIO CHELA, PARADORN SRICHAPHAN, STEFAN KOUBEK, JIRI NOVAK, IVO HEUBERGER, GASTON GAUDIO all met for a chat and posed for photos with the main sponsors of the Davidoff Swiss Indoors.

babsi
10-30-2004, 10:02 AM
Thanks for the articles everybody :) :)

Fergie
10-30-2004, 11:25 AM
Thanks for the new articles ;)

Daniel
10-31-2004, 06:20 AM
thanks, i would love a pic of Rogi and Gaston together :drool: :hearts: :)

WyveN
11-04-2004, 12:20 PM
Have you all read Roger's latest answers to fan questions on his site.
Some of his answers are very funny.

Is winning a calendar year Grand Slam (or Golden Slam like Steffi) one of your career goals?
They are not goals for me, because it would mean that this year would be a disaster.


:haha:

How do you hit your second serve with so much kick on it?
You tell me, there is no secret.

Do you also observe the spectators during breaks or do you just fade it all out and focus on your game?
Sometimes, because there are many different looking and dressed people watching, so it is funny sometimes to see fans waving at me during breaks.

WyveN
11-04-2004, 12:22 PM
Do you like playing tennis on the computer?
I love it and I hope that you can soon play with the player Roger Federer in the game.

:haha:

yanchr
11-04-2004, 03:48 PM
Oh, my...

Roger is way too funny. It seems like he answered the questions in so good sprits. He was joking all around :eek:

"Is winning a calendar year Grand Slam (or Golden Slam like Steffi) one of your career goals?
They are not goals for me, because it would mean that this year would be a disaster. "

:lol:Yes, Roger, it IS a disaster ;)

"I can’t stop wondering if you’ve ever felt that you’ve reached absolute happiness. Have you felt that something was missing; something that would make you completely fulfilled with all you’ve achieved (in all fields of your life)?
I don’t know if you can find absolute happiness. I don’t think I have so far because I’m not married, I don’t have kids, so my future is still very open and things to look forward to. So ask me again in 25 years then maybe my answer could be different. As tennis is not everything in the world. "

Well said Roger :worship: Great attitude :yeah:
I will remember to ask you this 25 years later ;)

"I was wondering if your biography is going to be available in English anytime soon.
No. "

Roger, you are too direct and word-saving :mad: :p

"I was wondering who your favourite players in women’s tennis are?
It used to be Martina Hingis, and now Serena."

:eek::eek: Never thought Roger would like Serena most now.

"Do you see the actual structure of tennis changing in the future due to technological advances? For example, would lengthening the tennis court itself be a possibility?
No rule changes please. I am No. 1 with the rules in place right now! Every change would make me a horrible player and I would have to consider quitting. Smile …………."

This one sucks :haha::haha::haha:

"Why do you always play with the Nike vapor shoes? Do you have your own Nike clothing line?
I change my shoe type approx. twice a year, but the design is up to Nike. I can let them know what colours I like and it has to match my tennis dress. "

Roger even thinks of MATCH between his dress and shoes when he is on court....;)



Roger, simply :worship::worship:
Thanks for the sensible and funny answers. Enjoy them very much :D

babsi
11-04-2004, 05:48 PM
He is a great guy,isn´t he?
:) :) :)
like your comments,yanchr:):)

Daniel
11-05-2004, 07:30 AM
Roger u rock :yeah: :banana:

jtipson
11-05-2004, 12:48 PM
Roger is in New York at the UN today, and taking part in a press conference to launch the Year of Sport (great - stop right there) and Physical Education (yuk - why do they have to spoil it ?). Anyway, it's gonna be live over the internet and is scheduled for 12:30 pm EST.

http://www.un.org/webcast/index.asp

babsi
11-05-2004, 01:33 PM
Thanks for the information,jtipson :)

laselva
11-05-2004, 05:04 PM
Roger is in New York at the UN today, and taking part in a press conference to launch the Year of Sport (great - stop right there) and Physical Education (yuk - why do they have to spoil it ?). Anyway, it's gonna be live over the internet and is scheduled for 12:30 pm EST.

http://www.un.org/webcast/index.asp

Thank you. I've just watched it. He looked terribly nervous. :eek:
Nice to see Roger again! And Mr.Ogi, funny old gentleman! :)

jtipson
11-05-2004, 05:07 PM
Thank you. I've just watched it. He looked terribly nervous. :eek:
Nice to see Roger again! And Mr.Ogi, funny old gentleman! :)

Yes, he did look rather nervous, didn't he? And smiling all the time :) Unfortunately I couldn't hear much because I'm at work and have lost my headphones! Guess we'll have to wait until Houston to see him next.

mitalidas
11-05-2004, 06:33 PM
Yes, he did look rather nervous, didn't he? And smiling all the time :) Unfortunately I couldn't hear much because I'm at work and have lost my headphones! Guess we'll have to wait until Houston to see him next.

hi jtipson, i have noticed that you have a great job where you are often watching Rogi's interviews with/without headphones, and his matches on a large screen (I remember!!! In your conference board room or something). can i interview there as well or what? ;)

gogo_guga
11-05-2004, 08:03 PM
Is Roger playing in Houston?

JBrocks
11-05-2004, 10:28 PM
German videotext wrote Roger hired Tony Roche.
anyone who can confirm?

mitalidas
11-06-2004, 01:04 AM
its been discussed on this thread --scroll back a week or so. He has been practicing with him, a lot. he also said in the beginning of the year, there was an Aussie who fit the bill. most people assumed it was cahill. guess not

lsy
11-06-2004, 11:17 AM
This is a great interview from Tennisweek. Once again he mentioned how much he loves tennis. Comparitively at his young age, he's very mature and had most things in perspective.

========================================

The Tennis Week Interview: Roger Federer


Photo By Michael Cole By Richard Pagliaro
11/06/2004



Tennis Week: Roger, how did you get involved in the United Nation's International Year of Sport and Physical Education and what appealed to you about it?

Roger Federer: Well, Mr. (Adolf) Ogi (former President of Switzerland and current UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace) actually contacted me only last week, so this is very spontaneous. Because I've been injured and unable to play I've had some time...

Tennis Week: How is your health? How is your leg?

Roger Federer: My health is better now. I'll travel right away to Houston after this.

Tennis Week: Do you feel good enough that you'll be able to play the Masters Cup?

Roger Federer: I do feel I'm able to play, but I have to start slow. So this was a very spontaneous decision where Mr. Ogi said: "Would you like to come and introduce the Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005?" He said he would love to have me here next to (UN Secretary-General) Kofi Annan. And I said "Yeah, I'd love to do it." So, we are all here.

Tennis Week: Ultimately, what message do you and Mr. Ogi most want to get across to people about the UN's International Year of Sport and Health?

Adolf Ogi: I think it is important for the first time that the United Nations passed a resolution which focused on the value on sport in relation with development of health, education and peace. And I think sport is a new instrument, which should be used throughout the world to create a more peaceful world, a more pleasant world. We have still 70 conflicts. I was President of Switzerland and now I am Kofi Annan's delegate on sport for development on peace. I think politicians have failed. Therefore, I think we need a new instrument. It is actually an old instrument, not used enough so far. Because sport can bridge difficulties, conflict, cultures. Sport can show what is possible to politicians. The ping-pong diplomacy between China and the U.S. in 1973 was the first break through in their relations. Ping-pong helped bring these two nations together. Today, we have 150 projects and I believe, not today or tonight or tomorrow, but in 10 to 20 years we can create a better world for sport. This is what we are hoping to do.

Tennis Week: I've read your web site, RogerFederer.net, which details the Roger Federer Foundation and its initiative to help children in South Africa. How do you balance your tennis career with your desire to help people, charitable and social causes? And how important is it for you to use this platform you have as the world's top player and an internationally-known star to help people and do things like this with the UN to try to make an impact beyond tennis?

Roger Federer: You're right (it is important) and it's also something very new to me because the Foundation was introduced last year only. I've just had my first event recently for the Foundation.

Tennis Week: How did it go?

Roger Federer: It was very good. We had great success, you know about almost $100,000 raised, which was fantastic. I never thought it was going to be so much and now I'm helping a project in South African because, you know, my mom is from there. My first goal was to actually help kids in South Africa so we founded this project in South Africa. I'm helping 30 kids in South Africa and making sure they get to eat twice a day, properly, that the infrastructure is fine. And that the money I can generate, by my presence, can only increase everything for them. And in being here to introduce the Year of Sport, I hope I can encourage them to do more sports.

Tennis Week: What have you learned in traveling the world, experiencing different cultures, meeting different people about the power of sport to educate and inspire people. You know, so many people — from children to adults — do respect you and look up to you. What have you learned about the power of sports to inspire, educate and just connect with people?

Roger Federer: I've been traveling basically since I was 12 years-old, almost, so I've been traveling 10 years. I've really met a lot of people, different cultures and sports has taught me very much, almost everything, if you like. Because I've always been on the road, you have to speak to different people, learn different cultures, you have to adapt, you know, and speak different languages. For me this is a great opportunity because I really agree with this project and what we're doing here. It's just fantastic because this is how I look at sports.

Tennis Week: Sports can unify people.

Roger Federer: It unifies people because let's say we face each other whether if it's in tennis, if it's a fight, if it's a race, if it's a game, you know you push each other hard, you compete to the max, you want to win, but you have to respect your opponent.

Tennis Week: And you shake hands at the end.

Roger Federer: And in the end, your opponent might be your best friend. So you walk away happy and if you lose you lose and your opponent can sometimes come to you and say "no problem, next time you'll beat me" or something like that. This is what sports is all about. Especially now, with the war and everything, I think sports makes people happy and makes them forget that there is more important things going on in the world. So for me, I feel this is a real opportunity.

Tennis Week: Given the sort of instability and violence we see in the world today, the terrorism, the United States invading Iraq and everything else going on, did it give you a greater sense of urgency to get involved? Did recent world events make you want to contribute or was it just a matter of this was something you felt in your heart was the right thing to do?

Roger Federer: Exactly. I think this is how it felt. Because this year is the Year of Rice so I don't know what the link would be for me to be in the Year Of the Rice. But for me to be in the Year Of Sport, it fits perfectly for me, I'm number one in the world right now and if I can help this cause that's fantastic. Plus, Mr. Ogi is Swiss and for me to come here and meet Mr. Kofi Annan is a great opportunity and truly a great honor.

Tennis Week: A few years back, Martina Hingis served as a UNICEF ambassador for the UN. Does Switzerland's stance in the world influence you getting involved?

Roger Federer: I don't exactly what Martina did as ambassador. Like I said earlier, it was something I felt was important. If I didn't get injured as well, I would have been playing in Paris and I wouldn't be here. So this is how it is now.

Tennis Week: Well, it's great that you're taking advantage of that time off to do something like this rather than sitting around watching TV or something..

Roger Federer: Exactly. I had to make sure with my doctors it was OK leaving earlier with my injury because I was supposed to leave on Sunday because of treatment. Now that I was injured and it's getting better they told me it was OK to leave because the treatment is not as necessary anymore. I'm doing fine so to me this was a great opportunity.

Tennis Week: Tennis does have a tradition of prominent players involved in social causes from Arthur Ashe, Andre Agassi, Andrea Jaeger, Chris Evert, Pat Rafter, yourself. What role would you like to see prominent tennis players play in getting involved and contributing to such causes? Can the sport, the players themselves, do more to help?

Roger Federer: Yeah. I think if you look at team players it's not so easy because you have the whole organization behind you and it's not so easy. As a tennis player, you are an individual and you can decide what you want to do. And for me, it was always one goal in my career: to actually have the Roger Federer Foundation and give something back.

Tennis Week: Even before you made it was that the goal?

Roger Federer: Yeah. Obviously, you have to have a name and make a name for yourself in order to do it. But once I got it, you know I said: "I don't want to rush into things, you know, because maybe it's too early to have a foundation." But I thought last year was the right year to do it. Everybody knows how much money I make, everybody knows the great life I am having. Of course, it's tough at times, I am traveling all the time and I would like to be home more. But this is one of the small ways I can give something back.

Tennis Week: And just the fact that you're here talking about it can promote it and inspire someone in any part of the world who follows you or follow to tennis to get involved.

Roger Federer: Correct and I've already gotten a lot of comments and compliments from people that I'm already having a foundation and trying to do things at my age. Some make it at 25, some make it at 30 and some make it at 60. I thought it was important to make it now, to seize the moment. Of course, I need to also spend time for the foundation, which makes it kind of difficult in the beginning now that I'm so busy with playing tennis and trying to defend the number one position. But this is beyond tennis, after my career as well. So I thought if I started early, then I can build something really nice.

Tennis Week: You're coming off one of the greatest years in the history of the Open Era. It's the type of year many might be tempted to cash in on and yet you haven't sold your soul commercially, signed with a big management agency and pursued excessive endorsements. Is that temptation there and how do you sustain the balance between your tennis career and everything else going on in your life: your foundation, commitment to causes like this and dealing with people like me who want to talk to you all the time?

Roger Federer: Tennis, for me, will always stay, for the moment, the most important thing. Not in life, you know, but it is very important to me. I really try to place everything around my schedule, around my preparation, around my holidays. Sometimes, if I'm really in the mood to do something for my foundation, I tell myself these are the days or the hours I have time to do it and then I place them at the right time, the same for interviews and everything. So it's really important to have the right balance because if you do too much for one, then the other one suffers. For me, I don't want to have my career suffering around the stress I'm in. Because in the end if my results are not there, then the demand is not there.

Tennis Week: The results give you the opportunity to do things like this.

Roger Federer: Exactly. Yes. The impact is bigger. I think that is important to understand. We all speak the same language — my management — and that's very important.

Tennis Week: Professionally, what can you do after the type of season you've had this year? What do you do for an encore? I mean, it's really pretty incredible, winning three of the four majors, where do you go from here?

Roger Federer: Next year will be a hard year for me to kind of prove myself again. I thought I had to prove myself this year after a fantastic season last year. And I'm really looking forward to come back to America after the U.S. Open win. I want to play more in Asia. Of course, I would love to defend my number one position — this stands over everything — of course the defense of the Grand Slam titles is very important as well. But for me, staying number one will be the main goal for next year as there's no Olympics and so on I really have this big, big focus of staying number one in the world. And then I want to get more involved in my foundation and make something happen.

Rogi is determined to stay where he is :yeah:. Really happy to hear he wants to play more in Asia too. Many think he went to BKK just for the money, sure plays a part but he probably really did want to come to this new place.

Tennis Week: You seem so cool on court and when I've spoken to you off the court you're so calm and relaxed and it seems the stress seldom gets to you. Does any of the pressure ever sort of get to you? Do the demands of being number one ever get to you? Do you ever want to go home and just smash something against the wall?

Roger Federer: (laughs). Well, I also do feel pressure, very often, in my life. If it's on court or off court, I have to make many, many decisions. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. Like today, I have to make a speech at the UN. Even though it's only a few minutes, still, you want to do well and you have to come up with the right words. For me, this is not something I am doing every day. For him (points to Mr. Ogi seated next to him) these are moments he is much more used to (smiles). Then I get nervous walking out on center court. So I have many, many times throughout the year where I totally become very nervous. So I think by always having to handle these sort of situations gives me much more confidence and routines and kind of helps me for my character — I become stronger — and again, as we were saying earlier, this is why sports have helped me so much. By experiencing such things and then being able to handle them better.

Tennis Week: I respect the fact you seem to be the sort of person who challenges yourself. You're not sitting back content in saying: "Hey, I'm Roger Federer, the top tennis player in the world." It's pretty cool that someone in your position, who could get so self-involved and wrapped up in being number one, is willing to try these things and try to contribute to others.

