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Roger news and articles

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mitalidas
08-28-2004, 03:09 PM
His plate numbers are BL 81088. ;)

aah, all the stalkers have the info now ;)

Mrs. B
08-28-2004, 04:19 PM
aah, all the stalkers have the info now ;)

Viel Glück! need the keys to his garage, too? :p

mitalidas
08-28-2004, 06:09 PM
Federer Arrives With Anonymity IntactBy HARVEY ARATON (nytimes)


WHEREVER he went at the Olympics, people recognized Roger Federer. When he carried the Swiss flag during the opening ceremony, competitors from many countries, a variety of sports, rushed up to shake his hand, to request a pose.

"At the opening ceremonies, I must have taken 200 pictures with athletes," he said, with a modest giggle. "I was a little bit, you know, a superstar."

Then the world's No. 1 tennis player and two-time Wimbledon champion, hailed at 23 as one of tennis's most gifted shot-makers ever, flew to New York for tomorrow's start of the United States Open and assumed his North American anonymity. Without a racket in his hand or his signature headband, with shaggy brown hair partly shielding penetrating, deep-set eyes, Federer walked into the restaurant of an East Side hotel last week and attracted no photo seekers, no autograph hounds. He turned no heads.

"Occasionally I get surprised, someone will say hello," he said, devouring a salad. "I feel like in America, especially in New York, people are so busy, running after their thing, so I don't get recognized very often."

We know - and he knows - that tennis in the United States is not exactly in an era that is golden, silver or even bronze. Federer has also not yet been past the fourth round at the Open, an unofficial litmus test for the sportscaster who doesn't know the difference between a rally and a volley. All across Sports-Talk Radio America, Federer is still the guy from a country with mountains who has been beating our guy, Andy Roddick, like a drum.

What tennis could obviously use here in America is less nationalism, and more internationalism. Less hometown heroism, and more ambassadors without borders. Less obsessing about how the Yanks are doing, and more appreciation for the artists from anywhere.

Good luck on this mission of international mercy that must begin with a major attitudinal adjustment by tournament promoters and network panderers.

"I think a lot of people have got the American tennis public all wrong," Rod Laver said in a telephone interview from his home in Southern California earlier this summer. American fans, Laver said, are smarter than what the tennis and television industries generally take them for. Across the decades, they loved Laver and Borg, Becker and Rafter, and will accept more than the steady diet of Americana they are too often fed.

Arlen Kantarian, the chief executive for professional tennis of the United States Tennis Association, agrees, especially in the case of Federer, whom he calls "the most entertaining racket in tennis." Yet it was at the 2003 United States Open that American self-absorption produced anger and protest in a variety of languages, thanks to the manipulation of a waterlogged schedule to ensure prime-time matches featuring American stars.

"Scheduling is crucial," Federer said. "You have to pick the right matches for the fans and for TV, but you can't always, always, always pass the other players over because the Americans get the priority. You have to build up others because suddenly you get to the semifinals and people say, 'Who is Carlos Moya?' Oh, he's No. 5 in the world."

Of course, Roddick, No. 2, is the American It boy, and his United States Open title last summer makes this year's event something of a homestand, despite a 1-7 career record against Federer.

Roddick lost to Federer in a close Wimbledon final and again on a hardcourt at the summer tour stop in Toronto. All serve and swagger, fire and forehand, he cannot orchestrate a tennis concerto the way Federer can. :p :p :p Yet Federer wants us to understand that his hybrid all-courts game is not the only one that is worthy of appreciation and awe.

"There I have to protect Andy," Federer said. "I know that I have a little bit of an advantage over him as far as commentating because I am playing a little bit in a way like the former players. But if you look at the top 10, who else is playing with that power, with that serve? Most of the others are counterpunchers. Andy is also unique."

What's apparent is that as much as Federer wants to beat Roddick, he realizes that joining him in a new-age rivalry is his ticket to enhanced visibility in this land of marketing opportunity. Federer would like his American friends to know that he has, since childhood, been a fan of the National Hockey League. Even more than Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg, his greatest adolescent reverence was reserved for Michael Jordan. He loves New York and always stays in Manhattan, even this week, with a political convention certain to complicate his commute.

"Traffic will be terrible," he complained, a sure indication that Federer knows New York better than it knows him.

Dirk
08-28-2004, 06:16 PM
Roger is very gracious to Andy. Rogi doesn't want a rivarly and doesn't care about marketing the sport nearly as much as building a legacy. The suits have their place in the tennis world and Rogi has his.

tangerine_dream
08-28-2004, 11:11 PM
I like this part better.... :angel: :bigclap: :banana:

Yet Federer wants us to understand that his hybrid all-courts game is not the only one that is worthy of appreciation and awe.

"There I have to protect Andy," Federer said. "I know that I have a little bit of an advantage over him as far as commentating because I am playing a little bit in a way like the former players. But if you look at the top 10, who else is playing with that power, with that serve? Most of the others are counterpunchers. Andy is also unique."

---------

Thank you, Roger. :worship: Unfortunately, your graciousness won't shut the haters up nor will it rub off on some of your fans. :sad:

Billabong
08-29-2004, 03:12 AM
The car:yeah:! soooo hot:D!!!

ytben
08-29-2004, 05:40 AM
Another article, this one is aimed for the gamblers out there. I don't like the title of the article :(

http://www.covers.com/includes/articles.aspx?theArt=30403&tid=44&t=2

U.S. Open: Fading Federer
Julian Dickinson

Ho-hum, another Grand Slam tennis tournament and guess who the favorites are.

Roger Federer and Andy Roddick have been pounding the competition into the hardcourt in nearly every tournament. The rivalry continues in the U.S. Open this week, where bettors can expect to see plenty of chalk next to the names of these two in every match leading up to the finals.

Federer is the clear favorite, at +138 and Roddick, the defending champion at Flushing Meadows, is not far behind with +250 odds. Roddick has been unable to solve his Swiss nemesis in their recent meetings, most notably, a 4-set loss in the final at Wimbledon, but in New York City, the American might have the advantage.


Although Federer has won eight titles already this year, including two majors, he has never made it past the fourth round at the U.S. Open. Perhaps the boisterous atmosphere or late-night matches disagree with the subdued nature of the world No. 1, but for whatever reason, he hasn’t found the same success at this tournament he in almost every other tennis court in the world.

To make matters even more difficult for Federer, he has drawn scrappy Spaniard Albert Costa in the first round. Costa has beaten Federer in their last two meetings, most recently at this year’s Rome Masters. To be fair, the last match was on clay, but Federer is also coming off back-to-back upsets, losing in the first round at the Cincinnati Masters and the second round of the Olympics in Athens.

Roddick also lost early at the Olympics, but he looks like a good bet to become the first repeat U.S. Open champion since Patrick Rafter in 1997 and 1998. The only serious roadblock in Roddick’s draw is the big Russian, Marat Safin. If Roddick can overpower Safin, he should be able to ride the momentum of the partisan crowd to another championship, especially if Federer goes out early.

But if bettors want value for their money, they should look at the longer odds on 2001 U.S. Open champ Lleyton Hewitt. At +600, the fiery Aussie is a tasty pick after some serious hardcourt success on the road to Flushing Meadows.

Hewitt finally looks like he’s regained his 2001 form after a few years of disappointing results. He and his coach, Roger Rasheed, took a thoughtful approach to this tournament, skipping the Olympics for the Legg Mason Classic, where Hewitt won his third title of the season.

A rejuvenated, refocused Hewitt could be a force to be reckoned with at Arthur Ashe Stadium in the upcoming weeks.

"I'm trying to continue the good form I've had over most of this year," said Hewitt. "These last weeks, I've sharpened up everything. I just want to be 100 per cent ready to go on Monday or Tuesday. I'm confident at how I'm hitting the ball. I'm consistent again. I may have the fourth seeding, but you still have to win seven matches at a slam."

Daniel
08-29-2004, 07:15 AM
nice car :)

RonE
08-29-2004, 07:26 AM
Is this guy for real?!

-------

Roddick will keep Federer waiting
By John McEnroe
(Filed: 29/08/2004)



It took Stefan Edberg nine years to work out how to make Flushing Meadows' positive energy work for him before winning there two years on the trot. While it may not take Roger Federer, a similar character to the passive Swede, quite as long, I still believe the best player in the world has a bit to learn about the wildest venue in Grand Slam tennis before he can add the US Open title to his CV.

The special atmosphere in New York has always suited slightly crazed guys such as Jimmy Connors and myself, which is why I believe Andy Roddick will successfully defend his title over the next two weeks. The young American has learned how to control his emotions in the last year or so while still maximising the electrifying support he receives there.

The hullabaloo seems to unsettle Federer, who looks so much more relaxed in the more sedate surroundings of Wimbledon, just as Edberg did. The Swede hated Flushing Meadows, but the two eventually hit it off. Another reason why I think the Open could be the last major Federer wins is that hardcourts are his least favourite surface. :retard: :smash: At home on all courts as he is, Federer finds this surface the least forgiving when it comes to footwork.

The Swiss likes a little more give than these courts allow. He doesn't move as well on them as, say, Andre Agassi. Also, I believe he has hit a bit of a wall after a tremendous year. He had an incredible 23-match unbeaten run, during which he won Wimbledon, then immediately afterwards Gstaad and Toronto, where he beat Roddick in the final. A couple of days later, he was killing the Slovak Dominik Hrbaty in Cincinnati only to end up losing.

It probably explained why he underachieved at the Olympics, but then so many players did. I have never felt comfortable with tennis at the Olympics, but, like a return to wooden rackets, I suppose there is no going back now. At least they could make a better job of it than they do.

If this is an important event, as everyone keeps telling us, why is it the men's and women's games are holding tournaments at the same time? It wouldn't happen while a Wimbledon or an Open was going on. Also, why aren't the matches played over five sets like the majors?

But getting back to the Flushing Meadows, it will be interesting to see how fast the courts are this year. I played on the Louis Armstrong Court with my brother against the Bryant twins shortly before they left for Athens - perhaps that's what screwed them up in Greece - and the court was playing with some bounce. Courts like that favour players who use a lot of spin but generally they have made them quicker to suit American players such as Pete Sampras and Agassi.

I bet Tim Henman wishes Wimbledon's groundstaff were as accommodating with the speed of their courts which, I believe, have slowed down significantly, in spite of what they may say, ever since Lleyton Hewitt won there two years ago from the baseline. Roddick, who tends to stay well back when he receives, is quite happy with a high bounce but would probably prefer it a little quicker to add extra penetration to his already thunderous serve. Henman has been drawn in a quarter which is difficult initially, but if he makes it through to the second week - and that's an 'if' almost as big as his first-round opponent Ivo Karlovic - life should get easier. He could be in with worse people than clay-courters such as Carlos Moya and the French Open champion Gaston Gaudio. A good run at the Open, say to the quarters, would legitimise Henman's new standing as an all-court player. After what he achieved at Roland Garros this year, anything is possible.

Just when we were wondering whether Agassi is in his final year he beats a tremendous field at Cincinnati to put himself back in the mix. Another semi-final at the US Open is well within his reach. Juan Carlos Ferrero, however, will do well to repeat last year's final place. He was mentally and physically whipped by his efforts last year and it has clearly affected this year.

So a win for Roddick over Federer in the final, which should spice up the Masters in Houston nicely.

mitalidas
08-29-2004, 08:26 AM
Is this guy for real?!
Another reason why I think the Open could be the last major Federer wins is that hardcourts are his least favourite surface[/B]. :retard: :smash:


I think what JMc is implying is that "...could be the last OF THE majors Federer wins.." meaning, he has won AO and W, and will win the FO before the USO. that's why he makes the immediate comparison to Edberg, for whom the USO was also the last among the majors that Edberg got.

lsy
08-29-2004, 08:29 AM
"Scheduling is crucial," Federer said. "You have to pick the right matches for the fans and for TV, but you can't always, always, always pass the other players over because the Americans get the priority. You have to build up others because suddenly you get to the semifinals and people say, 'Who is Carlos Moya?' Oh, he's No. 5 in the world."

Simple enough theory ;)

btw seems to me like Roger who was previously seen as too boring to be marketed in the US had suddenly become very marketable? ;)

That's a very good article from NYTimes though, thanks for posting Mitalidas.


"There I have to protect Andy," Federer said. "I know that I have a little bit of an advantage over him as far as commentating because I am playing a little bit in a way like the former players. But if you look at the top 10, who else is playing with that power, with that serve? Most of the others are counterpunchers. Andy is also unique."

Very true Roger. Unfortunately too much power gives people a "bullier" impression which doesn't normally appeal I guess.

mitalidas
08-29-2004, 08:35 AM
Our Rogi..... **sigh**, such a great ambassador for the game. So polite...

He probably wants to say "to hell with the fans and TV, lets be fair and schedule fairly so that all the non-Americans are not playing 3 matches at 2 am on two rainy days".

RonE
08-29-2004, 10:09 AM
I think what JMc is implying is that "...could be the last OF THE majors Federer wins.." meaning, he has won AO and W, and will win the FO before the USO. that's why he makes the immediate comparison to Edberg, for whom the USO was also the last among the majors that Edberg got.


Not that, I was refering to the bit about hard being Rogi's least preferred surface.

ytben
08-29-2004, 10:18 AM
Yeah Ron that bit also makes me :confused:

BTW which surface produces higher bounce? Decoturf or rebound ace?

RonE
08-29-2004, 10:21 AM
Yeah Ron that bit also makes me :confused:

BTW which surface produces higher bounce? Decoturf or rebound ace?

Definitely rebound ace- on decoturf the ball skids through more.

ytben
08-29-2004, 10:38 AM
Thanks for the info Ron. Surface wise, Rogi should have no problem with USO then if he can handle the higher bounce in AO. If anything will trouble Rogi, I agree it will be the atmosphere in USO.

SUKTUEN
08-29-2004, 10:54 AM
Roger is just sooooo kind and nice as always !!!! ;)

Roger ~~WE LOVE YOU SOOOOOO MUCH~~~~ :D :D :D

RonE
08-29-2004, 11:23 AM
Thanks for the info Ron. Surface wise, Rogi should have no problem with USO then if he can handle the higher bounce in AO. If anything will trouble Rogi, I agree it will be the atmosphere in USO.

You're welcome ytben.

While the atmosphere/conditions are a factor, I think too much is being made of the issue. Rogi last year in Houston took both Roddick and Agassi apart in sublime fashion in front of a ferociously partisan crowd.

As for the airplanes and noise- Roger will adapt. At the end of the day it is still about playing tennis, and Rogi has shown that he has strong enough mental capabilities to cope with difficult conditions of all sorts.

speedracer
08-29-2004, 12:54 PM
I understand WHY Rogi feels he has to say something nice about Roddick. But sometimes I wish he did not give sugar coated answers. Roddick is unique? Come on, power is not a pure tennis talent. If it is, Karlovic is unique as well.
Roger doesn't like hc? :scratch: :confused: Where did this mystery come from?

yanchr
08-29-2004, 04:20 PM
The special atmosphere in New York has always suited slightly crazed guys such as Jimmy Connors and myself, The hullabaloo seems to unsettle Federer, who looks so much more relaxed in the more sedate surroundings of Wimbledon, just as Edberg did.
These parts does make some sense to me. That generally shows how Europeans and Americans are differently made of.
which is why I believe Andy Roddick will successfully defend his title over the next two weeks. The young American has learned how to control his emotions in the last year or so while still maximising the electrifying support he receives there.
just because of the atmosphere? I think Andy will die for it that if things are really that simple.
Another reason why I think the Open could be the last major Federer wins is that hardcourts are his least favourite surface.
Ya, this also bewilders me:confused:
So a win for Roddick over Federer in the final, ......
Totally a dream if 'if' really happens.

yanchr
08-29-2004, 04:27 PM
btw seems to me like Roger who was previously seen as too boring to be marketed in the US had suddenly become very marketable? ;)
ya, me thinking the same. Why is Roger suddenly keen on marketing himself in US? Maybe the feeling of being recognized so often and asked for photoes and hands-shaking in Athens are just too good to resist? ;)

Anyway it's good for tennis, even though I really don't care that much if he is often recognized in US.

RogiFan88
08-29-2004, 06:22 PM
these writers are WILLING Rogi to crash out of the USO early... and Pandy to win again... whatever... more biased articles, what else is new...

RogiFan88
08-29-2004, 06:23 PM
i don't care if US ignores Rogi... not important...

LCeh
08-30-2004, 05:27 AM
EXTREMELY long article posted at Rogi's board, but a great and worthy read:

Federer Express
By David Law


Pete Sampras barely knew what to do with himself. Approaching the net on Wimbledon's Center Court as a beaten man for only the second time in nine years, Sampras stared across the court to where a young man, ten years his junior, lay on the grass crying.

Roger Federer had just come of age. Seconds earlier, the 19-year-old Swiss had sent another majestic, and this time lethal forehand flashing past the seven-time champion. The American had thrown the preverbial kitchen sink at Federer but the youngster had sent it back with interest, and as they shook hands, it seemed Sampras had finally found a successor worthy of carrying his baton of greatness into the new millennium.

Ever since he humbled the most prolific Grand Slam winner in history, memories of that day have been on show at the Swiss National Tennis Centre, an hour's train ride from Federer's home in Basel. Kids half his size and half his age fly around the courts, pummeling forehands and hoping to follow in his footsteps. Posters with his picture adorn the walls, and the red shirt he wore at the US Open hangs on display in a glass cabinet. That thrilling five set win over Sampras made him a household name in Switzerland and turned heads around the world, but the Roger Federer story has only just begun.

He still lives at the family home with father Robert and mother Lynette (who works in the accreditation department of the Davidoff Swiss Indoors in Basel), and first picked up a racquet at the age of three. At 14 he had to make a choice between his two favorite sports - tennis and soccer. A fanatical supporter of Basel's football team, he decided to make soccer a hobby, and tennis his career.

One of the first people to work with him at that age was Dutchman Sven Groeneveld, former coach to Greg Rusedski, Nicolas Kiefer and Tommy Haas.

"He had the ability to hit all the shots," remembers Groeneveld. "But he was taking full swings, hitting the ball hard and low over the net, and missing. I decided to put another net on top of the existing one to make him put more height on his strokes. It forced him to hit a heavy spin and get some depth, but he got upset. 'I don't want to play like this,' he told me. But once I'd explained to him that it was a shot he needed in a match, he accepted it."

Right from the beginning it was obvious that this was no ordinary boy. Tall, athletic and with a bob of brown curls on his head, he played dashing, daring, wonderfully cavalier tennis, hitting shots that few players could dream up on their most wildly imaginative day. He even gave one of them a name - the 'Cliffhanger'.

"He hits it as hard as he can, but with so much spin that it drops like a rock and goes in," explained Groeneveld.

Even for a professional player, it's almost unplayable. Basically, the ball flies towards you, swerving right to left, hits the ground, turns completely the opposite direction, and then springs up at you like a dog that hasn't seen its owner for a month (I know this because he hit three 'Cliffhangers' in my general direction by way of illustration. The first left me swinging at thin air, the second whistled past my ear, and the third hit me smack in the face). (How come I have never seen this shot? I want to see Rogi hit more spectacular shots... :( )

Even as a teenager, Federer earned comparisons to the very best players in the world, including Sampras. Both used the same Wilson racquet, both played with a classical, languid style, and both moved around the court like a cat.

But Federer was still just a boy, and an immature one at that. His match against Sampras at Wimbledon would later lead on-lookers to describe him as 'Borg-like', but as a junior, he was nothing of the sort.

"I was very surprised when people started to compare me to Borg because I always had the feeling that I the was opposite to him," said Federer. "When I was young, I was really carrying on like an idiot on the court. My parents were going nuts in the stands. It was ridiculous. My father was saying 'just relax, don't freak out', but I was convinced that I knew best."

At junior level it didn't seem to make much difference to his results. He was so good that he could compete with, and beat, virtually anyone who crossed his path. Even when things got tight, his natural talent would see him through.

Rene Stauffer, tennis correspondent for Swiss Newspaper Tages Anzeiger, vividly remembers the first time he saw Federer play.

"I was stunned by three things," said Stauffer. "The power and pureness of his shots, the terrible way he behaved after mistakes - he threw racquets and cursed all the time - and his ability to win even if things went wrong."

The match he had watched, against Lleyton Hewitt at the World Youth Cup in Zurich in the summer of 1996, was played before anyone had really heard of Federer, but the Swiss saved a match point to win it 7-6 in the third set. It began what now looks likely to be one of the next great rivalries in men's tennis.

In 1998, Federer ended the year as the No.1 junior in the world and won the Wimbledon Boys singles and doubles titles. Three days after those triumphs at the All England Club, he wandered into the press room at the Swiss Open in Gstaad, clutching a multi-colored mobile telephone that looked as if it belonged in a cartoon. He sat down to talk to the Swiss journalists, and the next day, at just 16 years of age, he made his professional debut. He was a boy in a man's world, and to Federer it was all just a big game.

The Swiss media though, were already wondering if this might be the next Boris Becker. They'd seen the excitement generated by Becker's Wimbledon win as a 17-year-old, and fancied some of the same.

But while Becker was already a man at 17, Federer wasn't even close to full maturity. He showed glimpses of his talent in 1999 to break into the top 100, but as he entered his 20th year, he still hadn't made the splash that some people expected. While Hewitt rose consistently, eventually winning the US Open and finishing the year as the No.1 player in the world in 2001, Federer's form was hit and miss, and the pressure began to build.

"Why do I lose all the close matches?" he asked desperately, after a three set tussle with Jiri Novak in Monte Carlo had gone against him in 2000.

Other tough losses followed. Andrei Medvedev beat him in Rome, Arnaud di Pasquale denied him the bronze medal at the Sydney Olympics, and perhaps most painfully, Thomas Enqvist took victory in their five set final in Basel - his home town event.

It was apparent that Federer needed more than just natural talent to fully realize his potential. He would play irresistible tennis for a set and a half, establish a lead but often lose his concentration, his mind and then the match. If he did grind his way through, he invariably used up so much physical and mental energy in the process, that there was nothing left in the tank for the next day.

Two things needed to happen. First, he needed to calm down on court. When he played, it seemed that every shot had to be perfect, otherwise he would lose his temper. He spent so much energy shouting into the sky, cursing every missed shot and flinging his racquet around, that when it really mattered, he had no reserves to call on. It was fabulously entertaining to watch, but enormously draining for him.

"I think that I have finally realized," said Federer, with a grin. "My coaches, Peter Carter before, and Peter Lundgren now, told me that throwing my racquet, getting pissed off and screaming didn't help my game, but I just didn't agree with them. I had the feeling that I had to release my anger somehow and I always told myself that I play better when I do. Now I realize that it is better when I show less emotions, concentrate more on my game and lose less energy."

These days, he releases his excess energy off court instead. He and Lundgren play video games and watch movies together, and for the Swedish 36-year-old, the challenge of keeping Federer occupied off the court is almost as important as fine-tuning his groundstrokes.

"It's a full-time job to keep him entertained," said Lundgren, who reached No.25 in the world as a player. "That's why during the Ericsson Open in Miami, we moved to South Beach. We could go down to the beach, take a swim, get in the car, play loud music, and he could scream. You have to let him."

Secondly, Lundgren knew that Federer needed to be physically stronger. Just like Sampras at 19, he needed to grow into his body, so they enlisted the help of physical trainer Pierre Paganini. Having worked with a combination of players, including Marc Rosset and the Maleeva sisters, Paganini knew what made tennis players tick.

"There were two objectives," he said. "The first objective was to make him faster, stronger, and to have more endurance. The second was to use those qualities at the right moment on the court."

Working like a dog off the court, and staying calm on it, the 'Federer Express' quickly gathered momentum, and in February 2001, it went into overdrive. Claiming the first title of his career in Milan, Federer was named the ATP Player of the Month for February. He won 14 of 16 matches, and led Switzerland almost single-handedly to victory over the United States in the Davis Cup in Basel.

He even began to look different. A member of the ATP's New Balls Please marketing campaign and now a Davis Cup hero with an ATP title to his name, his wide eyed fascination with tour life had been replaced by the serenity of someone who looked utterly comfortable in his surroundings. He wore a pony-tail, a head scarf wrapped around his forehead during matches, and a look of newly-developed maturity.

Coming into Wimbledon, with a Roland Garros quarterfinal appearance under his belt, Federer was determined to show what he could do on grass. Despite winning the Boys singles three years earlier, he'd lost in the first round at the All England Club the two previous years and there were question marks over his ability to serve and volley on grass.

Against Yevgeny Kafelnikov the previous year, Federer had become so discouraged watching returns whistle past him in the opening game that he tried to play the Russian, one of the best baseliners in the world, from the back of the court. It didn't work, and was never likely to. On this surface he needed to fight his battles from the net, no matter what.

"The problem is that if you stay back on grass, it doesn't really matter how bad the other guy's return is, it's still tough to dig it out," acknowledged Federer. "So you serve and volley to make the other guy at least hit a good return."

That was the theory, but as Lundgren explained, it took a while for Federer to get to grips with forcibly charging the net on every ball.

"When he first started practicing volleys he hated it, he wasn't good at it," said Lundgren. "It was like there were sharks inside the service box. But we practiced, and now the sharks are gone."

Proving the point, Federer fought his way past Xavier Malisse in the second round, swept aside Jonas Bjorkman in the third, and then saw the name of Pete Sampras written next to his own in the draw.

Having looked up to the American for as long as he could remember, this was a dream come true for Federer.

It also marked the first time in his career that he would play on the Center Court at Wimbledon.

"For me it was a very strange feeling," he said. "Walking towards center court - I'd never done it before - walking through the alleys just behind the scenes before anyone sees you. Before I walked on the court, the man who escorted me asked, 'so, do you know how it works on center court?' I said that I didn't. Then he looked at Pete and said 'well, you probably know.' I had to laugh.

"He told me that I had to turn around at the service line and make my bow to the (Royal) Box. That is something special, something I probably always wanted to do once in my life and career."

The burning question that remained was how he would react to playing Sampras. He'd been compared to the great man for years, admired him for as long as he could remember, and here he was about to mix it with him on the biggest stage in the world. It was the ultimate test.

"Sometimes I looked across the net and saw him, someone so special and different," said Federer. "Normally you look on the other side and just see an opponent, but this time when I looked over, I saw Pete Sampras, my idol.

"I didn't feel normal. On my first service game my hands were ice cold, but I started off with an ace so that relieved me straightaway. I was thinking, 'Oh come on, that's a good start!' After the first two games we played, it was a normal match and I got into the groove."

So much so that after three and a half hours, they were still going at it. At 4-4 in the final set, with Federer serving, Sampras went in for the kill.

"I was really scared that my chance was slipping away," said Federer. "I could see on his face that he was raising his game."

But to the champion's amazement, Federer stood firm, held serve, and turned the tables, forcing two match points on the American's serve.

"I was very calm walking to the other side at 15-40," said Federer, re-living the moment. "Of course the crowd were going wild, but I was very focused on what I had to do. I took a chance, told myself that he would go to my forehand, and everything seemed to go so quickly. I hit it and I knew right then, 'that's it.'"

It was the most astonishing moment. As Sampras turned to watch the ball drop well inside his baseline, Federer fell to his knees, then collapsed onto his back as the weight of what he had done began to register.

"I went down on my knees and thought, 'Wow, this is better than anything I have ever experienced so I might as well just lie down! I had the feeling that I could have laid down there forever."

He didn't. He got up immediately and ran to the net where Sampras was waiting patiently. Federer knew what he had done. He'd inflicted the most painful injury possible on the champion by beating Sampras in a place that the American regarded as his own back yard. To celebrate while Sampras waited at the net would only add salt to the champion's wounds.

"I told myself to go and shake hands with Pete. I couldn't make him wait because he must have felt terrible and wanted to get out of there. I think it was a thing of respect," said Federer.

The world hailed a new star. The 'king was dead, long live the king', they said. But this wasn't to be Federer's Wimbledon crown, not yet. Despite a similarly brilliant and equally stubborn performance against Britain's Tim Henman in the quarterfinals, Federer ran out of steam.

At 20 though, life is good. He has endless skill, a genuinely nice nature and a wickedly good sense of humour (his latest practical joke involves the victim calling his mobile phone, hearing Federer answer 'hello?', but then feeling stupid when the voice adds 'ha, got you again, leave a message'). In short, he has the potential to become one of the biggest names in the game.

Fellow New Balls Andy Roddick, Marat Safin and Juan Carlos Ferrrero will make waves of their own in the future, but it's the potential rivalry between Federer and Hewitt which really get pulses racing. They couldn't be more different. Federer's game and personality are loose, relaxed and easy on the eye while Hewitt is intensity personified.

The match they played in the Basel semifinals in 2000 was enough to make the mouth water. Both players ran side to side, hit the cover off the ball and dripped emotion throughout, and after saving a match point it was Federer who came through.

There was something familiar about watching Federer purr to the net and Hewitt counterattack from the baseline. It was like Sampras against Agassi all over again.

"I like to play Hewitt," says Federer. "I'm not surprised that he won the US Open because his game is so solid, his feet always move and his legs are always there. For me it's different. I have to tell myself to move. I hope that in the future my condition will be so good that I never lose matches because of my body again. If I can do that, I think I will be very dangerous, more dangerous even than him. When you play Hewitt, you know what's coming. When you play me, you don't know what's going to come."

One thing's for sure, if they both turn it on at the same time, tennis fans are in for a treat.

As Eurosport commentator Simon Reed put it, when he watched the Swiss beat the Australian that day in Basel.

"I've just seen the future of tennis, and it looks alright to me."

Daniel
08-30-2004, 09:04 AM
Thanks Lchech :)

Dirk
08-30-2004, 10:00 AM
Just wishing thinking from Mac. He is a fucking asshole. He was behind andy all the way in the Wimbly final and he even gave tips to Brad. I am so sick of this BS about the environment there. The surface suits Rogi more than Oz. He should be fine after a few matches.

SUKTUEN
08-30-2004, 01:30 PM
THANKYOU SO MUCH , ~~~~

THE article is good. :wavey:

Roger please play your best !!!!!!!!!!!! :worship:

WyveN
08-30-2004, 02:57 PM
Thanks for the articles!

Just hope roger concentrates on playing tennis instead of trying to promote tennis/himself over there by doing countless interviews etc

lsy
08-30-2004, 03:22 PM
Before I walked on the court, the man who escorted me asked, 'so, do you know how it works on center court?' I said that I didn't. Then he looked at Pete and said 'well, you probably know.' I had to laugh.

He has endless skill, a genuinely nice nature and a wickedly good sense of humour (his latest practical joke involves the victim calling his mobile phone, hearing Federer answer 'hello?', but then feeling stupid when the voice adds 'ha, got you again, leave a message').


:haha: :haha:

I supposed this is an old article but still a good read. Great to have more Rogi fans posting articles both here and Rogi sites, benefitting very lazy fans like myself ;)

btw I'm now obsessed to spot the "cliffhanger" shots on tv :eek:

moonlight
08-30-2004, 10:32 PM
Federer avenges Costa loss
From correspondents in New York
August 31, 2004

WORLD No.1 Roger Federer avenged one of his few losses in 2004 by defeating Spain's Albert Costa 7-5 6-2 6-4 in the first round of the US Open today.

The 23-year-old Swiss star, the dominant player on the ATP Tour this year, is hoping to add his first US Open title to the Wimbledon and Australian Open crowns he captured earlier in the year.

"This was a really good match for me today," said Federer, who fired 11 aces. "I felt I had some very good moments attacking, good moments defending and I am serving well."

Federer advanced to the second round where he will face qualifier Marcos Baghdatis of Cyprus.

The 2002 French Open champion Costa is one of just a handful of players to have beaten Federer this year.

"I started to figure out how to play him today," said Federer. "It was important to play aggressive and make sure to get a lot of first serves in. I think that made a difference in the end. He knows how to beat me. I am glad I got him back."

Federer is in the top half of the men's draw and appears to be on a collision course for a quarter-final showdown with eight-time Grand Slam winner Andre Agassi.

He said adding another Grand Slam to his 2004 resume would be special.

"If I could go three out of four that would be an incredible record," said Federer.

"That would be enough for me. You know I would be the second after (Mats) Wilander to do it. But we are not there yet. Let's just be patient."

Agence France-Presse


http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,10625287-32465,00.html

ytben
08-31-2004, 05:40 AM
Thanks for the article moonlight, more kisses for you :kiss: :kiss: :kiss:

I like this part:
"If I could go three out of four that would be an incredible record," said Federer.

"That would be enough for me. You know I would be the second after (Mats) Wilander to do it. But we are not there yet. Let's just be patient."

Let's just be patient.....will do Rogi ;)

Daniel
08-31-2004, 08:06 AM
Thanks, Go rogi :clap2:

RogiFan88
08-31-2004, 12:56 PM
Thanks for the articles!

Just hope roger concentrates on playing tennis instead of trying to promote tennis/himself over there by doing countless interviews etc

Just what I was thinking but I'm sure ROGi is concentrating on his tennis now that the tourney has begun!

SO

GO, ROGI!!!!!

Doris Loeffel
08-31-2004, 02:21 PM
Well he was focused enough to win in straight sets and that against Albert who beat him already twice...


Well done Roger

tangerine_dream
08-31-2004, 07:31 PM
I :hearts: this color shirt on Roger!

http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/08/31/blog/p1_federer_all.jpg

Federer holds court
World's No. 1 tennis player finally getting respect he deserves
August 31, 2004
*
Nike's big ad campaign for the 2004 U.S. Open features a close-up of Switzerland's Roger Federer, the world's top-ranked tennis player, festooned with the message "(Heart)*It or Leave It." As catchphrases go, this one is tough to figure out.

Here in the tennis ghetto, Federer isn't*exactly a polarizing figure. In fact, you'd be hard pressed to find*someone*more revered. Mention his name to colleagues and you get the equivalent of a present-tense eulogy. Monica Seles will tell you that Federer is the one player whom she would pay to watch. Serena Williams describes his game as "beautiful." Andy Roddick -- the player who is the closest thing Federer has to a rival -- famously remarked, "Geez, maybe I can play like him one day."

Though it took longer than it should have, Federer is starting to get his due from the masses. The marketing honchos at the USTA finally had the good sense to feature Federer prominently in the pre-tournament promotion. Even though*he -- horrors! -- is not American. And when Federer, the U.S. Open's top seed, took center stage Monday afternoon for his first-round match against Spain's Albert Costa, thousands filed into Arthur Ashe Stadium and the brahmins in the suites turned to face the court.

Federer didn't disappoint, turning in a clinical straight-set win that included his customary allotment of Dude-you-gotta-be-kidding-me shots. And again, he showed that he is a walking, talking, winner-zinging refutation for the shabby critiques that beset tennis.

Let's take them one by one:

•The serve has come to dominate. Federer's delivery is predicated on placement, not pace. He wins his share of points on his serve, but usually it's because he's unleashing nasty cutters, not because he's bringing pure heat. Consider that today he declared himself "very pleased" with his serving. In three sets, he registered all of 11 aces.

•Tennis has devolved into mindless baseline bashing. Against Costa, no slouch in the passing-shot department, Federer approached the net 39 times. Thirty of those ventures were successful. Federer slices and dices, he swings for the fences; he hits shots embroidered with spin, he hits 'em flat. Yes, Federer "has every shot in the book," as John McEnroe repeatedly says. But he also has many that aren't.

•Technology is ruining the sport. At this very moment, I am staring at a bus, the side of which is plastered with a picture of Federer and his space-age Wilson wand. But the irony is that Federer's versatile, artistic game relies little on technology. Arm him with a Jack Kramer wood and he would be plenty effective.

•Tennis players are insufferable prima donnas. Or worse yet, boring. Here's all you need to know about Federer's maturity level: He has coached himself all year.

Beyond that, Federer hung out with The Blog last week. As he nursed his Frappucino, he held court on everything from Broadway shows to his evolution from underachieving head case to tennis colossus. At a time when not a whole lot of athletes do the whole self-reflection drill, get a load of Federer's take on his previous failings:

"Sometimes in the past I walked off knowing I still had much more left in me. Last year at the French Open, that was the worst. I had the wrong tactics. It's the first round and I lost the first set 7-6, and I start the second set saying, 'My gosh, I'm not going to win this thing. I'm going to have to win another three sets. This guy is going to make me run all day. Even, then I'm only in the second round.' After one set, I'm telling myself I have no chance to win this tournament. Can you believe it?

"Second set, went fast. Then I'm like, 'Rog, you have react!' Too late, I lost 7-6. That was on Center Court and people were starting to talk badly. At least the correction came a few weeks later at Wimbledon. It's funny, now when I lose, I feel like I gave everything. I don't like it, but I can live with it."

If Federer wins the Open, it will be his third Grand Slam title of 2004 -- cementing the most dominant year in tennis since McEnroe went 82-3 in 1984. (With all due respect to Michael Phelps and Lance Armstrong, will any athlete have had a better year?) Long story short: If you haven't yet done so, check this guy out these next few weeks.

Half-volleys from Flushing

Tennis' mensch quotient just fell by one. After losing to France's Fabrice Santoro on Monday night, Todd Martin announced his retirement. It was fitting that he did so late at night at the U.S. Open, and in the shadows of Andre Agassi, who was playing in front 20,000 fans when Martin struck his last ball as a pro. ... Brian Baker, the tennissean Tennessean, took a set off of third-seeded Carlos Moya on Monday afternoon. Alas, he succumbed to cramps and lost. ... In a battle between the shortest ATP player and one of the tallest, Mario Ancic (6-foot-5) fell to mighty Olivier Rochus (5-5) in straight sets. ... Daniela Hantuchova -- a top-10 player who was front and center on the WTA's marketing plans not long ago --*was banished to an outside court but survived France's Camille Pin in a sweaty-palmed third-set tiebreaker. ... NCAA singles champ Amber Liu (Stanford) lost to Julia Vakulenko, who wins today's prize for weirdest service motion. ... This has nothing to do with tennis, but here's a piece worth reading: ... Are the Agassis turning into the Brontes? First Mike Agassi, paterfamilias, writes a memoir. Now Tami Agassi, Andre's older sister, has published a celebrity cookbook titled Star Palate. Tammy is a breast-cancer survivor, and all proceeds will go to cancer research. ... Note to the Mets: If you insist on playing Phil Collins (and we wonder why that team is so lousy?) during BP, at least turn the volume low enough so we don't have to hear it on the Grandstand Court. ... Next time you bemoan the price of U.S. Open tickets, consider this: Monday's day session started at 11:00. By the time Santoro finished off Martin, it was well after 10 p.m.

*

Mrs. B
08-31-2004, 08:14 PM
good write up on the Fed. thanks.

RogiFan88
08-31-2004, 09:05 PM
is this fr Sports Illustrated? is the issue out this week? if so who's on the cover?

Daniel
09-01-2004, 08:49 AM
thanks, good article :D

ytben
09-01-2004, 10:30 AM
Rogi's interview transcipt from Rogi's site :eek:

AN INTERVIEW WITH ROGER

R. FEDERER/A. Costa: 7-5, 6-2, 6-4


Q. It's almost embarrassing to criticize a straight-sets win at a Grand Slam, but I kind of suspected you wanted to finish up that match in the third set different than the way you did.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I definitely wish it was different at the end, you know - obviously to win, but to close it out like I usually do, you know, just serve it out. I guess it seems like I was too dominant, you know, for a while. There was not enough rallies suddenly, and that worked against me because the game I lost, I was against the wind. Actually to get the 5-2 lead, I think if I get that lead, I'm not going to give it away. But I got broken, and then when I served for the match, you know, I just had a terrible service game. I went for too much. That's how quickly it goes.



Q. Borg was 0-9 in this tournament. How important is it for you to win here at some point and get that monkey off your back?
ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I don't see it so bad like you guys are. I feel like I've been playing well here in the past, consistent. I've never had a first-round loss here. I've been three times in the fourth round. So I've been actually winning my matches here. I've just been maybe losing the big ones. At the time I was not the favorite, you know, to beat Agassi. Nalbandian was a dark horse, a guy I didn't like to play too much. Once when I played Max, it was like midnight and he blew me off the court. Not much I could do in those matches. I feel like this surface suits my game. It's quicker than Australia. I don't know. To speak about Borg's record and compare it to mine, I don't think that is fair.

Q. Roger, he's one of the few guys to have beaten you this year. What did you do differently in this match than your last two matches?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, in Miami, you know, I had match points. I should have closed it out actually. I think I served for the match at 5-4 last year and had two match points. In Rome I really started well. You know, kind of missed again many chances in the second set to run away with it. He really got the momentum going, played really well after. For me, it was important to play aggressive, make sure get a lot of first serves in. That's what I did. I think that made the difference in the end. I also started to figure out how to play him today, so I'm happy about that.

Q. It seems like Al Costa is one of those players who if you let him get a set, he gets so much tougher. Do you come out against him having to get as fast a start as you can to get on top of him?
ROGER FEDERER: You always hope to get off to a good start against everybody. It's always good in a best-of-five match to win the first set, you know, because it kind of gives you time actually, you can analyze what has been happening. But you're right, against Costa, if you give him a set, his game changes and he knows he can rely on all his shots. And if you're on top of him, he starts thinking and maybe changing up his game plan. This is when you can take advantage of it. That's what happened today.

Q. How fresh do you feel at the moment, given you played an awful lot since Wimbledon?
ROGER FEDERER: I feel good actually. I thought it was a really good match for me today. It's not just a match I came through. I felt I had some very good moments attacking, good moments defending, and I'm also serving well. There's been really good things all over the place. That is something I like obviously. It's something I can build on for the next match.

Q. The popularity of tennis has struggled a bit in this country. I was reading an article the other day in the Times, an interview with you, you were talking about the feeling of strain that you come over here and have some anonymity. I hope I'm not misquoting.
ROGER FEDERER: It's normal. I don't have to sign as many autographs in the States as in Europe. Here you have many other sports, you know, which are following. So for me it's very difficult to say how much time tennis gets on TV because I'm never here. But I don't know. I feel good here. Once you're on the tennis grounds, it seems like every other tennis tournament. Obviously, New York City, it's kind of a different city, you know, busy people around there. I'm happy not to be recognized so often so I can actually go to normal places to eat and stuff.

Q. Do you think part of that is due to the fact that New York crowds, maybe Americans in general tend to relate to the oversize personality like Jimmy Connors and Andre Agassi rather than kind of like others?
ROGER FEDERER: They're Americans. They're always here. I think it's easier definitely for an American, you know, to be a star here than a non-American. But that's the way it should be, so you're doing the right thing.

Q. Agassi was always bigger than Sampras for that reason.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Well, different personalities, you know.

Q. A lot of commentators point to you as being one of the guys who has the talent and the game to possibly win a calendar-year Grand Slam. Is that something you ever think about?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've been asked many times after the Australian. I'm not going to do it this year (smiling).

Q. What about in the future, do you think it's something that could actually happen?
ROGER FEDERER: I wish it's going to happen. But I know how tough it is. Yeah, I'm playing many matches. To always keep it up and always beat everybody, it's not the easiest thing to do. It's easier to lose than to win. So I don't know. It's not something I'm really aiming for now.

Q. How special would it be this year to win three out of four Grand Slams?
ROGER FEDERER: That would be something. That would be more than enough for me to win three out of four. You know, to be a second after Wilander to do it, it would be nice. We're not there yet. Let's just be patient (smiling).

Q. Lleyton Hewitt has been flying a bit under the radar. Have you been keeping a bit of an eye on him?
ROGER FEDERER: I've been checking him out (laughter). I know how tough he is, especially on the American hard courts. I definitely think he's one of the, let's say, top four contenders for the title this year, next to me, Agassi and Roddick. I feel like once he gets going, he's very tough to stop. I hope for him he didn't play too much leading up to this. I think he hasn't been playing too much over the last say one and a half years, so he's got a lot of energy left in his tank.

Q. Do you think he's one of those players who actually profits by playing more?
ROGER FEDERER: Could be, yeah. Just takes the confidence with him the last three tournaments he won, and he carries it through the whole US Open. I wouldn't be surprised. Let's keep an eye on him.



FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

RonE
09-01-2004, 11:13 AM
Great articles and interview transcript. Thank you Tangy, Moonlight and Ytben :yeah:

SUKTUEN
09-01-2004, 11:34 AM
Thankyou sooooo much!!!! :worship:

Roger will play at about 8:00 PM? :confused:

ytben
09-01-2004, 11:38 AM
Capriati's match is at 7pm EST, Rogi's match is next. So yeah, be ready in front of your TV by 8pm.

moonlight
09-01-2004, 04:39 PM
Rogi's interview transcipt from Rogi's site :eek:


:yeah: I have been waiting for it to come out. Thanks for posting it, ytben :kiss: :hug:

Daniel
09-02-2004, 07:12 AM
Thanks guys :yeah:

Vamos Roger :D

Fedex
09-02-2004, 10:08 PM
Is this guy for real?!

-------

Roddick will keep Federer waiting
By John McEnroe
(Filed: 29/08/2004)



It took Stefan Edberg nine years to work out how to make Flushing Meadows' positive energy work for him before winning there two years on the trot. While it may not take Roger Federer, a similar character to the passive Swede, quite as long, I still believe the best player in the world has a bit to learn about the wildest venue in Grand Slam tennis before he can add the US Open title to his CV.

The special atmosphere in New York has always suited slightly crazed guys such as Jimmy Connors and myself, which is why I believe Andy Roddick will successfully defend his title over the next two weeks. The young American has learned how to control his emotions in the last year or so while still maximising the electrifying support he receives there.

The hullabaloo seems to unsettle Federer, who looks so much more relaxed in the more sedate surroundings of Wimbledon, just as Edberg did. The Swede hated Flushing Meadows, but the two eventually hit it off. Another reason why I think the Open could be the last major Federer wins is that hardcourts are his least favourite surface. :retard: :smash: At home on all courts as he is, Federer finds this surface the least forgiving when it comes to footwork.

The Swiss likes a little more give than these courts allow. He doesn't move as well on them as, say, Andre Agassi. Also, I believe he has hit a bit of a wall after a tremendous year. He had an incredible 23-match unbeaten run, during which he won Wimbledon, then immediately afterwards Gstaad and Toronto, where he beat Roddick in the final. A couple of days later, he was killing the Slovak Dominik Hrbaty in Cincinnati only to end up losing.

It probably explained why he underachieved at the Olympics, but then so many players did. I have never felt comfortable with tennis at the Olympics, but, like a return to wooden rackets, I suppose there is no going back now. At least they could make a better job of it than they do.

If this is an important event, as everyone keeps telling us, why is it the men's and women's games are holding tournaments at the same time? It wouldn't happen while a Wimbledon or an Open was going on. Also, why aren't the matches played over five sets like the majors?

But getting back to the Flushing Meadows, it will be interesting to see how fast the courts are this year. I played on the Louis Armstrong Court with my brother against the Bryant twins shortly before they left for Athens - perhaps that's what screwed them up in Greece - and the court was playing with some bounce. Courts like that favour players who use a lot of spin but generally they have made them quicker to suit American players such as Pete Sampras and Agassi.

I bet Tim Henman wishes Wimbledon's groundstaff were as accommodating with the speed of their courts which, I believe, have slowed down significantly, in spite of what they may say, ever since Lleyton Hewitt won there two years ago from the baseline. Roddick, who tends to stay well back when he receives, is quite happy with a high bounce but would probably prefer it a little quicker to add extra penetration to his already thunderous serve. Henman has been drawn in a quarter which is difficult initially, but if he makes it through to the second week - and that's an 'if' almost as big as his first-round opponent Ivo Karlovic - life should get easier. He could be in with worse people than clay-courters such as Carlos Moya and the French Open champion Gaston Gaudio. A good run at the Open, say to the quarters, would legitimise Henman's new standing as an all-court player. After what he achieved at Roland Garros this year, anything is possible.

Just when we were wondering whether Agassi is in his final year he beats a tremendous field at Cincinnati to put himself back in the mix. Another semi-final at the US Open is well within his reach. Juan Carlos Ferrero, however, will do well to repeat last year's final place. He was mentally and physically whipped by his efforts last year and it has clearly affected this year.

So a win for Roddick over Federer in the final, which should spice up the Masters in Houston nicely.
Thats the biggest load of crap I've read in awhile. Then again, I havent read so much recently so maybe this is tame.

Dirk
09-02-2004, 10:57 PM
no fedex its really that bad.

Billabong
09-02-2004, 11:01 PM
GO Rogi:D!

Daniel
09-03-2004, 07:56 AM
Vamos Roger :clap2:

Seraphim
09-05-2004, 02:38 AM
Vote for Roger!

http://www.jacksonville.com/images/galleries/manatees/

Daniel
09-05-2004, 12:16 PM
I did, :)

LCeh
09-09-2004, 08:25 PM
Top-seeded Federer wins in five sets

Reuters

NEW YORK -- Top seed Roger Federer survived a stirring rally from two-time champ Andre Agassi to reach the semifinals of the U.S. Open for the first time on Thursday, squeezing through 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.

Resuming at two sets to one ahead after rain stopped play on Wednesday, Federer was rattled when the 34-year-old Agassi hit back to take the fourth set, breaking serve in the eighth game on a lucky net cord.

But a rare missed forehand from the American in the swirling wind handed the world No. 1 the crucial break in the eighth game of the final set and Federer held his nerve to claim a place in the last four.

"It was really difficult," Federer said. "It was one of the worst conditions I've played in.

"It was a good situation for me to be two sets to one up (overnight), but once I lost the fourth set I wasn't very relaxed because I knew Andre was playing very well in the wind. I'm just really happy to get through."

Federer will now play fifth seed Tim Henman, who became only the second British man in the Open Era after Greg Rusedski in 1997, to reach the last four when he beat 22nd seed Dominik Hrbaty 6-1, 7-5, 5-7, 6-2.

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/usopen04/news/story?id=1878116

LCeh
09-09-2004, 08:28 PM
Agassi falls to Federer
09/09/2004 22:05 - (SA)

New York - Roger Federer, who is seeking his third Grand Slam of the year, put on an impressive display of serving and shot making to beat Andre Agassi 6-3 2-6 7-5 3-6 6-3 and reach the semi-finals of the US Open.

Federer, of Switzerland, now faces Britain's Tim Henman, who beat Dominik Hrbaty, of Slovakia, for a place in Sunday's final.

World No 1 Federer had his hands full with Agassi on Thursday but managed to break the eight-time Grand Slam winner's serve in the eighth game of the fifth set to take a crucial 5-3 lead.

Federer fired 16 aces and blasted 54 winners in the three hour, two minute match which was played over two days after heavy rain washed out a good portion of Wednesday's matches.

The match was played under much different conditions than Wednesday as winds swirled and gusted around Arthur Ashe stadium.

The wind forced the players to step back several times from the service line and dodge paper and plastic debris blowing on to the court from the stands.

"It was very difficult, one of the worst conditions I have played in," said Federer, who advanced to his first semi-final here.

Keep the ball in play

"It was tough to come back from no wind the night before to the day with all this wind. I just tried to keep the ball in play. It was like playing a warm-up."

Federer and Agassi produced three superb sets on Wednesday before the rain stopped play with Federer holding a 6-3 2-6 7-5 lead.

The 23-year-old Swiss is trying to become the first man since Mats Wilander of Sweden to capture three Grand Slams in the same year.

He won three of the past five Grand Slams but this is the Grand Slam that has given him the most trouble, losing in the fourth round in each of the last three years.

"It is my first time in the semis so I hope I can keep it up," Federer said. "Three out of four (Grand Slams) would also be fantastic."

Agassi said the wind wasn't an excuse but the gusts made it difficult for him to get into a rhythm.

"Hitting the ball in the centre of the court was a great shot today," Agassi said. "I just didn't come up with it when I needed it.

"It was as extreme as it gets. If chairs are blowing over that is a problem."

Agassi had four aces but couldn't overcome four double faults and 39 unforced errors.

http://www.news24.com/News24/Sport/Tennis/0,,2-9-1517_1586884,00.html

WyveN
09-10-2004, 02:20 PM
More rubbish articles from reporters that dont give Roger any credit


Roger Federer: Forget any visions you have of Roger Federer being a lumbering, big server whose best surface will always be grass. The 23-year-old Swiss is quicker than Pete Sampras ever was. He has the type of mobility that should give him the opportunity to win a French Open someday. Thursday, the vesatile Federer was able to beat one of the best ball strikers ever in five sets, in what was essentially a backline slugfest (read: Andre Agassi's game.) "I have a lot of respect for his baseline game," said Federer a traditional serve-and-volleyer. "He passes so well I really couldn't get to the net."

Andre Agassi: Despite trailing 2 sets to 1, Agassi says that he walked onto stadium court Thursday believing he was playing better than his opponent. The 34-year-old especially liked his chances when it became clear that they'd be playing in swirling winds. "I don't have a high ball toss and my strokes are compact," said Agassi of his success in the wind.

In the end, despite grabbing the fourth set 6-3 and coming close to a break in the fifth set, he was unable to keep Federer from advancing. After, the talk focused on how much longer Agassi would play. "Contrary to what you hear, I've never had the intention not to play," said Agassi, who struggled for much of the summer. "As long as I'm forcing the best players to play good tennis to beat me, I owe it to the game to stick around."

Head Games
Going deep into the third set, it appeared that the baseline game of Agassi was gradually wearing down Federer. Then Agassi double-faulted twice in the 11th game and was broken. Federer quickly capitalized by taking the third set 7-5 before the rains came and eventually postponed the match until Thursday. He may have lost the fourth set -- largely on his struggles with his serving toss in the wind -- but basically Federer's strategy of staying back and playing Agassi from the baseline worked. Federer may have made 56 unforced errors to Agassi's 39, but the difference came in winners -- he had 54 to Agassi's 34. You couldn't help but think that his plan of staying back probably would have failed miserably against the Agassi of just a couple of years ago.

mitalidas
09-10-2004, 02:41 PM
it's not the most flattering i agree, but its still quite balanced given the crap they really put out there sometimes. many of the things said here Rogi confirms in his interview (on the Open page).

I think the fourth set for Agassi was exaqctly like the third set was for Rogi. One person was playing better, had all the chances to go up, and then one weak moment and the set belongs to the other player (Rogi in 3rd and Agassi in 4th)

More rubbish articles from reporters that dont give Roger any credit


Roger Federer: Forget any visions you have of Roger Federer being a lumbering, big server whose best surface will always be grass. The 23-year-old Swiss is quicker than Pete Sampras ever was. He has the type of mobility that should give him the opportunity to win a French Open someday. Thursday, the vesatile Federer was able to beat one of the best ball strikers ever in five sets, in what was essentially a backline slugfest (read: Andre Agassi's game.) "I have a lot of respect for his baseline game," said Federer a traditional serve-and-volleyer. "He passes so well I really couldn't get to the net."