Roger Federer: This is why I made this spontaneous decision: because this is beyond tennis. This is sport, this is world-wide and I can sit next to Mr. Ogi and Mr. Annan and try to promote this Year of Sport. Otherwise, it's just Roger Federer, the tennis player, and that's it. This is above and beyond.

Tennis Week: What would you say to people who want to get involved in the UN Year of Sport or who want to get involved in your initiative in South Africa? Whether they want to contribute their time or money or just get involved, what can they do?

Roger Federer: They can definitely go on my web site RogerFederer.net to learn more about my Foundation.

Tennis Week: I've been visiting your web site a lot lately to follow your status. Do you go on there yourself a lot?
(better watch what we said there....lurkers around :eek: )

Roger Federer: I go there also, very much. When it comes to the International Year of Sport, I would recommend that people go to the United Nations web site.

Tennis Week: I know your focus here at the UN today is talking about the Year of Sport, but can I ask you a few tennis questions?

Roger Federer: The easy questions (laughs)? Yes.

Tennis Week: I'm sure you're sick of hearing this all the time, but what is the coaching status? Early in the year, you said you hoped by next year (2005) you'd have a coach in place. There have been some unconfirmed recent reports. How is that search going?

Roger Federer: The situation is still the same. I still don't have a coach. There is no real plans to actually have one in the near future. It's not even a plan, really, I'm just still making up my mind on who is the right person and so on

Tennis Week: Are you waiting for anyone in particular? Or are you just waiting for the right situation?

Roger Federer: Yes, exactly. For the moment, I haven't found the right person yet, let's put it this way.

:confused: Tony Roche is really unconfirmed news I guess..Poor Rogi...nobody wants to work with him... :sad: Honestly I will really admire the next person who's going to be his coach, so much pressures

Tennis Week: Do you play the ball or the opponent? Will you just play your game regardless or devise tactics based on a given opponent?

Roger Federer: Umm...I think it's 50-50. First, I think you have to make sure about your own game and second, throughout the match, you have to adapt to what your opponent is doing, to how he plays, what has worked for him, what has worked for you and then you work it out.

Tennis Week: In the Wimbledon final, some speculated the rain delay would help Roddick because he could go back and talk to his coach whereas you were losing and don't have a coach to consult. Do you ever coach yourself on the court or during changeovers or are you more intuitive and play more on feel?

Roger Federer: I play very much from feel, from the way I see it, and from what has worked for my opponent and what has worked for me. And then, work around it and see how I can make the difference. Rain delays don't happen often, especially during Wimbledon finals, it was very hard for me going into the rain delay being down.

Tennis Week: Particularly since you hadn't been down the entire tournament.

Roger Federer: Exactly. I said to myself: "I think I have to take a chance here." Because if I keep on playing like this, I will probably lose, so I might as well change up things a little bit. It worked out for me. Of course, I decided to serve and volley more, but to break him, you cannot serve and volley (laughs), you know so I first actually had to get back into the set before I could play my game. I had a good start and played a fantastic tiebreak, so it was great.

Tennis Week: What moment — on the court and off the court — has given you the greatest satisfaction and joy this year?

Roger Federer: Off court, definitely my event last Sunday where I really had my first event for the Roger Federer Foundation. And then I think being here today (a the UN) is a very special moment, of course. On court, I think...a ah...I have so many (laughs). I think the three Grand Slams are fantastic and each has a special place for me. Australia, I became number one in the world. Wimbledon, I defended my title. The U.S. Open, I played a fantastic final, so I think these are the three best moments of my career.

Tennis Week: Who has inspired you in your life?

Roger Federer: I was always looking up as a tennis player to Boris Becker, who was so big in Germany and Switzerland. Off court, I'm only getting into these other things now because when you're young, when you're 17, you sometimes only see the sports world. I have had the opportunity to meet many, many great people and this will be much more important to me.

Tennis Week: For a guy who left school early, you're such an articulate, intelligent person, who seems to have a grasp of the world beyond tennis. Do you read a lot?

Roger Federer: (laughs). No, I don't read too much. I think again we come back to traveling the world, meeting people, seeing the cultures I've seen.

:haha:...honest boy

Tennis Week: That's a good education.

Roger Federer: I thought so. And by handling the pressure moments I've had, I think it's made me a more stable person. The way my parents raised me and brought me up and also the coaches have been very important because they guide you through the career. And always important to me was respect, to respect people. I just stick to these principles and they seem like they've been working well so far so I hope they will continue to do so.

:yeah:

Tennis Week: What's the most unusual or bizarre experience you've had as a result of your celebrity?

Roger Federer: I've had many of them (laughs). People you look up to come to you and say "I'm your biggest fan!" And you say: "Really? You?" And that happens occasionally and it's funny. And then you have people in the middle of the street who cannot help themselves and come up to you and start shaking as they talk because they cannot believe they are talking to you. It's interesting and funny to see the reactions sometimes.

Tennis Week: What do you make of the talk of player withdrawals, player injuries resulting from a long season and players defending their right to withdraw to protect themselves from aggravating injuries. I saw Roddick's comments in Paris earlier this week..

Roger Federer: What did he say?

Tennis Week: He basically said "In what other sport do you play 11 months of the year? I am going to finish my season on December 5th and start next year on January 5th. I would rather pull out of an event than injure myself. If they can't understand the way an athlete works, it's too bad." Is the schedule too long? Is it too long? Does it need to be shortened to protect the players from injuries? What do you think?

Roger Federer: I think in a way the season is definitely long. But you can adjust your schedule. Scheduling is very important in my career. I have to make sure I don't just chase tournaments. I just play my schedule I really like to play. I don't think that is an excuse for any of the players because that's just how the tour is. We have a great tour. We should not forget that. We have many, many highlights in our year and you have to be ready for them. And sometimes you are tired. Don't play if you are too tired. If you think, "I really should help the sport", you know you should go play even though you are tired, but still make sure you prevent injuries.

Tennis Week: So you have to take care of yourself.

Roger Federer: You have to take care of yourself. You have to be aggressive sometimes, but not all the time. Think about the fans around the world who want to see you. Think about tournament directors who love to have you there. Think about the sponsors who support the game. I think you have to make it up to all of them. Because we are living our dreams basically because of them. We didn't start when we were three years old because we wanted to play on Wimbledon's Centre Court. We started because we loved playing, we loved hitting the ball and suddenly we make it there. We live the tour and let's say we start saying: "Oh, the tour is too long, I'm too tired." I don't agree.

Always thoughtful. I admire how he never just complains but give deeper thoughts into things and understand his role.

Tennis Week: You can't have it both ways.

Roger Federer: No. You have to make some sacrifices for this life we have. You can't play tennis 'till you're 60. The career already stops at 30 or 35 years old because then your body is used, you're tired of traveling and so on, so you might as well enjoy it now while you can.

Again...:yeah:

Tennis Week: I often go back and watch that tape of you against Agassi in the first match of last year's Masters Cup in Houston where you hit that tremendous running forehand winner at the end. You tend to produce these eye-opening, jaw-dropping type of shots under pressure more than anyone else. Are there any moments on court — like that running forehand in Houston — where you surprise yourself and sort of say to yourself: "Wow, I can't believe I hit that shot. That's pretty cool."?

Roger Federer: (smiles) Yeah, that match point in Houston, you're right, that was fantastic.

Tennis Week: That was unbelievable because you created such a sharp, short angle from a full sprint.

Roger Federer: I had almost stopped playing that point because I thought the ball was out and I won the match and then the point continued. He had that easy forehand put away volley and I ran and hit it and I could not even see the ball (land) because of the great angle I hit (laughs). It was just fantastic.

Tennis Week: Remember against Andre in Indian Wells, it was almost the same scenario when he had a volley and you hit a very similar shot. I'm sitting there thinking: "Agassi is never going to want to volley deep to your forehand again after those two..." But do you ever hit a shot that surprises you and brings a smile to your face.

Roger Federer: (laughs). Oh yeah, I think every player surprises themselves a little bit. Because you practice hard, you prepare as best you can and then when a shot like this happens during a match situation — a big point, the crowd gets into it and you've maybe only hit that shot three times in your life before that and then you can hit it on the biggest court in the world, you know — that is surprising and yeah, it feels really good of course. (laughs).

Tennis Week: Champions players from Tony Trabert to Rod Laver to John Newcombe to John McEnroe to Stefan Edberg to Pete Sampras have said you are the player they most enjoy watching. Who do you like to watch?

Roger Federer: I just like to watch tennis. If I'm flipping through the channels and see a match I will watch it, really no matter who is playing. I just like the game very much. I really don't watch the senior tour as much, but one player I would really like to watch is Bjorn Borg because I never had the chance to see him when he was at his best and from what I have seen and heard he is a very special player and obviously a great champion.

Good to hear again how much he loves this game. He had mentioned about Bjorn Borg lately. I think he's setting his eyes on winning FO and Wimby back to back ;)

=========================================

And you wonder why most Rogi's fans are "older"? Coz he gives "boring" answers such as this which probably only the slightly "older" ones are going to appreciate ;)

Don't come after me...those really young ones around here, I'm either just generalising or you guys/gals are like Rogi, way too mature and intelligent comparitively ;)

babsi
11-06-2004, 03:09 PM
Great interview:) great guy:)

THANKS Isy :) :)

lunahielo
11-07-2004, 12:35 AM
Thanks, lsy~~ :)
Great interview.............
and Rogi, what a sweetie! :hearts:

Ooo, I am excited about Houston!! ;)

Daniel
11-07-2004, 06:13 AM
nice interview

thanks :D

WyveN
11-07-2004, 07:01 AM
great interview, thanks

Action Jackson
11-07-2004, 07:34 AM
Thanks for the interview and it just confirms how Rogi is, there is no acting there.

bad gambler
11-07-2004, 07:38 AM
so is he playing houston or not?

tournament will be poorer without him, and yes i know i'm stating the obvious

Skyward
11-07-2004, 01:59 PM
Thanks Isy! It's one of his best interviews. :worship:

yanchr
11-07-2004, 03:57 PM
Great interview.

Roger Federer: You have to take care of yourself. You have to be aggressive sometimes, but not all the time. Think about the fans around the world who want to see you. Think about tournament directors who love to have you there. Think about the sponsors who support the game. I think you have to make it up to all of them. Because we are living our dreams basically because of them. We didn't start when we were three years old because we wanted to play on Wimbledon's Centre Court. We started because we loved playing, we loved hitting the ball and suddenly we make it there. We live the tour and let's say we start saying: "Oh, the tour is too long, I'm too tired." I don't agree.

Too impressive to not try to quote it even if you have already hightlighted it, lsy ;)

What can I say about this great PERSON? You simply have to show respect to this person even if you don't like him at all.

mitalidas
11-07-2004, 09:37 PM
Safin targets world number one Federer in 2005
Sun 7 November, 2004 19:31

By Francois Thomazeau

PARIS, Nov 7 (Reuters) - Marat Safin, back to his very best with a record-equalling third Paris Masters title on Sunday, hopes to be a match for world number one Roger Federer next year.

The Russian, ranked seventh in the world, is the only player apart from Federer to have won back-to-back Masters Series tournaments this season, his Paris success following victory in Madrid last month.

Safin, who has experienced an erratic season, will sign off at next week's Masters Cup in Houston, where he will be able to gauge his form against seven of the game's leading players, including the Swiss number one.

"Nobody really looks forward to playing against Federer, under any circumstances, because the way he's playing right now, this year, is way too good," Safin told reporters.

"He was very solid, very stable, and he just was much better than other players -- much, much better. Even Roddick, although he improved a lot, he couldn't do much against Federer."

Federer won 10 tournaments in 2004, including the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open grand slam titles. He beat American Roddick in the Wimbledon final.

"Roddick played three, four finals this year, and Federer beat him quite easily," added Safin. "You have to be in really good condition to beat Roger.

"Next year, I will try to do my best and try to compete with him. That will be quite an effort for me.

"But it's quite a challenge to be at the same level as him. If he continues this way, he can be one of the greatest players of all time."

Safin was world number one in 2000, the year he won his only grand slam title at the U.S. Open.

Daniel
11-08-2004, 05:39 AM
good that Marat has a lot of respect for Roger .
thanks mitalidas :D

Fedex
11-09-2004, 01:50 AM
Safin targets world number one Federer in 2005
Sun 7 November, 2004 19:31

By Francois Thomazeau

PARIS, Nov 7 (Reuters) - Marat Safin, back to his very best with a record-equalling third Paris Masters title on Sunday, hopes to be a match for world number one Roger Federer next year.

The Russian, ranked seventh in the world, is the only player apart from Federer to have won back-to-back Masters Series tournaments this season, his Paris success following victory in Madrid last month.

Safin, who has experienced an erratic season, will sign off at next week's Masters Cup in Houston, where he will be able to gauge his form against seven of the game's leading players, including the Swiss number one.

"Nobody really looks forward to playing against Federer, under any circumstances, because the way he's playing right now, this year, is way too good," Safin told reporters.

"He was very solid, very stable, and he just was much better than other players -- much, much better. Even Roddick, although he improved a lot, he couldn't do much against Federer."

Federer won 10 tournaments in 2004, including the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open grand slam titles. He beat American Roddick in the Wimbledon final.

"Roddick played three, four finals this year, and Federer beat him quite easily," added Safin. "You have to be in really good condition to beat Roger.

"Next year, I will try to do my best and try to compete with him. That will be quite an effort for me.

"But it's quite a challenge to be at the same level as him. If he continues this way, he can be one of the greatest players of all time."

Safin was world number one in 2000, the year he won his only grand slam title at the U.S. Open.
Nice article, and its nice to here Safin say those good things about Roger. I want to see him do well here too, but I fear Roger may interfer with that. ;)

Billabong
11-09-2004, 03:25 AM
I think Rogi will get better match by match:)! His first match may be very tough though!

Fedex
11-10-2004, 01:22 AM
I think Rogi will get better match by match:)! His first match may be very tough though!
True. He had an unbelievably tough match vs. Andre in his first match, then rolled through everyone else, including Andre again in the final. :)

Billabong
11-10-2004, 03:49 AM
True. He had an unbelievably tough match vs. Andre in his first match, then rolled through everyone else, including Andre again in the final. :)

yep;)! Good example:)

WyveN
11-10-2004, 04:40 AM
I think Rogi will get better match by match:)! His first match may be very tough though!

Thats why hopefully he gets a good draw in terms of scheduling. Even with Hewitt when Roger is playing well he can blow him away but if he gets Lleyton first up then he may be rusty which will lead to unforced errors which is what Lleyton relies on.

yanchr
11-10-2004, 10:55 AM
Should it be like 1-7/8, 2-7/8, 3/4-5/6 for their first matches? So I think Roger will play either Henman or Gaudio first. Not too bad a start for Roger.

mitalidas
11-10-2004, 11:26 AM
Henman could still be tough despite their last two matches

Honestly, there are no easy matches here no matter what the draw. Its like going straight into the QF level at a GS

jtipson
11-10-2004, 11:51 AM
Should it be like 1-7/8, 2-7/8, 3/4-5/6 for their first matches? So I think Roger will play either Henman or Gaudio first. Not too bad a start for Roger.

Yes, I think that's how it was last year. Then for the second round of matches, the two winners and the two losers play each other (if that makes sense!).

RonE
11-10-2004, 02:07 PM
I am, as usual looking for precedents to draw hope from- remember Pete in 1999? He had just come off a long injury which forced him out of the USO, and apart from one match he played and was forced to retire in Paris, he hadn't played any matches leading up to TMC (YEC back then) and his injury was far more serious (dislocated vertabrae if I remember correctly). He did look a bit rusty in his first match, was even bludgeoned by Agassi in his 2nd round robin match but then came back strong to win the rest of his matches and the event with it.

speedracer
11-10-2004, 02:49 PM
Should it be like 1-7/8, 2-7/8, 3/4-5/6 for their first matches? So I think Roger will play either Henman or Gaudio first. Not too bad a start for Roger.