Andre Agassi: Despite trailing 2 sets to 1, Agassi says that he walked onto stadium court Thursday believing he was playing better than his opponent. The 34-year-old especially liked his chances when it became clear that they'd be playing in swirling winds. "I don't have a high ball toss and my strokes are compact," said Agassi of his success in the wind.

In the end, despite grabbing the fourth set 6-3 and coming close to a break in the fifth set, he was unable to keep Federer from advancing. After, the talk focused on how much longer Agassi would play. "Contrary to what you hear, I've never had the intention not to play," said Agassi, who struggled for much of the summer. "As long as I'm forcing the best players to play good tennis to beat me, I owe it to the game to stick around."

Head Games
Going deep into the third set, it appeared that the baseline game of Agassi was gradually wearing down Federer. Then Agassi double-faulted twice in the 11th game and was broken. Federer quickly capitalized by taking the third set 7-5 before the rains came and eventually postponed the match until Thursday. He may have lost the fourth set -- largely on his struggles with his serving toss in the wind -- but basically Federer's strategy of staying back and playing Agassi from the baseline worked. Federer may have made 56 unforced errors to Agassi's 39, but the difference came in winners -- he had 54 to Agassi's 34. You couldn't help but think that his plan of staying back probably would have failed miserably against the Agassi of just a couple of years ago.

speedracer
09-10-2004, 04:18 PM
" said Federer a traditional serve-and-volleyer" :confused:

Since when?

AgassiFan
09-10-2004, 05:33 PM
I think the fourth set for Agassi was exaqctly like the third set was for Rogi. One person was playing better, had all the chances to go up, and then one weak moment and the set belongs to the other player (Rogi in 3rd and Agassi in 4th)

The 3rd set was the deciding set; if Andre pulls it out, then he has all the momentum in the world and Roger has to win back-to-back sets in EXTREME wind conditon. I don't think the match would have even gone into the 5th quite frankly.

But as it was, as soon as Andre double faulted and hit the very top of the net the next point at 5-5, I said "Game over!". Because it really was.

Dirk
09-10-2004, 10:43 PM
Rogi is up first tomorrow at noon EST time zone. I hope Rogi destroys Timmy in 3. :)

vene
09-10-2004, 11:58 PM
NEW YORK -- First, critics said Roger Federer couldn't win the big ones, because he started his career with a 2-6 record in tournament finals.

Then they said he couldn't handle the demands of Grand Slams, because he had six first-round losses and just two quarterfinal appearances over his first 16 majors.











And, most recently, they said he couldn't deal with all the distractions and difficult conditions at the U.S. Open, because he kept losing in the fourth round.

Well, what are they saying now?

After disposing of Andre Agassi in five sets in a match suspended by rain, then whipped by 40 mph winds, the top-ranked Federer heads into the U.S. Open semifinals Saturday just two wins away from his third major title of the year.

No one has won three Slams in a season since Mats Wilander in 1988; before that, it hadn't happened since Jimmy Connors turned the trio trick in 1974.

"That would be something. That would be more than enough for me, to win three out of four," Federer said. "We're not there yet. Let's just be patient."

He displayed all kinds of patience against Agassi, an eight-time major champion whose compact swing normally makes him dangerous in the wind. Federer waited for the right moments, picking his spots to put together a 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3 victory.

"One of the things that he does really, really great is he can sort of hang in there," Agassi said, "and then if you drop your intensity just a touch, or if the wheels come off for a second, he can really capitalize."

One other indication of how Federer went from being a very good player to a great one: He began his career 0-3 against Agassi, and now leads the series 4-3.

Few players have the upper hand against Federer, but he'll face one of them in the semifinals: No. 5 Tim Henman, who holds a 6-2 head-to-head edge. The other semifinal pits 2001 Open champion Lleyton Hewitt against No. 28 Joachim Johansson, who upset defending champ Andy Roddick in his first major quarterfinal.

Both semifinal matchups provide intriguing contrasts in style.

Like Roddick, Johansson relies on a big serve -- his 30 aces Thursday night raised his tournament-leading total to 109 -- and a big forehand. Hewitt is his generation's top returner, and he scrambles along the baseline as well as anyone, retrieving apparent winners and going from defense to offense very quickly.

Henman, meanwhile, is one of the last true serve-and-volley specialists, while Federer prefers to hang back at the baseline but is capable of mixing it up.

"I've got to try and play my style. There's no question that this is the toughest task in tennis right now, playing Federer," said Henman, never a Slam semifinalist anywhere but Wimbledon until going that far at the French Open this year.

"He's the No. 1 player. He's had such an incredible year."

Now there's an understatement.

Federer is 62-6 with a tour-high eight titles, including at the Australian Open and Wimbledon. He's won three of the past five majors and is 15-0 against top 10 players, dating to November. And he's won his last 10 tournament finals.

"Maybe I've had a very dominant season so far, but I always look at it this way: It's a new match, a new day," Federer said. "I have to again prove myself."

Copyright © 2004, The Associated Press

Skyward
09-11-2004, 12:19 AM
Rogi is up first tomorrow at noon EST time zone. I hope Rogi destroys Timmy in 3. :)

No, his match is second, at 3:00 PM EST at the earliest.

Dirk
09-11-2004, 02:30 AM
Fuck Enberg from CBs called it wrong. ROGI BETTER FUCKING KILL DORKO IN 3 SETS. I DON'T WANT HIM FUCKING TIRED FOR KKK HEWITT!!!!! :fiery:

jtipson
09-11-2004, 03:16 AM
Yeah, it's Lleyton's match first, which makes sense to me.

Sky in the UK also got it wrong yesterday - they said after Henman's qf that his semi would be first on Saturday, but of course that's before Roddick lost, and I guess the USTA would have put Andy/Lleyton on second had he made it.

Fedex
09-11-2004, 07:23 AM
Fuck Enberg from CBs called it wrong. ROGI BETTER FUCKING KILL DORKO IN 3 SETS. I DON'T WANT HIM FUCKING TIRED FOR KKK HEWITT!!!!! :fiery:
Yes, now more than ever I hope Federer wins in 3 sets, quickly. I'd hate to see that little punk win this thing, because of a tired Federer. :fiery: :mad: He is now in the semis, I am expecting great things from him, including dispatching Hewitt in the final!!! Vamos, ROGI, KILL THEM ALL!!! :fiery:

lsy
09-11-2004, 09:32 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/open/2004-09-10-federer-semis_x.htm

Federer closer to taking New York
By Douglas Robson, Special for USA TODAY

NEW YORK — It's no secret Roger Federer uses his racket with a magician's virtuosity. But after completing his rain-suspended quarterfinal match against Andre Agassi on Thursday afternoon in a howling wind, the Merlin of tennis showed why it is not just his physical talent that opponents must neutralize. It is also his mind.

"I'm especially happy to deal with all the conditions here," said the top-seeded Federer, who needed two days and five sets to upend two-time Open champ Agassi 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. "I've experienced the wind, I've experienced the rain, the night sessions, Agassi and the crowd. For me this is a very big step in my career." :clap2:

Long on talent but shy on results until he captured Wimbledon in 2003, the 23-year-old Swiss has come into his own as the premier player of his generation.

Over the last 10 months, his display of shot-making, movement, determination and poise has pundits pegging him as a threat to break Pete Sampras' record of 14 majors.

"To me, Federer is like an artist out there," says U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe, who says the 6-1 Federer's game is "more well rounded" than Sampras'.

Even before beating Agassi to reach his first semifinal in New York, Federer has been closing in on one of the greatest years in tennis history.

• He is two wins from becoming the fourth man in the Open era to win three or more majors, joining Rod Laver (1969), Jimmy Connors (1974) and Mats Wilander (1988).

• His 62-6 match record is the best on the ATP Tour since 1989, when Ivan Lendl compiled the same mark.

• His eight titles in 2004 are more than any player's at this point of a season since Thomas Muster's 10 in 1995.

• He has won big titles on three surfaces this season, including Wimbledon on grass, the Australian Open on hardcourt and Hamburg on clay.

• He is 10-0 this year against top-10 players and 15-0 since November. "It proves that you deserve to be up there, and I've proven it now many times," Federer says.

Frenzied New York, however, has been an environment where Federer, born in the small Swiss town of Basel, has struggled, never before reaching the quarterfinals.

Wins over the last year in North America, including the Masters Cup in Houston last November and in Indian Wells, Calif., and Montreal this year, set the groundwork for his success this fortnight. "I've won quite a few tournaments here, and that actually gave me confidence to play well here in New York."

Part of his success also has been learning to deal with the expectations that come with being No. 1. "I know I cannot play every day at 100%, so for me to lose it is always a disaster for the media and everybody," he says.

What must be particularly disheartening for his opponents is that Federer doesn't even have to be at top form to beat the best players.

"I saw that with Pete early in his career," says Paul Annacone, who coached Sampras for most of his career and now coaches Federer's semifinal opponent, Tim Henman. "That's what turns good players into great players."

Playing the game with a preternatural calm, Federer's style has drawn comparisons to another former No. 1 with ice in his veins, Bjorn Borg. Unlike the plethora of fist-pumpers in tennis, Federer rarely says more than a "Yeah!" or "C'mon!" and moves with an effortless grace.

"He doesn't sweat," quips McEnroe. "To watch him play is like watching a guy who has no sense of urgency ever. He's not really worried about what his opponents do because he knows he can play any style."

His rivals don't underestimate his competitive fire.

"I know I certainly don't," Agassi said after his defeat, his fourth in a row to Federer.

Wilander, now Sweden's Davis Cup captain, isn't sure why no player has duplicated his feat in 16 years, especially since he thinks it might have been harder in his day because of the greater difference in surface speeds.

But he has no problem sharing it. "I'd love to have my name next to Roger Federer, Rod Laver and Jimmy Connors," he says.

A win in New York could usher Federer into crossover star status, something he enjoys in much of the world but not yet in America.

"It might be too much to be right away a star at 23," he says. "I'll just be who I am: Roger Federer. If people like me, that would be nice. I'm not going to force the issue." :clap2: :yeah:

But the road to his first Open title won't be a cakewalk.

No. 5 seed Henman, who has a 6-2 record against Federer and whom Federer admires for his serve and volley ability, will offer a difficult task.

One player no longer in Federer's way is defending champion Andy Roddick, who fell in a thrilling quarterfinal match to Joachim Johansson 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6, 6-4.

Johansson was playing in the first five-set match of his career but held off the hard-serving Roddick, who lost to Federer in the Wimbledon final.

SUKTUEN
09-11-2004, 09:58 AM
"Maybe I've had a very dominant season so far, but I always look at it this way: It's a new match, a new day," Federer said. "I have to again prove myself."

Roger, :lol:

Why you always said something make me love you more & more? :kiss: :kiss:

:hearts: I love your style ,your clam and your smart so much!! :hearts:

:bounce: GO FEDERER!!!!!!!!! :bounce:

mitalidas
09-11-2004, 12:53 PM
A useful piece by the US Media, against the US media. I'll post excerpts here. And, serves them right! This fictitious rivalry between Rogi and andy, etc. How about building up the real rivalry, between Lleyton and Rogi, etc?

Where did the Americans go for U.S. Open?
BY FILIP BONDY

NEW YORK - (KRT) - This is what the U.S. Tennis Association gets for all the American flags it drags onto the court during the trophy ceremonies, for wrapping its drop shots in stars and stripes. This is what CBS gets for promoting U.S. players as if they are the only athletes who know how to slice or dice a backhand, and what we New York papers get for covering all Williams sisters, all the time.

There are four men in two semifinals, none named Andre Agassi or Andy Roddick. There are a pair of Russian women for the Super Saturday final, neither of them Anna Kournikova or Maria Sharapova. If they're not pinups, they're news to us.


We've been spoiled rotten around here, and haven't always acted graciously about it. We've buried the non-Americans on side courts, sneered at their accents, shown tapes of Roger Federer's matches mostly on rain delays. We've written about them only if they happen to be standing across the court from somebody with a short, punchy nickname like Pistol Pete or A-Rod.

Now, we have a problem. For starters, how are we going to spell or pronounce their names properly?

Elena Dementieva has eight vowels, about four too many for our concentration spans. Joachim Johansson thinks he can charm us with alliteration, and it's not working. Lleyton Hewitt has a double "L" at the front end, double "T" in the back. What's that about?

And we're never quite sure whether it's Federer, or Federererer. Where do you stop with this guy? Federer can play tennis, trust me on that one.

Mrs. B
09-11-2004, 09:12 PM
ahh. somebody who sees the light.

the USO is gonna have a dream finals tomorrow. but that's for the real tennis affectionados. ;)

Seraphim
09-11-2004, 11:09 PM
A useful piece by the US Media, against the US media. I'll post excerpts here. And, serves them right! This fictitious rivalry between Rogi and andy, etc. How about building up the real rivalry, between Lleyton and Rogi, etc?

Where did the Americans go for U.S. Open?
BY FILIP BONDY

NEW YORK - (KRT) - This is what the U.S. Tennis Association gets for all the American flags it drags onto the court during the trophy ceremonies, for wrapping its drop shots in stars and stripes. This is what CBS gets for promoting U.S. players as if they are the only athletes who know how to slice or dice a backhand, and what we New York papers get for covering all Williams sisters, all the time.

There are four men in two semifinals, none named Andre Agassi or Andy Roddick. There are a pair of Russian women for the Super Saturday final, neither of them Anna Kournikova or Maria Sharapova. If they're not pinups, they're news to us.


We've been spoiled rotten around here, and haven't always acted graciously about it. We've buried the non-Americans on side courts, sneered at their accents, shown tapes of Roger Federer's matches mostly on rain delays. We've written about them only if they happen to be standing across the court from somebody with a short, punchy nickname like Pistol Pete or A-Rod.

Now, we have a problem. For starters, how are we going to spell or pronounce their names properly?

Elena Dementieva has eight vowels, about four too many for our concentration spans. Joachim Johansson thinks he can charm us with alliteration, and it's not working. Lleyton Hewitt has a double "L" at the front end, double "T" in the back. What's that about?

And we're never quite sure whether it's Federer, or Federererer. Where do you stop with this guy? Federer can play tennis, trust me on that one.

Someone send this guy a bottle of wine.

mitalidas
09-12-2004, 03:28 AM
more yummies:

Despite his credentials, Hewitt is the decided underdog. After being dismantled in straight sets, Henman said it would take some sort of marvel to beat Federer.

"If you take Roddick's serve and Agassi's returns and my volleys and Hewitt's speed and tenacity, then you've probably got a good chance against Federer," said the 30-year-old Henman, who failed to reach the first Grand Slam final of his career. "That's a lot of people involved in one player."


From: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/12/sports/tennis/12men.html

Daniel
09-12-2004, 07:52 AM
thanks :)
Go Rogi :D

shaoyu
09-12-2004, 10:17 AM
Quite a chuckle. The author seems either to be a Rogi fan, or Henman hater ~_^

http://sport.scotsman.com/tennis.cfm?id=1070372004

mitalidas
09-12-2004, 06:26 PM
These are the types of idiots that should be banned from putting things in print. What a stupid fool this one is:


Shaun Powell
In time, we might become sold on Roger Federer, the best in the world, a player with the all-around game to make a Pete Sampras-like run before he's done. But if he wins today, he can take the trophy and walk down Broadway at noon tomorrow and might draw a few double-looks.

His anonymity probably has more to do with the stagnant state of tennis than anything else. Regardless, he lacks the charisma to do for tennis what Tiger Woods did for golf.

So we're left with Federer vs. Leyton Hewitt to close out the U.S. Open, a tournament that'll strain to cause a ripple on NFL Sunday.

This should be a good match, too, because Hewitt hasn't dropped a set.

It will go over big in Switzerland and Australia. Around here, we're ready for some football.

http://www.newsday.com/sports/columnists/ny-sppow123964950sep12,0,2300798.column?coll=ny-sports-columnists

mitalidas
09-12-2004, 07:11 PM
And here is one from the NY Post, which I am shocked, seems to be finally getting it right:

Any further insistence on wearing our protectionist hearts on our sleeves will doom Roddick's shoulders to break down worse than Serena's knee or Lindsay's hip. If our best player got plenty tired of people getting tired of waiting for him to finally win a Slam, just wait to see how Roddick handles becoming our only realistic chance, unrealistically dooming him to disappoint us often.

His loss to Joachim Johansson, which followed an Olympic loss to Fernando Gonzalez, which followed his Wimbledon finals loss to Roger Federer, mounts more evidence that Roddick, at 22, is settling in at being just another good player. This is especially true now that Federer's engine appears to have become the equal of his full-loaded chassis.

http://www.nypost.com/sports/30114.htm

Seraphim
09-13-2004, 04:18 AM
Something wrong with this title.
Talk about starting a fight. Hewitt never said this.

http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/V4/L0/home_Lng0.shtml

LCeh
09-13-2004, 04:20 AM
They never said Lleyton said that though. That was more like a catchy title. A very misleading one though. :rolleyes:

Daniel
09-13-2004, 07:24 AM
I heard someone on South African Tv talking so good aobut Roger and he said something like: Roger Federer is such a champion and can be compared to champions like Pete Sampras" I liked that comment.

Bravo Roger :clap2: :bounce: :kiss:

moonlight
09-13-2004, 09:04 AM
:wavey: guys check out this funny article about the Basel Baker :lol:

Warm feeling from bagels
By Bud Collins | September 13, 2004

NEW YORK -- The "Basel Baker," a.k.a. Roger Federer, was in town yesterday, peddling his finest bagels on an asphalt meadow in Flushing.


He didn't care how they tasted to Lleyton Hewitt. Federer force-fed two of them to the scrambling Aussie, anyway, on his merry way to the tennis championship of the United States, 6-0, 7-6 (7-3), 6-0.

Federer, on an Alpine high at sea level, won his third major of the year. (The last guy to do that was Swede Mats Wilander in 1988.) Basel's favorite son turned so much heat on Hewitt, the 2001 champ, that Hewitt might have turned out as the gingerbread man.

Back at home, in his Swiss neighborhood where the tongue is Baseldytsch, Federer would be known as the "Basler Beck" if he were to open a bakery. However, bagels aren't big there.

"No, those sets are just zero sets," said a Swiss reporter, Rod Ackermann of Neue Zuercher Zeitung. "If it was just two sets, 0 and 0, we call it a pair of spectacles. I guess in this case, the 7-6 would be the nose between two eyeglasses."

Federer had a nose for the title immediately, in an 18-minute opening set. While the sweet aroma of his baking wafted through the throng of 23,226, they were quickly aware that Federer had elevated even himself -- to No. 1-plus. When he came down to just plain No. 1 after leading, 5-3, in the second, No. 5 Hewitt could deal with him. Momentarily.

The oven cooled for four games, and the gritty Hewitt, all heart and legs, forced the tiebreaker. But the "Basel Baker" was soon back on the job, upping the burners, creating a concluding bagel that put him in the dough for a million bucks.

New Yorkers, who cherish their bagels, were appreciative. Some felt Federer's were sesame because of the magic in the fingers of his right hand. His shots flew so effortlessly and flawlessly that he seemed Ali Baba in sneakers, crying "Open sesame!" to scoop up the treasure. Of course, Hewitt, slapped around from so many directions, felt himself to be in the clutches of at least 40 thieves.

Really, the lights went out for Hewitt before they came on in the amphitheater. Usually the men's final finishes after dark, but the last of the day's abundant sun was still up when Hewitt went down. The feisty little guy, mistreated on a grand occasion as few Wimbledon and US Open champions have been, has not been a favorite in Flushing because of jams in the past with James Blake and Andy Roddick. It took the wondrous shotmaking of Federer to make some witnesses feel sorry for him.

"Hewitt -- do it!" pleaded one spectator as he entered the tiebreaker. She, and others, wanted more than 1 hour 49 minutes of such stirring tennis. But fleet Federer was not going to oblige.

His were all-everything bagels. Not exactly a blend of garlic, onion, poppyseed, sesame, and salt, but a heady mix of slice, topspin, heavy forehand blasts, serve-and-volley, angles from both sides, drop shots, and leaping smashes. All delivered with rare balance, and moves as smooth as butter icing.

Federer, the only Swiss male to seize the US Open, had the thermostat so high that he slugged .470, nailing 47 of his 100 points on winners: 11 aces, 9 service winners, 27 other untouchables, including 15 forehands.

Double-bageling in major finals is a most uncommon bit of baking. It has happened only thrice before, twice at the French: Guillermo Vilas over Brian Gottfried in 1977, and Gottfried von Cramm over Fred Perry, 6-0, 2-6, 6-2, 2-6, 6-0.

As far as the US, you'd have to go back 120 years to a Bostonian, Dick Sears, who beat New Yorker Howard Taylor, 6-0, 1-6, 6-0, 6-2, at Newport, R.I., an all-Harvard final. It seems unlikely Sears and Taylor knew from bagels. Maybe it was said that Sears made a hasty pudding of Taylor.

For Hewitt, it was simply bageled, toasted, and creamed like cheese.

Mrs. B
09-13-2004, 09:31 AM
:lol:

that's a good one. love his humour. this is the same guy that calls Roger the "Basel Dazzle". lol

Mrs. B
09-13-2004, 09:36 AM
They never said Lleyton said that though. That was more like a catchy title. A very misleading one though. :rolleyes:

remember Andy in Toronto during his runner-up speech?
"you're getting to be very, very annoying..." lol

ok. in fairness to Lleyton, he didn't say this. but we have titles like that all the time over GM. ;)

Dirk
09-13-2004, 09:57 AM
Guys I looked over the channels today and I don't see Rogi booked for anything. :fiery: USTA is not doing a good job. Maybe he will do Leno when he goes to LA. Is he going there for business or pleasure? Maybe he has some deals to seal up.

mitalidas
09-13-2004, 11:07 AM
Leno is crazy not to take Roger.

Roger has a great sense of humour, not the pithy catchy phrases of a certain other player, but a deeper funnier sense. And its so natural!!!! Like with Dick Enberg at the end of the oncourt interview

knight_ley
09-13-2004, 12:45 PM
I'm hoping that Roger will at least be on McEnroe tonight since I am going up there today :)

knight_ley
09-13-2004, 11:49 PM
FYI for people in the states -- ROGER WAS AT McENROE TODAY!!!!!!!!! How great was it to be there with him!!!!!!! Anyways, it airs tonight at 10pm est on CNBC -- Roger was a surprise guest!!!!!!!! So if you're in the States, watch it!

Clara Bow
09-13-2004, 11:55 PM
Thanks for the heads up! How did the audience react- how does he look in person? (Yes I'm shallow.)

Federer will also be on Charlie Rose tonight on PBS (need to check your local listings)

Earlier totday he was on the CBS Early Show, Live with regis and Kelly, and Cold Pizza on ESPN. Didn't see any myself- found out after the fact...arrgh.

LCeh
09-13-2004, 11:56 PM
Thanks a lot for the update Eternity. I will definitely catch it. :D

mitalidas
09-14-2004, 12:32 AM
Federer has talent to be the greatest player ever
Nick Bollettieri14 September 2004

Excerpt:
Roger Federer is the most talented tennis player I have ever seen. He has the capacity to become the greatest in history. This conclusion isn't simply a result of his sublime victory over Lleyton Hewitt in Sunday's US Open final. It's because, uniquely in the history of tennis, in my opinion, he has no weaknesses at all and such an array of strengths that the world is his for the taking, health and motivation permitting.

All the YUMMY :D details on http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/story.jsp?story=561486

tangerine_dream
09-14-2004, 01:57 AM
Hee! Has anyone else been suffering from Rogi Overload today? ;) I have been waiting for this moment all year and it's finally arrived: the US media has finally woken up to Roger. :bigclap: Now they can't get enough of him and I can't read enough articles on him, or tape enough shows that he's appearing on. :banana: This is the same kind of high I experienced last year when Andy won USO and the bombardment began. Wheeeee! It's like being drunk in the woods with your friends and singing songs that make absolutely no sense but you're too delirious to care. http://www.fragforce.org.uk/forum/images/smilies/beer.gif

mitalidas
09-14-2004, 02:08 AM
Indeed. It is being called the Americanization of Federer (http://msnbc.msn.com/id/5992608/)

I have not had this high since Pete won in 2002 (not a fan of roddick's, but loved Pete)

Clara Bow
09-14-2004, 02:09 AM
Tangy- I have also loved that Federer has appeared on a lot of shows. But I am so mad that I didn't Tivo the morning shows because I didn't know if he would be on (I had a feeling about Regis too- darn.) My one big wish is that he could appear on Letterman since Dave often has the winners on his show but this week it's all repeats. Too bad because Daves' interviews with Andy and Marat after they won were great.

I'm also glad that Federer is getting props in the print media as well. Also- according to one of the New York dailies a couple of days ago, Anna Wintour- the editor of Vogue really liked Roger when she met him a couple of weeks ago so it's no surprise that he's off to LA for a Vogue shoot. I'm hoping that maybe he will appear on The Tonight Show tommorow since that's in LA but I don't have my fingers crossed.

But- yea- more media coverage. Yes- I'm disappointed in the ratings for the final but not surprised. And I think that the increased media attention that Feds is now getting will bode well for the future.

Dirk
09-14-2004, 02:15 AM
The ratings can only improve. Besides the European ratings balanced out the bad US ratings for tennis I'm sure. :)

knight_ley
09-14-2004, 03:33 AM
Thanks for the heads up! How did the audience react- how does he look in person? (Yes I'm shallow.)

Well when we got in there the announcer told us there would be a surprise guest... And I had gotten my hopes up that Roger would be there, so then when I got there people who worked there were like "no no he is not here" So I was like sad cuz I really thought he'd be on... And the day had been terrible up to that point cuz on our way there we got lost for 2 hours! So I wanted to go home cuz I was feeling so terrible.

So when we got into the studio and seated, the annoucner said there was a surprise guest, and I just kinda looked at my friend like :confused: And then he said that it was a tennis player... And I just grabbed her hand. And then he said that he won the US Open Yesterday and I started to squeal and he got halfway thru "roger" when I like started clapping and was like "OMG OMG OMG OMG!!!!!!" ANd my friend was like "YES MARY!!!!!!!!!!" And he was like "OH we have a Federer fan here!" And then he named like a bunch of other tennis players saying they were on too and I was like "I DONT CARE WHO ELSE IS HERE!" So then he said he was just kidding and I thought he meant about Roger! So I got sad again, but the executive producer saw me like pout and was like "No no Roger is here" lol...

And when Roger came out I shot up to give him a standing ovation and then another guy stood up and then pretty much the whole audience did... I aws the only person who was like FEDERER FAN you know? There were 2 guys there who seemed pretty keen on tennis, and everyone laughed with Roger and clapped for him and everything...... :)

And he is adorable in person! That was the first time I've ever been like 5ft away from him and he is much skinnier than I thought... I always thought he was like bigger, you know? Not like fat but just bigger... Like he looks so tall in person but like a normal guy in person. And Mirka is GORGEOUS in person. But yea, he is gorgeous in person too! lol.... :)

LCeh
09-14-2004, 03:39 AM
Very cool Mary, thanks a lot for sharing your experience.

Sounds like you had a really good time there! :yeah:

Dirk
09-14-2004, 03:41 AM
I will agree that mirka looks better in person.

Clara Bow
09-14-2004, 03:43 AM
Thanks for your recap simpleternity! :)

I'm not surprised that Mirka looks good in person because she has really nice cheekbones and I saw a couple of pictures of her from parites in NY where she looking stunning.