I bet the groups will be like that

Federer
Hewitt
Safin
Henman

Roddick
Moya
Coria
Gaudio

:lol: Just kidding. But everything is possible in Houston. :lol:

By the way, Jon W thinks that Agassi and Nalbandian withdrew from Paris because they were sure that someone was going to pull out from Houston. Possibly Fed? :confused:

"If Federer and/or Coria withdrew from the Masters Cup due to injuries, would Agassi qualify? Reading the [Masters Cup] Web site, you'd think the field is set in stone, which -- based, on Coria's injury and lack of play, seems questionable. --Susan Kery, Albuquerque, N.M.

Let's leave it at this ... the scuttlebutt is that certain players know with relative certainty that certain other players will not be playing Houston so they dropped out of Paris, confident that their spot in the Masters Cup would be secure. "

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/11/08/mailbag.1108/index.html


Does anybody know how fit/healthy/ready Rogi is?

RonE
11-10-2004, 03:25 PM
Does anybody know how fit/healthy/ready Rogi is?

I asked the same question in the "Federer doubtful for Masters Cup" thread. They do not have any new info on his condition on his website. guess no one really knows right now except Rogi and the people closest to him.

If someone here does know, please let us know :help:

Mrs. B
11-10-2004, 03:35 PM
hope this answers your query, RonE.


Tennis Week: How is your health? How is your leg?

Roger Federer: My health is better now. I'll travel right away to Houston after this.



Tennis Week: Do you feel good enough that you'll be able to play the Masters Cup?

Roger Federer: I do feel I'm able to play, but I have to start slow. So this was a very spontaneous decision where Mr. Ogi said: "Would you like to come and introduce the Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005?" He said he would love to have me here next to (UN Secretary-General) Kofi Annan. And I said "Yeah, I'd love to do it." So, we are all here.





Tennis Week: Well, it's great that you're taking advantage of that time off to do something like this rather than sitting around watching TV or something..

Roger Federer: Exactly. I had to make sure with my doctors it was OK leaving earlier with my injury because I was supposed to leave on Sunday because of treatment. Now that I was injured and it's getting better they told me it was OK to leave because the treatment is not as necessary anymore. I'm doing fine so to me this was a great opportunity.

*M*
11-10-2004, 03:51 PM
I am, as usual looking for precedents to draw hope from- remember Pete in 1999? He had just come off a long injury which forced him out of the USO, and apart from one match he played and was forced to retire in Paris, he hadn't played any matches leading up to TMC (YEC back then) and his injury was far more serious (dislocated vertabrae if I remember correctly). He did look a bit rusty in his first match, was even bludgeoned by Agassi in his 2nd round robin match but then came back strong to win the rest of his matches and the event with it.
That is encouraging. Roger hasn't played since Bangkok, correct? That's about a month and a half ago. One good thing about the Round Robin format is that one loss won't necessarily knock you out of the whole tournament.


By the way, Jon W thinks that Agassi and Nalbandian withdrew from Paris because they were sure that someone was going to pull out from Houston. Possibly Fed? :confused:
Wasn't Gil Reyes involved with Coria somehow? I think Agassi thought Coria would pull out, but Coria seems bound and determined to go. Andre's an alternate, so he still might play if someone hurts themselves (a good possibility since everyone's so banged up right now).

RonE
11-10-2004, 07:07 PM
hope this answers your query, RonE.


Tennis Week: How is your health? How is your leg?

Roger Federer: My health is better now. I'll travel right away to Houston after this.



Tennis Week: Do you feel good enough that you'll be able to play the Masters Cup?

Roger Federer: I do feel I'm able to play, but I have to start slow. So this was a very spontaneous decision where Mr. Ogi said: "Would you like to come and introduce the Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005?" He said he would love to have me here next to (UN Secretary-General) Kofi Annan. And I said "Yeah, I'd love to do it." So, we are all here.





Tennis Week: Well, it's great that you're taking advantage of that time off to do something like this rather than sitting around watching TV or something..

Roger Federer: Exactly. I had to make sure with my doctors it was OK leaving earlier with my injury because I was supposed to leave on Sunday because of treatment. Now that I was injured and it's getting better they told me it was OK to leave because the treatment is not as necessary anymore. I'm doing fine so to me this was a great opportunity.


Thank you very much for that Mrs. B :D :wavey:

He still seems slightly apprehensive- I just hope he will be o.k.

Daniel
11-11-2004, 06:07 AM
Thanks Mrs B :kiss:

lunahielo
11-11-2004, 11:36 PM
And here's what the great Rod Laver says about Roger~ :)

'Rocket' believes Federer has the whole world in his hands
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 12/11/2004)

Rod Laver was so extraordinary a tennis player that it was said he could hit aces with a frying pan. However, there was much more to his game than giving the ball a fearful clump: he also had style and grace, and is the only man to have achieved two grand slams. Laver is still known as 'The Greatest'; Roger Federer is now challenging for that title.

The Australian, who often called himself "a runt", believes Federer could instead be the greatest player to have twirled a racket. "Oh, I would be honoured to even be compared to Roger," Laver said. "He is such an unbelievable talent, and is capable of anything. Roger could be the greatest tennis player of all time." But this was not Laver's famed modesty speaking. Laver totally bamboozled his opponents during the racket-swinging Sixties, and is sufficiently self-aware to recognise his place in tennis history. However, the four-time Wimbledon champion still follows the game closely, and knows real talent when he sees it on his television set in California. One generation was anointing another yesterday.

When Federer triumphed at Wimbledon last year, his first Grand Slam title, the early transmission times did not bother Laver, now 66. Laver would sit up in bed with the remote control and a sense of awe. He will be watching next week's coverage from Houston, where the Swiss will complete his remarkable season at the Tennis Masters Cup, the year-end showpiece.

Federer will want to win his 13th final in a row, a run that started in 2003. Federer, 23, has four grand slam titles to Laver's 11, after winning the Australian Open, Wimbledon again, and the US Open this season. Federer believes that he can one day win the French Open, and his ambition next year is likely to be matching that calendar sweep, which Laver achieved in 1962 and 1969.

"Roger knows that he has the shots to beat anybody," Laver said. "A lot of the time you watch him, and realise that he is sizing up an opponent before he strikes his winner. He always seems to be in control. When he gets in the groove, Roger knows that he can really hurt an opponent. What he has achieved, has all been down to confidence, he is a real confidence player." But it is not just about numbers. Laver has long lamented the lack of touch and control, "the robots" taking over "an increasingly one-dimensional sport", and sees Federer as pure entertainment. As Laver said, Federer is the one, way above all the rest, whom fans want to watch.

`The Rockhampton Rocket' had quick hands, and when a serve arrowed towards him he had five different ways of playing the return. Federer is just as quick-witted, and can improvise to great effect. "That is such a rare gift. So much of what he does is on instinct. You can't coach a lot of what he does as it is just natural talent," Laver said. "A lot of the shots that he produces are just totally uncanny." Federer's backhand is the one that gets this aficionado purring. "His backhand is the best shot he plays, as he can roll his racket over the top of the ball, or hit it straight. I don't know how he manages to hit the ball so cleanly all the time," Laver said.

Laver suffered a stroke in 1998. It was feared at the time that he would not survive, but he was fortunate that when the blood vessel burst in his brain he was doing a television interview next to one of the leading medical facilities in Los Angeles. He has made a remarkable recovery, and plays golf to a low handicap, and occasionally makes an appearance on the tennis court.

Laver and Federer have the same kind of aura about them, one without the pretence or bombast of lesser players, but which only relies on their on-court mastery. Laver said that, after the racket-hurling and cursing of Federer's juniors days, the world No 1 now has the mental approach needed to dominate the tennis world, a `Mr Nice Guy' but with the quiet menace of his shot-making.

"He knows that he is good, but he does not shout about it," Laver said. "He looks calm, but I think there is fire under the surface. But he plays well under pressure. And Roger does not want to get involved in stirring things up, and being controversial. All he wants to do is play tennis and win grand slam titles." Laver would have won more grand slam titles if he had not been banished from the oldest tournaments for five years after turning professional before the start of the Open era in 1968. He believes that only injury or disillusionment will prevent Federer from realising his talent. Laver does not believe that Federer needs a rivalry to sustain his enjoyment of the sport. "He pushes himself hard anyway," Laver said.

Federer had an amicable split with Swedish coach Peter Lundgren last year, and although there are rumours that he has approached Australian Tony Roche for a hands-off relationship, he is fast making tennis coaches unfashionable.

Laver said that Federer will prosper on his own. "There could be a worry that Roger gets fed up with all the travel. If you have a coach then you may be pushed into more tournaments and other commitments. But Roger is free to play when he wants, so there is not the same risk of burn-out."

Laver had gone way over the time he had given for the interview, but he would not stop talking about Roger Federer. "It seems like he has every intention of being around for a long time. If he is, he can achieve whatever he wants to achieve," he said. "Roger is such a great player and such a great champion. Roger could be 'The Greatest'."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
(I liked the part about Roger making tennis coaches *unfashionable)

mitalidas
11-11-2004, 11:51 PM
i loved this article --goosebumped me

lunahielo
11-12-2004, 12:46 AM
i loved this article --goosebumped me
Me, too, mitalidas...that's why I wanted to post it for all of Rogi's fans, even though it was so long........... :)

Daniel
11-12-2004, 05:44 AM
thnaks , the article is just so great. :D :yeah

babsi
11-12-2004, 07:18 AM
Thanks lunahielo,what a great article:):):)

Roger and Laver are one of a kind, aren´t they - both very talented,both able to use there talend and so nice and kindhearted :) :) :)

RonE
11-12-2004, 09:46 AM
Great article :worship: thanks :yeah:

yanchr
11-12-2004, 10:46 AM
What an article! Laver does :worship: Roger as I do.

Thanks so much lunahielo :hug:

Mrs. B
11-12-2004, 01:24 PM
Roger & Rod are the same that they are humble with themselves inspite of their achievements. :worship:
they even almost share the same birthdate!

lunahielo
11-12-2004, 03:22 PM
Thanks so much lunahielo
All of you are most welcome....I loved that article............
and like you said, Mrs. B...they both seem to be such classy men~ :-)

knight_ley
11-12-2004, 03:29 PM
that article is amazing :) thanks for posting it!

RogiFan88
11-12-2004, 06:05 PM
Well, anyone who has had an association w Pat Rafter can only be positive for Rogi! Good on ya, mate!!

squirrel
11-12-2004, 09:39 PM
here are a lot of new Roger hair style:http://www.wireimage.com/GalleryListing.asp?navtyp=SRH&logsrch=1&sfld=C&nbc1=1

mitalidas
11-13-2004, 12:51 AM
Federer the favorite in season-ending ATP Masters Cup

HOUSTON (AP) -- Roger Federer is back in Andy Roddick's home state, trying to put the finishing touches on a dominant season in men's tennis.

Federer will be the favorite going into the ATP Masters Cup at Westside Tennis Club that starts Monday. Roddick, the former No. 1, will be his primary pursuer when the top eight players in the world meet in the final ATP event of the season.

With an 8-1 career record against Roddick, Federer wants to maintain his mastery of the top American -- who lives a three-hour drive away in Austin.

"Remember, our careers are only at the beginning," Federer said. "I try not to be superstitious. If I practice well, it doesn't mean I'll have a good match and if I practice badly it doesn't mean I'll have a bad match. There are no signs."

There is no reason for Federer, 23, to lack confidence. He's ranked No. 1 in the world after winning 10 tournaments -- including three grand slams -- this year. He has been slowed recently by a pulled thigh muscle, but after a lengthy workout this week Federer pronounced himself in good shape.

Federer's ascent to the top of the world rankings started with a victory over Roddick at last year's Masters Cup tournament at Westside when Roddick was ranked No. 1.

"Wimbledon was my proudest moment this year," Federer said. "The principle goal in 2005 is to be No. 1."

The Masters Cup format includes four players each in red and blue groups playing a round robin to reach the semifinals on Nov. 20, with the championship match the following day.

Federer is seeded atop the blue group, which also includes former U.S. Open champion Marat Safin, Guillermo Coria and Tim Henman. Roddick leads the red group that also includes two-time Masters Cup champion Lleyton Hewitt, Carlos Moya and French Open champion Gaston Gaudio.

Roddick has been a favorite at Westside Tennis Club since he was a tour rookie and won the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championship there in 2001. Roddick beat Pete Sampras for the clay-court title in 2002 and has been runner-up the past two years.

Hewitt, formerly ranked No. 1 in the world, has won four ATP titles this season and would love to finish the year with a victory over Federer -- who eliminated Hewitt in the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open this year.

Fedex
11-13-2004, 05:05 AM
C'mon Roger, lets go undefeated again. It seems as though Roddick has gotten himself to actually believe he'd [/I]want[I] to play Federer here. That is a major bluff on his part. He know's he stands no chance, if Federer comes to play. C'mon Roger, lets continue the mastery of Roddick :D :yeah: I might actually root for Roddick, just so he can play Federer again, and once again kick his ass, and shut his arrogant self up, once more. :)

Fedex
11-13-2004, 05:11 AM
And here's what the great Rod Laver says about Roger~ :)

'Rocket' believes Federer has the whole world in his hands
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 12/11/2004)

Rod Laver was so extraordinary a tennis player that it was said he could hit aces with a frying pan. However, there was much more to his game than giving the ball a fearful clump: he also had style and grace, and is the only man to have achieved two grand slams. Laver is still known as 'The Greatest'; Roger Federer is now challenging for that title.

The Australian, who often called himself "a runt", believes Federer could instead be the greatest player to have twirled a racket. "Oh, I would be honoured to even be compared to Roger," Laver said. "He is such an unbelievable talent, and is capable of anything. Roger could be the greatest tennis player of all time." But this was not Laver's famed modesty speaking. Laver totally bamboozled his opponents during the racket-swinging Sixties, and is sufficiently self-aware to recognise his place in tennis history. However, the four-time Wimbledon champion still follows the game closely, and knows real talent when he sees it on his television set in California. One generation was anointing another yesterday.

When Federer triumphed at Wimbledon last year, his first Grand Slam title, the early transmission times did not bother Laver, now 66. Laver would sit up in bed with the remote control and a sense of awe. He will be watching next week's coverage from Houston, where the Swiss will complete his remarkable season at the Tennis Masters Cup, the year-end showpiece.

Federer will want to win his 13th final in a row, a run that started in 2003. Federer, 23, has four grand slam titles to Laver's 11, after winning the Australian Open, Wimbledon again, and the US Open this season. Federer believes that he can one day win the French Open, and his ambition next year is likely to be matching that calendar sweep, which Laver achieved in 1962 and 1969.

"Roger knows that he has the shots to beat anybody," Laver said. "A lot of the time you watch him, and realise that he is sizing up an opponent before he strikes his winner. He always seems to be in control. When he gets in the groove, Roger knows that he can really hurt an opponent. What he has achieved, has all been down to confidence, he is a real confidence player." But it is not just about numbers. Laver has long lamented the lack of touch and control, "the robots" taking over "an increasingly one-dimensional sport", and sees Federer as pure entertainment. As Laver said, Federer is the one, way above all the rest, whom fans want to watch.

`The Rockhampton Rocket' had quick hands, and when a serve arrowed towards him he had five different ways of playing the return. Federer is just as quick-witted, and can improvise to great effect. "That is such a rare gift. So much of what he does is on instinct. You can't coach a lot of what he does as it is just natural talent," Laver said. "A lot of the shots that he produces are just totally uncanny." Federer's backhand is the one that gets this aficionado purring. "His backhand is the best shot he plays, as he can roll his racket over the top of the ball, or hit it straight. I don't know how he manages to hit the ball so cleanly all the time," Laver said.

Laver suffered a stroke in 1998. It was feared at the time that he would not survive, but he was fortunate that when the blood vessel burst in his brain he was doing a television interview next to one of the leading medical facilities in Los Angeles. He has made a remarkable recovery, and plays golf to a low handicap, and occasionally makes an appearance on the tennis court.

Laver and Federer have the same kind of aura about them, one without the pretence or bombast of lesser players, but which only relies on their on-court mastery. Laver said that, after the racket-hurling and cursing of Federer's juniors days, the world No 1 now has the mental approach needed to dominate the tennis world, a `Mr Nice Guy' but with the quiet menace of his shot-making.

"He knows that he is good, but he does not shout about it," Laver said. "He looks calm, but I think there is fire under the surface. But he plays well under pressure. And Roger does not want to get involved in stirring things up, and being controversial. All he wants to do is play tennis and win grand slam titles." Laver would have won more grand slam titles if he had not been banished from the oldest tournaments for five years after turning professional before the start of the Open era in 1968. He believes that only injury or disillusionment will prevent Federer from realising his talent. Laver does not believe that Federer needs a rivalry to sustain his enjoyment of the sport. "He pushes himself hard anyway," Laver said.

Federer had an amicable split with Swedish coach Peter Lundgren last year, and although there are rumours that he has approached Australian Tony Roche for a hands-off relationship, he is fast making tennis coaches unfashionable.

Laver said that Federer will prosper on his own. "There could be a worry that Roger gets fed up with all the travel. If you have a coach then you may be pushed into more tournaments and other commitments. But Roger is free to play when he wants, so there is not the same risk of burn-out."

Laver had gone way over the time he had given for the interview, but he would not stop talking about Roger Federer. "It seems like he has every intention of being around for a long time. If he is, he can achieve whatever he wants to achieve," he said. "Roger is such a great player and such a great champion. Roger could be 'The Greatest'."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
(I liked the part about Roger making tennis coaches *unfashionable)
Thanks for that article :) It has restored a little faith in me, that Rogi is going to win this event again. I dont know what Roger will show up, but I hope its something similar to how he played last year. ;) :D

Daniel
11-13-2004, 06:22 AM
the last article is good , he says his priority in 2005 in to be #1, so i mean we will give all his effort to win the GS so that way #1 ranking is for him :)

Yoda
11-13-2004, 10:56 AM
Thanks lunahielo...great article :yeah:

Always great to hear Rogi's peers giving him wonderful praise :)

RonE
11-13-2004, 04:14 PM
Federer is seeded atop the blue group, which also includes former U.S. Open champion Marat Safin, Guillermo Coria and Tim Henman. Roddick leads the red group that also includes two-time Masters Cup champion Lleyton Hewitt, Carlos Moya and French Open champion Gaston Gaudio.


????????????? :confused: :confused: I think they have it mixed up.

RogiFan88
11-13-2004, 11:57 PM
I hope Rogi can defend the TMC, which w end his 2004 in style... if not, he'll still be #1 so no matter... as long as Pandy craps before the SF...

Billabong
11-14-2004, 01:46 PM
Thanks for the great article:worship:!

bettywps
11-14-2004, 02:38 PM
The November Newsletter is out on Roger's site! :bounce:

-------------------------------------

Newsletter november 2004


Dear fans

What a terrific feeling! I am 100% fit just before Houston and my thigh-injury has healed completely. I was very fortunate as it didn’t bother me during the process of recovery thanks to the great work of my team and the decision to take this break. I now know that it has been the right thing to do.

It was one of the most difficult moments in my tennis-career so far. All the spectators and fans were eager to be part of my first appearance as the world’s number one at my home tournament in Basel. I was also looking forward to the event immensely – returning to the Swiss Indoors where I had worked as a ball-boy 10 years earlier, respectfully passing balls to stars like Stefan Edberg or Wayne Ferreira. The tension amongst the tournament director, the journalists and the sponsors – just about everyone – was enormous. Then, suddenly, the bad news: a torn muscle-fibre in my left thigh. Competing was absolutely out of question. I had to inform tournament director Roger Brennwald of the news only a few hours before my opening match. But the thing really bothering me was how to explain it to my fans. They had all looked forward to this so much, how would I tell them that I was unable to play in Basel due to an injury? I ended up saying to myself that the easiest thing would be getting across what I felt like inside; expressing my huge disappointment and my annoyance about the situation. So I went out there and talked to the many fans and I had the impression that they understood. I am very glad that the Davidoff Swiss Indoors 2004 ended up being a big success with many great matches and a very sympathetic champion, Jiri Novak.

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the large number of top-players cancelling their participation in tournaments like Madrid, Basel and Paris. I have also been asked if I have an explanation and whether I see a solution for improving the situation. Tennis, like all other sports, is very demanding for a professional athlete. Even the more so for top-players as they usually play several rounds in a tournament. But we know this and have to learn to deal with the tournament schedule. Every player has to decide for himself how much is feasible. I, too, had to learn to make rational decisions even if my heart wanted the opposite, like not playing in Basel.


My diary

Let’s go back to the last exciting moments since my fantastic victory at the US-Open. By the way, it is terrific to see that a large number of new fans in the United States have joined our community since! I visited Hollywood and then flew off to Hong Kong where I gave interviews to the Asian media for an entire day. I appeared in shows for CNBC, CNN and ESPN/Star Sports TV and was interviewed by the Wall Street Journal Asia as well as the world’s largest newspaper, Japan’s “The Yomiuri Shimbun”. To be honest, the discussions with the Asian journalists on topics on and off court were pretty demanding. I can definitely say that I’ve learnt a lot. I was pretty whacked after the non-stop media-marathon from 8.30 in the morning until 15.30 in the afternoon. But it certainly looks like the effort was worth it – my interviews are going to be repeated on CNN until Christmas!

After the stopover in Hong Kong I flew on to Bangkok. Just like so many times before, this year it all added up perfectly in Thailand. I didn’t have too much trouble defeating Andy Roddick in the final 6:4, 6:0 – tournament victory number 10 this season. It was also a special experience to see the enthusiasm of the spectators in Bangkok. The whole week seemed to be one big party. Most games were sold out with over 10’000 fans and the run for tickets for the semi-finals and the final was immense. Hundreds or even thousands of spectators could only follow the matches on a big screen outside the stadium. It is certainly terrific for us players to see our sport booming at such a rate in Asia. In my opinion that is also one of the reasons why having the Masters Final in Shanghai again for three years as of 2005 is great. It is also up to us athletes to promote our sport on a global level and take responsibility as ambassadors - especially in Asia.

After the victory in Bangkok I was finally on my way back home via Dubai. Mirka and I had spent a total of six weeks travelling - from the end of August up until the beginning of October. I enjoy travelling a lot but after a trip around the world you do feel like a couple of days at home! I wanted to take enough time to prepare for Madrid and Basel, show a good performance in Paris-Bercy and top it all off by trying to repeat my victory in Houston. Well, I guess you all know what happened then…


My goals for 2005

As you already know I have one major goal for 2005: defend my number one position. I have already planned the coming season together with my management and we have defined the tournaments for the first half: Doha, Australian Open, Rotterdam, Dubai, Indian Wells, Miami, Monte Carlo, Rome, Hamburg, Roland Garros, Halle and Wimbledon. The Grand-Slams obviously have kind of a special status within all of these tournaments. Who would not want to win them? The ‘threepeat’ in Wimbledon would certainly be something extraordinary. But I definitely don’t want to focus uniquely on winning the Grand-Slams, all the other tournaments are important as well. Unfortunately there is a consequence of planning my season this way: I will not be able to play the first Davis-Cup round for Switzerland. The dates for this round have been moved by a month from February to March. This is exactly the period during which I will be competing in Rotterdam, Dubai, Indian Wells and Miami, simply making it too much for me. It was definitely a very hard decision to take but my injury this autumn due to fatigue was a strong influence. In my heart I have the strong desire to play, to go out there and take on the Dutch with my team-mates, to cheer for my country. Experiencing team-spirit on court is certainly something that I miss in tennis. But my common sense said no to my participation in the first round. For the moment I want to leave open what my involvement in the second round will be. I can only say that chances are I will be there, even after a victory against Holland, which I think my mates are very well capable of achieving. In my opinion there are many arguments for renouncing the first Davis-Cup round. I nevertheless kept asking myself how my team-mates and fans in Switzerland would respond to my decision – and they were great! As far as I can see the team-members as well as the tennis fans show much understanding. On the one hand they are disappointed, but they understand me. And that’s what counts most for me.


Making a difference

All bad things also have a good side to them: The break I had to take these last weeks finally gave me the necessary time to dedicate myself to my Foundation. We organised a charity event during the Swiss Indoors and were able to gather CHF 110’000.-. It is incredibly motivating to see how much I can achieve. For this reason I want to spend more time with activities related to the Foundation in 2005, helping children in South Africa and supporting gifted, young athletes all over the world. I will also travel to South Africa in the first quarter of the year in order to see the impact of the projects in Port Elizabeth myself. Furthermore, I have agreed to become an ambassador for the UN’s “Year of Sport”. I am absolutely convinced that sports can help overcome prejudice and build bridges between cultures and nations. If I can make a contribution to this I am more than happy to do so and am very much looking forward to the task.


www.rogerfederer.com

I am always thrilled to see the amount of traffic on my website and also seeing how the number of registered users is increasing constantly – we have almost reached 14’000! I love reading all the comments and discussions and catch myself smiling every now and then doing so.
I would like to thank you for your loyalty and your interest in my person as well as all my activities. We have therefore decided to set up an entirely new concept. All I want to say for the moment is this: be prepared for plenty of great stuff next year!



Dear friends, I have to focus on the last matches for the season in Houston now. I’ll give you a next update in Decemeber.

Take care, bis bald, à bientôt
Your Roger

Mrs. B
11-14-2004, 02:47 PM
thanks for posting it here. :)

Mrs. B
11-14-2004, 02:48 PM
????????????? :confused: :confused: I think they have it mixed up.

all the author had to do was to check MTF's GM and he'd get his infos right! :lol:

avocadoe
11-14-2004, 03:25 PM
thanks...such good news that Roj is feeling well...entries make me love him all the more :)

RonE
11-14-2004, 03:56 PM
Great sutff :yeah:

I'm so glad to hear he is 100% fit physically :D

I was only slightly disappointed that he did not say specifically in his goals for 2005 was to win the French Open and complete his collection.

Then again, maybe he did not want to put too much pressure and expectations on himself. :shrug:

mitalidas
11-14-2004, 04:46 PM
For Roger Federer, simple equates to sanity. Simple is his stated game plan. He has put a box around his life, and only the important things are allowed in.

Tennis. Mirka, his best girl. A tiny cadre of trustworthy friends. That's it. There are no distractions, no discordant notes, no dithering. No wasted energy. And no wavering whatsoever from his personal mission: excellence on the court, serenity off it.

A Zen of sorts — but without the self-conscious meditative element. In the autumn of 2004 in Roger Federer's 23rd year, it can be said he has achieved balance and harmony. He has won the right to be called the best tennis player in the world. And, he said, "I have somebody who loves me. So it's all good right now." :)

But Federer knows from experience that bliss can be ephemeral. As a temperamental teen star, he lost his way. He even lost his mentor, Peter Carter, in an automobile accident. So Federer is, above all, a well-grounded realist. He never will take anything for granted.

"This tournament," he said of the looming Masters Cup, the ATP's season-ending championship, "is a new tournament. And next year will be a new year. Every day, I start over. It's always zero-zero again."

Federer came to Houston unsure of his fitness. He hadn't played in more than a month, first because he was "absolutely tired. The finals, the important matches ... and I have played many of them this year. They take a toll." Then, during a warm-up hit three hours before his first match in Basel, his left thigh suddenly felt like somebody had jabbed it with a Swiss Army knife.

That pain forced him to withdraw from his hometown tournament, a decision he called "very, very disappointing because of the fans. I used to be a ball boy there, you know."

A small tear in the muscle showed up on an MRI. But after two weeks of rest and physiotherapy followed by multiple hours of hard work at Westside Tennis Club this past week, Federer pronounced himself fit. Everything is again OK with him — hence seemingly less OK for the other seven players in the elite Houston field.

"I can play and move like I want to," he said. "It's really looking very good. I know what I need to do to be ready to play at 1 o'clock Monday. With the confidence I have right now, it's not so difficult to get the momentum back."


Defending Masters Cup
Some believe the Masters Cup is only a funny-money tournament because the purse — nearly $4 million — is comically inflated. Federer, should he reprise his undefeated run of a year ago here, stands to pocket more than $1.5 million. That would put him over $6 million for the season, a sum only Pete Sampras in 1997 has accumulated in a calendar year.

But the surreal dimensions of such wealth diminish its impact. For Federer, a victory would hold more intrinsic value.

No player of the modern era, the so-called Open era, has won three Grand Slams and the season-ending championship in the same year. (Rod Laver probably would have in 1969, when he swept the four Slams, but the ATP didn't have a Masters Cup.)

A 5-0 Federer run also would leave him 74-6 on the year. No full-time player has lost fewer than seven matches since John McEnroe went 82-3 in 1984.

It's worth noting that, save for Tim Henman in the quarterfinals in Rotterdam last February, nobody has beaten Federer except by ambushing him early in a tournament.

Note his unblemished record in semifinals and finals this year. Also note his 15-1 record against the guys in the top 10. He has defeated each of his Masters Cup foes at least once.

In winning on clay in Hamburg in April, Federer zapped what became half of the Houston field: Gaston Gaudio, Carlos Moya, Lleyton Hewitt and Guillermo Coria. And he has whacked :) the distant No. 2, Andy Roddick, three times, most recently finishing him off in Bangkok with a 6-0 pasting.


Coming-out party
Should we have seen this onslaught coming? Well, in 2001, on the day Federer made his Centre Court debut at Wimbledon, he ended the 31-match winning streak of Sampras, his idol.

But while Federer's Sampras-similar skills were self-evident, the intangibles appeared to be lacking.

As one skeptical Swiss journalist said: "We haven't seen him put his heart down there on the court."

Today, Federer's languid, effortless excellence is deceptive.

"When he's not playing well, which isn't often," said Tony Trabert, a three-Slam champion in 1955, "you wonder how hard he's trying. We used to ask ourselves, 'Why doesn't Roger beat more people?' There were questions about his heart and his head. Did he have the courage and the guts to do it? He's answered those questions."

Federer's transformation began in early 2003 when he reeled off four victories in lesser tournaments leading up to Wimbledon. Once there, he copped his first major. Still, going into the Masters Cup, he hadn't separated himself from French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero or recently crowned U.S. Open king Roddick. The threesome arrived at Westside as apparent equals.

No more.

"It started for me when I began winning the smaller events — Marseille, Dubai, Munich, Halle," Federer said. "If I could dominate those tournaments, that told me that maybe I should also be able to sneak through in the bigger ones. When I finally did, it gave me the drive to aim higher, to win more Grand Slams."

After thumping Roddick and Andre Agassi successively in Houston, he took his winter holiday. Then, refreshed, he strode through the Australian Open fortnight, knocking out Hewitt, David Nalbandian, Ferrero and Marat Safin in succession. When the carnage was complete, Federer had displaced Roddick as the No. 1 player in the world.

"That gave me an unbelievable amount of energy," Federer said. "Ever since, I've been giving 100 percent in every match against everybody. That was not always the case for me."