Daniel
09-14-2004, 07:04 AM
thanks simpleternity :)

lsy
09-14-2004, 02:05 PM
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/comment/0,10070,1303956,00.html

Federer has world playing catch-up

Swiss sweep to US title puts him in a class of one

Stephen Bierley
Tuesday September 14, 2004
The Guardian

Roger Federer was on his way out of Flushing Meadows on Sunday evening and heading back to Manhattan when a small group of excited children stopped him for his autograph. None of them could find a pen. But instead of jumping into the waiting vehicle the new US Open champion paused while one was found, smiled and signed. :hug:

The Swiss world No1 is one of sport's nice guys, the possessor of a sublime talent that has done much to lift tennis to an altogether more rarefied stratum at a time of biff-bang baseline dominance. He has the style, grace and artistry of champions past and, if the game can develop and progress after his fashion, then so much the better for everyone.

Much of Tim Henman's success this year, including a semi-final here and at Roland Garros, has stemmed from the fact that he is prepared to get forward towards the net as much as possible, though sometimes not often enough.

"There are so few players coming to the net and volleying. This can upset the rhythm of the baseliners and people enjoy seeing it, too," said the British No1.

The great strength of Federer, who has now won four of the last five grand slam events, is his brilliant shot making and his versatility. He can win from the back of the court such is the immense power and disguise of his forehand which he takes early with the ball on the up, and he can also kill a point off at the net.

These days he volleys less than he did, principally because he has no need, except against that handful of players who can still bother him. However, he possesses an all-court game that he can adapt according to the circumstances, leaving everybody else to figure out ways of discovering any small chinks in his armour. This has been made all the more difficult because of his supreme confidence, his aura of invincibility.

This being America, the clamour immediately began as to whether Federer could and would equal or beat Pete Sampras's record of 14 grand slam wins, including seven at Wimbledon.

"I don't know what to say," said Federer. "I was asked this question after winning the Australian Open this year, then everybody went a little bit quiet after the French." :haha: :tape:

At Roland Garros the Swiss was beaten in the third round by Brazil's Gustavo Kuerten, the three-times French Open champion, although it was only a temporary setback. Unlike Sampras, who never got beyond the semi-finals on the Paris clay, there appears every chance that Federer will one day win the French Open, thereby joining Rod Laver and Andre Agassi as the only two players to have won all the four major championships in the Open era.

"Roger is such a big-time player. When he plays like he did against me today he's in a different league," said Lleyton Hewitt, the former world No1 and US champion three years ago, who lost the final 6-0, 7-6, 6-0.

Federer, who admitted to being exhausted, is a naturally modest man. So, when he says he "feels like a superstar", it is because, like all champions, he knows his worth. "But it's important for me to represent the sport correctly and be a good role model for the kids." :clap2:

For all the talk of records, and the possibility of him "becoming the greatest player ever", Federer is only too aware of the pitfalls. "There is a lot of hard work and sacrifice and it takes only one injury for your career to be destroyed. I know how much effort I put into it and those close to me know this is something special for me, this is something out of this world." :clap2:

Federer will finish the year as the world No1, with little chance of him being caught until well into next year. The rest, including Henman who is now at a career-equalling best of No4 in the world, must keep working and hoping.

"Roger has taken tennis to another level," said Hewitt. "Everybody else has to strive to improve. That's what motivates us all."

WyveN
09-14-2004, 02:28 PM
The tennis world knows because they have seen it over the past
fortnight, but now newly crowned US Open champion Roger Federer admits
that he is playing "beautiful tennis".

Only the French Open has evaded Federer in a magnificent 2004 that has
seen him win nine titles, winning every final he has reached in an
incredible year for the 23 year-old from Basle.

"I don't want to be cocky," Federer said on Monday. "But I do feel
that I play beautiful tennis, when my movement and my technique come
together I feel totally in balance on the court.

It is easy to forgive any perceived arrogance after his straight sets'
destruction of both Britain's Tim Henman and Australian Lleyton Hewitt
in the semi-final and then final of the US Open.

"In some ways," he continued, "I feel that I am playing tennis the
traditional way, to be number one in the world with a one-handed
backhand is something special."

No one would bet against Federer improving upon an impressive majors
record and adding to his 20 career titles on the ATP Tour.

Fans back in Britain will be pleased to see that his priority is a
successful defence of his Wimbledon title, although supporters of
Henman may be dismayed.

"I like the history of the sport, that's why Wimbledon is my number
one priority, with the white clothing and the tradition. It's what I
grew up watching.

"I think my style can inspire a lot of kids. I always thought tennis
should not be about waiting for your opponent to make a mistake, it
should be about attacking and mixing up your game.

"I didn't always have the strength to play that way, but it came very
quickly and when I was about 17 it took off like a rocket."

tangerine_dream
09-14-2004, 02:58 PM
But- yea- more media coverage. Yes- I'm disappointed in the ratings for the final but not surprised. And I think that the increased media attention that Feds is now getting will bode well for the future.

I didn't know Marat was on the Letterman show after he won. :eek: Maybe Roger will get an invite then. :banana:

I'm not worried about the low ratings in the US. We're in a transitional stage where the Andre/Pete years has made its exit and the casual fans suddenly have to get to know a bunch of new players. It'll take a year or two before people finally accept the new generation and tune in to watch them. :)

crimson
09-14-2004, 05:12 PM
From the ATP website:
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2004/federer_clinches_no1.asp

Federer Earliest to Clinch Year-End No. 1 Spot

After his dominating performance at the US Open, Roger Federer was confirmed as INDESIT ATP 2004 Race Winner and is now poised to surpass other milestones in 2004. ATP confirmed today that Federer has accumulated an insurmountable lead in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race, marking what is believed to be the earliest a player has locked up the prestigious year-end No. 1 position in the Open Era (since 1968).

The Swiss, who captured his third Grand Slam title of the season on Sunday, now has a number of other tennis milestones, including capturing a fourth ATP Masters Series in a season.

With a 64-6 record in 2004, Federer has a 91.4 percent win-loss record which, if maintained, would make him the first player in ATP history (since 1990) to post a season win-loss percentage above .900. If he also maintains his perfect record against the game’s top players for the rest of the season (he’s 12-0 against top 10 players), he will be the first player in tennis history to do so.

"Anyone who didn’t know Roger Federer was a unique and creative athlete before the US Open victory certainly knows it today,” said ATP Chief Executive Officer Mark Miles.

"We are excited that in our first year of being title sponsors of the INDESIT ATP Race, we have witnessed a level of excellence that has never been matched before since the creation of the Race," said Fabio d'Angelantonio, INDESIT Advertising Manager.

"Our sponsorship of the Race helps us strengthen INDESIT's reputation as a leading brand and it perfectly represents the INDESIT world and mission: We work, you play. It is always an exciting challenge to reach the very best results in our fields."

Already an international superstar, Federer proved on Monday to be an increasingly hot commodity in the United States when he embarked on a whirlwind media tour of New York City to talk about his remarkable achievements and life as the World’s No. 1 player. He appeared as a guest on ESPN’s Cold Pizza, CBS’s Early Show and Live with Regis and Kelly before hitting Times Square for a photo shoot and media roundtable.

By end of day, he also had conducted talk show interviews with John McEnroe and Charlie Rose. (To see photos from Federer’s New York media tour, log on to http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/gallery/federer_gallery/)

Federer’s incredible victory at the US Open marked the first time in the Open Era that anyone had won his first four Grand Slam finals: 2003 Wimbledon, 2004 Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open. He also became the first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three of the four Grand Slam titles in a year and the fourth player in the Open Era to win at least three of the four along with Jimmy Connors, who won three in 1974, and Rod Laver, who won all four in 1969.

Federer’s 20th career title in New York earned him an unassailable 440-point lead in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race over his nearest challenger Andy Roddick. Even if the American wins every tournament he plays during the rest of this year, he cannot surpass Federer’s current total of 1087 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points.

With three months of the season still remaining, there are many other milestones within reach for Federer:

Having already won three of 2004’s ATP Masters Series shields in Indian Wells, Hamburg and Toronto, Federer will be looking to become the first player since the series began in 1990 to win four of the nine total in a single season.

His victory over Hewitt also marked his 17th consecutive victory over a Top 10 player in the INDESIT ATP Entry Rankings. He is 12-0 in 2004. No player has ever gone undefeated against Top 10 opponents during a season.
With nine titles already under his belt, Federer could tie or surpass Thomas Muster’s record mark of 12 titles in a single year. He is scheduled to play five more ATP tournaments in 2004. Muster achieved his feat in 1995.

Federer’s victory over Hewitt in the US Open final was his 11th consecutive victory in a final and his ninth in 2004. He is also looking to become the first player to appear in more than seven finals and remain undefeated during a season. His last loss in an ATP final came at the hands of Jiri Novak in Gstaad in July 2003.

Having assured himself of one of the elite eight places at the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, Federer will be looking to become the seventh player (since 1970) to defend the title. Federer went undefeated in Houston in 2003 and if he wins the title again he will join Lleyton Hewitt (2001-02), Pete Sampras (1996-97), John McEnroe (1983-84), Ivan Lendl (1981-82, ’85-87), Bjorn Borg (1979-80) and Ilie Nastase (1971-73) as players able to successfully defend the prestigious title.

Federer’s 64-6 mark on the ATP circuit in 2004 is the best since Ivan Lendl went 79-6 in 1989. Lendl eventually lost in the semifinals of the ATP Masters in New York against Stefan Edberg to finish the year with a 79-7 record.

INDESIT ATP RACE WINNERS – Federer’s current tally of 1087 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points already is a record since the Race began in 2000. Here’s how his mark compares with previous year-end totals:

Year Player Year-end Points Total

2004 Roger Federer 1087*
2003 Andy Roddick 907
2002 Lleyton Hewitt 873
2001 Lleyton Hewitt 897
2000 Gustavo Kuerten 839

*as of September 13, 2004.

*M*
09-14-2004, 05:59 PM
I just received the latest issue of Tennis magazine in the mail, and they have Roger on the cover! It's about time. The last time was in March 2003, where they were saying "what's he waiting for?" (in terms of winning Grand Slams). A lot has changed since then. I didn't get the chance to read the article yet.

The cover pic is not the most flattering (how dare they show him sweating ;)), but he certainly looks intimidating!

lsy
09-14-2004, 06:13 PM
"I like the history of the sport, that's why Wimbledon is my number
one priority, with the white clothing and the tradition. It's what I
grew up watching.

Will be interesting to see if he's going to put more focus in winning FO or still having defending Wimby his priority next year.


"I think my style can inspire a lot of kids. I always thought tennis
should not be about waiting for your opponent to make a mistake, it
should be about attacking and mixing up your game.

Hopefully he does inspire the young kids, who knows we might have a new generation of young players playing the styles we enjoy to watch.


ATP confirmed today that Federer has accumulated an insurmountable lead in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race, marking what is believed to be the earliest a player has locked up the prestigious year-end No. 1 position in the Open Era (since 1968).

Another record! :bounce:

Thanks for all the articles!

the cat
09-14-2004, 07:19 PM
Hi t_d! :wavey: Marat was so much fun of the Late Show with David Letterman after he won the 2000 U.S. Open! :D You really should see that interview. And Marat also did a long interview with Charlie Rose after he won the U.S. Open.

I think Roger would really enjoy doing some American talk shows. He laughs easily when he's a round Bud Collins so I'm sure he would laugh if he's around Regis Philbin or David Letterman. :D

RogiFan88
09-14-2004, 07:22 PM
cool, this is US tennis mag, right?

no, no, Marat was on C Rose, not Letterman, that I know of anyway

I never saw Mirka in TO... boo hoo... she wasn't at his 2-hr practice...

RogiFan88
09-14-2004, 07:36 PM
Well when we got in there the announcer told us there would be a surprise guest... And I had gotten my hopes up that Roger would be there, so then when I got there people who worked there were like "no no he is not here" So I was like sad cuz I really thought he'd be on... And the day had been terrible up to that point cuz on our way there we got lost for 2 hours! So I wanted to go home cuz I was feeling so terrible.

So when we got into the studio and seated, the annoucner said there was a surprise guest, and I just kinda looked at my friend like :confused: And then he said that it was a tennis player... And I just grabbed her hand. And then he said that he won the US Open Yesterday and I started to squeal and he got halfway thru "roger" when I like started clapping and was like "OMG OMG OMG OMG!!!!!!" ANd my friend was like "YES MARY!!!!!!!!!!" And he was like "OH we have a Federer fan here!" And then he named like a bunch of other tennis players saying they were on too and I was like "I DONT CARE WHO ELSE IS HERE!" So then he said he was just kidding and I thought he meant about Roger! So I got sad again, but the executive producer saw me like pout and was like "No no Roger is here" lol...

And when Roger came out I shot up to give him a standing ovation and then another guy stood up and then pretty much the whole audience did... I aws the only person who was like FEDERER FAN you know? There were 2 guys there who seemed pretty keen on tennis, and everyone laughed with Roger and clapped for him and everything...... :)

And he is adorable in person! That was the first time I've ever been like 5ft away from him and he is much skinnier than I thought... I always thought he was like bigger, you know? Not like fat but just bigger... Like he looks so tall in person but like a normal guy in person. And Mirka is GORGEOUS in person. But yea, he is gorgeous in person too! lol.... :)

DID you plan to go to the show the day after the USO on the off-chance that Rogi might be there??? If not, that was INCREDIBLE LUCK!!!

Loved reading your account... I can completely understand your experience... and isn't ROGI so beautiful in person?? It's those bright eyes of his... and everything else of course! He is skinny in person... yet so strong! ;)

Too bad the rest of us couldn't be there too... can you imagine it??!!! We w have to be introduced for sure! [I mean, to ROGI, not to each other!!]

eleven
09-15-2004, 12:15 AM
The Age’, Australia
14-09-2004

Federer an Artist from Another Era
With his deft touch, Roger Federer reminds us how beautiful tennis can be,
writes George Vecsey.

It is much too soon to discuss whether Roger Federer can be the best player of his time, or any time. Let us see whether injuries or money or boredom kick in. It is not too soon, however, to discuss whether Federer has the most beautiful tennis game any of us are likely to see.

In this age of nuclear equipment and super-sized players, Federere plays with the deftness of long-ago men of modest size in long white slacks, rolled-up shirtsleeves and wooden racquets. The new champion of the US Open brings back the antique feel of this sport, the way it was when people played for just cups or just for the sheer fun of creating something beautiful out on a lawn.

This is a different sport that Federer plays, a game we had almost given up seeing again. We see it in grainy videos of Rod Laver streaking across the court; we caought glimpses of it when Henri Leconte was on his game, for a point or two. We enjoyed it when Martina Navratilova hit an overhand or dashed to the net, and there was beauty in John McEnroe’s touch and Pete Sampras’ serve.

But Federer is a fluid, complete artist, who has now won a grand slam title on the hard court of the brawling city of New York, which has chewed up many a tennis tourist. Bjorn Borg used to leave New York virtually cross-eyed and muttering to himself. Kevin Curren once lobbied for the imminent destruction of the joint. But Federer charmed the demanding galleries of queens with his placid determination and the most complete tennis game of his generation, at very least.

(… the match…)

Just look at Federer: 185 centimetres, 80 kilograms, more solid-looking the closer you get to him, blue shirt with one white stripe on the left shoulder (a soccer captain’s stripe, perhaps), white shorts, white sneakers, white headband, thick curly brown hair, and almost no twitches or mannerisms, unlike Jimmy Connors or McEnroe.

As an athlete, Federer stirs up memories of the most efficient great performers, such as Joe DiMaggio and Jack Nicklaus. They did it over decades, of course. He is just beginning.

The other day, he listed soccer as the sport he most likes to watch, ahead of tennis. I asked him which soccer player he admired most. “Zidane,” he said, referring to the French star still performing for Real Madrid. I would have said Franz Beckenbauer, the great German field general. But that’s the company into which Federer is moving.

“Let’s hope roger doesn’t get satisfied if he cointinues to win and gets too wealthy that he doesn’t have the extra incentive to go out there and play,” said Jack Kramer, 83, who was inducted into the Open’s hall of fame on Sunday.

“A champion of his stature,” Kramer continued, “the game needs him, and he’s 23 now, as I understand it. Let’s hope he has the same drive that Sampras had for so long.”

Tim Henmen, who was demolished by Federer in a semi-final match on Saturday, said Sampras was slightly easier to play than Federer at his best. But Sampras won 14 grand slam titles.

Margaret Court was also inducted in the Open’s hall on Sunday, along with McEnroe and Steffi Graf. “I think you probably look at the statistics and time,” she said, “ You see champions come through today. People say, ‘They’re great champions’, and they’ve won one grand slam, two grand slams.”

Federer has won four. But they have been in the six most recent grand slam tournaments.

On Sunday, he cautioned us: “The road is long, you know.”

The best thing we can do is watch him – and that is a joy.


Sorry about that if I have made any mistake because I don’t have much time to type this up.

LCeh
09-15-2004, 12:28 AM
Thanks a lot eleven for typing the article. :D

On Sunday, he cautioned us: “The road is long, you know.”

I found it hilarious that they included the "you know" part in there... :haha:

eleven
09-15-2004, 05:42 AM
I found that Roger is quite like to say 'you know' in the interviews.

Seraphim
09-16-2004, 02:32 AM
Goodbye mediocrity, hello to the top-class world of Federer.

By Richard Hinds
September 15, 2004

They said sport would never be like that again. The days when Rod Laver could put all four grand slam trophies in the one cabinet. When they put the name of Jack Nicklaus on the leaderboard before they painted on the name of the tournament sponsor. As dusty as the exhibits at your nearest sporting museum.

The depth was now too great. Sports were too "global". The big-prize cheques made the incentive too strong for too many.

This was the age of sporting egalitarianism where stardom could be achieved in a single performance, and greatness was defined by an above-average season or two.

As majors were raffled and teams played pass-the-parcel with significant trophies, the theory held water. When seven different players won the eight men's grand slam tennis titles in 2001 and 2002 this was even said to be a good thing. This was depth, not transition. Get used to it, buddy.

But guess what? It was a lie. An excuse created by the marketers and tour promoters and agents stuck with trying to sell mediocrity as the established stars were fading and the potential replacements had not yet risen.

It is a myth that has been exposed in several sports by the domination of individuals and teams who have defied the drab conventional wisdom and risen above the pack.

The latest is Roger Federer. The Swiss star was not meant to win three grand slam events in a calendar year - especially not without raising a bead of sweat. Just as Tiger Woods was not supposed to complete the non-calendar slam in 2001 or Vijay Singh was not meant to win four of the past five US PGA Tour events or the Brisbane Lions were not supposed to win four consecutive AFL premierships as they seem likely to do.

You might also mention Michael Schumacher and Arsenal and Lance Armstrong as examples of dominance that was supposed to belong in Don Bradman's time, not ours - although in some sports the reality was not lost. They did not abandon the grand sporting principle - as some in golf and tennis, particularly, did - that not all participants are created equal.

To do that is not merely to lose sense of historical perspective, it is to forget how much the once-in-a-lifetime talents raise the standard of sport and enrich the performances of those who challenge them. Federer is still years away from achieving those feats.

However, by winning four of the past six grand slam titles he has exploded the myth that all the top contemporary tennis players are direct descendants of Laver and McEnroe and Borg. Even that each grand slam champion deserved to be treated as a superstar.

One of the most impressive things about Federer's domination is that it comes at a time when men's tennis is in rude health. Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Juan Carlos Ferrero are worthy challengers. Erratic talents such as Marat Safin and Carlos Moya provide regular testing material. At Wimbledon, Pete Sampras sometimes looked like a Ferrari in a yard full of second-hand Lasers. Federer is the shiniest machine at a quality dealership.

So much so that some - as golf spruikers did with Woods - might cast Federer as merely one of a number of exceptional talents who prove how good the modern game can be.

But, on early evidence, the Swiss is much more precious. He is proof that extraordinary talents can dominate in any era.

Michael Jordan was the most celebrated individual in any major team sport in the past 20 years. As his retirement neared, an illusion was created that he had inspired a generation of stars of equal or even greater talent. But, of course, while there are those who can match Jordan's pay packet and ego, there is none fit to dribble in his sneakers.

That is one of the problems with a superstar vacuum. When there are no genuine champions the marketing men and media will serve them up anyway. No Pele? No problem! Here is David Beckham instead.

Which is why it is such a blessing - even a relief - to see a genuine champion emerge. To see Federer hypnotise his opponents with a wave of the racquet and understand that he is playing against history as much as anything on the other side of the net. To know that if he can stand the test of time Federer will make a genuine impact. And that his greatness will be in the eye of the beholder, and not announced on the side of a cereal packet.

LCeh
09-16-2004, 02:55 AM
Wow, what an article. Thanks a lot for posting it Seraphim!

LCeh
09-16-2004, 03:49 AM
This one's from tennisweek:

Laver: Federer Can Sweep The Slam

By Adrianna Outlaw
09/15/2004

It is the toughest task in tennis. Winning the Grand Slam is an achievement so astoundingly arduous only two men in tennis history — Don Budge in 1938 and Rod Laver in 1962 and 1969 — have ever actually accomplished it in a single season.


From his home in San Diego, California the man known as "The Rocket" has watched the Swiss stylist soar to three Slam titles this season and believes Federer is capable of mastering all four majors in a season.

"He has the potential to pull it off," Laver told the New York Post. "But he can't strive to do it. He must enjoy it and, if something good happens like a Grand Slam, even better. Records are made to be broken. I'll be the first to shake his hand."

The sight of opponents shaking Federer's hand has become a familiar conclusion to tournaments this year. The 23-year-old Federer's straight sets thrashing of 2001 U.S. Open champion Lleyton Hewitt in the Flushing Meadows final on Sunday marked the first time in Open Era history a man won his first four Grand Slam finals — 2003 Wimbledon and the 2004 Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open titles. Federer, who raised his record to 9-0 in tournament finals this season, became the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three majors in a single season and joined Jimmy Connors, who won three Grand Slam championships in 1974, Laver, who swept the Grand Slam in 1969 and Wilander as only the fourth man in the Open Era to win at least three majors in a single season.

Only a third-round loss to three-time Roland Garros champion Gustavo Kuerten in Paris prevented Federer from making a run at the Grand Slam. The man who has won tournament titles on all surfaces believes he has the ability to score a Grand Slam sweep.

"I haven't been too far away this year, it's definitely possible," Federer said. "I guess you would have to ask the other guys if they think I can do it."

Former No. 1 Hewitt, who has won two of the four majors, is convinced the consistency Federer maintained at majors this year gives him a shot at the Slam.

"He's definitely got a chance, there's no doubt about it. Especially the way that he's had this year as well, and, you know, he's always going to have a chance going into every major, even the French Open," Hewitt said. "You know, he lost in the third round this year to Guga, but it's going to take a guy like Guga or someone like that to beat him at every Slam. So, you know, you like your chances of him trying to pick up at least one out of the four every year for a few years."

Winning the Grand Slam is such a rare feat only five players in history have done it: Budge, Laver, Maureen Connolly (1953), Margaret Court (1970) and Steffi Graf, whose 1998 Grand Slam was dubbed "The Golden Slam" when she captured the Olympic gold medal after claiming all four major titles.

Andre Agassi, Roy Emerson, Fred Perry, Budge and Laver are the only men to capture all four majors over the course of their careers. Agassi's archrival, Pete Sampras, is one of several men who owns three of the four majors.

In recent years, the depth in men's tennis as well as the emergence of surface specialists has made winning the Grand Slam seem as elusive as finding the Holy Grail. When Budge and Laver scored Slam sweeps majors were played on only two surfaces, grass and clay. With the four majors contested on three different surfaces, the task is tougher now. The red clay of Roland Garros may pose the greatest challenge for Federer, who beat Roland Garros champion Gaston Gaudio, former French Open champion Carlos Moya and Roland Garros runner-up Guillermo Coria on red clay to claim the Tennis Masters Series-Hamburg title in May. Because Federer learned to craft his style on clay and has solidified his status as a man for all surfaces, Laver is convinced he can reign at Roland Garros.

"I would think he can (Roland Garros)," Laver said. "He has the makings because in Switzerland you're brought up on clay to a good extent. Winning on clay is a mind game and he has the anticipation and knowledge when he plays the ball. He reminds you of the old guard."

Many Grand Slam champions favor Federer's style because he combines traditional tennis strokes with the creativity, imagination, explosiveness and all-court athleticism of a player who is truly unique among today's top players in playing tennis on his own terms.

"I don't want to be cocky, but I do feel that I play beautiful tennis, when my movement and my technique come together I feel totally in balance on the court," Federer said. "In some ways I feel that I am playing tennis the traditional way, to be number one in the world with a one-handed backhand is something special."

A student of tennis history, Federer values tennis traditions he strives to sustain. In age where racquet technology has made the return of serve such a weapon and produced a generation of players who sometimes seem comfortable advancing to the net only to engage in the post-match hand-shake, Federer's brand of tennis is exciting because he's actively attacking from virtually every position on the court in an effort to win points rather than waiting for opponents to lose them.

"I like the history of the sport, that's why Wimbledon is my number one priority, with the white clothing and the tradition. It's what I grew up watching," Federer said. "I think my style can inspire a lot of kids. I always thought tennis should not be about waiting for your opponent to make a mistake, it should be about attacking and mixing up your game. I didn't always have the strength to play that way, but it came very quickly and when I was about 17 it took off like a rocket."

Whether Federer can stay healthy and continue his current pace to perhaps challenge Sampras' record of 14 career major titles remains to be seen. But the man who stunned Sampras in the 2001 Wimbledon fourth round to snap the seven-time Wimbledon winner's 31-match winning streak at the All England Club, said Sampras' streak of six straight years as No. 1 remains one of the most impressive accomplishments in men's tennis.

"I'm impressed by him being ranked number one for six years, that shows how much effort he put into his career, but I guess that's why he is a little off the scene in tennis, he put everything, his whole heart into tennis," Federer said of Sampras. "He can now look back and enjoy it and I hope one day I will have a similar moment but I think I will stay more involved in tennis."

Laver, who 20 major titles overall, including 11 Slam singles championships, can envision Federer challenging Sampras' record of 14 majors.

"At 23, he's only won four. (Ouch, "only"? How many guys have won more than 4 slams? :lol:) He's got a way to go, but the potential to get that mark is there," Laver told the New York Post. "He's got the game and mind. He's on his way."

lsy
09-17-2004, 11:47 AM
Hey all,

Jos from Rogi's site posted the link to the complete audio interview of Rogi in Charlie Rose show. Was great to finally get to hear it. For those of you who haven't gotten the chance to do so, here's the link :

http://www.bloomberg.com/media/tv/crose/

Mrs. B
09-17-2004, 01:02 PM
thanks for putting it here, Corinna. a must-hear for all Roger fans. 2i1minutes, wow.
already heard him on Swiss tv talk like that---he did catch a cold or something. ;)

LCeh
09-17-2004, 02:17 PM
Thanks a lot lsy! That was just a great interview. Unlike the stupid journalists, Charlie actually asked some really good questions, and Roger answered them well. :D

RogiFan88
09-17-2004, 02:41 PM
Considering that CRose is educated, older and usually interviews people fr the arts, politics, the world of science and health, he w ask intelligent Qs, to which our Rogi answered intelligently!

woo hoo!

lsy
09-17-2004, 02:45 PM
Yeah I thought it was a great interview too. So glad of finally getting the whole interview.