Nine subsequent titles have followed, including his Wimbledon repeat and his U.S. Open breakthrough.

"This year," he said, "has definitely been fantastic for me."

Federer's single conspicuous failure was his third-round loss at Roland Garros, the last unconquered Slam. But look who beat him: Gustavo Kuerten, a three-time champion.

"Googa on clay ... it can happen," Federer said, smiling. "But clay is very natural to me. I grew up on that surface. I know I can play well on the clay. The last three years have been disappointing for me at Roland Garros (he lost in the first round each of the previous two). If I can get through a quarterfinals there, that would be a big occasion for me."


No. 1 in importance
But Roland Garros isn't his burning goal, the hole it represents in his résumé notwithstanding. Federer goes into 2005 with two objectives, 1a and 1b if you will: Stay No. 1 and retain the Wimbledon title.

"Those are most important to me," he said. "I won't change my preparations just to win the French."


Status quo
Federer doesn't intend to change anything. Nothing's broken; nothing needs to be fixed. After parting ways after four years with his most recent coach, Peter Lundgren, at the end of 2003, he expected to find another forthwith. It never happened, though, and now such a hire offers only an unnecessary layer of complication.

Federer travels with three people: Mirka, trainer Pavel Kovac, and his friend Reto Staubli.

"I know my game very well," Federer said, to which Trabert responded: "It shows in his decision-making process. Roger is the most complete player we've seen in quite a while. He can play every style of tennis, and he understands when to change tactics. It's fun to watch.

"I think an entourage is cumbersome. It makes a player weaker. They're relying on others to take care of everything. But Roger knows what he needs to work on, what's not going as well as he'd like, and he finds a way to fix it."

Not that there has been much to tweak. For the moment, Federer's tennis formula appears infallible. In addition, he's handsome, well-spoken in three languages, engaging and approachable. Quite a package for a simple guy.

lunahielo
11-14-2004, 05:40 PM
Beautiful article.
I am sitting here..calmly smiling after reading it.
Thank you, mitalidas...thank you.

RonE
11-14-2004, 06:06 PM
Thank you for another wonderful article Mitalidas :wavey:

Well, I guess my question regarding the French Open was answered there, although I would dearly love to see him have a big breakthrough there as well :)

babsi
11-14-2004, 06:47 PM
Great news letter,as allways :) :):)

Thanks for the wonderful article mitalidas :) :)

RogiFan88
11-15-2004, 03:04 AM
Yeah, some simple guy our Rogi!!

VAMOS, ROGI!!!!!

federer_roar
11-15-2004, 04:44 AM
A great letter as usual from Roger. He didn't forget to mention his experience in Thai open. The fact that he chose to play in a less prestigious tournament in asia drew many criticisms and skepticisms about his movitation. Some believe he has to be driven by money to play in there.

I am glad he had good time in Thailand and most of important reiterated in newletter his liking for playing more in Asia.

Daniel
11-15-2004, 09:13 AM
Thakns :)

^Sue^
11-16-2004, 07:28 AM
Roger Federer Wins First Ever Golden Bagel Award™
Roger Federer snagged the 2004 Golden Bagel Award™ at the ATP Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, Texas. Federer is the first recipient of this irreverent new award, presented to the men's pro tennis player who serves up more "bagels" (sets won 6-0), than any other player.

Houston, TX (PRWEB) November 16, 2004 -- Roger Federer snagged the 2004 Golden Bagel Award™ at the ATP Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, Texas. Federer is the first recipient of this irreverent new award, presented to the men's pro tennis player who serves up more "bagels" (sets won 6-0), than any other player.

"I think I need some cream cheese with that," Roger Federer said on inspecting the full-sized golden-dipped bagel. Presenters asked the World's Number One player if he knew how many bagels he had served during the course of the year. "Six?" Federer guessed. No, he was told, you gave out 12 bagels. "What!" he exclaimed.

The rest of the top eight players gathered in Houston for the Tennis Masters Cup administered the following bagels during the course of the year: Guillermo Coria 7, Andy Roddick 4, Lleyton Hewitt 4, Tim Henman 4, Gaston Gaudio 4, Marat Safin 3 and Carlos Moya 3.

About Golden Bagel Award™
The Golden Bagel Award™ is presented to the player - among the Top 8 ATP singles players at the Tennis Masters Cup - who wins the most 6-0 sets between January 1 and the start of the season-ending Masters event. Davis Cup matches and incomplete sets are not counted. The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) website is used as the definitive data source.

In the event of a tie, the number of "fries" (6-1 sets) will determine the winner. "It's all in good fun," said award presenter Tom Suhler, "And if there's still a tie after the fries are counted, we'll cut the thing in half and have a laugh."

About SideSpin Productions, Inc.
SideSpin Productions creates, develops and markets television and video projects, that include a wide array of services: concept development, production, post- production and direction - supported by a marketing effort that includes traditional channels with web- based promotion.

Currently in production is Off the Racquet™ is a fast-paced tennis entertainment show for players, spectators, and people interested on what happens off-the court and behind the scenes. The show's theme is FUN! And they have lots of it with a guest-list that includes the best pros in the game, amateur court rats of all abilities and fans from all over the globe. The 30-minute show is packed with interviews, features, skill drills and commentary, so they have to keep it moving to squeeze in all the excitement.

*Ljubica*
11-19-2004, 03:22 PM
Hi guys :wavey: I'm not a regular poster here, though some of you may know me from other Forums. Anyway - I just heard that Roger is going to play in the Kooyong Exhibition tournament next year as part of his warm-up for the Australian Open. I apologise if this has been posted elsewhere, but I couldn't find it mentioned in a quick scan through your Forum, so I thought I would post it here anyway just in case you didn't know. It's an 8-man event held in a round-robin format - and the other players taking part are Nalbandian (who won the title last year), Agassi, Roddick, Srichaphan, Henman, Gaudio and Massu. David really loved this tourney last year and I hope Roger does too :)

WyveN
11-19-2004, 03:25 PM
Thanks Rosie. David played awesome tennis there this year and if his healthy he has a great chance of defending his title, hopefully we get to see a Federer-Nalbandian match.

Daniel
11-20-2004, 06:44 AM
Thanks :d

Daniel
11-20-2004, 07:09 AM
got some pat of an interview rwith Krajiceck talking about Roger:

What do you think of Roger Federer, the Swiss world number one?

If you are only looking at the tennis and what he has done last year, you will think that he is better than Pete. Which, maybe, he is. But Pete had the desire to play at the highest level for so many years. That is very difficult, mentally. That in turn is the biggest question for Federer. Can he maintain the high level over six-seven years to break the record of 14 Grand Slams? Will he be able to remain world number one for five-six years in a row?

That is actually the only thing he is yet to prove. But if he continues to play tennis like this, he will definitely break Pete's record. Federer can be the best ever; he has the potential. The only question is whether he has the desire.

Among all the younger players, who do you think is most capable of challenging Federer at his best?

I think they all have their own weapons. When Federer is playing at his best he is a very difficult player to beat. But if you look at Marat Safin and the way he can play from the back of the court, he is very talented as well. So, I think he can match up to him.

[Andy] Roddick can challenge him as well if he serves big consistently for the entire match. If he does that, then he is tough to break even for a guy like Federer.

Hewitt is such a fighter on the court; he never gives up. They all have qualities to beat him. But tennis-wise, it's all so simple and easy for Roger. You can say that if they play ten times, Roger will win most of the matches. But all these guys have qualities to beat him. One important fact is that against these three guys, Roger has to play at his best or else they will take over.

Mrs. B
11-20-2004, 09:02 AM
Gracias, Daniel! :wavey:

lunahielo
11-20-2004, 12:12 PM
Nice article, Daniel. Thank you. :)

babsi
11-20-2004, 12:24 PM
Danke,Daniel! :)

Daniel
11-21-2004, 07:06 AM
Federer reaches Masters Cup final with record-tying tiebreaker

By MICHAEL A. LUTZ, AP Sports Writer
November 20, 2004

AP - Nov 20, 5:23 pm EST
More Photos


HOUSTON (AP) -- Roger Federer won a record-tying 38-point tiebreaker after rallying from a 1-4 deficit in the second set to defeat Marat Safin 6-3, 7-6 (18) Saturday in the semifinals of the ATP Masters Cup.

The tiebreaker lasted 26 1/2 minutes and was the third to reach 20-18 since the system started in 1970. Premjit Lall won a tiebreaker by that score against Bjorn Borg in the first round at Wimbledon in 1973, and Goran Ivanisevic did the same against Daniel Nestor in the first round of the 1993 U.S. Open.

``I'm happy to win that tiebreaker; it was very special,'' Federer said. ``That was really fun. It was going back and forth and there were only big points. The level of play was very high. It's not like we were giving each other those points. The whole match was great.''

The top-ranked Federer will play for his 11th title of the year on Sunday against Lleyton Hewitt, who won the final 20 points against a deflated Andy Roddick 6-3, 6-2.

Federer extended his record against top 10 opponents to 22-0 dating to last year's Masters Cup, but it wasn't easy.

After rallying to force the tiebreaker, Federer fought off six set points and wasted seven match points. But the Swiss star finally ended it on his eighth match point, when 2000 U.S. Open champion Safin sailed a forehand long. Safin's double-fault set up that last point.

``I'm already happy with the tournament,'' Federer said. ``I came in not sure of how it would be because of the injury, and I hadn't played in a while, but I've won all my round-robin games and if I could win back-to-back championships, that would be fantastic.''

ADVERTISEMENT


Safin broke Federer in the second game of the second set and moved on to a 4-1 lead. Federer held in the sixth game after fighting off two break points and then broke Safin in the seventh game on Safin's forehand error.

``I was probably going for too much because I knew I have Roger Federer on the other side, so I had to do something extra,'' Safin said. ``I didn't really make any huge mistakes in the tiebreak. I was unfortunately, a little bit nervous. I had to wait more for a good opportunity.

``Otherwise I don't regret anything from the tiebreak, even though I had six break points.''

Daniel
11-21-2004, 07:13 AM
Tie Breaker Is an Epic, and Federer Pulls Through
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Published: November 21, 2004


OUSTON, Nov. 20 - It was a day for big numbers at the Tennis Masters Cup on Saturday. Lleyton Hewitt won the last 20 points of his semifinal match against a befuddled Andy Roddick. Roger Federer and Marat Safin extended each other into a tie breaker as long as any in the sport's history - a 26-minute tour de force that Federer finally wrestled into his corner, 20-18.

But first and foremost it was a day for big shots at big moments with the top four players in the world sharing the season-ending stage at the Westside Tennis Club. All but Roddick lighted up an overcast afternoon with the quality of his ground strokes, pressure serves and defense on the stretch.

All four men have been ranked No. 1 in the world. All four have won the United States Open on an outdoor hardcourt not much quicker than the one in use here. But only Hewitt, who trounced Roddick, 6-3, 6-2, and Federer, who beat Safin, 6-3, 7-6 (18), will have the opportunity to play Sunday.

It is a fitting final, considering that Hewitt won this itinerant eight-man tournament in 2001 and 2002, and that Federer won it here last year.

Federer has not stopped winning since, collecting three of the four Grand Slam titles this season, opening a mammoth lead in the world ranking and showing no sign of weakness here. He had not played in a tournament since Oct. 3 and was returning from an injury to his left thigh muscle.

Safin, who has been on a late-season roll, pushed hard enough to crack most mortals in the second set, gambling successfully on his huge returns and backhands. But Federer responded by huffing and lunging and even letting out the occasional shriek. For Federer, a man who makes a difficult game look easy, it was one of the rare times when he was seen sweating. But that would be the extent of Safin's victory; Federer saved six set points in the tie breaker and finally closed out the match on his eighth match point, when Safin's last big-swinging forehand flew long.

"We were pushing each other to the limits," Federer said.

It was the longest tie breaker in a big match. Since the tie breaker was introduced in 1970, only two had gone to 20-18, but those were in first-round matches.

This one could have ended on the 24th point, when Safin, facing his fifth match point, pounced on a short ball with his best shot, the backhand, and overhit it crosscourt. It was called out, but before Federer could thrust his arms into the humid air, the chair umpire, Steve Ullrich, overruled the call.

Less secure young tennis champions might have started throwing things, but even though Federer said he thought the shot had been wide, he swallowed his frustration and stayed focused.

"I'm happy I kept my act together and finished the tie break well, because it's not an easy thing to do, because there's a lot at stake at that point," Federer said.

The temperature never approached a boiling point in the first semifinal because of Hewitt's superb passing shots and precise baseline play and Roddick's oddly slumped shoulders down the stretch.

It was still a match until 2-2 in the second set, but Roddick was unable to win another point.

"I definitely lost my rhythm; I can't explain it," he said. "I just didn't feel like the ball was doing what I wanted to do today."

babsi
11-21-2004, 10:08 AM
Thanks,Daniel :) :)

Mrs. B
11-21-2004, 10:54 AM
Gracias, Daniel! :kiss:

mitalidas
11-21-2004, 01:52 PM
DARREN CAHILL will not coach the world No.1 Roger Federer, saying he is happy to stay with Andre Agassi in 2005.

The South Australian coach of Agassi for three years said media speculation he would link with the Swiss champion came from a common thread – Federer's former coach, Peter Carter, who died in a car accident in August, 2002.

"Certainly with Andre wanting to go through 2005 and beyond that as well, he's got no plans of retiring anytime soon which I think is good news for the tennis community because we still need people like Andre playing the game. The thing with Roger, a lot of it is because the press have put two and two together," Cahill, who coached Lleyton Hewitt to world No.1 said.

"They know that Peter Carter was a great friend of mine and Peter was really responsible for the upbringing of Roger from about 11 or 12 years of age. He coached Roger all the way through.

"So when Peter passed away and then obviously Roger Federer decided to go coachless this past year, a lot of the media put two and two together," Cahill told Seven's tennis program Slam yesterday.

The fact Agassi, who turns 35 in April, is not considering retirement also means Cahill is not interested in other coaching appointments, although that was not always the case after linking with Agassi in February, 2002.

"To be honest, I didn't know how long the job was going to last," he said.

"I went across when he was 32 years of age and I didn't know if it was going to be a six-month job or a one-year or two-year job. But I'm still here and it's three years later.

"He's totally committed to 2005 and beyond.
Cahill also touched on his highly-publicised split with Hewitt in 2001, saying it was simply time for the pair to go their separate ways.

"It was made out to be a lot but it really wasn't," Cahill said.
"After three years of living with each other the whole time, you certainly have some bumps along the way – that's no different with Andre and myself – there's always little issues you have to deal with and it got to the stage where it was just better for us to go our separate ways.

lunahielo
11-21-2004, 06:51 PM
Thank you, Daniel and Mitalidas~~ :)

Roger never ceases to amaze me with his talent and his class.

RogiFan88
11-21-2004, 08:00 PM
Yep, Rogi is all class and talent! I keep thinking how lucky I am to have seen him play live... there's nothing like it! He IS amazing... even in practice! And he's such a sweetie in person!

GO, HOPP, ALLEZ, FORZA, VAMOS, DAVAI, ROGI!

Daniel
11-22-2004, 05:25 AM
Federer defends Master Cup with 13th victory

By MICHAEL A. LUTZ, AP Sports Writer
November 22, 2004

AP - Nov 21, 10:30 pm EST
More Photos


HOUSTON (AP) -- Top-seeded Roger Federer won a record 13th straight final Sunday, beating Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-2 in the title match of the ATP Masters Cup.

Federer, who beat his 23rd straight top-10 opponent, dominated the final tournament of the season just as he dominated most of 2004. He won his second straight Masters Cup and broke the record of 12 straight finals victories shared by Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe.

``It's been an incredible season, like a fairy tale,'' Federer said. ``I can leave on vacation now with a great feeling and with great memories. My priorities now are to defend my Wimbledon title and to defend my No. 1 ranking. That's what I'm aiming for.''

Federer, who earned $1,520,000, became the first player since Ivan Lendl in 1986-87 to win consecutive Masters Cup titles without losing a match. Federer also won his 22nd tournament since 2000, the most of any player in that span. Hewitt has won 21.

Federer won his 74th match of the year, tying Andy Roddick for the tour lead. He moved ahead of Hewitt in career matches 8-7 by winning the last six in a row, including twice in this year's Masters Cup.

``I've had some tough losses to him (Hewitt), he's the player I've played the most,'' Federer said. ``They have been great matches. He's a great counter puncher and the last few matches have been one-sided, which surprises me because he's such a great player.''

Rain delayed the tournament through the week, and it happened again Sunday. The start was delayed almost three hours, and the first set was just 27 minutes old when rain stopped play with Federer leading 5-2.

ADVERTISEMENT


Federer served flawlessly in the early going, missing only nine serves in the first set and hitting seven aces.

Federer broke in the second game at the second break point with a passing shot. Leading 4-1, Federer allowed Hewitt to escape another break point in the sixth game but Federer had three straight errors and Hewitt held.

After the rain delay, Federer closed out the first set and broke Hewitt in the fifth game of the second set for a 3-2 lead. Hewitt won only four points after that, popping a service return beyond the baseline on match point.

``He doesn't give you any cheap points,'' Hewitt said. ``He served so well today and he mixes up his serves. They are not as big as (Andy) Roddick or (Marat) Safin but he has such good variety. He sets up his serves so well.''

The final was less memorable than Federer's semifinal victory over Marat Safin on Saturday when Federer won a record-tying 20-18 tiebreaker in the second set.

It was the third tiebreaker to reach 20-18 since the system started in 1970. It equaled tiebreaker victories by Bjorn Borg in a 1973 first round over Premjit Lall at Wimbledon and by Goran Ivanisevic against Daniel Nestor in the 1993 U.S. Open.

Federer and Hewitt also met in the finals of the U.S. Open with similar results, Federer winning 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-0.

``I think he played better in the U.S. Open,'' Hewitt said. ``It's hard to fault the way he played at the start of the Open. I don't think I've ever seen any one play that good. He had spots like that today.''

The tournament final was reduced to best of three sets instead of best of five because of the threat of more rain.

Daniel
11-22-2004, 06:10 AM
At Year's End, Federer Is Just Better Than Everyone Else
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Published: November 22, 2004


OUSTON, Nov. 21 - Federer fatigue? Not as long as Roger Federer keeps dominating men's tennis in style.

Rarely have an extended series of mismatches been more pleasing to the eye, and those few thousand fans who braved two lengthy rain delays at the final of this year's Masters Cup had the soggy privilege of watching a fitting conclusion to one of tennis's finest seasons.

Advertisement


"It started at the Australian Open and just kept on coming," Federer said after defending his title in Houston. "This is just way too much to ask for."

Federer's 6-3, 6-2 victory Sunday over his former nemesis Lleyton Hewitt earned him the biggest prize in the game - $1.52 million - and brooked no argument. Certainly not from Hewitt, a feisty Australian who held a 7-2 advantage over Federer when the year began but who lost to him six times in six attempts this year.

He was hardly alone. Throughout a long year of surface changes and time-zone changes, no top-10 player could solve the Federer riddle. The only man to defeat him in a match of true import was Gustavo Kuerten, in the third round of the French Open. Otherwise, it was all Federer all the time when it mattered most. He was 11-0 in tournament finals and is the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three of the four Grand Slam titles in the same year.

But Wilander did not win the Masters in 1988, failing to advance out of the round-robin phase of the Tour championship.

"There's no doubt that the last year and a half he's taken it to another level," said Hewitt, a former No. 1 player who won the Masters in 2001 and 2002.

Comparing eras in tennis is risky business, but on paper, Federer's season was probably the finest since Rod Laver's Grand Slam in 1969.

When Federer arrived in Houston for this hardcourt event reserved for the top eight players in the world, he was short on match play after missing more than a month with a torn leg muscle. Hewitt and Marat Safin were in fine form, and Andy Roddick was fresh and motivated, preparing for next month's Davis Cup final in Seville, Spain. But Federer swept through the round-robin phase and the final two knockout rounds without the loss of a match. The only set he lost was against Carlos Moya in a round-robin match after Federer had already qualified for the semifinals. "What can I say?" Federer said. "This is just an unbelievable end to a fantastic season for me."

For much of the afternoon, it appeared that his season might not end until Monday. It has been a rainy week in Houston, rainy enough to make tennis officials happy that this tournament will be back under a roof when it moves to Shanghai for at least three years beginning in 2005.

After a rain-delayed start Sunday, Federer served two aces in the opening game, then broke Hewitt's serve in the next after a series of tough baseline rallies.

When more rain forced them off the court for 73 more minutes, Federer already had a 5-2 lead.

Hewitt had been particularly sharp in Saturday's semifinal, breaking Roddick's rhythm and confidence with his precise and opportunistic baseline play. But poking holes in Federer's game and belief in himself is a much more complicated task, and Hewitt was not quite steady enough with his first serve or ground strokes to pose a serious threat.

Hewitt's hunches often fail him against Federer. If Hewitt stays back, Federer has the forehand quality and backhand consistency to stay with him. If Hewitt tries to attack the net, as he did on occasion early in the second set, Federer's passing shots are precise enough to make that a losing proposition, too.

What to do? It is the question that all of Federer's foils will be asking themselves between now and January's Australian Open. The obvious answer is to improve, but the bar is terribly high, and Federer is showing no sign on or off the court of being afraid of heights.

Daniel
11-22-2004, 06:11 AM
Germany

E-Mail This Story Printer-Friendly Format







German Economy Sputters as Volkswagen, Siemens Invest Their Profits Abroad

Airbus to Win EADS Backing for $3.3 Billion New Plane Project, People Say

BASF, Siemens, Volkswagen, Sartorius Shares May Be Active: Equity Preview




Federer Lifts 2004 Earnings to $6 Million at Masters (Update1)
Nov. 21 (Bloomberg) -- Top-ranked Roger Federer beat Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-2 to win the Tennis Masters Cup for a second straight year and lift his 2004 earnings past $6 million.

Federer, 23, dominated his Australian opponent in a final reduced to a best-of-three-sets contest because of rain at Houston's Westside Tennis Club. It was Federer's 13th straight victory in a final, surpassing the mark he shared with John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg.

Success at the season finale completed a year of dominance in which Federer became the first men's player to win three of the four Grand Slams since 1988. Federer, who won 11 titles this year, pocketed $1.5 million for winning all five matches at the eight-man tournament to take his season earnings to $6.3 million.

``It's an unbelievable end to a fantastic season,'' Federer said after his 23rd straight win over a top-10 player. ``It started at the Australian Open and just kept on coming. This is way too much to ask for, it's been fantastic.''

Federer won the Australian and U.S. Opens, Wimbledon and Masters Series events in Indian Wells, Toronto and Hamburg. He ended the year on a 17-match winning streak after losing in the second round at the Athens Olympics.

Rain Delay

After rain delayed the start by three hours, Federer broke Hewitt in his opening service game to establish a 5-2 lead before the weather forced the players off court after 31 minutes. The Swiss dropped just two points when play resumed to wrap up the first set 6-3.

Third-ranked Hewitt, aided by two contentious line calls, fought off three break points at the start of the second set. He was unable to hold serve in the fifth game when Federer used his backhand to work a break point and clinched a 3-2 lead with a backhand volley.

Federer broke again in the seventh game, wearing down his opponent with his ground strokes before sealing his sixth straight victory over the 23-year-old Hewitt with two big serves.

``Roger's been the standout player above everyone else for at least a year and a half now,'' said Hewitt, who won $700,000 for finishing as the runner-up. ``He really deserves this title. It's a hell of an effort.''

Next year's Masters Cup, which has closed the men's tennis season since 2000, will return to Shanghai after two years in Houston.



To contact the reporter on this story:
Dan Baynes in Sydney dbaynes@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Grant Clark in Singapore at gclark@bloomberg.net
Last Updated: November 21, 2004 22:52 EST

WyveN
11-22-2004, 07:03 AM
Rogers interview is up on the Houston site, he talks about all his losses during the year.

Action Jackson
11-22-2004, 07:18 AM
Federer ends brilliant year with Masters title
(adds quotes, detail)
By Steve Keating
HOUSTON, Nov 21 (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer capped one of the finest seasons in tennis history by successfully defending his Masters Cup crown with a devastating 6-3 6-2 final win over Lleyton Hewitt on Sunday.

The 23-year-old Swiss collected a first prize of $1.52 million and a new luxury car and now heads for a well-earned holiday to savour a memorable campaign during which he lifted 11 titles, including the Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian Open grand slams.
"This is a wonderful end for me," Federer told reporters. "This has been an incredible season, a great, fantastic season.

"It's a fairy-tale ending, to leave for vacation with great feelings and great memories."
After a day of steady rain that threatened to delay the match until Monday and shortened the season finale from a best-of-five to best-of-three sets encounter, Federer put on a sparkling display to speed to victory in just over an hour.
The win was Federer's 22nd in a row against a top-10 ranked opponent, a run stretching back to last year's Masters Cup.

Six of those victories have come at Hewitt's expense this season, including a straight-sets thrashing in the final of the U.S. Open.

THIGH STRAIN
Having not played since straining his left thigh preparing for his home tournament in Basel a month ago, Federer's fitness had been the big question mark hanging over the event.

Federer, though, proved he was back to his sublime best by sweeping into the final.
Hewitt was also playing his best tennis since winning back-to-back Masters titles in 2001 and 2002, and with one last chance of taking revenge on the Swiss, the fiery Australian did not lack for motivation.

Rain delayed the start by three hours but did nothing to dull Federer, who won the opening game to love before breaking Hewitt with a stinging forehand winner to go 2-0 up.

The Federer express stalled when rain again swept over the Westside Tennis Club to send the players to the locker room with the world number one leading 5-2.
Returning to the court an hour and 17 minutes later, Federer quickly wrapped up the set.

The Swiss held three break points at the start of the second set but Hewitt would not go down without a fight, tenaciously holding serve.

Federer then stormed to victory by reeling off the last five games, including two breaks, to secure his second Masters title.

"He doesn't give you any cheap points," said Hewitt. "He's very tough, he's got great rhythm.

"This week my game's been good enough to beat nearly everyone but one guy. The last two big tournaments, the U.S. Open and here, the only guy I've run into who's been better has been Roger Federer.

"The last year and a half he's taken it to another level. (Andre) Agassi and (Pete) Sampras on their day were pretty awesome players and Roger is definitely up there."

crimson
11-22-2004, 04:22 PM
Roger has won both the Player of the Year and Ambassador for Tennis awards for 2004 from the International Tennis Writers Association. :)

http://www.wtatour.com/newsroom/stories/NewsArticle_5796_rx.asp

ATP world No.1 Roger Federer was unanimously voted Player of the Year by tennis writers and was also honored with ITWA’s Ambassador for Tennis award for his efforts to promote the sport.

Federer won three Grand Slams titles this year – the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open. The 23-year-old Swiss is the first male player to accomplish the feat since Sweden’s Mats Wilander in 1988.

“Roger’s an extraordinary talent and what’s he’s achieved this year has been amazing, but he also works extremely hard with media and sponsors and that’s what makes him such a blessing to the game,” said Eleanor Preston, co-President of ITWA. “Few No.1s in the history of tennis have done such a good job off the court as well as on it. He’s truly a pleasure to write about.”

In 2003, Federer and Belgium’s Justine-Henin Hardenne won ITWA’s player of the year awards, while Belgium’s Kim Clijsters and Morocco’s Younes El Aynaoui won the Ambassador for Tennis awards. ITWA presented the winners with Monteblanc pens.

The International Tennis Writers Association was formed four years ago to represent the select group of journalists who travel the globe, week-in and week-out, covering tennis for the written and broadcast media. ITWA includes members from 17 countries and the coverage they provide brings tennis to millions worldwide. ITWA is committed to working with the sport’s governing bodies, tournaments, agents and players both to improve the working conditions of tennis journalists and to gain recognition for the media’s vital role in the promotion of the sport.

babsi
11-22-2004, 06:11 PM
Thank you crimson, for posting :)
There is surly no one more deserving than Roger!
You couldn´t dream up a guy like him,he just had to come along :) :) :)

babsi
11-22-2004, 06:17 PM
Btw. an austrian sports side reported today,that only few knew,that Roger had actually straind both of his tights - I´m glad we didn´t knew it,we were scared as it was :(

RonE
11-22-2004, 06:35 PM
Great year Roger, now back to work

How big was Roger Federer's season? To find bigger, you have to go back to 1974 when Jimmy Connors captured three majors and 12 tour titles. But for the Swiss, who lifted his 11th trophy of 2004 at the season-ending Masters in Houston, now comes the hard part, argues James Buddell.



RE-LIVE: ATP Masters Cup final
MASTERS CUP: Praise be to Federer

You really do have to look back 30 years to match Federer"s achievement.

And that takes into account stellar seasons enjoyed since by Guillermo Vilas, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Mats Wilander and Pete Sampras.

This year, Federer became the first player to win three major championships in a season since 1998. He also won eight other tour titles.

Only last week, Rod Laver - the Grand Slam winner of 1962 and 1969 - was commenting on Federer.

The Australian believes the 23-year-old could become &lsquoThe Greatest'. Note to readers: Laver doesn't dish out praise lightly.

But one season alone doth not make a legend: the history books please.

INTO THE BOOKS

Since 1974, tour &lsquoheavyweights' have only ever enjoyed a maximum of three years of overpowering dominance.

Take Connors: the American ran the men's game in 1974-75 winning 22 titles before bowing to Vilas (16 titles in 1977) and Borg with 32 between 1977 and 79.

McEnroe racked up 54 of his 77 singles titles from 1979 to 1984, but his only true epic season was 1984 with 13 crowns and an 82-3 match record.

Lendl laid the foundation stone of dominance in the 1980s with 15 titles in 1982, but the Czech was at his best in 1986 and 1987.

Wilander enjoyed only one true dream year with three tour titles in 1988 and Courier's successes of 1992 and 1993 amounted to ten overall.

Sampras won 10 titles in 1994, but even though 22 others followed between 1995-97, including seven of his 14 majors, he never sustained consistant dominance.

While Andre Agassi was Sampras' rival in the 1990s, the Vegas Kid reaped just five titles overall in his renaissance year of 1999, when he finished as world number one.

PLAYING HIS OWN GAME

So can Federer sustain his dominance of the circuit over several years - thereby fulfilling Laver's great expectations?

That depends first on whether the competition will get in his way.

The current erratic form of his rivals, namely, Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick and Marat Safin, suggests Federer is in with a shot at greatness.

But he has only won four majors to date.

For Federer, the great unknowns are the emergence of new rivals and injuries, particularly to his wrist due to a snapped forehand action.

In an era, where super-fit athletes pound the ball, to stay at the top of the game, as Borg (1976-80) and Sampras (1993-98) did is, your correspondent believes, a tougher-than-ever proposition.