Rogi mentioned his bouncing of balls between points a trick from playing basketball :lol:

mitalidas
09-17-2004, 06:33 PM
A LAME "How to" beat Federer

(Isn't it just really convenient that someone is bagelled the media often highlight sthat they didn't "play their best", rather than point out the obvious: They did not play their best because RF did not let them!!!! HELLO!!)


New plan to tame rampant Roger
David Tanner
September 18, 2004
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,10795840%255E2722,00.html

Daniel
09-17-2004, 11:19 PM
thanks, i love the article Lchech :)

lina_seta
09-18-2004, 12:59 AM
i hated that "New plan to tame rampant Roger" article.... :(
Hewitt did not played badly... he did as usual.. as he did all week, but its only not enough to beat rogi!... he hadnt have a single match with Top 10... so his level of tennis is logically higher than his opponents'... reason why he didnt drop a set... until the final... where he dropped all 3! 2 at love! :o (rogi dropped 3 too)

oh havent finished... first thing first... that is an article from "theaustraliannews.com"?!... such sore loosers they needed to write this article as consolation! AND if Andy found the answer to how to beat roger y didnt he win TMS toronto? where he lost 2 consecutive sets?! im seeing a 10-1 record in the future... we all know roger didnt play his best at wimbly, but he did really really well at USO, and NOBODY would have beaten him that day.. not even hewitt at his best! so that article after their hero's defeat is just plain pointless..

mitalidas
09-18-2004, 02:14 AM
lina_seta, i am in agreement completely. during the match (at 3-0 in the third) i remember thinking "hewitt is doing his best, but roger is showing the gulf in the quality of tennis between #1 and the rest".

to be fair, australian coverage has been extremely awesome on Rogi. This was an exception, the first exception I have read actually

Yoda
09-18-2004, 02:32 AM
Poor article overall but it did hit the nail on one area...The Wimbledon Final

I remember whilst watching the final, thinking Roger was actually being dictated to a lot more than he was dictating the play himself. Andys constant use of power from both wings was surprising Fed and I felt during spans of that game Roger was just defending until Andy made an errors. So happy when Rogi found a way to win :woohoo:

Rogi went back to the drawingboard and in Toronto he showed improvements in his game that handled Andy's power with greater ease.

IMO That match was Roger's finest this year. :bowdown:

Daniel
09-18-2004, 03:55 AM
Federer Earliest to Clinch Year-End No. 1 Spot


© Getty Images
After his dominating performance at the US Open, Roger Federer was confirmed as INDESIT ATP 2004 Race Winner and is now poised to surpass other milestones in 2004. ATP confirmed today that Federer has accumulated an insurmountable lead in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race, marking what is believed to be the earliest a player has locked up the prestigious year-end No. 1 position in the Open Era (since 1968).

The Swiss, who captured his third Grand Slam title of the season on Sunday, now has a number of other tennis milestones, including capturing a fourth ATP Masters Series in a season.

With a 64-6 record in 2004, Federer has a 91.4 percent win-loss record which, if maintained, would make him the first player in ATP history (since 1990) to post a season win-loss percentage above .900. If he also maintains his perfect record against the game’s top players for the rest of the season (he’s 12-0 against top 10 players), he will be the first player in tennis history to do so.

"Anyone who didn’t know Roger Federer was a unique and creative athlete before the US Open victory certainly knows it today,” said ATP Chief Executive Officer Mark Miles.

"We are excited that in our first year of being title sponsors of the INDESIT ATP Race, we have witnessed a level of excellence that has never been matched before since the creation of the Race," said Fabio d'Angelantonio, INDESIT Advertising Manager.

"Our sponsorship of the Race helps us strengthen INDESIT's reputation as a leading brand and it perfectly represents the INDESIT world and mission: We work, you play. It is always an exciting challenge to reach the very best results in our fields."

Already an international superstar, Federer proved on Monday to be an increasingly hot commodity in the United States when he embarked on a whirlwind media tour of New York City to talk about his remarkable achievements and life as the World’s No. 1 player. He appeared as a guest on ESPN’s Cold Pizza, CBS’s Early Show and Live with Regis and Kelly before hitting Times Square for a photo shoot and media roundtable.

By end of day, he also had conducted talk show interviews with John McEnroe and Charlie Rose. (To see photos from Federer’s New York media tour, log on to http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/gallery/federer_gallery/

Federer’s incredible victory at the US Open marked the first time in the Open Era that anyone had won his first four Grand Slam finals: 2003 Wimbledon, 2004 Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open. He also became the first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three of the four Grand Slam titles in a year and the fourth player in the Open Era to win at least three of the four along with Jimmy Connors, who won three in 1974, and Rod Laver, who won all four in 1969.

Federer’s 20th career title in New York earned him an unassailable 440-point lead in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race over his nearest challenger Andy Roddick. Even if the American wins every tournament he plays during the rest of this year, he cannot surpass Federer’s current total of 1087 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points.

With three months of the season still remaining, there are many other milestones within reach for Federer:

Having already won three of 2004’s ATP Masters Series shields in Indian Wells, Hamburg and Toronto, Federer will be looking to become the first player since the series began in 1990 to win four of the nine total in a single season.

His victory over Hewitt also marked his 17th consecutive victory over a Top 10 player in the INDESIT ATP Entry Rankings. He is 12-0 in 2004. No player has ever gone undefeated against Top 10 opponents during a season.
With nine titles already under his belt, Federer could tie or surpass Thomas Muster’s record mark of 12 titles in a single year. He is scheduled to play five more ATP tournaments in 2004. Muster achieved his feat in 1995.

Federer’s victory over Hewitt in the US Open final was his 11th consecutive victory in a final and his ninth in 2004. He is also looking to become the first player to appear in more than seven finals and remain undefeated during a season. His last loss in an ATP final came at the hands of Jiri Novak in Gstaad in July 2003.

Having assured himself of one of the elite eight places at the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, Federer will be looking to become the seventh player (since 1970) to defend the title. Federer went undefeated in Houston in 2003 and if he wins the title again he will join Lleyton Hewitt (2001-02), Pete Sampras (1996-97), John McEnroe (1983-84), Ivan Lendl (1981-82, ’85-87), Bjorn Borg (1979-80) and Ilie Nastase (1971-73) as players able to successfully defend the prestigious title.

Federer’s 64-6 mark on the ATP circuit in 2004 is the best since Ivan Lendl went 79-6 in 1989. Lendl eventually lost in the semifinals of the ATP Masters in New York against Stefan Edberg to finish the year with a 79-7 record.



Here is a statistical look at potential milestones for Roger Federer during the remainder of the 2004 ATP circuit:

INDESIT ATP RACE WINNERS – Federer’s current tally of 1087 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points already is a record since the Race began in 2000. Here’s how his mark compares with previous year-end totals:

Year Player Year-end Points Total
2004 Roger Federer 1087*
2003 Andy Roddick 907
2002 Lleyton Hewitt 873
2001 Lleyton Hewitt 897
2000 Gustavo Kuerten 839

*as of September 13, 2004.



YEAR-END INDESIT ATP ENTRY RANKING – With a current total of 6760 points, Federer is looking to finish the year with the highest number of points since the ATP began in 1990, although the points breakdown changed slightly in 2000 (Andy Roddick finished with the highest number of points since 2000 with 4,535). Here are the highest point totals:



Year Player Points
1994 Pete Sampras 5097
1999 Andre Agassi 5048
1996 Pete Sampras 4865
1995 Pete Sampras 4842
1997 Pete Sampras 4547



WIN-LOSS LEADERS (SINCE 1990) - With 64 wins already in 2004, Federer is on course to record the highest number of wins since the ATP circuit began in 1990. Here is a look at the year-end win-loss leaders since then:



Year Player W-L
1995 Thomas Muster 86-18
1993 Andre Agassi 83-15
2001 Lleyton Hewitt 80-18
1996 Yevgeny Kafelnikov 80-25
2003 Roger Federer 78-17



PERCENTAGE WIN-LOSS LEADERS (SINCE 1990) – With a 64-6 record in 2004, Federer has a 91.4 percent win-loss record. He could finish the season with the highest win-loss percentage since the ATP began in 1990. Here is a look at the players with the highest year-end percentage:



Year Player W-L %
1995 Andre Agassi 73-9 .890
1994 Pete Sampras 65-11 .871
1996 Pete Sampras 55-12 .855
1993 Pete Sampras 83-15 .847
1999 Stefan Edberg 70-14 .833
1999 Pete Sampras 40-8 .833



FIRST TO FOUR - Federer is looking to become the first player to win four ATP Masters Series shields in one season. Here is a look at the players to have won three in a year since the series began in 1990:



Year Player AMS Titles
2004 Roger Federer Indian Wells, Hamburg, Toronto
2002 Andre Agassi Miami, Rome, Madrid
1998 Marcelo Rios Indian Wells, Miami, Rome
1995 Andre Agassi Miami, Montreal, Cincinnati
1995 Thomas Muster Monte Carlo, Rome, Essen*
1994 Pete Sampras Indian Wells, Miami, Rome
1990 Stefan Edberg Indian Wells, Cincinnati, Paris

*Held in Essen for one year before moving to Stuttgart in 1996

Daniel
09-18-2004, 04:15 AM
Federer Secures Year-End No. 1 Rank Among Other Records

By Richard Vach

So dominant has been Roger Federer's 2004 campaign that he could take a nap through the remainder of the year and still finish No. 1 ahead of the trailing Andy Roddick.

Among the Swiss' other records this year, Federer is 12-0 against Top 10 opponents in 2004, with 17 total wins over Top 10 opponents in a row. No player has ever gone undefeated against Top 10 opponents during a season.

With nine titles already under his belt in 2004, Federer could tie or surpass Thomas Muster's record mark of 12 titles in a single year in 1995. He is scheduled to play five more ATP tournaments in 2004.

Federer's last loss in an ATP final? To Jiri Novak in Gstaad in July 2003, 12 finals ago.

Federer's 64-6 win-loss in 2004 is the best since Ivan Lendl went 79-7 (season total) in 1989. Last year Federer was 78-17.

With his first US Open win, Federer became the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three slams in a year. If Federer can win Madrid or Paris this year, he would also become the first man to win four Masters Series titles in one year.

Federer is, by the way, without a coach, if anyone is up for the task of "improving" upon the Swiss' game.

yanchr
09-18-2004, 09:17 AM
Hey all,

Jos from Rogi's site posted the link to the complete audio interview of Rogi in Charlie Rose show. Was great to finally get to hear it. For those of you who haven't gotten the chance to do so, here's the link :

http://www.bloomberg.com/media/tv/crose/
:hug: lsy, good interview from Roger.

Roger was really stuffed up. Sometimes I can't even make out what he was saying. It seems like he is quite prone to getting sick, luckily not injury though. Hope he can get fine soon.

yanchr
09-18-2004, 09:27 AM
Poor article overall but it did hit the nail on one area...The Wimbledon Final

I remember whilst watching the final, thinking Roger was actually being dictated to a lot more than he was dictating the play himself. Andys constant use of power from both wings was surprising Fed and I felt during spans of that game Roger was just defending until Andy made an errors.
I think this article made a little sense regarding this part. Maybe it is right that only pure power can frustrate Roger's style of play, however he is playing, like what Andy did in the Wimbly final. The problem is how many players now have the power like Andy has, and how long this damn power can last during a match...

Dirk
09-18-2004, 09:27 AM
Rogi sounded fine to me. I don't get why he gets sick but he sniffs way too much. I will have to tell him that in my next letter. I don't want Ninja to get sick during an big event and lose because of it. :fiery:

Marc Rosset is Tall
09-18-2004, 09:31 AM
Maybe Rogi has some problems with allergies.

Yoda
09-18-2004, 03:13 PM
I think this article made a little sense regarding this part. Maybe it is right that only pure power can frustrate Roger's style of play, however he is playing, like what Andy did in the Wimbly final. The problem is how many players now have the power like Andy has, and how long this damn power can last during a match...


True...but I believe Roger can handle Andy's current power as he showed in Toronto. :worship:
Now if Andy takes his power game to the next level....that will be Rogers next test.
However Roger has not reached his full strength....so there's plenty of power potential still untapped.

Shy
09-18-2004, 04:43 PM
I think this article made a little sense regarding this part. Maybe it is right that only pure power can frustrate Roger's style of play, however he is playing, like what Andy did in the Wimbly final. The problem is how many players now have the power like Andy has, and how long this damn power can last during a match...
I agree. Most people can not hit that hard during an entire match, especially not a 5 sets matches.

Dirk
09-18-2004, 06:50 PM
Sniffing doesn't help. He needs to blow his nose and not get his head stuffed up. He seems to get sick when it rains. It rained at Wimbly and he got sick and it rained at the Open and he got sick. Didn't get sick during the rain at Wimbly 03 though. I hope he looks into it and I'm sure he will. He was fine in Gstaad.

mitalidas
09-18-2004, 06:58 PM
I agree. Most people can not hit that hard during an entire match, especially not a 5 sets matches.

and such people will unfortunately go the Goran way, with shoulder injuries, and rotator surgeries

mitalidas
09-18-2004, 07:05 PM
Rogi in Charlie Rose show. Was great to finally get to hear it. http://www.bloomberg.com/media/tv/crose/

thanks Isy. it's such a treat!

I love the way he says "resurgent? what does that mean?". He is such a genuine guy, just the best!!!!

EDIT: there is another great interview below, Charlie Rose with Bollitieri. as nice as it is to hear Rogi "admit" to the beauty of his game, it sounds even nicer when Bollitieri gives Rogi (pre-USO 2004) the handicap to win.

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10006005&sid=a.9jiJXx0oYw&refer=charlie_rose

moonlight
09-18-2004, 10:08 PM
Amazing Federer good for the game

2004-09-15 / Knight Ridder / By Charles Bricker
A half-hour before Roger Federer was scheduled to take the Arthur Ashe Stadium court for his semifinal match with Tim Henman last Saturday, the two men were in the upstairs players lounge, competing against each other on an electronic putting game machine.

You wouldn't find Pete Sampras consorting with the enemy 30 minutes before a big match. A half-hour before a Grand Slam showdown, Andre Agassi would be in his cocoon. And Jim Courier? He would have walked into the locker room with his surly game face on. Never mind a half hour before the match.

But what we've got here in the new U.S. Open champion is a different cat, and it's a fabulous thing for tennis that he is.

He doesn't have a coach. He doesn't travel with a stringer. He doesn't have a private jet. He doesn't have a public relations consultant to filter his interview requests. There is no entourage, and he refuses to let celebrity turn him into a recluse 30 days or 30 minutes before a match.

Roger Federer is old school, a throwback, a retrofit ... whatever the operative hip phrase is these days to describe the perfect amalgamation of today's power tennis and yesterday's style and creativity.

Old master

They don't teach that sort of tennis any longer in most of the tennis academies. Walk into one of these junior tennis factories today, and you'll see 14 and 15 year old kids trying to knock the fuzz off the ball with every stroke.

Anyone that has seen Federer's heavy-wristed forehand knows he can not only knock the fuzz off the ball but bust the seams on it as well. But it's his ability to plot and strategize in the midst of a point that separates him from the pack.

Power will take one only so far these days, as Andy Roddick found out a year and a half ago. It was only after new coach Brad Gilbert taught him how to think through points that he moved from No. 10 to nearly No. 1. As Roddick has often said of his vast improvement: ``It's between the ears.''

The difference between him and Federer is that Roger recognized all that at an early age, and by the time he turned pro he had the defined style that has taken him to the top.

Why did he develop that way? ``Where I grew up, I had coaches who put a lot of effort into techniques, then into movement and tactics. And movement and tactics dominate the rest,'' he said.

There is no entourage because ``my parents and coaches throughout my career brought me up so I could travel on my own. I think it's very important when you're young. My parents never traveled with me. I've had a very simple career. I got help from the Swiss tennis federation, and I used everything they gave me,'' he explained.

Fancy footwork

Movement and tactics. They have to blend, Federer said Monday, the day after he won his fourth Grand Slam title. If, when you watch Federer play, you isolate on his feet, you'll understand what he means. Watch the feet. Watch his nimble dance along the baseline as he moves smoothly into his next shot.

There is seldom a false step or a sudden half-step at the last moment to adjust to a ball. It's as if his feet are in some perfect harmony with whatever is thrown at him.

When you can strike the ball with that sort of economy of motion, you can play tactical tennis.

As a young junior, his first idol was Boris Becker, a great power player. But friends soon suggested he watch Stefan Edberg more closely. That, I'll wager, is where Federer picked up his calmness on court. Of course he admired Sampras, but, he said, there was also Marcelo Rios. ``Rios . . . he has a beautiful game, great forehand and great touch,'' said Federer.

It's easy now to understand how all these factors began to influence the way he plays. Force and finesse. In his mind, you have to have both.

People have said he plays "beautiful" tennis. "It's nice to hear, but I don't want to be copied," said Federer, who has a way of making you laugh with his deadpan remarks.

"I'm just playing my tennis. It's very simple. There's no extra movement in my technique to make it look strange or anything. I think I've found the right balance."

Of course he'll be copied, or at least you hope he will. There's only one thing better right now in tennis than Federer's style of play. And that's Federer himself.

Skyward
09-18-2004, 10:16 PM
Great article! Thanks for posting it, Moonlight :)

Dirk
09-19-2004, 12:12 AM
AWESOME ARTICLE!!!!!!!!

RogiFan88
09-19-2004, 01:05 AM
cool that Rogi admired Rios' game cos he too was an artist but w an artist's temperament... too bad he retired... I like the guy

Daniel
09-19-2004, 09:50 AM
I dont like Rios, too bad temper :fiery:

but his game was good.

Thanks for the article moonlight :)

Fergie
09-19-2004, 12:55 PM
Roger admired Marcelo, another reason for love him more :hug:

Thanks for the nice article :yeah:

Yoda
09-19-2004, 01:43 PM
Great article moonlight.

Roger's movement was greatly enhanced by being a fantastic football (soccer) player as a junior.

Dirk
09-19-2004, 07:25 PM
He said in his Rose interview and elsewhere that about 3 years ago his trainer and him came up with the footwork plan and it would take about 2 to 3 years. Rogi commented on this before, but soccer did help him develop better cordination.

Daniel
09-20-2004, 07:33 AM
so Roger must be good playing soccer :D :bounce:

Skyward
09-20-2004, 10:05 PM
I thought that after Roger beat Agassi under ridiculous conditions, I'd never hear about him "winning pretty". But here we go again,

"We'll temper our Federer praise a bit and agree with your assertion about the French Open. Though Federer is obviously better on clay than Sampras ever was -- he's already won multiple TMS titles on dirt -- I don't like his odds at the French. Federer is a clean player who likes the conditions to be "just so." To borrow from Brad Gilbert, Federer is all about "winning pretty." Hard to see him getting dirty, grinding out five-setters against Gaston Gaudio, Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian and the like on clay."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/09/20/mailbag.0920/index.html

Fedex
09-20-2004, 11:40 PM
Oh, man, not that crap again. :rolleyes: Oh, well, what can you do. For every tangerinus in the world, there's an idiotic reporter.

Fedex
09-20-2004, 11:43 PM
He said in his Rose interview and elsewhere that about 3 years ago his trainer and him came up with the footwork plan and it would take about 2 to 3 years. Rogi commented on this before, but soccer did help him develop better cordination.
Actually, I was thinking along the same lines. I always thought soccer would have maybe something to do with his excelent footwork, as obviously that is key in soccer to have good footwork, and obviously Roger was a very god soccer player. :)

Yoda
09-21-2004, 12:09 AM
Actually, I was thinking along the same lines. I always thought soccer would have maybe something to do with his excelent footwork, as obviously that is key in soccer to have good footwork, and obviously Roger was a very god soccer player. :)


I remember the 2001 Wimbledon game against Sampras where I noticed how beautifully Federer moved around the court (instantly became a fan of his game). His movement has improved even more since then and on all surfaces but he always had that wonderful balance.

Being proficient in other sports will bring an extra dimension to your tennis.
Roddick who plays some basketball - probably helps his overhand smash.
Malisse, another one with a very good soccer background also has beautiful movement.
But then again Chela plays a bit of soccer too but moves like a donkey (sorry Chela fans) :devil:

tangerine_dream
09-21-2004, 12:38 AM
Thanks for the article, moonlight! :D

Oh, man, not that crap again. :rolleyes: Oh, well, what can you do. For every tangerinus in the world, there's an idiotic reporter.

LOL. How sweet. My very own stalker still can't stop obsessing over me. :kiss: Please continue to prove me right. I love it.

Fedex
09-21-2004, 01:03 AM
Thanks for the article, moonlight! :D



LOL. How sweet. My very own stalker still can't stop obsessing over me. :kiss: Please continue to prove me right. I love it.
Speaking of a total unoriginal thought. :rolleyes: Keep being an arse,(cant help yourself, can you?? :haha: ). Ah, since tangerinus is SO brilliant, why not a moderator for the Federer forum. Then, we will be able to keep phoney fans such as tangerinus out of this forum. I nominate either Dirk or GWH. :) GWH is espcially good with trolls like her.

Blaze
09-21-2004, 01:09 AM
I thought that after Roger beat Agassi under ridiculous conditions, I'd never hear about him "winning pretty". But here we go again,

"We'll temper our Federer praise a bit and agree with your assertion about the French Open. Though Federer is obviously better on clay than Sampras ever was -- he's already won multiple TMS titles on dirt -- I don't like his odds at the French. Federer is a clean player who likes the conditions to be "just so." To borrow from Brad Gilbert, Federer is all about "winning pretty." Hard to see him getting dirty, grinding out five-setters against Gaston Gaudio, Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian and the like on clay."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/09/20/mailbag.0920/index.html

I'm actually starting to enjoy such articles. First they started with the fact that the US open will be the last Slam Federer will win because of the noise in New York, the night games and partisan crowd. During the first week of the open, he overcame most of that. During the second week, critics still weren't convinced and said that a big night match with crowd favorite Agassi in the grueling atmosphere of New York will get to him. Even God himself was on his side when he defeated Agassi because that match had all the socalled intangibles stacked against him. He faced a very hostile crowd in the night when the worst weather during the open was looming. The next day, to leave out any doubts, he completed the match against Agassi in a worst crowd with the worst possible weather I have seen tennis played in. After that, they couldn't complain about anything else.

Now they have started with the French Open. I wish some idiotic reporter will ask him if he can sneak away with the title in Paris because that will only motivate him to win it more.

In conclusion, I have started to view such articles as motivation but what really annoys me is they fact thet they presume to know what a particular player likes or not. Since when did Rogi claim that he can't have is game any other way than perfect?

Fedex
09-21-2004, 01:10 AM
Oh, and you love what again, tangerinus?? :confused: Being an arse, obsessing over the Nalby fans?? :rolls: Feeling so insecure about your own self, you have to send spys over to the Nalbandian forum?? :haha: You are TOO funny. :haha:

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 02:02 AM
I love the way PMac was willing Rogi to lose early in the USO right fr the beginning, almost before the actual draw started... yes, because Rogi hates the heat, the humidity, the noise, the hostile crowds, the airplanes, the rain, the wind, his big Amer opponents... what else? Oh yeah, he doesn't have the "personality" to win the big USO, on AA, at night... blablablablablablablabla... ad nauseum...

You showed everyone, ROGI!! Haha!

And not one Amer in the F on the M or W's side...

The big prediction crashed: no Pandy, no Serenadog...

In fact, what, all the F had non-Amers! Incredible! How in the world can any non-English-as-a-first-language speaker or "no-personality" player actually win the "prestigious" USO?!

Well, duh, it happened...

Kinda nice to see a slow downward slide of Amers in sports in general, witness the "dream team" in Athens, the Ryder Cup results [woo hoo, Europe!!]... I'm loving it!

Thank you, ROGI!

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 02:05 AM
I thought that after Roger beat Agassi under ridiculous conditions, I'd never hear about him "winning pretty". But here we go again,

"We'll temper our Federer praise a bit and agree with your assertion about the French Open. Though Federer is obviously better on clay than Sampras ever was -- he's already won multiple TMS titles on dirt -- I don't like his odds at the French. Federer is a clean player who likes the conditions to be "just so." To borrow from Brad Gilbert, Federer is all about "winning pretty." Hard to see him getting dirty, grinding out five-setters against Gaston Gaudio, Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian and the like on clay."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/writers/jon_wertheim/09/20/mailbag.0920/index.html

Well, anyone who puts store in what Brat says is a dork... loved the look on Brat's face during the QF match that Pandy lost to Pim2... precious!

Yep, the mudslinging had begun... :rolleyes: :p ... better get used to it... bet those slangers can't wait for Rogi to crash out early at RG05... whatEver!

Fedex
09-21-2004, 02:09 AM
I love the way PMac was willing Rogi to lose early in the USO right fr the beginning, almost before the actual draw started... yes, because Rogi hates the heat, the humidity, the noise, the hostile crowds, the airplanes, the rain, the wind, his big Amer opponents... what else? Oh yeah, he doesn't have the "personality" to win the big USO, on AA, at night... blablablablablablablabla... ad nauseum...

You showed everyone, ROGI!! Haha!

And not one Amer in the F on the M or W's side...

The big prediction crashed: no Pandy, no Serenadog...

In fact, what, all the F had non-Amers! Incredible! How in the world can any non-English-as-a-first-language speaker or "no-personality" player actually win the "prestigious" USO?!

Well, duh, it happened...

Kinda nice to see a slow downward slide of Amers in sports in general, witness the "dream team" in Athens, the Ryder Cup results [woo hoo, Europe!!]... I'm loving it!

Thank you, ROGI!
Serenadog?? :haha: :rolls:

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 02:11 AM
you like my little pet name for her? cute, ain't it?!!

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 02:12 AM
as in Who let the dogs out, woof woof woof woof woof...

Billabong
09-21-2004, 02:56 AM
RF :wavey:

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 03:21 AM
Hi Billabong! Comment ca va?

Bonne nuit!

EHendrick
09-21-2004, 04:53 AM
Wait, so Wertheim, "doesn't like his odds at the French" and then later on in the Q&A says of a Federer career slam, "I'll be surprised if this doesn't happen". So I'm confused. Does he think it's possible or not? I definitely think Roger can do it. I saw him cranky and not playing pretty in Toronto and came back from vacation to see that he had won the damn thing!!

jtipson
09-21-2004, 07:16 AM
And what is this rubbish about him not being able to grind out wins on clay? This year he beat Gaudio in 3 and Coria in 4 (after losing the first set) in Hamburg. Personally I think Nalbandian would be more of a problem on clay for him, and so are the lower ranked clay specialists. But Wertheim isn't very consistent.

Oh yes, anybody else notice that someone mentioned the Sampras v Federer Wimbledon match as being 1999? Bet that will get corrected next week.

Daniel
09-21-2004, 07:36 AM
Nalbandian would be aproblem for him when David is healthy, right now David is not a problem for anyone in any surface. About Coria, Rogi beat him when so many people consider Guille the fav. to win the title and RG.

lsy
09-21-2004, 12:14 PM
I thought that after Roger beat Agassi under ridiculous conditions, I'd never hear about him "winning pretty". But here we go again,

"We'll temper our Federer praise a bit and agree with your assertion about the French Open. Though Federer is obviously better on clay than Sampras ever was -- he's already won multiple TMS titles on dirt -- I don't like his odds at the French. Federer is a clean player who likes the conditions to be "just so." To borrow from Brad Gilbert, Federer is all about "winning pretty." Hard to see him getting dirty, grinding out five-setters against Gaston Gaudio, Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian and the like on clay."



borrow from Brad Gilbert??? :haha: That guy who used to say Rogi was overrated??? :haha:

Well at least he did mention the below :

"Last Sunday, 23,000 fans watched a blow-out of a final but still felt like they got their money's worth, simply because Federer was such a joy to behold. In a weird way, I thought there was more atmosphere for the '04 final than there was the previous year when Roddick won. In '03, fans were excited that an American kid won the big prize, but it was achieved by dint of serves and forehands. Last week they were treated to an absolute virtuoso performance that displayed every shot in the book -- and a good many that aren't."

ABSOLUTELY! :yeah:

Love seeing Rogi continues to shut his critics off, Houston, AO then USO...time for FO Rogi ;)

Daniel
09-22-2004, 07:35 AM
Rogi :yeah: :bounce:

Dirk
09-22-2004, 08:11 AM
His FO arguement is crap. The only person he lost to on clay out of that bunch was David on clay in 02. Roger has improved and only the more experienced and older clay courters (Costa, Alex) and the big stars (JC, Guga, Coria) could really pose a problem for Rogi on the clay. I'm not saying Rogi will win the FO next year or even the year after but he certainly can win it. If he stays healthy and plays till his late 20s and early 30s there is no reason why Rogi can't win FO twice over along with all the other slams. Rogi is a darn good clay courter and he will only get better.

mitalidas
09-22-2004, 12:16 PM
People,

On rogi's website, there is a post "CONTROVERSIAL ARTICLE
Dear Fans

We are sorry for having caused offence by publishing the article ‘SWISS STRUGGLE TO ACCEPT SPORTING HERO OF THEIR OWN’, which is indeed controversial. We have therefore taken it off the site. "


What is this about? Did anyone read it? I was in Switzerland in the summer, and everyone loves Rogi!!!!! It is just talked about all the time, and in particular (and unfortunately) it is mentioned in the same breath as the non-love for Hingis

Mrs B? Daniel? Other Schweizers on MTF. Anyone know what this is about?

Mrs. B
09-22-2004, 12:20 PM
just read that they removed it and made me curious. no i don't have a clue but will try to find out...

Mrs. B
09-22-2004, 12:23 PM
here it is. it's from the Financial Times. :mad:


Swiss struggle to accept sporting hero of their own
By Simon Kuper
Published: September 17 2004 18:17 | Last updated: September 17 2004 18:17

The Swiss are not used to this. They rarely produce great athletes, not ones that foreigners notice anyway, but now they have a tennis player who is being described as the best ever.


Though Roger Federer is just a boy from Basle, he seems to possess every tennis stroke in its platonic form. His victory in last week's US Open was his third in this year's four grand slams. Could he be the first Swiss hero since Wilhelm Tell?

Non-Swiss readers may not be fully informed of the country's sporting heritage. Switzerland used to produce great skiers, simple men from the mountains who were popular partly because in the Swiss mind skiing is linked with the army. The skiers are no longer very good, but last year a Swiss sailing team admittedly loaded with New Zealanders won the America's Cup. Despite the local shortage of oceans, the Swiss also excel at beach volleyball.

However, none of Switzerland's sporting triumphs has had the masses dancing in their suburban roads. It is not that sort of country. “The Swiss don't love their heroes that much,” explains the Swiss ethnologist Fabrizio Sabelli. “That type of personality needs a collective complicity to be raised to the status of national hero. In Switzerland, there is no unity. Everything is fragmented, at the level of languages, cantons, communes, even bistros.”

Then along came Federer, who seemed the designer Swiss hero. He was friendly, handsome and a genius. He came from a middle-class suburb. He enjoyed the national card game of Jass. He spoke both the country's main languages, Swiss German and French, even if he rarely said anything interesting in either. “Rodscher”, as they called him locally, was often seen in the stands of the Basle football club. Admittedly his mother was South African, but this simply fitted the Swiss tradition of having roots abroad.

Here was a well-behaved young man, not an arrogant superstar like other countries produced. Die Weltwoche, weekly organ of Switzerland's German-speaking Bürger, praised Federer for reaching the top “with the virtues of the middle-class Swiss, with seriousness, solidity, politeness and a touch of hardness”.

When he won his first Wimbledon last year, the Swiss were pleased. The organisers of the Gstaad tennis tournament gave him an 800-kilogramme cow, whom he christened Juliette, prompting speculation about which former girlfriend this could refer to.

The Swiss newspaper Le Matin prayed that the “little Swiss” would not be “eaten up” by the great big world, but he never was. Just as Juliette has refused to become an international jetsetter, preferring to spend her summers in a Gstaad meadow, Federer too has stayed loyal to Switzerland. He claims the only thing he misses in the country is a beach. Whereas Martina Hingis, an earlier Swiss tennis champion, emigrated to Florida, Federer merely moved with his parents to a slightly wealthier suburb of Basle. His Mum and Dad run his business affairs. His girlfriend manages his schedule, and she is not some foreign model but a former Swiss tennis player named Mirka Vavrinec.

Next month he will dutifully return to Basle to play in the Davidoff Swiss Indoors championship. This is something of a family event: Federer was once a ballboy here, his sister a hostess, and his mother handled accreditations.

Federer has remained a Swiss patriot. When asked whether winning the US Open compensated for his failure in the Athens Olympics, he replied that he had already had his compensation: carrying the Swiss flag at the Olympic opening ceremony. He had also hung a flag from the balcony of his room in the Olympic village. Admittedly his patriotism did not extend to doing military service he got out of it by pleading a bad back but then you can't have everything. Mostly, Federer is a good boy, an appropriate hero for a country that does not like stars.

Nonetheless, he is now threatening to acquire that status. In 2003 Swiss television viewers voted him “Swiss of the Year”, which makes you wonder what they will give him this year after three grand slams. Last Sunday night some Swiss even stayed up late to watch him win the US Open. But not many did. The Swiss admire Federer, but they don't love him as they did their skiers. He is perhaps too perfect, not quite equal enough.

“Abroad, a Roger Federer would be a real star,” shrugs Sabelli. “Here people don't accord them the quality of being out of the ordinary.” The nice Swiss boy prefers it that way, or at least that is the official line.

mitalidas
09-22-2004, 12:28 PM
In 2003 Swiss television viewers voted him “Swiss of the Year”, which makes you wonder what they will give him this year after three grand slams.

How about "Federer for President" :)

I think it is just Swiss style, to be understated. Not loud like Americans in their love for their heroes. My husband is swiss, and the whole clan loves Federer but in a polite, restrained way
They clap and nod in delight when he wins on TV, while I am shouting my head off

jtipson
09-22-2004, 12:31 PM
Thanks Mrs B. It's not a terribly serious article, too full of humour for that. I wonder who objected, and to what?

SUKTUEN
09-22-2004, 12:32 PM
How about "Federer for President" :)

I think it is just Swiss style, to be understated. Not loud like Americans in their love for their heroes. My husband is swiss, and the whole clan loves Federer but in a polite, restrained way
They clap and nod in delight when he wins on TV, while I am shouting my head off

I do not understand, What problem is the article? :confused: :confused:

Mrs. B
09-22-2004, 12:40 PM
the title is misleading but it's a harmless article and one can't take one Swiss ethnologist's comment too seriously. Times have changed, i know the young players in my club go bananas while watching Roger's matches on tv. i was at the Davis Cup in Lausanne for 3 days and their cheers were definitely louder whenever Roger hit the courts. Same in Gstaad.
There's tv coverage whenever he plays, and when he won the USO, it was the headlines from most papers.

mitalidas
09-22-2004, 01:02 PM
well, it is innocuous in general.
but i guess it is inappropriate to put in on Rogi's own website, by his own web-handlers. that site is reserved for all his great accomplishments naturally, not anything that detracts.

Yoda
09-22-2004, 01:07 PM
Overall the article was positive on Rogi.
However I felt it was a little negative on the Swiss people

Dirk
09-22-2004, 07:49 PM
what a fuck!!!!!! :fiery: Federer did not get out of his military service and can do it after he retires and during his break. It would ruin his career and hurt his country to do it now. People don't love Rogi, give me a break. :fiery: You can tell I don't like the guy who wrote this up. ;)

squirrel
09-22-2004, 08:03 PM
look at this: http://nationmultimedia.com/page.news.php3?clid=9&id=121322&usrsess=1

vamos_guille
09-22-2004, 08:58 PM
about this article... I don't think I know a lot of things about swiss and Switzerland, but my grand-parents own a chalet in Valais ( french talking area) where I spend winter and summer hollidays, and one day I heard some french-swiss talking about german-swiss and making fun on them. So I wonder if; in Switzerland there is not the same problem than in Canada for example where the Quebecker don't like very much ( or simply hate) the english canadian, and they regard themselves as Quebecker and not as Canadian. So I ask the qestion to the Swiss people here... Do you regard yourselves as Swiss or german-swiss, or french-swiss if you are french-swiss ???

mitalidas
09-22-2004, 11:46 PM
I can assure you that there is indeed friction between the french-speaking swiss, and the german-speaking swiss. I know for a fact that many german-speaking swiss jokes are about the french-speaking people

vamos_guille
09-23-2004, 06:07 AM
lol, for me this is the opposite... every year I spend about a month in a french talking area of Switzerland where people joke about german-speaking swiss, and I can't bear them a grudge for doing that cause I'm french and anyway, as you say german-speaking swiss do the same things... perhaps it can explain the fact they say in the article that there is no unity in Switzerland, and that's why( perhaps) Roger is not a "Superstar" here.
But I can asurre you that, if Roger were french,for example he would be a hero in France and I could certainly compete with Zidane for the place of GOD OF FRANCE ( but not sure he would beat him, Zidane is very very very popular in France, simply the number one of the personnalities , anyway, tennis is less popular than football )

:hearts: ZIDANE PRESIDENT :hearts:

mitalidas
09-23-2004, 12:09 PM
yeah i guess if (heaven forbid) Rogi was american, he would be "Mayor for a day" in some city, probably be seen at the Oscars, have a holiday named for him, pitch a few bad drinks or shampoo or something, and been married off to aliens by the National Enquirer by now
the Swiss style is understated, but it suits Rogi so well. I think people love him there, but not in the loud way that fans in the US do

WyveN
09-23-2004, 12:39 PM
The article seems fine to me, imo Roger prefers things the way they are rather then the over the top reaction the Chilleans got for doing well at the olympics.

vamos_guille
09-23-2004, 01:43 PM
yeah i guess if (heaven forbid) Rogi was american, he would be "Mayor for a day" in some city, probably be seen at the Oscars, have a holiday named for him, pitch a few bad drinks or shampoo or something, and been married off to aliens by the National Enquirer
LOL Is it what's happening to Roddick, did he marry an alien ??? Did he make some advertising for hair gel ??? ( he needs some), you don't seem to be proud of being american mitalidas ( or perhaps it's juste me...)

Mrs. B
09-23-2004, 02:15 PM
actually Roger is one reason why the Röstigraben is irrelevant. ;)

yanchr
09-23-2004, 03:21 PM
Same ask here, how is this article so controversial that it should be removed:confused: I don't quite get it. It's just the overall style and attitude of a people, maybe different from that of other peoples who seem more along with the world trend? But there is always no rights or wrongs with different cultures, is there?

Roger not hyped up to the sky in his country? If it's the case, I just love it the way it is, though I highly doubt that Swiss are really indifferent to him generally. Actually I think it is the country like Switzerland which will produce and bring up a young talent like Roger, close to perfect in someone's word. Can you imagine Roger would be the same way like he is now particularly in terms of personality, not to mention other aspects, if he were an American?

babsi
09-23-2004, 07:49 PM
totaly agree, yanchr!

Things are not better or worse in different countries, they are just, well differnent and thank god for that.

*M*
09-23-2004, 11:22 PM
Same ask here, how is this article so controversial that it should be removed:confused: I don't quite get it. It's just the overall style and attitude of a people, maybe different from that of other peoples who seem more along with the world trend? But there is always no rights or wrongs with different cultures, is there?

Roger not hyped up to the sky in his country? If it's the case, I just love it the way it is, though I highly doubt that Swiss are really indifferent to him generally. Actually I think it is the country like Switzerland which will produce and bring up a young talent like Roger, close to perfect in someone's word. Can you imagine Roger would be the same way like he is now particularly in terms of personality, not to mention other aspects, if he were an American?
I completely agree with you.

Some people immediately reacted negatively to the article, and so the webmaster pulled it. I wish it had stayed there long enough for people to be able to re-read it, as I think some of them took it the wrong way and over-reacted. It's more a commentary on the Swiss than of Roger, and the author was making a broad, exaggerated implication that can be taken in either (or both) a positive or negative light. The only part that I didn't like was regarding the military service. I thought I read somewhere that he was going to teach or something in the off-season to fulfill his obligations.

As you say, I don't think the Swiss are indifferent to Roger. I don't live in Switzerland, so I don't know exactly how in general they regard him. But if it's true that they don't fall all over themselves for him, is that necessarily so bad? I think it's kind of a good quality to be even-keeled and not over-the-top (like Roger himself), as long as they do appreciate and respect his talents and accomplishments.

I live in the US, and here celebrities and athletes are often put up on a pedestal: "They build you up, so they can tear you down." Worse yet, some are idolized to a point where they get away with stuff most people wouldn't (*cough* OJ, *cough* Kobe). I hope Roger's life in Switzerland is a happy one, and that his celebrity there never causes him to move to another country, become a recluse, or become stuck on himself.

mitalidas
09-24-2004, 02:06 AM
a somewhat blah article. blah blah blah


"Big Red" threat to Federer express

BEIJING (Reuters) - A resurgent Marat Safin could emerge as the best hope to challenge Roger Federer's stranglehold on men's tennis -- with a little insider help.

The Russian giant won his first tournament in almost two years with a battling 7-6 7-5 victory over compatriot Mikhail Youzhny in the China Open final at the weekend.

Safin, who briefly topped the world rankings after capturing the 2000 U.S. Open, paid tribute to his Swedish coach Peter Lundgren after breaking a 22-month title drought in Beijing.

Lundgren guided world number one Federer to his first grand slam title at Wimbledon last year before they parted company in December. He has been working with Safin since April.

"This is my first title with Peter, hopefully it won't be our last together," said a tearful Safin. "It's not party time because I won."

While his talent has never been in question, Safin's work ethic has been called into doubt before.

The tempestuous Russian escaped a fine despite saying he gave up during his first-round defeat at this year's Wimbledon.

Safin created an unwanted slice of history at the 2000 Australian Open, when he became the first player to be fined for tanking, or not trying, at a grand slam tournament.

The 24-year-old, known as "Big Red" for his booming serves and imposing presence, insisted he was prepared to knuckle down and keep his famous temper in check under Lundgren.

"I know that it doesn't help me at all to get crazy with myself on the court," said Safin. "In the past sometimes I did that, threw my racket or whatever. It's no good."

FIERY TEMPERAMENT

Lundgren also coached former number one Marcelo Rios, another player with a fiery temperament.

"Lundgren worked with Rios," joked Safin. "If he can deal with Rios, then he can understand me."

Safin, who slid out of the top 50 last year after an injury-plagued season, played with a steely determination in China. Not one racket was smashed in anger.

He did not drop a set in Beijing and fought fire with fire in a pulsating final against fellow Muscovite Youzhny.

His hunger back, Safin edged above Andre Agassi into eighth spot in the ATP Champions Race after claiming his 12th title.

For now, Safin has set his sights on being one of the eight players to qualify for the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Houston.

But he warned that he could be ready to launch a real challenge to Federer in 2005.

"This year, Federer is playing incredible," said Safin, who was beaten by the all-conquering Swiss in the Australian Open final at the start of the year.

"But next year, who knows? He has to keep this level and a lot of players want to beat him and be number one. Maybe me too."

Certainly, nobody -- not Safin, Agassi or Andy Roddick -- could stop Federer in 2004 as he became the first man to win three grand slam titles in a year since Swede Mats Wilander in 1988.

With his confidence restored and his power clearly undiminished, Safin could be a serious threat to Federer next year.

"It feels great to be back," said Safin. "You forget the feeling (of winning). But I have the motivation now to work hard. I want to try to work hard and keep this feeling."

Fedex
09-24-2004, 02:20 AM
Safin's still has alot of work to do, if he is to seriously challenge Federer. I hope this win, builds more confidense, because Marat is one of the few players, that I think actually CAN have a rivalry with Rogi. ;) :)

mitalidas
09-24-2004, 03:00 AM
'Untouchable' Federer has talent to be greatest

By Nick Bollettieri
Roger Federer is the most talented tennis player I have ever seen. He has the capacity to become the greatest in history.

This conclusion isn't simply a result of his sublime victory over Lleyton Hewitt in the US Open final. It's because, uniquely in the history of tennis, in my opinion, he has no weaknesses at all and such an array of strengths that the world is his for the taking.

Such grand statements need provisos. There will always be "unknowns" that can radically affect progress. An injury could end Federer's career at any time. He may get married, have kids, change his priorities. Staying there is the hardest part. But make no mistake, Federer has it all. He is as close to tennis perfection as we have seen. Four Slam titles should just be the beginning.

Before explaining how this is different from every former "great", and I mean everyone from Laver and Emerson to Connors, Borg, McEnroe, Lendl, Sampras and Agassi, let's consider Federer's brilliance.

His service is superb: powerful, exceptional placement, varied, consistently accurate. Even serving at 25-30km/h slower than the Roddicks of this world, it can be more punishing.

His forehands are unsurpassed. He has no rival as a shotmaker. He is capable of coruscating brilliance through his ability to make any shot from any area of the court. Some of his play against Hewitt, in a 6-0, 7-6, 6-0 win that broke records galore, was simply breathtaking, with his manipulation of the ball at all angles and speeds at times appearing beyond the laws of physics.

His single-handed backhand is a rare, significant tool. His returns are awesome, flashing. His volleys are basic but executed wonderfully.

(and more at:

http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=2235877&fSectionId=1470&fSetId=505

Dirk
09-24-2004, 03:03 AM
Fedex no way. http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/otn/happy/merror.gif Peter can give him some tips but Rogi knows what can bother him out there and he knows how to adjust. Marat is a meathead and all Rogi has to do is vary the pace and direction and the change up will cause Marat to think and focus too much which will lead to him blowing a fuse. That is why Rogi beats Marat on clay so easily. Rogi can toy with him and Marat can't overpower him. Marat's beat chance is indoors. He beat Rogi in Moscow so maybe he has a great chance there.

lsy
09-24-2004, 07:08 AM
I did read that article when it was posted in Rogi's site and my first impression was :

- wow...FINALLY the webmaster is actually posting some articles of Rogi!!!
- after reading the article for the first time, I was a bit :confused: as to whether some of the things said in this article were meant as a joke and if they were, in a positive or negative way?
- some remarks as quoted below I wonder if it's too subjective or necessarily appropriate despite the writer obviously trying to be funny :


"He spoke both the country's main languages, Swiss German and French, even if he rarely said anything interesting in either."

"Admittedly his patriotism did not extend to doing military service he got out of it by pleading a bad back but then you can't have everything."

"Last Sunday night some Swiss even stayed up late to watch him win the US Open. But not many did. The Swiss admire Federer, but they don't love him as they did their skiers. He is perhaps too perfect, not quite equal enough."

“Here people don't accord them the quality of being out of the ordinary.” The nice Swiss boy prefers it that way, or at least that is the official line.

Don't get me wrong, I admittedly got tired of reading articles which had nothing new to say but only about how "perfect" or how "beautiful" his tennis is after a while :o :tape: . Refreshing to read things in a difference perspective...now I know the Swiss finds Rogi too perfect to love ;) :lol:

But I do think it's a bit inappropriate for this particular article to be posted in the front page of Rogi's official site. What's even more confusing to me is why out of all articles that the webmaster had seldom/never posted and all of a sudden when they did, they chose this in particular? Having said that I don't think they have to remove that article alltogether, they could have moved it to the press clippings section and I think that would be no problem at all.

Ok...that's my "refreshing" thoughts on this subject ;)

tangerine_dream
09-24-2004, 04:20 PM
yeah i guess if (heaven forbid) Rogi was american, he would be "Mayor for a day" in some city, probably be seen at the Oscars, have a holiday named for him, pitch a few bad drinks or shampoo or something, and been married off to aliens by the National Enquirer by now
the Swiss style is understated, but it suits Rogi so well. I think people love him there, but not in the loud way that fans in the US do

LOL. I think you're exaggerating a bit. Tim Henman's the one with Henman Hill, remember? ;) And Roger got a cow, plus a years' supply of Toblerone (the best gift anyone could ask from their country :rocker2: )

I know Roger's doing a lot of ads in Europe. I wish we could see some of them here in the states. :sad: That Wilson racket with the Williams's sisters was lame. Roger needs to be featured by himself and saying a few words.

I didn't think there was anything offensive about that article that was posted on his site and then taken down.

BTW, did anyone post the Tennis magazine and Sports Illustrated articles here yet, or in another thread? If not, I could scan them in. Love the intense-looking picture of Roger on the cover of Tennis mag, especially. :yeah:

mitalidas
09-24-2004, 04:41 PM
LOL. I think you're exaggerating a bit. Tim Henman's the one with Henman Hill, remember? ;) And Roger got a cow, plus a years' supply of Toblerone (the best gift anyone could ask from their country :rocker2: )

I didn't think there was anything offensive about that article that was posted on his site and then taken down.
:yeah:

i agree about the non-offensivity (a word in the lines of mauresmo's aggressivity) of that article. but i do think that it was a weird post for rogi's own website, which is reserved for Praise and Admiration and Facts (including his losses), but not to detract from his accomplishments

as for cow and toblerone (i did not know about the toblerone), yeah, it is a funny joke, very much in line with european humour. i believe that as an american he would have won from his "U.S. canton" you know, a fancy car, a trip to Hawaii, a meeting with GWB at the White House and a presenter at the Emmy awards, or some combination of these :o

*M*
09-24-2004, 04:51 PM
But I do think it's a bit inappropriate for this particular article to be posted in the front page of Rogi's official site. What's even more confusing to me is why out of all articles that the webmaster had seldom/never posted and all of a sudden when they did, they chose this in particular? Having said that I don't think they have to remove that article alltogether, they could have moved it to the press clippings section and I think that would be no problem at all.
It did seem to be somewhat an odd selection; however, being that this is Roger's official site I thought that maybe "someone" originally had requested that it be put there and didn't expect the reaction that it got. :shrug: I would think especially front page postings would need to some sort of approval from Roger's camp first.

lsy
09-24-2004, 05:04 PM
It did seem to be somewhat an odd selection; however, being that this is Roger's official site I thought that maybe "someone" originally had requested that it be put there and didn't expect the reaction that it got. :shrug: I would think especially front page postings would need to some sort of approval from Roger's camp first.

Seeing that Roger is not with any agents and pretty much had everything managed within his own team, I won't be surprised if his site is managed by some childhood friends :lol: though I must say I had seen quite some improvement on his site over the past year.

But yup, that's what I meant, it's a bit weird to have this article in the front page, that's all.

Dirk
09-24-2004, 06:06 PM
It used to be that way with Jerome. His site is now with a big company. It was one of things me and him talked about in Miami.

mitalidas
09-24-2004, 07:09 PM
anyone see this? backhanded compliment?

Top 10 Ways No. 2 Andy Roddick Can Gain on No. 1 Roger Federer

10. The ATP passes the rule that American players get three serves.

9. Andy goes Marat-style, filling his courtside player's box with 3-5 scantily-clad blondes to distract Fed.

8. A-Rod and Venus Williams both rocket to No. 1 after joint-authoring the book, "Losing? Hit the Ball Even Harder!"

7. Get Roddick's coach Brad Gilbert to also coach Federer, :mad: getting him to change to a two-handed backhand.

6. In a stunning press release, the ATP announces Federer will henceforth only be allowed to hit to Andy's forehand.

5. The US Open continues its policy of putting European players on during rain-forecasted days, and Americans on during the sunshine.

4. Andy and coach Brad Gilbert have another wacky skydiving adventure, this time during the 2004 US Open, unnerving the Swiss by "accidently" landing on Federer during his first round match. Attention SportsCenter.

3. Take away Roger Federer's coach...oh, nevermind. :p

2. Like the Gstaad tournament, give Federer a cow every time he wins a title, eventually distracting him with tending to the herd.

...and the No. 1 way Andy Roddick can gain on Roger Federer:

1. The ATP allows A-Rod to use the new gasoline-powered Babolat model.

RogiFan88
09-24-2004, 08:09 PM
ha ha very funny... but not too original... who wrote this?

mitalidas
09-24-2004, 10:18 PM
ha ha very funny... but not too original... who wrote this?

the correct attribution is to Richard Vach (from tennisx.com)
yeah, it is sort of lame
but the fact that an American writer recognizes that roddick would need such far-fetched measures to beat Rogi, just goes to show Rogi in a better light than ever :angel:

I used to laugh at the Rogi-andy "rivalry" but used to say (you can look back on my posts all along) that the Federer-Hewitt rivalry, was a real one. Now even that seems like a non-rivalry.... Rogi is left to compete with History!!!! Yeah

Daniel
09-24-2004, 11:44 PM
:lol: very funny

Daniel
09-25-2004, 02:19 AM
Big Red" threat to Federer express
By Alastair Himmer

Photo: Reuters
Click to enlarge

BEIJING (Reuters) - A resurgent Marat Safin could emerge as the best hope to challenge Roger Federer's stranglehold on men's tennis -- with a little insider help.

The Russian giant won his first tournament in almost two years with a battling 7-6 7-5 victory over compatriot Mikhail Youzhny in the China Open final at the weekend.

Safin, who briefly topped the world rankings after capturing the 2000 U.S. Open, paid tribute to his Swedish coach Peter Lundgren after breaking a 22-month title drought in Beijing.

Lundgren guided world number one Federer to his first grand slam title at Wimbledon last year before they parted company in December. He has been working with Safin since April.

"This is my first title with Peter, hopefully it won't be our last together," said a tearful Safin. "It's not party time because I won."

While his talent has never been in question, Safin's work ethic has been called into doubt before.

The tempestuous Russian escaped a fine despite saying he gave up during his first-round defeat at this year's Wimbledon.

Safin created an unwanted slice of history at the 2000 Australian Open, when he became the first player to be fined for tanking, or not trying, at a grand slam tournament.

The 24-year-old, known as "Big Red" for his booming serves and imposing presence, insisted he was prepared to knuckle down and keep his famous temper in check under Lundgren.

"I know that it doesn't help me at all to get crazy with myself on the court," said Safin. "In the past sometimes I did that, threw my racket or whatever. It's no good."

FIERY TEMPERAMENT

Lundgren also coached former number one Marcelo Rios, another player with a fiery temperament.

"Lundgren worked with Rios," joked Safin. "If he can deal with Rios, then he can understand me."

Safin, who slid out of the top 50 last year after an injury-plagued season, played with a steely determination in China. Not one racket was smashed in anger.

He did not drop a set in Beijing and fought fire with fire in a pulsating final against fellow Muscovite Youzhny.

His hunger back, Safin edged above Andre Agassi into eighth spot in the ATP Champions Race after claiming his 12th title.

For now, Safin has set his sights on being one of the eight players to qualify for the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Houston.

But he warned that he could be ready to launch a real challenge to Federer in 2005.

"This year, Federer is playing incredible," said Safin, who was beaten by the all-conquering Swiss in the Australian Open final at the start of the year.

"But next year, who knows? He has to keep this level and a lot of players want to beat him and be number one. Maybe me too."

Certainly, nobody -- not Safin, Agassi or Andy Roddick -- could stop Federer in 2004 as he became the first man to win three grand slam titles in a year since Swede Mats Wilander in 1988.

With his confidence restored and his power clearly undiminished, Safin could be a serious threat to Federer next year.

"It feels great to be back," said Safin. "You forget the feeling (of winning). But I have the motivation now to work hard. I want to try to work hard and keep this feeling."

lsy
09-25-2004, 05:40 PM
It used to be that way with Jerome. His site is now with a big company. It was one of things me and him talked about in Miami.

Big company? Really? I only know he has some new guy handling his PR but not sure about his site.

Well then I hope this big company can start from the small thing, like adding all the flags in the guestbook...I had read too many people complaining about that for the past year.

But midnight is a great help on Rogi's site though.

Fedex
09-25-2004, 06:20 PM
anyone see this? backhanded compliment?

Top 10 Ways No. 2 Andy Roddick Can Gain on No. 1 Roger Federer

10. The ATP passes the rule that American players get three serves.

9. Andy goes Marat-style, filling his courtside player's box with 3-5 scantily-clad blondes to distract Fed.

8. A-Rod and Venus Williams both rocket to No. 1 after joint-authoring the book, "Losing? Hit the Ball Even Harder!"

7. Get Roddick's coach Brad Gilbert to also coach Federer, :mad: getting him to change to a two-handed backhand.

6. In a stunning press release, the ATP announces Federer will henceforth only be allowed to hit to Andy's forehand.

5. The US Open continues its policy of putting European players on during rain-forecasted days, and Americans on during the sunshine.

4. Andy and coach Brad Gilbert have another wacky skydiving adventure, this time during the 2004 US Open, unnerving the Swiss by "accidently" landing on Federer during his first round match. Attention SportsCenter.

3. Take away Roger Federer's coach...oh, nevermind. :p

2. Like the Gstaad tournament, give Federer a cow every time he wins a title, eventually distracting him with tending to the herd.

...and the No. 1 way Andy Roddick can gain on Roger Federer:

1. The ATP allows A-Rod to use the new gasoline-powered Babolat model.

Those are good, but I saw them a long time ago.

Skyward
09-25-2004, 10:05 PM
From the Tennis Magazine (October issue)

Ready For His Close-Up

by Harvey Araton

America should embrace the amazing talent that is Roger Federer.


Do you know what tennis could really use in the fast-changing and ever-crowded American sports entertainment landscape? Less nationalism and more internationalism. Less hometown heroism and more ambassadors without borders. Less obsessing about how our guy is doing and more appreciation for the artist from anywhere.

Exhibit A: Roger Federer. " People here are not, or should not be, looking at where Roger from," says Rod Laver. " He's not too Swiss, or too American, or too anything. He's just one of this uncanny talents whose instincts for the game don't come along too often."

For the record, Federer is from Switzerland. But Americans should by now have recognized his grass-court predilection for serve and volley, like Pete Sampras, and his ability to dictate from the baseline, like Andre Agassi, and his talent for creating his own geometry on court, like john MacEnroe. Mix it all together, and what do you get?

" the most entertaining racquet in tennis- the magic wand", says Arlen Kantarian, the USTA's chief executive of professional tennis.

Of course, Andy Roddick is the American It Boy now that Sampras has gone and Agassi is going. Roddick as all serve and swagger, fire and forehand. But he can't orchestrate a tennis concerto the way Federer can. He won't make people pinch themselves and wonder what they just saw, as Federer did in the semis of the Pacific Life Open last spring.

That day he was deep into the third set against Agassi, who was trying to stay on serve. Leading 40-15, Agassi pulled Federer off court with a backhand, approached the net, and punched Federer's defensive reply into the open court. Then Agassi relaxed, believing, it appeared, that the point was over. This was a huge mistake against a man with the wingled feet of the ballet dancer. Federer ran the ball down and with perfect racquet preparation rifled a forehand passing shot that an astonished Agassi could only plop back with a lunging volley, setting up an easy pass for Federer. Deflated, Agassi was soon broken, aced off the court, and out of the tournament.
"What a privelege for those people to see that", Laver says.
Americans have appreciated foreign players before. They loved Laver. Borg never won the US Open, but his mystique carried across the NA. Rafter was a matinee idol.

Will Federer ever catch on with the american public?Hopefully, but it will take time. He has to continue to play well and build on his foundation of greatness before the American marketing machine embraces him and may be even realizes that focusing on the homeboys and homegirls is a shortsighted strategy. To grow the game, eyes must be opened and borders must be crossed. A rare player like Roger Federer should be globally celebrated because such talent, like art, belongs to us all.

LCeh
09-25-2004, 10:10 PM
Thanks a lot for the post Skyward. I am glad Roger really is getting the attention he deserves, but hopefully this won't distract his training and practice. :o

BTW, lsy, whenever I read your posts now I feel like I am reading my own posts because of your avatar. :lol:

Blaze
09-25-2004, 10:14 PM
Nice article :)

Dirk
09-25-2004, 10:19 PM
Perfect article. :)

lunahielo
09-26-2004, 01:29 AM
Wonderful article.
Thanks. :)

mitalidas
09-26-2004, 02:51 AM
We embrace Harvey Araton

lsy
09-26-2004, 03:26 PM
Great article Skyward! :yeah:

What's funny for me though is having read all these tennis related articles for the past year, it's becoming really entertaining to read how they change tunes every now and then.

Previously:
Foreign top players are too boring, no personalities, fans can't relate to them therefore don't like watching them which is why focus are all on the local players

After the phenomenal year Roger has had especially "sneaking" away the USO trophy, it is

Now:
American marketing focusing on the homeboys and homegirls had been a shortsighted strategy

and best of all Roger is now "an art that belongs to us all" :haha:

Well done Roger! Once again, he let his racquet do the "promoting" for him ;)

Ok...sorry I should just enjoy the article instead of making fun of it...just can't help it :lol: :tape:

I have the same feeling, LCeh... :o

lsy
09-29-2004, 05:06 PM
Hey all!!!

I was on msn and then all of a sudden....*tink*....you're received a mail from.............................ROGER FEDERER!!!!!!

:woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

It's his latest newsletter! Hope you all received it too!

ytben
09-29-2004, 05:52 PM
What a great newsletter!!!! The best so far, although the one before this is really close behind. Really can tell from Rogi's pespective his whole journey in USO, his excitement his happiness. So in depth too :D :D :D

And he signed it:
"Take care, bis bald, à bientôt
Your Roger" :angel:

btw what is bis bald, à bientôt mean? :o I think à bientôt = much loved?

lsy
09-29-2004, 06:09 PM
Maybe some of you haven't gotten it, so here you go :D

I think it's a great one too and once again he's telling lots of how he feels...I'll read it again tomorrow, too sleepy now....

Enjoy!

=======================================


Contents

1. Hi, tennis fans
2. My diary
3. A flying visit to California and on tour in Asia
4. My first steps
5. Your suggestions for the improvement of my website



1. Hi, tennis fans

Flushing Meadows, September 13, 2004, just after 7 p.m.: Lying flat on Centre
Court I look up to the darkening sky for a brief moment when a thought suddenly
strikes my mind: Now the world is yours! If you can make it in New York you can
make it anywhere. Next thing I know my emotions are overwhelming and I am
fighting
back my tears ( :hug: Rogi...to think there are idiots who think you over-reacted after winning :rolleyes: ).
I see clearly again and get up for the shake-hands with Lleyton.

I have just achieved the third Grand Slam victory this year a few seconds ago!
Amazing, unreal. I suppose I would have laughed at anyone having predicted such
a success beginning of this year. I had definitely set the goal of confirming
my great performance in 2003 and maybe even celebrating the one or other victory
in addition to that. But now this! I certainly would never had imagined this
to ever become reality, not even in my wildest dreams. Coming to think of it:
every single one of the Grand Slams has its very own history. The victory at
the Australian Open was incredibly important to me as I was not quite certain
how the separation from my coach Peter Lundgren just two months earlier would
affect my game. Taking home the cup in Melbourne was then proof to me that it
can also be done without the support of a coach. Repeating the victory in
Wimbledon
this year confirmed that I am able to handle the enormous pressure of being the
number one favourite out there. And now the title in the vibrant arena of
Flushing
Meadows, the highest of blessings in the American world of tennis. Obviously
I am now constantly being asked by the media when I am planning to conquer
Roland
Garros. Well, that is certainly one of my main goals and I will give all I've
got to get there. But I will not put myself under pressure.

I was highly motivated to make up for the disappointing performance at the
Olympic
Games. I had arrived in New York early in order to prepare intensely for the
US Open. The week before the tournament I gave a few interviews for CNN, USA
Networks, New York Times, USA Today and Sports Illustrated which had been
arranged
beforehand. The reason for giving these interviews is not only because working
with the media is just part of the job, it is much more my desire to contribute
to the promotion of tennis in the US. I also took part in sponsor's events by
Wilson, Nike and Maurice Lacroix, my watch-sponsor. Participating in the
Nike-Kids
Day on the Saturday before the Open was great fun. Of course Mirka and I also
wanted some entertainment on our own, so we enjoyed the musicals “The Beauty
and the Beast” as well as “The Boy from Oz” on Broadway.

Well, this might sound like I did not train at all before the US Open! That was
definitely not the case, as you can imagine. I still had more than enough time
to practice on a daily basis and get used to the specific conditions in Flushing
Meadows. Having this time at my disposition gave me a lot of confidence for the
challenges yet to come. And my feeling was confirmed right from the beginning
of the tournament, starting with a clear victory over the experienced Albert
Costa. And it continued in a smooth way round after round. You know me: As soon
as I am really into a tournament I start feeling more and more confident. The
match against Agassi then certainly was a key to my further success. Winning
the match was not just a victory against one of the greatest tennis players of
all times, it was also a victory against my former weakness of getting
distracted
by difficult conditions. Rain delay on the first day, strong winds on the
second.
The quarter final at the US Open 2004 is one of the matches I will never ever
forget; a milestone for my development as a tennis player. Believe me, just five
years ago I would have gone crazy with a wind like that, I would probably never
have managed to get my game together properly. Anyway, I managed to put all this
aside and was able to defeat Andre in five sets. That gave me an enormous amount
of mental strength for the final weekend. With all due respect for Tim Henman's
game I was now able to approach the semi-final in a much more confident way.
But then the evening before the final my throat started aching. Going to bed
I hoped that it would not get any worse. Unfortunately I got up the next morning
with a rather bad cold. But what a relief when I noticed that it was not all
that bad after all. There was one further thing that was different: I had always
had at least one day off between the matches during the entire tournament -
except
for the final! So I also felt a bit tired and had a strange feeling, not having
had enough time to prepare for Lleyton's game mentally. It was clear that I
needed
to play a perfect match and I was also aware of the fact that my name would
appear
in the hall of fame should I manage to take home the title. I suppose it was
the strong confidence as well as the looseness I had gained from the match
against
Agassi which helped me right from the start. I played like I very rarely do and
managed to hit the balls in an almost perfect way in the first set. This gave
me the certainty of being able to win the tournament already this year. The key
to my victory was then the tie-break in the second set.

And then I experienced the toughest after-match of my career: The Monday after
the final I - who love nothing more than sleeping in :lol:- was invited to three
morning TV-shows. I was on “Cold Pizza” at ESPN, visited the “Early Show” in
the CBS Studios and was already in “Regis and Kelly” at 9.30 a.m. I dashed off
to a photo shooting at Times Square at 11 a.m., then had lunch with media in
the Hard Rock Café, enjoyed a chat with John McEnroe, which I had been looking
forward to very much. John's wittiness and competence in tennis is just amazing
and he is so much fun talking to. To finish off my amazing tour I starred in
the Charlie Rose TV-Show. I must say that the whole media circus, the American
way, was a most interesting experience and somehow different to anything I had
experienced before. In other cities the celebrities from the show-business come
to visit you. Here in New York you tour around yourself and I found it extremely
exciting to compare the shows with the ones I know from different countries all
over the world.


2. My diary

After the victory in Wimbledon and my first ATP-title on Swiss soil in Gstaad
I enjoyed my holidays in Dubai to the fullest. I do love warm climates, but at
47 degrees Celcius air temperature and 37 degrees water temperature it was
almost
too hot for my liking. I relaxed on the beach with Mirka, enjoyed plenty of
wellness
and indulged in doing nothing at all. I slept for long hours, sometimes even
during the day. Pure relaxation, as you can see! My most sportily activity in
Dubai was in a car - on the new Formula 1 track they are building.

Because I am on the road so often I wanted to spend some time at home and also
deal with some business matters after my holidays. That was the reason for my
rather late arrival in Toronto, making my victory at the Canadian Open just the
more surprising! It had been a perfect week right from the beginning. I focussed
entirely on the matches and hardly did anything next to playing tennis, merely
going to the cinema twice („Spiderman 2“ and „The Bourne Supremacy“) and
enjoying
the excellent food in a variety of Japanese restaurants in Toronto.
Unfortunately Cincinnati did not work out at all. Given the fact that Hrbaty
played a really good match the defeat was not too hard to deal with.

The Olympic Games in Athens were a wonderful event. Being able to march into
the stadium with the Swiss delegation and carrying the flag for my home country
was one of the most impressive experiences in my life. It was also extremely
moving to see all the other delegations, proudly representing their countries
in such a colourful way. I had the strong feeling of belonging to one huge,
international
family in just that moment. The atmosphere in Athens was very relaxed and it
was a great occasion to meet sportsmen and -women from all kinds of countries
and disciplines. I was able to meet Carl Lewis, amongst many others.
Unfortunately
my experiences on the tennis court were not quite as encouraging. The bitter
defeat against unleashed Tomas Berdych was not easy to take at first. But with
a couple of weeks of distance and my triumph at the US Open I am now able to
look back and consider the early out at the Olympics as a good experience which
I can learn from. I am already looking forward to the next Games in Beijing in
four years time.


3. A flying visit to California and on tour in Asia

After the marathon with the media in New York I took a week off in California.
It was my first visit to Los Angeles and Hollywood. Thanks to my excellent
contacts
to Arthur Cohn, a film producer from my home city Basel and six-time Oscar
winner,
Mirka and I had the opportunity to meet movie legend Kirk Douglas and the
magician
David Copperfield. And we even coincidentally met Danny de Vito in the street.
I don't admire all these people just because they are celebrities but because
they have come all this way and are strong personalities.

The week in the Sunshine State was perfect to loosen the tension after the US
Open and also take my mind off tennis. I am now really looking forward to
playing
tennis again and also travelling around in Asia a bit. The Masters in Shanghai
three years ago has been my first real tournament in Asia. I don't know these
areas of the world all that well yet but the impressions I have had until now
have only been positive. I admire their enthusiastic way as well as their warmth
and hospitality. And of course I love the Asian cuisine, especially the light
Japanese way of cooking. I am looking forward to learning a lot more about this
fascinating continent. (and the people here are really looking forward to see more of you too Rogi :yeah: )
I will certainly keep you updated on all the details of
my trip and the tournament in Bangkok in my next newsletter.


4. My first steps

At the age of 6, I played for the fun of it. I could never really get enough.
I played with my parents, friends and whoever wanted to play with me at the
tennis
club. If there was no one to play with I would spend hours smacking tennis balls
against the tennis wall. Already then I was told to have excellent coordination
skills, not only in tennis. As a matter of fact I had a flair for all different
kinds of sports and tried skateboarding, basketball, table-tennis, badminton,
football, wrestling (Rogi...wrestler :scared: NO WAY!), skiing, swimming and I spent hours playing softball tennis
on the street. But my favourite game next to tennis definitely was football.
My parents considered football a perfect balance for team sport and fitness.
So I practiced both sports for a long time, not able to decide which one of the
two I wanted to focus on. But then, at the age of twelve, I chose tennis.

I started having tennis group practice at the age of 9, i.e. three times a week
(2 x 2 hours and 1 x one and a half hours), and an occasional private lesson.
Fixed private coaching started at the age of 10, one lesson of 40 minutes
weekly.
I regularly played tournaments over the weekends. At the age of 12 I had one
hour of fitness training weekly.

I became Junior Champion in all age groups in Switzerland and was selected to
join the Swiss National Tennis Center in the French-speaking Ecublens (at the
time) run by the Swiss Tennis Federation in order to fully concentrate on tennis
at the age of 14. I had tennis training or fitness/coordination training about
2 hours daily.
This continued until I finished school and became a professional at the age of
16. From then on I started playing more and more international junior
tournaments
and was away quite often. Blocks of fitness and tennis training were arranged
according to my annual tennis tournament schedule. Until I became a professional
the tennis, fitness and tournament planning was done in coordination with the
Swiss Tennis Federation, the coaches, fitness trainers and my parents.

I was already told at an early age that I had great talent. However, talent
alone
does not make good tennis player. Once I made it successfully to the ATP tour
in 1998 I began working even harder on specific aspects of my game. I
continually
improved my technique, optimised my footwork and developed more strength. This
process of constant technical and physical development still continues today.
There is still room for improvement in different areas.


5. Your suggestions for the improvement of my website

In my last newsletter I had asked you for your comments on my website. I would
like to thank you for the large number of comments, compliments and critical
remarks! The variety of suggestions is large: more pictures, an improved photo
gallery, more interviews and newspaper-articles on me, live-results, easier
navigation,
more information and pictures on my youth, a French version of the website
additionally
to the English and German one etc.
We have taken them all into account and have started implementing a few all
ready,
as you most probably have noticed. Our aim is clearly to offer all of you a
platform
meeting your needs. One thing is certain: There are a lot of exciting changes
to come! :woohoo: Can't wait!


Take care, bis bald, à bientôt
Your Roger




************************************************** ***

Inhalt

1. Liebe Fans, liebe Tennisfreunde
2. Mein Tagebuch
3. Eine Stippvisite in Kalifornien und unterwegs in Asien
4. Mein Einstieg ins Tennis
5. Eure Verbesserungsvorschläge für meine Website




1. Liebe Fans, liebe Tennisfreunde

Flushing Meadows, 13. September 2004, kurz nach 19 Uhr: Ausgestreckt auf dem
Center Court liegend blicke ich einen kurzen Augenblick in den eindunkelnden
Himmel über mir und plötzlich schiesst mir ein Gedanke durch den Kopf: Jetzt
gehört dir die Welt! Wer es in New York schafft, der schafft es überall. Dann
überkommen mich die Gefühle, ich kämpfe mit den Tränen. Ich fasse mich wieder
und stehe für das Shake-Hands mit Lleyton auf.

Ich habe vor wenigen Sekunden den dritten Grand Slam-Sieg in diesem Jahr
errungen!
Unglaublich, unwirklich. Wer mir einen solchen Erfolg Anfang Jahr prophezeit
hätte, den hätte ich wohl ausgelacht. Ich habe mir zwar vorgenommen, mein
bereits
ausgezeichnetes Tennisjahr 2003 zu bestätigen und vielleicht sogar noch eins
draufzusetzen. Aber dies! Nein, nicht in meinen kühnsten Träumen hätte ich mir
das ausmalen können. Wenn ich mir das so überlege: jeder der drei Grand Slams
hat seine eigene Geschichte. Der Sieg am Australian Open war unheimlich wichtig
für mich, weil ich doch etwas verunsichert war, wie sich die Trennung von meinem
Coach Peter Lundgren nur zwei Monate vorher auf mein Spiel auswirken würde. Der
Gewinn des Pokals in Melbourne zeigte mir dann aber, dass es auch ohne Coach
machbar ist. Die Wiederholung des Wimbledonsiegs dieses Jahr war für mich die
Bestätigung, dass ich mit dem grossen Druck, der Nummer Eins Favorit zu sein,
umgehen kann. Und nun der Titel im Hexenkessel von Flushing Meadows, die höchste
Weihe in der amerikanischen Tenniswelt überhaupt. Natürlich werde ich nun von
den Medien ständig gefragt, wann ich Roland Garros erobere. Klar ist das ein
grosses Ziel von mir und ich werde mein Bestes geben, um es auch zu erreichen.
Aber unter Druck setzen lasse ich mich deswegen nicht.

Nach meinem enttäuschenden Abschneiden an den Olympischen Spielen war ich hoch
motiviert, in New York die Scharte Athen auszuwetzen. Ich war früh nach New York
gereist, um mich intensiv auf das US Open vorbereiten zu können. In der Woche
vor dem Turnierstart gab ich einige im Voraus eingefädelte Interviews für CNN,
USA Networks, New York Times, USA Today und Sports Illustrated. Ich mache das
nicht nur, weil Medienarbeit einfach dazugehört, sondern ich möchte auch meinen
Beitrag zur Promotion des Tennis in den USA leisten. Neben diesen Medienterminen
nahm ich noch an Sponsoren-Events von Wilson, Nike und meinem Uhrensponsor
Maurice
Lacroix teil. Vor allem die Teilnahme am Nike-Kids Day am Samstag vor dem
Turnier
machte mir unheimlich Spass. Natürlich wollte ich mir auch noch etwas
Unterhaltung
nur für mich und Mirka gönnen. Deshalb haben wir noch die Broadway-Shows „The
Beauty and the Beast“ und „The Boy from Oz“ besucht.

Das alles klingt jetzt so, als ob ich gar nicht trainiert hätte vor dem US Open!
Dem war natürlich nicht so. Ich hatte noch genügend Zeit, jeden Tag auf dem
Platz
Bälle zu schlagen und mich an die speziellen Bedingungen in Flushing Meadows
zu gewöhnen. Diese Akklimatisationszeit gab mir viel Sicherheit und stimmte mich
zuversichtlich für die bevorstehenden Herausforderungen. Der Einstieg ins
Turnier
mit einem glatten Sieg gegen den Routinier Albert Costa klappte denn auch sehr
gut. Und dann ging es Runde für Runde weiter. Ihr kennt mich ja: wenn ich einmal
so richtig im Turnier bin, dann fühle ich mich immer wohler und sicherer. Der
Match gegen Agassi war für mich dann wirklich die grosse Knacknuss. Dieser Sieg
war nicht nur ein Sieg gegen einer der grössten Tennisspieler aller Zeiten,
sondern
auch ein Sieg gegen meine einstige Schwäche, mich von widrigen äusseren
Bedingungen
irritieren zu lassen. Am ersten Tag Regenunterbrechungen, am zweiten Tag
Sturmböen.
Das Viertelfinale ist eines der Spiele, das ich nie mehr vergessen werde, ein
Meilenstein für meine Weiterentwicklung als Tennisspieler. Ich kann euch sagen,
noch vor fünf Jahren wäre ich bei einem solchen Wind ausgerastet, da hätte ich
mit Sicherheit kein vernünftiges Spiel zustande gebracht. Ich konnte all dies
nun aber auf die Seite schieben und Andre in fünf Sätzen besiegen. Das gab mir
unheimlich Selbstvertrauen für das Finalwochenende. Mit allem Respekt vor den
Stärken von Tim Henman konnte ich nun lockerer dem Halbfinale entgegensehen.
Am Abend vor dem Final machte sich dann aber eine Erkältung bemerkbar. Ich hatte
Halsschmerzen. Ich ging ins Bett und hoffte, dass es nicht noch schlimmer werden
würde. Am Morgen wachte ich dann so richtig verschnupft auf. Ich spürte aber
bald, dass es doch nicht so schlimm war. Was für eine Erleichterung! Es kam noch
etwas dazu: Ich hatte während des ganzen Turniers mindestens einen Tag Pause
zwischen den Spielen - ausser vor dem Final! Ich fühlte mich also auch noch
etwas
schlecht erholt und hatte ein mulmiges Gefühl, da ich kaum genügend Zeit hatte,
mich mental auf Llyetons Spiel vorzubereiten. Ich wusste, dass ich gegen ihn
einen perfekten Match spielen musste und mir war auch klar, dass ich Eingang
in die Rekordbücher finden würde, falls ich siegen sollte. Wahrscheinlich halfen
mir dann meine steigende Form und die neu gewonnene Lockerheit aus dem
Agassi-Spiel.
Im ersten Satz traf ich jeden Ball, ich spielte wie ich nur sehr selten spielen
kann. Das gab mir die endgültige Gewissheit, den Titel bereits in diesem Jahr
holen zu können. Der Gewinn des Tiebreaks im zweiten Satz war schliesslich der
Schlüssel zum Sieg.

Und dann erlebte ich den intensivsten „After-Match“ in meiner bisherigen
Karriere:
Am Montag nach dem Final wurde ich zu drei TV-Morgenshows eingeladen - ich, der
nichts lieber macht, als lange auszuschlafen! - um 7.30 Uhr war ich Gast bei
ESPN in der Show „Cold Pizza“. Eine Stunde später trat ich dann in den CBS
Studios
bei der „Early Show“ und um 9.30 Uhr bereits live bei Regis und Kelly auf, wo
ich sogar bei einem Tischtennis-Match herausgefordert wurde. Danach ging es um
11 Uhr für ein Fotoshooting ab zum Times Square, dann zum Lunch mit Medien im
Hard Rock Café und anschliessend ein längerer TV-Talk mit John McEnroe, worauf
ich mich ganz speziell freute. John hat soviel Witz und Tenniskompetenz, dass
es einfach immer Spass macht, mit ihm zu plaudern. Zum Abschluss dieses
unglaublichen
Tages reichte es dann noch für einen letzten Auftritt in der Charlie Rose Show.
Dieser Medienrummel à l'Américaine war eine hochinteressante Erfahrung und
irgendwie
anders als alles Bisherige, das ich erlebt habe. In anderen Städten kommen die
Prominenten ans Turnier, um mit einem zu sprechen. Hier in New York macht man
selbst die Runde und ich fand es äusserst spannend, die Art der Shows mit
denjenigen
anderer Länder vergleichen zu können.


2. Mein Tagebuch

Nach dem Wimbledonsieg und meinem ersten ATP-Titel auf Schweizer Boden am Swiss
Open in Gstaad genoss ich meine Ferien in Dubai in vollen Zügen. Ich liebe hohe
Temperaturen, mit 47 Grad Luft- und 37 Grad Wassertemperatur - so etwas hatte
ich noch nie erlebt - war es mir dann aber doch fast etwas zu heiss. Ich
entspannte
mich mit Mirka am Strand, gönnte mir etwas Wellness und frönte das Nichtstun.
Ich schlief extrem viel, teilweise auch tagsüber. Erholung pur also. Meine
sportlichste
Aktivität in Dubai leistete ich mit einer Runde - mit dem Auto
selbstverständlich!
- auf der neuen Formel 1 Piste.

Weil ich so oft auf Achse bin, wollte ich nach meinen Ferien noch etwas Zeit
zu Hause verbringen und einige geschäftliche Dinge erledigen. Ich bin dann
relativ
spät ans nächste Turnier in Toronto angereist. Daher war es für mich auch eher
überraschend, dass ich den Titel am Canadian Open holte. Es war von Beginn weg
einfach eine perfekte Woche. Ich konzentrierte mich voll auf das Turnier, ging
lediglich zweimal ins Kino („Spiderman 2“ und „The Bourne Supremacy“) und ass
mich durch die vielen guten japanischen Restaurants in Toronto. In Cincinnati
klappte es dann aber überhaupt nicht. Da Hrbaty aber einen wirklich guten Match
lieferte, konnte ich die Niederlage verschmerzen.

Die Olympischen Spiele in Athen waren ein wunderbares Erlebnis. Mit der
Schweizer
Delegation ins Stadion einmarschieren zu können und dabei die Fahne für mein
Heimatland zu tragen, war für mich eine der eindrücklichsten Erfahrungen in
meinem
Leben. Bewegend fand ich aber auch, allen anderen Delegationen zuzuschauen, wie
sie stolz und mit ihren oft farbenprächtigen Kleidern ihre Länder vertraten.
In diesem Moment hatte ich wirklich das Gefühl, dass wir Athleten alle einer
grossen Familie angehören. Die Atmosphäre in Athen war relaxt und man traf viele
Sportler aus verschiedensten Disziplinen und Länder. So traf ich beispielsweise
auch Carl Lewis an. Weniger erfreulich waren meine Erlebnisse auf dem
Tennisplatz.
Die bittere Niederlage gegen den entfesselten Tomas Berdych machte mir zuerst
schon zu schaffen. Aber mit der Distanz von ein paar Wochen und meinem Triumph
am US Open betrachte ich das frühe Aus bei Olympia als gute Erfahrung. Ich freue
mich jetzt schon auf die Spiele in Peking in vier Jahren.


3. Eine Stippvisite in Kalifornien und unterwegs in Asien

Nach dem Medienmarathon in New York schaltete ich eine Ferienwoche in
Kalifornien
ein. Es war mein erster Besuch von Los Angeles und Hollywood. Dank den guten
Kontakten von Arthur Cohn, einem Filmproduzenten aus meiner Heimatstadt Basel
und sechsfacher Oscar-Preisträger, hatten Mirka und ich die Gelegenheit, die
Filmlegende Kirk Douglas und den Zauberer David Copperfield zu treffen. Auf der
Strasse trafen wir dann noch zufällig den Schauspieler Danny de Vito an.

Die Woche im Sonnenstaat Kalifornien war perfekt für mich, um die Anspannung
nach dem US Open zu lösen und etwas Abstand zum Tennis zu gewinnen. Jetzt freue
mich wieder richtig aufs Tennisspielen und die Reise durch Asien. Das Masters
in Shanghai vor drei Jahren war ja bisher mein einziges richtiges Turnier im
asiatischen Raum. Ich kenne diese Weltregion noch nicht so gut, aber die wenigen
Eindrücke, die ich bis jetzt erhielt, waren ausschliesslich positiv. Ich mag
die Begeisterungsfähigkeit der Menschen, aber auch ihre Wärme und
Gastfreundschaft.
Und natürlich liebe ich die asiatische Küche, vor allem die leichte japanische
Küche hat es mir angetan. Ich freue mich darauf, noch viel mehr über diesen
faszinierenden
Kontinent kennen zu lernen. In meinem nächsten Newsletter werde ich ausführlich
über meine Erlebnisse während meiner Asienreise und dem Turnier in Bangkok
berichten.



4. Mein Einstieg ins Tennis

Als ich sechs Jahre alt war, spielte ich aus purem Vergnügen Tennis. Ich konnte
nicht genug kriegen davon. Ich spielte mit meinen Eltern, mit Kollegen, mit
Bekannten,
einfach mit allen, die im Tennisclub mit mir ein paar Bälle schlagen wollten.
Und wenn es niemanden gab, der mit mir spielte, verbrachte ich Stunden damit,
Tennisbälle gegen die Wand zu hämmern. Bereits zu diesem Zeitpunkt wurde mir
gesagt, dass ich über überdurchschnittliche koordinative Fähigkeiten verfüge
- und dies nicht nur im Tennis. Ich liebte es, alle möglichen Sportarten
auszuprobieren.
So war ich beim Skateboarden, Basketball, Tischtennis, Badminton, Fussball,
Wrestling,
Skifahren oder Schwimmen anzutreffen. Neben Tennis spielte ich aber am liebsten
Fussball. Dieser Mannschaftssport bildete den perfekten Ausgleich zum
Individualsport
Tennis. Lange konnte ich mich nicht entscheiden, auf welche der beiden
Sportarten
ich setzen sollte. Als ich dann aber zwölf Jahre alt war, fiel meine
Entscheidung
aufs Tennis.

Mit neun Jahren begann ich mit Gruppentraining. Dabei hatte ich dreimal pro
Woche
Tennistraining, zweimal à zwei Stunden und einmal eineinhalb Stunden,
gelegentlich
kamen auch Privatstunden dazu. Wöchentliche Privatstunden à 40 Minuten nahm ich
ab zehn Jahren. Ich spielte nun auch regelmässig an den Wochenenden Turniere.
Mit zwölf Jahren kam noch eine Stunde Fitnesstraining einmal in der Woche dazu.


Weil ich bereits als Junior erfolgreich war (Schweizer Meister in allen
Altersgruppen),
erhielt ich im Alter von 14 Jahren die Möglichkeit, mich am Nationalen Tennis
Zentrum im französischsprachigen Eclubens voll aufs Tennis konzentrieren zu
können.
Dort erhielt ich täglich während zwei Stunden Tennis- oder
Fitness/Koordinationstraining.
Mit 16 Jahren schloss ich die Schule ab und entschied mich für eine
Profikarriere.
Damit begann auch die Zeit, in der ich vermehrt internationale Juniorenturniere
bestritt und viel unterwegs war. Nun wurden auch Trainingsblöcke für Kondition
und Tennis anhand meines Turnierkalenders festgelegt. Bis ich Profisportler
wurde,
planten der Schweizer Tennisverband, meine Tennis- und Konditionstrainer sowie
meine Eltern die Trainings und Turniere.

Mir wurde schon früh gesagt, dass ich grosses Talent besässe. Doch Talent allein
genügt nicht. Als ich es 1998 in die ATP Tour schaffte, begann ich mehr und mehr
gezielt an meinem Spiel zu arbeiten. Auch jetzt noch feile ich kontinuierlich
an meiner Technik, optimiere die Beinarbeit, trainiere meine Schnellkraft etc.
Dieser Prozess der ständigen Weiterentwicklung ist nie abgeschlossen. Ich sehe
auch jetzt noch einige Steigerungsmöglichkeiten in meinem Spiel.

5. Eure Verbesserungsvorschläge für meine Website

Im letzten Newsletter hatten wir euch um eure Meinung zu meiner Website gebeten.
Wir danken euch für die grosse Anzahl Kommentare, Komplimente und Kritiken! Die
Palette eurer Vorschläge ist umfassend: Mehr Bilder, eine einfacher zu
bedienende
Photogallerie, mehr Interviews und Zeitungsartikel über mich, Zwischenresultate
meiner Spiele, eine einfachere Navigation, mehr Informationen und Bilder aus
meiner Jugendzeit, neben der deutschen und englischen Version der Website auch
eine Version auf Französisch etc.
Wir haben alle eure Vorschläge aufgenommen und uns teilweise bereits an deren
Umsetzung gemacht, wie ihr sicherlich feststellen konntet. Unser Ziel ist es
ganz klar, euren Bedürfnissen gerecht zu werden und euch eine Plattform zu
bieten,
welche euren Wünschen entspricht. Wir können euch jetzt schon mitteilen: Ihr
könnt noch viel Neues erwarten!

Bis bald, à bientôt, take care
Euer Roger




************************************************** ***

Contenu

1. Chers fans, chers amis du tennis,
2. Mon journal
3. Visite rapide en Californie
4. Mes premiers pas
5. Vos propositions pour mon site web




1. Chers fans, chers amis du tennis,

Flushing Meadows, le 13 septembre 2004, juste après 19h, allongé les bras et
les jambes ouvertes sur le Center Court je lève mes yeux au ciel sombrant pour
un bref moment. Tout à coup une pensée me traverse la tête : maintenant le monde
t'appartient ! Si on réussit à New York, on réussit presque partout. Et là mes
émotions me rattrapent et je me bats contre mes larmes. Je reviens à moi, me
lève et me prépare pour le shake-hands avec Lleyton.

Je viens, depuis quelques petites secondes, de gagner le 3ème titre du Grand
Chelem cette année. Incroyable, irréaliste ! Si quelqu'un m'aurait anticipé
cette
victoire, je me serais foutu de lui ! J'ai certes planifié de confirmer cette
superbe bonne année de tennis passée et même d'en faire plus. Mais comme ceci
? Non jamais, même pas dans mes rêves les plus fous et les plus profonds que
je me suis fais. Quand j'y pense : chaque Grand Chelem a sa propre histoire.
La victoire à l'Open d'Australie était extrêmement importante pour moi, car je
n'étais pas très sûr de moi par cause de la séparation de mon entraîneur Peter
Lundgren deux mois avant, et je ne savais pas comment ceci allait influencer
mon jeu. Mais la victoire m'a confirmée que c'est aussi faisable sans coach.
La victoire que j'ai de nouveau gagnée au Wimbledon m'a montré que j'étais apte
à gérer la pression de devoir toujours être le favori. Et maintenant le titre
à Flushing Meadows, le plus grand événement dans le monde du tennis américain
! Naturellement les médias me demandent sans cesse quand je vais conquérir
Roland
Garros. C'est certainement un grand but et je ferais mon mieux pour y arriver
un jour. Mais je ne me laisserai pas me mettre la pression.

Après ma décevante partie aux Jeux Olympiques j'étais très motivé de tout donner
à New York. J'étais venu très en avance pour pouvoir me préparer à fond pour
l'US Open. Une semaine avant le tournoi j'ai donné quelques interviews : CNN,
USA Networks, New York Times, USA Today et Sports Illustrated. À coté de ces
rendez-vous des médias, j'ai également participé à des évènements de mes
sponsors
Wilson, Nike et Maurice Lacroix. J'ai surtout apprécié le Nike Kids-Day auquel
j'ai participé samedi avant le tournoi. Je voulais tout de même avoir un peu
de distraction pour moi et Mirka, et comme cela nous sommes allés voir deux
spectacles
du Broadway (« The Beauty and the Beast » et « The Boy from Oz »).

Ça a l'air comme si je ne me serais pas du tout entraîné avant l'US Open !
Naturellementt
ce n'était pas le cas. J'avais encore assez de temps pour lancer des balles sur
le court et pour m'habituer aux conditions spéciales de Flushing Meadows. Cette
acclimatation m'a donné beaucoup de sûreté et d'assurance pour ce défi à venir.
L'entrée dans le tournoi a très bien marchée avec une victoire comme sur des
roulettes contre le routinier Albert Costa. Et puis ça a continué tour après
tour. Vous me connaissez : une fois que je suis à fond dans le tournois je me
sens de plus en plus sûr et de mieux en mieux. Le match contre André Agassi
était
pour moi vraiment le top ! Cette victoire n'était pas seulement une victoire
contre l'un des plus grands joueurs de tennis de tous les temps mais aussi une
victoire contre mon point faible d'autrefois de me laisser irriter par des
conditions
venant de l'extérieur. Le premier jour, interruption par cause de pluie. Le
second
jour, pour cause de rafales. Le quart de final est un jeu que je ne vais jamais
oublier ; un incisif pour mon développement en tant que joueur de tennis. Je
peux vous dire, il y a 5 ans j'aurais pété les plombs avec un vent pareil. Je
n'aurais sûrement pas fais un jeu acceptable. Mais je pouvais tout mettre de
côté et battre André Agassi en cinq sets. Ça m'a donné énormément de confidence
pour le week-end de la finale. Avec tout le respect pour la force de Tim Henman
j'étais beaucoup plus relâché d'affronter la demi-finale. Mais le soir avant
la finale un rhume s'est fait remarquer. J'avais mal à la gorge. Je me suis
couché
en espérant que ça ne s'aggravait pas plus. Le matin je me suis réveillé avec
le nez tout enrhumé. Mais j'ai vite remarqué que ce n'était pas si grave que
ça. Quel soulagement ! Mai il y avait encore une autre chose : j'avais pendant
tout le tournois au moins une journée de libre entre chaque match, à part avant
la finale. Je me sentais donc pas très reposé et j'avais un sentiment bizarre
parce que j'avais pas assez de temps pour me préparer mentalement pour le match
contre Lleyton. Je savais que je devais jouer un match parfait contre lui et
j'étais conscient que j'allais être dans les livres des records si je le
vaincrais.
Peut-être ma forme excellente et ce nouveau sentiment de relâchement du match
contre André Agassi allaient m'aider. Pendant le premier set j'ai rattrapé
toutes
les balles, je jouais comme je le fais très rarement. Ceci m'a donné le coup
final de ma certitude que j'allais récupérer le titre déjà cette année. La
victoire
du tie-break du deuxième set était finalement la clé pour la victoire.

Et puis j'ai vécu sans doute l'après match le plus intensif : lundi après la
finale j'ai été invité pour trois émissions de télé matinales. Moi, celui qui
aime rien de plus que de dormir le matin ! À 7h30 l'émission télé “Cold Pizza”
de ESPN, après cela « Early Show » chez CBS, à 9h30 chez « Regis and Kelly »,
à 11h un rendez-vous de photos sur le Times Square, ensuite un déjeuner avec
les médias dans le Hard Rock Café et après cela une interview télé assez longe
avec John Mcenroe pour lequel je me suis réjouis spécialement. John a tellement
d'humour et de connaissances sur le tennis que c'est toujours un régal de
pouvoir
papoter avec lui. Pour finir cette journée incroyable j'étais invité à
l'émission
télé « Charlie Rose Show ». Ce tourbillon de médias à l'américaine était une
expérience très intéressante et de plus très différente de ce que je connaissais
d'habitude. Dans les autres villes ce sont les célébrités qui viennent te voir
au tournoi pour te parler. Ici à New York on fait le tour soi même et je
trouvais
ça extrêmement intéressant de pouvoir comparer les émissions de télés avec les
autres pays.


2. Mon journal

Apres ma victoire à Wimbledon et mon premier titre ATP sur le territoire suisse
au Swiss Open à Gstaad, j'ai profité un max. de mes vacances à Dubaï. J'adore
les hautes températures mais je n'ai jamais encore vécu une telle chose. Avec
47°C d'air et 27°C de température d'eau ça commençait quand même à être trop
chaud pour mon goût ! Je me suis relaxé avec Mirka à la plage, m'accordait un
peu de wellness et m'abandonnait au fait de rien faire. J'ai beaucoup dormis,
des fois même pendant la journée. C'était du relax à fond ! Mon activité la plus
sportive à Dubaï était de faire un tour...avec la voiture bien sûr... sur la
nouvelle piste de la formule 1.

Du fait que je suis toujours en route, je voulais encore passer quelques temps
chez moi à la maison après mes vacances et régler quelques tâches d'affaires.
Je suis de ce fait arrivé un peu tard pour le prochain tournoi à Toronto. C'est
aussi pour cela que j'étais assez surpris de conquérir le titre du Canadian
Open.
C'était depuis le début une semaine parfaite. Je me suis concentré à fond sur
le tournoi et suis allé seulement deux fois au cinéma (« Spider Man 2 » et «
The Bourne Supremacy »). J'ai aussi dégusté les multiples bons restos japonais
à Toronto. Mais à Cincinnati ça n'a pas marché du tout. Cependant, du fait que
Hrbaty a livré un match tellement bien, ça m'a permis de bien digérer cette
défaite.

Les Jeux Olympiques d'Athènes étaient un événement incroyable. De pouvoir faire
son entrée avec la délégation suisse et tenir le drapeau de mon pays natal était
une des plus belles expériences que j'ai vécu dans ma vie. Ce que je trouvais
aussi très touchant c'est de voir les autres délégations qui entraient avec tant
de fierté et leurs vêtements colorés représentant leur pays. Pendant ce moment
j'avais vraiment le sentiment que nous, les athlètes, appartenaient à une grande
famille. L'atmosphère à Athènes était très relax et on rencontrait beaucoup de
sportifs de différentes disciplines et de différents pays. C'est comme ça aussi
que j'ai rencontré Carl Lewis. Moins drôle était l'événement sur le court de
tennis avec ma défaite contre Tomas Berdych qui m'a tourmenté au début. Mais
en prenant des distances de quelques semaines et en me rappelant ma victoire
à l'US Open, la fin très rapide aux JO m'a livrée une bonne expérience. Je me
réjouis déjà maintenant pour les Jeux à Pékin dans quatre ans.


3. Visite rapide en Californie

Après le marathon des médias à New York je me suis offert une semaine de
vacances
en Californie. C'était la première fois que j'ai visité Los Angeles et
Hollywood.
Grâce à Arthur Cohn, un producteur de films et un gagnant de 6 oscars, venant
de ma ville natale, Mirka et moi avaient l'occasion de rencontrer la légende
Kirk Douglas et le magicien David Copperfield. Sur la route on a également
rencontrés
par hasard l'acteur Danny de Vito. J'admire ces gens parce qu'ils ont acquit
quelque chose dans leur vie et parce que ce sont pour moi de vrais
personnalités.

Cette semaine sous le soleil californien était parfaite pour me relâcher de
cette
tension de l'US Open et de pouvoir prendre des distances par rapport au tennis.
Maintenant je me réjouis à nouveau beaucoup de pouvoir rejouer au tennis et de
pouvoir voyager en Asie. Le « Masters » il y a trois ans était mon premier
tournoi
sur le territoire asiatique. Pour l'instant je ne connais pas vraiment cette
région du monde, mais les impressions que j'ai eues jusqu'à présent ne sont que
positives.
J'aime l'enthousiasme de ces gens, mais aussi leur chaleur humaine et leur
hospitalité.
Et bien sûr j'adore leur cuisine asiatique, spécialement la cuisine légère des
japonais. Je me réjouis de pouvoir apprendre encore beaucoup plus sur ce
continent
fascinant. Sur ma prochaine lettre je vais vous raconter exclusivement de mon
séjour en Asie et de mon tournoi à Bangkok.


4. Mes premiers pas

Quand j'avais 6 ans, je jouais du tennis pour le simple plaisir. Je n'en pouvais
pas en avoir assez. Je jouais avec mes parents, avec des amis, des connaissances
et avec tout le monde du club de tennis qui voulaient jouer quelques balles avec
moi. Et si il n'y avait personne pour jouer avec moi je passais mon temps à
jouer
contre le mur. On me disait déjà à ce temps là que mes compétences de
coordination
étaient épatantes, non pas seulement au tennis. J'adorais essayer toutes les
genres de sport. On me rencontrait au skateboard, basket-ball, le ping-pong,
le badminton, le foot, le wrestling, le ski ou la nage. À coté du tennis
j'adorais
aussi le foot. Mes parents voyaient dans ce sport de groupe le parfait équilibre
avec le sport individuel du tennis. Je ne savais pas pendant très longtemps pour
lequel des deux sports j'allais me décider. Mais alors que j'avais 12 ans j'ai
pris la décision de me consacrer au tennis.

À l'age de neuf ans j'ai commencé l'entraînement en groupe. J'avais
l'entraînement
de tennis 3 fois par semaine, deux fois pendant 2 heures et une fois pendant
une heure et demie. De temps en temps j'avais encore des cours privés. J'ai
commencé
à prendre ces cours à 40 minutes à l'age de dix ans. À partir de là je
participais
régulièrement à des tournois les week-ends. À l'age de 12 ans j'allais
m'entraîner
une fois par semaine à la salle de gym.

J'étais champion suisse dans toutes les catégories d'âges. À 14 ans j'ai eu la
possibilité de me concentrer à fond sur le tennis dans le Centre National de
Tennis à Eclubens, dans la région francophone de la Suisse. J'avais chaque jour
pendant deux heures l'entraînement de tennis ou l'entraînement de
coordination/fitness.
À seize ans j'ai fini l'école et je me suis décidé de faire une carrière
professionnelle
de tennis. J'ai commencé par ce fait à voyager beaucoup. De plus des séquences
d'entraînement d'endurance et entraînement de tennis étaient planifiés par
rapport
à mon emploi du temps des tournois. Jusqu'au moment où je suis devenu un sportif
professionnel c'était la Fédération Suisse de Tennis, mon entraîneur de tennis
et mes parents qui géraient mes tournois et mon entraînement.

Depuis très jeune, les gens me disaient que je possédais un talent énorme. Mais
le talent ne suffit pas pour se développer en un grand joueur de tennis. Lors
de mon premier temps sur le tour ATP en 1998, j'ai commencé à travailler de plus
en plus sur mon jeu. Pendant les années passées je travaillais continuellement
à ma technique, à m'améliorer dans mon travail de jambes et je prenais de plus
en plus de force. Ce processus de développement continue sur ma technique et
sur mon développement physique n'est pas encore achevé jusqu'à présent. Il y
a toujours des aspects à améliorer.


5. Vos propositions pour mon site web

Dans la dernière lettre nous vous avons demandés de nous donner vos avis sur
le site web. Je vous remercie à tous pour les compliments, critiques et
commentaires.
La palette de vos propositions à mieux faire est incroyable : plus d'images,
une galerie photos plus facile à utiliser, plus d'interviews et d'articles sur
moi, des résultas provisoires, une navigation plus facile, plus d'informations
et de photos sur ma jeunesse et avec les versions en allemand et en anglais,
une version en français etc.… On a pris toutes ces propositions en considération
et on est déjà en train de changer des choses concernant quelques de vos idées
comme vous avez peut-être pu remarquer !
Notre but est de toute façon de réaliser tous vos souhaits et d'offrir une
plate-forme
qui correspond à vos besoins. On peut vous dire déjà une chose : vous pouvez
vous attendre à beaucoup de nouveautés !



A bientôt, bis bald, take care
Vôtre Roger

Fergie
09-29-2004, 06:22 PM
Thanks for posting the last Roger's newsletter, I still don't recieve it :rolleyes:

FedFan
09-29-2004, 06:28 PM
Isy, thanks a lot for the newsletter ! :D It is great.
I always appreciate your comments. :yippee:

ytben
09-29-2004, 06:34 PM
Obviously
I am now constantly being asked by the media when I am planning to conquer
Roland
Garros. Well, that is certainly one of my main goals and I will give all I've
got to get there. But I will not put myself under pressure.

I love his attitude for RG, just perfect! :D

And then I experienced the toughest after-match of my career: The Monday after
the final I - who love nothing more than sleeping in - was invited to three
morning TV-shows.

:haha: Rogi

Mrs. B
09-29-2004, 08:46 PM
thanks for posting it here, lsy. i also got one today. ;)

RogiFan88
09-29-2004, 09:10 PM
What a great newsletter!!!! The best so far, although the one before this is really close behind. Really can tell from Rogi's pespective his whole journey in USO, his excitement his happiness. So in depth too :D :D :D

And he signed it:
"Take care, bis bald, à bientôt
Your Roger" :angel:

btw what is bis bald, à bientôt mean? :o I think à bientôt = much loved?

don't know the bis bald... ask Mrs. B. or Doris or anyone else who knows Swiss German

à bientôt = see you soon! ;)

Fedex
09-29-2004, 09:38 PM
Great article, that was :yeah: God, he had another cold before the Open Final?? Geez, no more colds Rogi. Atleast it went away before the final, unlike Wimbledon.

Yoda
09-29-2004, 11:52 PM
Lovely article.
Great humility for one so talented and successful. Reminds me of the olden day budhist monks. Power & Humility


Yeah Rogi, I love my sleep too :zzz:

lunahielo
09-30-2004, 02:47 AM
bis bald
Loosely translated~~Until later, Hasta luego, etc. :D

LCeh
09-30-2004, 02:52 AM
I really enjoyed this newsletter. He wrote a lot about his feelings, so that was very good. :D :yeah: Too bad lsy mentioned it here before I checked my inbox, losing the surprise element :mad: ;)

Billabong
09-30-2004, 03:10 AM
Merci lsy:hug:! Great article:D!

Dirk
09-30-2004, 07:12 AM
Lovely newsletter. :)

babsi
09-30-2004, 07:28 AM
Thank you Isy!

What a great, insideful and sweet newsletter - loved it!!!!
Thanks Roger!

Zetlandsk
09-30-2004, 07:36 AM
GWH had typed this article out a while ago on GM, so I decided to copy and paste it here, for the benefit of those who haven't read it.

This was a huge feature on Roger Federer in an Australian Sports magazine, unfortunately there isn’t an online version of this, so I decided to take the best parts of it out and post it here. I might even do it in two parts, or three parts even.

The Artful Roger
By Suzi Petkovski

In the jaded if-this-is March-it-must-be-Miami world of pro tennis, Roger Federer does not merely excite the bored denizens, he brings them to tears.

Among the pros who reached for their hankies after the 22-year-old’s Wimbledon tour de force were none other than Kim Clijsters, the girlfriend of the guy who won it last year and no less a legend than Martina Navratilova. “The stuff he played in the last two matches,” raved Martina, “just phenomenal.”

Women weep and blokes can’t help but admire the Federer style. “Before I ever played him,” said James Blake, a Federer victim at the US Open, “I loved watching him play. His backhand is so smooth. And his demeanour on court is one of the best. He is very relaxed.”

Wimbledon was, fittingly a dream run for the man who plays like a dream, Federer commanded the game’s greatest stage with hypnotic beauty, dropping just one set in seven matches and reducing soon-to-be US Open champ Andy Roddick and the richly talented Mark Philippoussis to lumbering artisans. The languid power, artful volleys, gliding forehand, slashing backhand- all flowed like treacle from tin. In a mesmerising final Federer out-aced Philippoussis 21 to 14, struck 50 glided winners to just nine errors, and never faced a breakpoint in 7-6 6-2 7-6 win.

“I can’t really ay I did much wrong.” Mused he luckless Philippoussis. “Obviously he is very talented. He can do everything.”

Marvelled the more effusive Roddick: “As far as talent goes, I don’t know if there’s anybody out there more talented.” The last shot (of the second set) was just ridiculous.”

“Finally,” praised three-time champion Boris Becker, ‘you see a player with old grasscourt technique: he plays serve-and-volley tennis and plays the slice and doesn’t need the 140mph serve to succeed.

Doubles star Leander Paes observed:” He played flawless tennis, hit shots you saw Martina or McEnroe hit ... shots ahead of their time.”

After Federer’s romp during the TMC in Houston. “A phenomenally talented player,” Andre Agassi gushed before their round-robin encounter. “He has great firepower plus a great feel and flair for the game.” Federer demonstrated all that and more in his first win over Agassi, braving two matchpoints and conjuring 63 winners- a huge tally in three sets against a champion of Andre’s stature.

After a 6-3, 6-0, 6-4 drubbing, which ended his dream of becoming the oldest man to win the elite event, Agassi was even more complimentary, calling the stylish Swiss ‘an inspiration to play against.” Agassi maybe the people’s favourite, but no one is disappointed to see a sublime talent at his best.

Unlike those on-court labourers who see entertainment as an accidental by-product of their game, Federer needs to feel the breath of the crowd. “I hope you guys enjoyed it,” he told the Wimbledon gallery after his emotional win. What’s not to like? Watching Federer is like the tennis equivalent of a neck massage. He’s delectable as Swiss chocolate, an pen-top car in beach weather. An icy beer at a summer barbeque.

There was an obvious symbolism in Federer’s win- coming as it did the year Pete Sampras abdicated. If Federer is the Wimbledon successor to seven-time champion Sampras, he also has the potential to take Pete’s mantle as the dominant champion of the game.

Philippoussis for one, isn’t convinced, believing tennis is too deep for any one man to dominate. Anyone but Federer. The way the Swiss scythed through the Masters field for the loss of just one set only enhanced his standing as the game’s next superstar. He extended his dominance over Roddick to 5-1, blasted Juan Carlos Ferrero out of the No. 2 position, ended his Groundhog Day dramas with David Nalbandian 6-3,6-0 and beat Agassi twice within the week.

Certainly, Roddick won’t be getting cosy in the No. 1 spot. Though Federer was pipped for the top spot by the American, he finished No.1 for tournaments (seven) and matches won (78). No