But there is no doubt after last week that the Basel-born is the only player of the current generation capable of emulating Don Budge (1938) and Rod Laver (1962 and 1969) in the quest for that elusive first-ever Grand Slam of the open era.

lunahielo
11-22-2004, 11:25 PM
Thank you, Daniel, GeorgeWH, RonE and crimson, for the nice articles. :) (Hope I didn't forget anybody)
My oh my, what a guy we support! I know we all wish him a continuation of his fabulous success~~and many more months as #1~

A question? Did anyone see the end of the Master's ceremony? My ESPN went off of tennis. I am wondering how Mattress Mac handled things?? ;)

Also~~News Flash :wavey:The December issue of 'Vogue '(USA) has a really good spread on Roger and Mirka...Fabulous pics and a page and a fourth article. Nicely done~~~very nice
In case you see it on the newstand, it has Cate Blanchett on the cover.

mitalidas
11-23-2004, 12:01 AM
This is a good one:

It must be hell to be Roger Federer. There you are, just trying to play tennis, and people keep giving you awards, trophies, money, cars - "I have no more space," the poor man said having collected his second Masters Cup title, another $1.52 million (£818,000) and yet another Mercedes.

The rain had lashed down all day on Sunday and there was no sign of it stopping until Tuesday night so when the radar revealed a small window of opportunity in the early evening, it was all hands to the pumps. The final was reduced from best-of-five to best-of-three sets and if everyone could hurry up, that would be very helpful.

Federer did just as he was told and set about Hewitt from the first ball. His serve was impregnable - he dropped just 11 points on it - while his forehand was ferocious. The backhand was not bad either and as for the volleys, they were pinging into the corners with abandon.

And this was against Hewitt in the form of his life, the best he has shown since he was world No 1 two years ago.

"The last one-and-a-half years, I have really started to go like a rocket," Federer said. "It's just been an incredible year for me from beginning to the end."

Vowing to fix his focus on maintaining his position as No 1 and defending his Wimbledon title - "It is the most prestigious tournament," he said - his only worry is getting a decent match.

He is so much better than everyone else that no one can challenge him. Still, as problems go, it is not such a bad one to have.

lunahielo
11-23-2004, 12:45 AM
Thanks, mitalidas~

Here's another good one...and I think Lleyton sums it up in one sentence~near the end~:):

Fantastic season for Roger Federer

Pravda:RU:World...
01:27 2004-11-23

When Pete Sampras confirmed his retirement at the 2003 U.S. Open, the phrase "we may never see his like again" was heard around the tennis world.

Fifteen months on, Roger Federer is lord and master of the men's game and the Sampras era is but a distant memory.

Federer's victory in Sunday's Masters Cup final was, as the Swiss said himself, "an unbelievable end to a fantastic season" and statistically Sampras has been left in the shade.

The 23-year-old from Oberwil won three of 2004's four Grand Slams, a feat last achieved by Sweden's Mats Wilander in 1988, informs Reuters.

Federer's triumphs at Wimbledon, Gstaad and the Canada Masters also matched Borg's 1979 achievement in winning consecutive trophies on grass, clay and hard courts.

The Swiss sensation eventually finished the year with a 74-6 win-loss record, the best winning record since McEnroe managed 82-3 in 1984.

In just 12 months, Federer has set standards that will see him go down in history - but he is already aiming higher in 2005, reported the BBC Sport.

"You're the best, mate," Hewitt beamed to Federer post-match before quickly switching focus to the Australian summer, where he is desperate to become the first Australian man to land the national title since Mark Edmondson in 1976, according to the Melbourne Herald Sun.

lina_seta
11-23-2004, 02:02 AM
"You're the best, mate," Hewitt beamed to Federer post-match
aww how nice... ^_^... now i like him more than before heheh

mitalidas
11-23-2004, 02:38 AM
lleyton is stating the obvious.... but nice to say that anyway. I think that Agassi and Hewitt are the most genuine and gracious losers. They give it their all, but they are always gracious when they lose

Billabong
11-23-2004, 02:41 AM
Thanks:D

Daniel
11-23-2004, 05:39 AM
thanks guys :)

lsy
11-23-2004, 01:22 PM
Rogi :banana: :banana:

Player of the year AND Ambassador for tennis 2004 :hug: :yeah:

Federer, Sharapova Earn ITWA Honors


Photo By Evan Pinkus By Tennis Week
11/20/2004

Roger Federer has won all 10 finals he’s contested this year, but today the top-ranked Swiss enjoyed a double dose of success in sweeping a pair of prestigious titles on the same day.


The International Tennis Writers Association (ITWA) has unanimously selected Federer as the Player of the Year as well as honoring him with the ITWA’s Ambassador for Tennis award for his efforts to promote the sport.

Maria Sharapova won the women’s Player of the Year award while, in a result reminiscent of their race for the No.1 ranking, Lindsay Davenport and Amelie Mauresmo were neck and neck in the voting for the women’s Ambassador for Tennis award. The pair will share the honor after voting ended in a dead heat.

The 23-year-old Federer opened the season by capturing his first Australian Open title. He successfully defended his Wimbledon championship before crushing former No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt to claim the U.S. Open and become the first man in the Open Era to win his first four Grand Slam finals. Federer is the first man since Sweden’s Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three majors in a single season.

"Roger’s an extraordinary talent and whas he’s achieved this year has been amazing, but he also works extremely hard with media and sponsors and that’s what makes him such a blessing to the game," said Eleanor Preston, co-President of ITWA. "Few No.1s in the history of tennis have done such a good job off the court as well as on it. He’s truly a pleasure to write about."

Read the whole article in following link :

http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11810&bannerregion=

lsy
11-23-2004, 01:29 PM
oops...so crimson already posted about the awards, sorry :o

I think Rogi's last interview for the year as the world champion deserved to be posted ;) :yeah:

An Interview with Roger Federer
November 21, 2004

Q. Great champions got the title Masters many times Ivan Lendl, Pete Sampras. So now you are a great member of Masters, aren't you?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it's nice to be on the board, you know, with many other great players. All the records, you know, I broke or equaled or whatever I did, you know, this year, has just been fantastic. Also throughout last year already. Like Lleyton said, the last one and a half years for me I have really started to go like a rocket.
This is a great end. You know, only a few guys have won two Masters Cups in a row Lleyton and Lendl and you name it, I don't know. So it's just a few of them, it's nice (smiling).

Q. This must be like the icing on the cake. You've had a fantastic year three Grand Slams in the bag, you've retained your Masters Cup title, and now, obviously, the only thing missing at the moment is the French Open. So are you going to now make that your priority?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I won't. Like you said, you know, this has been an incredible season for me, a great end to a fantastic season. It's kind of a fairy tale ending, you know, for me to again leave for vacation with great feelings, great memories.
So for next year, it won't be my first priority. My priority is to defend my Wimbledon crown and to maintain my No. 1 ranking. That's what I'm aiming for.

Q. On a lighter note, you won a great car tonight and you won another one last year. What else do you have in your car collection?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it's my third car I've won, and I won a Harley Davidson (laughing). I sold the one car and I still got the other well, now this one I haven't got yet in my garage. But it's getting there's a problem. I have no more space, so (laughing)...
So I have to figure out what I'm going to do with it.
But I'm definitely very happy because I love cars, I love convertibles, and I love fast cars, so this is great.

Q. After a year like that, what are you the most proud of?
ROGER FEDERER: Everything, yeah, basically. Because early in my career, you know, I was struggling with consistency. I mean, I couldn't get more consistent than this year, you know. For me, this is incredible.
I in the beginning of my career I was struggling with outdoor, you know, being able to play in the wind, the night session, those things. Now I got over that, you know. I was struggling on the clay, I lost my first 10 or 15 matches on clay on the pro tour. There also I have won many great tournaments now.
So I've really proven it's been all surfaces, everywhere in the world, you know, that I can win the title. I think that makes it very special, this whole year, because the season I've had, and I've basically won on all continents. It's just been incredible for me from beginning to the end.

Q. First of all, actually, you love Wimbledon.
ROGER FEDERER: Excuse me?

Q. You love Wimbledon, of course.
ROGER FEDERER: Uh hmm.

Q. I've got a petition I want you to sign to ban Bud Collins from Wimbledon for what he said on the court, that there's no Centre Court like this one in the world, not even Wimbledon (laughter). Now, the only similarity I saw was the rain. Bud said on the court to Mattress Mack, "Great court. There is no better place to watch tennis in the world than here, not even Centre Court at Wimbledon." Now, I've got a letter I want you to sign, and Bud won't be able to come again.
ROGER FEDERER: Okay (laughing).

Q. Is that okay?
ROGER FEDERER: That's fine, yeah (smiling).

Q. Seriously, it's been such a great year. Has there been any disappointment at all, anywhere?
ROGER FEDERER: There has been, you know, disappointments. Like the Olympic Games, of course, you know. Because at the beginning of the year, that was one of my major three goals of the season, you know, to do well there and to get a medal because I just missed out on it the year or four years before in Sydney.
The other disappointment was to lose against France in Davis Cup at home for the first time being at home as the No. 1 in the world. That was tough as well.
You know, the other losses were acceptable, you know. Against Nadal.
There's only a few, I can quickly run through them, so that's nice.
Like Nadal, and he played fantastic and I was still sick. Henman played fantastic as well in Rotterdam. Berdych surprised me maybe a little bit at the Olympics. You know, Guga at the French, he was just a better player, as simple as that.
Where else did I lose? Hrbaty in Cincinnati, yeah, not so easy. I should have won that match but lost it.
So I had, yeah, a fantastic season so...
I've never run through so many losses so quickly.

Q. What's the secret to picking up so well after a rain interruption, or particularly if you've been waiting around for three hours, like you did today? Do you have a particular secret which gets you into the groove so quickly?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I kind of quite like, you know, to wait for the match to be played. The problem is when you're waiting once the match started, like today at 5 2, 40 30, you really hope to get off to a good start again early in the match.
But to wait until the match starts is not really a problem for me because you find enough stuff to do during that time. You actually have even more time than expected, you know, to prepare. You just have to make sure that you're in, suddenly the court's dry and you have to walk on. For this reason, I don't have any problem with that.
But of course it's never easy for the rhythm once it gets interrupted.

Q. A man with such variety and versatility, is there a particular shot you enjoy hitting more than others?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I definitely have my preferences. I love hitting my forehand anywhere on the court. I like hitting actually slice, because these are the safe shots in my game. The other ones are good, too, you know, but these are the ones I feel most comfortable with.

Q. You're going for the lines, or it just happens you hit them so often?
ROGER FEDERER: I guess it just happens. Early in the rounds, early in the tournament, I don't really chase down the lines too much because I want to play it more safe, I want to get the feel for the court and the balls and sometimes, you know, you get surprised and you lose.
But this hardly happened this year only once. And once a tournament or the matches get underway, I start to feel better, and then I start also going much more for the corners. That's exactly again what happened this week.

Q. I noticed that you mentioned Shanghai when you took the prize today on the court. I just want you to give some comments about your impressions of the city and your experience two years ago in Shanghai.
ROGER FEDERER: I was very surprised how big it was. I knew it was big, but I didn't think it was that big. I had a great experience there. It was my first Masters Cup, in Shanghai. I had a great time. Even though I lost in semis against Lleyton, you know, we had a terrific match. And I'm really looking forward to go back there.
But you're not qualified, you don't have a wildcard after winning this one today, unfortunately. So I have to do everything again next year to try to get there. At least, you know, I got three chances, so that's good to know.
I think it's great, you know, that Asia gets a big tournament again because they have tournaments, but only rather small ones, I would say. I think Asia also deserves a big one. So for this reason, I'm very happy Shanghai has got it again.
Yeah, the city is fantastic, the people are nice, so hopefully I can make it there.




- By ASAP Sports

Skyward
11-23-2004, 01:59 PM
Thanks for posting Roger's interview.

The season has just ended, but I miss him already.

Daniel
11-23-2004, 02:03 PM
I miss him too, :hug: :smooch:

Mrs. B
11-23-2004, 02:06 PM
thanks, lsy! :kiss:

Roger likes Asia...;)

User ID 4783
11-23-2004, 02:09 PM
On Roger's official web site I read one of his hobbies is 'Jassen'. I'm German but I really don't know that word, can someone explain to me what it means?

lsy
11-23-2004, 02:12 PM
thanks, lsy! :kiss:

Roger likes Asia...;)

Rogi :hug: :kiss: Almost like he discovered a new region ;)

I miss him too...and it's only 1 day since we last watch him played :o

yanchr
11-23-2004, 03:59 PM
I miss him too :sad: and I will also miss all you guys here :hug:

We all deserve a break here, just like Roger. Luckily, the off season is not that long ;)

Doris Loeffel
11-23-2004, 04:01 PM
On Roger's official web site I read one of his hobbies is 'Jassen'. I'm German but I really don't know that word, can someone explain to me what it means?

Jassen is pretty swiss I belive guess the closest to it would be skat a game that germans do play. It's a game you play with cards you can be just 2 ppl but also up to 7 the same question has been asked once on rf.com and somebody posted a great link with the rules in english to this game. Been searching for it but unfortunately haven't been able to find it again

crimson
11-23-2004, 07:05 PM
oops...so crimson already posted about the awards, sorry :o

I think Rogi's last interview for the year as the world champion deserved to be posted ;) :yeah:



Don't worry about it Isy :) Thank you for posting this interview with Roger, it was great to read :yeah:

Mrs. B
11-23-2004, 07:21 PM
On Roger's official web site I read one of his hobbies is 'Jassen'. I'm German but I really don't know that word, can someone explain to me what it means?

http://www.pagat.com/jass/swjass.html

:)

Clara Bow
11-23-2004, 11:33 PM
For those of you who can get US Vogue the December issue (the one with Cate Blanchett on the cover) will have an article and picture about Roger in it.

mitalidas
11-24-2004, 02:26 AM
Clara Bow! I bow to you

Please, scan and post that... would love to see/read

SUKTUEN
11-24-2004, 04:35 AM
Oh I miss Roger too~~~~ :hug:

I Will watch Roger's match tape~~~waiting next year~~ :worship: :yeah:

I cannot image how I heart break when Roger retirement :bigcry: :bigcry:

Daniel
11-24-2004, 06:44 AM
Roger :hug: :smooch: :drool:

WyveN
11-24-2004, 07:22 AM
I cannot image how I heart break when Roger retirement :bigcry: :bigcry:

fingers crossed thats many many years away ;)

WyveN
11-24-2004, 07:25 AM
Think Roger might be in with a shot at the sportsmanship award after the way he conducted himself in the Safin match.

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 09:09 AM
For those of you who can get US Vogue the December issue (the one with Cate Blanchett on the cover) will have an article and picture about Roger in it.

the pics look gorgeous. Mirka looks fab.
i'm gonna get one as soon as it hits the kiosks here. ;)

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 09:10 AM
Think Roger might be in with a shot at the sportsmanship award after the way he conducted himself in the Safin match.

he'll probably be voted as Swiss sportsman of the year again. ;)

babsi
11-24-2004, 09:12 AM
It would be very deservring,WyveN!

We have only reason to be proud of him - not one embaresing moment all year long - only class!!!!!!!!!!

SUKTUEN
11-24-2004, 09:14 AM
Oh~~~ Roger I love you so much~~~ :hearts: :smooch: :smooch:

lsy
11-24-2004, 09:17 AM
Think Roger might be in with a shot at the sportsmanship award after the way he conducted himself in the Safin match.

Don't be too sure, I hardly read any article mentioning about that anywhere. Just imagine this being other player handled by bunch of PR people, I bet we will be reading this again and again and again everywhere, just like the *cough* heroic superhero savior incident :lol: :tape:

to those of you who don't visit Rogi's official site very often, you should these days, plenty of pictures and news posted and there's an awesome Houston report written by a nice Rogi fan there :D

lsy
11-24-2004, 09:22 AM
he'll probably be voted as Swiss sportsman of the year again. ;)

Probably?

I thought that should be for sure ;)

babsi
11-24-2004, 09:34 AM
Because this is the end of the tennis season I want to thank everyone on this forum for there posts - you are all very lovely people :) :) :)
I guess everyone has some kind of year end holliday heading there way,so have the best of times!!!!!!!!!
We will all have differnet wishes for the coming year,but one wish will be the same for all of us.
Wish you all the best
Susanne

WyveN
11-24-2004, 10:33 AM
to those of you who don't visit Rogi's official site very often, you should these days, plenty of pictures and news posted and there's an awesome Houston report written by a nice Rogi fan there :D

Thanks Isy. I just read the whole thread, took a while but that is definetly the best tennis report I have ever read.
If only I could write reports like that, reporting on Portugal wouldnt be such a problem ;)

lsy
11-24-2004, 01:55 PM
Thanks Isy. I just read the whole thread, took a while but that is definetly the best tennis report I have ever read.
If only I could write reports like that, reporting on Portugal wouldnt be such a problem ;)

:smash: I used to dream of a report like Sadie's from you...but now :o :o

and it's "l" not "I" :sobbing: :bigcry: after one year...

Susanne :hug: :kiss:

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 02:05 PM
Because this is the end of the tennis season I want to thank everyone on this forum for there posts - you are all very lovely people :) :) :)
I guess everyone has some kind of year end holliday heading there way,so have the best of times!!!!!!!!!
We will all have differnet wishes for the coming year,but one wish will be the same for all of us.
Wish you all the best
Susanne

hey, babsi!

nice having you here. hope you'll still be around for the start of the new season to cheer on for Roger! ;)


Alles Gute... :wavey:

Mrs. B

mitalidas
11-24-2004, 03:26 PM
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.

Get set for the 2005 Federer Show! May all his dreams (and all OUR dreams for him) come true then....

Can't wait ....! See you soon

Doris Loeffel
11-24-2004, 03:39 PM
http://www.pagat.com/jass/swjass.html

:)


Thanks Mrs. B. for diging it out for me - I tried just couldn't find it...

SUKTUEN
11-24-2004, 03:51 PM
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.



Thankyou so much you remember me~~ :worship:

RogiFan88
11-24-2004, 04:27 PM
mitalidas, you won't be popping in over the off-season to see if there is any Rogi news? you never know... anyway, have a great holiday too... we don't get one til Christmas.

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 05:55 PM
Thanks Mrs. B. for diging it out for me - I tried just couldn't find it...

ever heard of google? ;)

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 06:01 PM
yes, Happy Holidays to everyone! :wavey:

it's been worth being Roger's fan all these years and i'd say this year he has reached his potential---reaching No. 1, winning 4 Slams, and being a Tennis Master twice! the best might yet to come...

hey guys, that post from Sadie at Roger's site about her time in Houston was just fantastic! another lucky one who's seen him live.
:)

Mrs. B
11-24-2004, 06:04 PM
Thankyou so much you remember me~~ :worship:

why would mitalidas forget our poster of great Roger pics here? :kiss:

User ID 4783
11-24-2004, 07:14 PM
http://www.pagat.com/jass/swjass.html

:)
thanks for that. I really didn't know this word :rolleyes:

RonE
11-24-2004, 09:19 PM
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.

Get set for the 2005 Federer Show! May all his dreams (and all OUR dreams for him) come true then....

Can't wait ....! See you soon

Thank you Mitalidas :D :hug:

I will still be here, looking in to see if I and anyone else can find more interesting news and tidbits about Roger- I don't know how active this forum is during the off season but my guess is not that much.

I will also be going to Switzerland again in two weeks time for vacation but I will still be online. Have a good one :yeah:

Yoda
11-24-2004, 11:47 PM
It's been a great year....and this thread is such a wonderful source ofinfo.

Keep up the good work and cya all aboard the Fed Expressin 2005 :wavey:

Daniel
11-25-2004, 08:32 AM
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.

Get set for the 2005 Federer Show! May all his dreams (and all OUR dreams for him) come true then....

Can't wait ....! See you soon

Hello to you and all the federer FAns :wavey:
this year has been good, we have supporting , he has been winning and lets hope the good moments keep going next season :bounce: :kiss:

:dance: ;passing some Heineken to everyone: cheerrs :aparty: :drool: :lick:

yanchr
11-25-2004, 02:14 PM
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.

Get set for the 2005 Federer Show! May all his dreams (and all OUR dreams for him) come true then....

Can't wait ....! See you soon
You missed me, the deeply devoted one :bigcry: ;)

I love all Roger fans here! Big hugs for everyone :hug: We have a dream year coz of Roger, and we get together thanks to Roger :angel: Wish everyone here enjoy the holidays we deserve (I myself will go to some island for vacation soon :D) and focus on gaining the year-end bonus ;), and above all, get fully prepared of the 2005 Federer Show! I'm sure we are well blessed to have it on nail.

Never mind this forum will go through some quieter moments for quite some days, Ron ;) It will regain its energy right on the very start of Roger's next season's action :banana: It's Jan 3 in Doha ;) Let's wait patiently....

Mrs. B
11-25-2004, 02:21 PM
:dance: ;passing some Heineken to everyone: cheerrs :aparty: :drool: :lick:

cheers!

I propose a Xmas party here on December 25 and we'll have a chat thread and we can drink and eat (& sing Xmas carols) and reminish about Roger's great season!
what do you guys think? :cool:

SUKTUEN
11-25-2004, 03:15 PM
Although, I miss Roger~~ :couple:

But I will Roger take a good rest is most important~~ :hug:
:worship: God Please bless Roger health~~~~ :worship:

mitalidas
11-25-2004, 06:45 PM
You missed me, the deeply devoted one :bigcry: ;)



AAARGH
it was unintentional... I was typing quickly, before the students came in . and i had just read posts by the ohters. you are one of the biggest supporters ever of Rogs... merry xmas :) and see you in 05

WyveN
11-25-2004, 10:08 PM
I will still be here, looking in to see if I and anyone else can find more interesting news and tidbits about Roger- I don't know how active this forum is during the off season but my guess is not that much.


There is still plenty of Roger things that will be happening. I am looking forward to all the awards he gets, I recall last year he was getting all sorts of awards almost weekly so this time around it will be :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

mitalidas
11-26-2004, 01:05 AM
Federer playing role of `The Dominator'

MIAMI - (KRT) - And so, another seemingly endless tennis season comes to a close. There is no question who dominated the men's tour. That would be Swissman Roger Federer. The pony-tailed maestro ended the year with a victory at the Masters Cup, his 13th consecutive win at a final, breaking the record formerly shared by Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe.

Federer won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, the first man to win three of the four Slams since Mats Wilander in 1988. He won 23 straight matches against top 10 opponents and finishes the season with a 74-6 record, the best since McEnroe went 82-3 in 1984.

He is also rolling in the dough. Federer won $6.5 million in prize money in 2004, just shy of Pete Sampras' record $6.5 million in 1997.

``In the short term, Federer has established a gap and there's no doubt about that,'' Tim Henman said.

``Federer is so confident right now, and he's sort of riding that wave of 2004. There's no doubt that he has been No. 1 by a big margin.''

RogiFan88
11-26-2004, 01:22 AM
pony-tailed maestro ? not anymore...

Mrs. B., what shall we feast on for Christmas?

Daniel
11-26-2004, 05:21 AM
I like your idea Mrs B :dance: :kiss:

Mrs. B
11-26-2004, 09:23 AM
pony-tailed maestro ? not anymore...

Mrs. B., what shall we feast on for Christmas?

anyone can bring their prefered dishes. ;) you can bring your delicious Indian curries, how about some sushi...;) i'll bring some Swiss cheese--raclette, anyone?
Daniel can bring the wine.
lol, yanchr & suktuen can bring Peking Duck! :lick: *hungry*


i'll bring this too. ;)
http://www.lindt.com/public/switzerland/02_produkte/pralines/pralines_du_confiseur/pdcneu/255x271spiegelstimmungpdc.jpg

RonE
11-26-2004, 09:32 AM
OMG Mrs B., are those Sprungli? :drool: :lick: :lick:

SUKTUEN
11-26-2004, 09:46 AM
Oh ~~ I love Swiss Cholocotle so muchhhhhhhh :bounce: :hearts:

lsy
11-26-2004, 09:59 AM
anyone can bring their prefered dishes. ;) you can bring your delicious Indian curries, how about some sushi...;) i'll bring some Swiss cheese--raclette, anyone?
Daniel can bring the wine.
lol, yanchr & suktuen can bring Peking Duck! :lick: *hungry*



:lick: :lick: Mrs.B!!! Shouldn't have come this thread, making me even hungrier now

I can bring satay, dumplings, laksa, kuih, ice kacang...:lick: :lick:

:aparty: :rocker: :aparty: :rocker: I luv party and....CHAT thread? Finally??? :banana::lol:

But I will be away for holiday xmas, gotto find a computer and join in the party...:banana:

Mrs. B
11-26-2004, 10:14 AM
lsy, now you're talking! yummy Malay food. i'm getting more hungry now and my lunch break is 45 minutes away! :(
do drop by and join the party. perhaps we can already start the chat thread now...

RonE, don't you just love Lindt-Sprüngli chokies here? :lick: they're my faves.

lsy
11-26-2004, 10:23 AM
lsy, now you're talking! yummy Malay food. i'm getting more hungry now and my lunch break is 45 minutes away! :(

:lol: and I can bring whole lot of Chinese food too, fried bee hoon, poh piah, wanton, red bean soup, bobochacha :lick:...just name it ;)

I'll off for dinner now and it's Friday night :banana::banana:


do drop by and join the party. perhaps we can already start the chat thread now...

We should have started one loonnnngggg time ago ;) yes, will try to drop by, don't think I'm going to miss all those foods do you?

Mrs. B
11-26-2004, 10:28 AM
:lol: and I can bring whole lot of Chinese food too, fried bee hoon, poh piah, wanton, red bean soup, bobochacha :lick:...just name it ;)

I'll off for dinner now and it's Friday night :banana::banana:



We should have started one loonnnngggg time ago ;) yes, will try to drop by, don't think I'm going to miss all those foods do you?

check the other thread, we've started it. and no, i didn't think you'd miss all the food. i know how you Malaysians loooove to makan! :lol:

RonE
11-26-2004, 11:18 AM
RonE, don't you just love Lindt-Sprüngli chokies here? :lick: they're my faves.

Yes I do, they are a weakness of mine :o

RogiFan88
11-26-2004, 03:34 PM
Mmmm... yummy! Making me hungry and it's not even lunchtime here...

lunahielo
11-26-2004, 11:34 PM
Originally posted by mitalidas~
Hi everyone -- all the usual suspects (RonE, Daniel, Wyven, Fedex, Rogifan, SUKTUEN, Rogiman, Isy, Mrs. B, Basi, _Sue_, linaseta, legolas, uh --who'm I missing? Many.... I know... cant remember all) and everyone else who has been around to support Rogi for months and months... (oh, where's Dirk? Dirk too), HAVE A GREAT HOLIDAY.

You missed me, too~~but you are certainly forgiven.. :)
I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. I will be doing some traveling~~to New England (snow country~~yea)~
But I will be checking in from time to time to see how all of you are doing~~and to find out the latest *Roger* news!

Get set for the 2005 Federer Show! May all his dreams (and all OUR dreams for him) come true then....

I am looking forward to another year with out guy as #1.
Peace, Paz, Paix, Frieden y Pax~~to all, :wavey:
Luna~~~~~(lunahielo)

lina_seta
11-27-2004, 01:20 AM
AHHH!!! Year 2005
I wish the BESSSTTTTT for ROGERRRR the king of tennis =)

only to stay healthy all year =)... a FO would be nice.. but im not looking that far away... i want 2005 to start to c federer play.. but i dont want 2005 to start cuz it ll be a stressful year for me... last highschool year =O

Xmas season so nearrr... my FAVVVV season =D!!! (though it will be summer here by xmas hehehe)

Daniel
11-27-2004, 05:56 AM
my fav dish is past and pizza and KFC :drool:

mitalidas
11-27-2004, 03:12 PM
Federer is Hewitt's big challenge
By Greg Prichard
Sydney
November 28, 2004

Lleyton Hewitt has to break out of his comfort zone, strip his game down and reinvent himself with shots he has not previously been comfortable playing if he hopes to match it with Roger Federer again, says his mentor John Newcombe.

Newcombe described it as a massive challenge and one he's not sure Hewitt can meet. But it is one he believed the former world No.1 would accept in an attempt to turn things around against Federer.

"I think Lleyton would see it as an exciting challenge," Newcombe said. "I speak to him regularly and I'll be floating my ideas to him and Roger (Rasheed, Hewitt's coach), for what they're worth."

Newcombe, who introduced Hewitt to Davis Cup when he was Australian captain, said the problem confronting the former world No. 1 was the same every other player faced in trying to deal with Federer. "Federer is playing as well as anyone I've seen," Newcombe said. "He has raised the bar. He's doing it easily at the moment and it's unlikely he's going to drop unless he gets an injury or something happens psychologically to upset him.

"The rest of the guys have to try to catch up. It's no different for Andy Roddick than it is for Hewitt. Roddick isn't going to get better against Federer unless he improves his backhand and volleys."

Newcombe said Hewitt's playing style was still good enough against anyone else, but could no longer get the job done against Federer.

"Roger isn't feeling anything from the game Lleyton is throwing at him," he said. "Lleyton has to come up with a different game plan and that means coming out of his comfort zone."

Newcombe suggested two shots Hewitt should work on to make his game stronger against Federer. "Lleyton is not a big fan of hitting his backhand down the line, but he's going to have to do it," he said. "And when he hits his forehand across court, he likes to hit it with topspin and relatively safe, but Roger is set up for that and if Lleyton drops it short, Roger is all over it. He has to flatten it out and hit it harder and deeper. I'm sure Lleyton's coach is already pointing this stuff out to him.

"Lleyton relies on his ability to get a lot of balls back and counterpunch and that used to be enough against Roger. Roger would get disenchanted and sulk and Lleyton would take advantage of that. But Roger is stronger now and Lleyton has to react to that. Whether he can make the necessary changes effectively is the question and it would take a lot of work, but he can try."

Federer, who finished this year with a phenomenal win-loss record of 74-6, has won 23 straight matches against top-10 ranked players. Against his fellow players in the current top 10, he has a 22-1 record this year.

Newcombe said that if Federer continued in a similar vein for another five years he would not only be one of the all-time greats, but maybe the best ever.

Daniel
11-28-2004, 07:24 AM
Thanks mitalidas :D

WyveN
11-28-2004, 09:47 PM
Some nice Federer videos here.
http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/playermultimedia_lng0_rub9_spo57_ven18606.shtml

Watch the one of Federer in his Houston appartment.

lina_seta
11-29-2004, 12:55 AM
federer is everyone's big challenge ;)

Daniel
11-29-2004, 07:53 AM
federer is a nightmare for everyone :lol: no one wants to play him ;)

Doris Loeffel
11-29-2004, 11:10 AM
anyone can bring their prefered dishes. ;) you can bring your delicious Indian curries, how about some sushi...;) i'll bring some Swiss cheese--raclette, anyone?
Daniel can bring the wine.
lol, yanchr & suktuen can bring Peking Duck! :lick: *hungry*


i'll bring this too. ;)
http://www.lindt.com/public/switzerland/02_produkte/pralines/pralines_du_confiseur/pdcneu/255x271spiegelstimmungpdc.jpg


I'll take care of the Rösti ;)

Mrs. B
11-29-2004, 12:58 PM
LOL, has anyone noticed this? you go to atp's official site and there's the main story of Roger capping the banner year. put your cursor on the picture where he's jumping, and it says: Lleyton Hewitt! :haha: :haha: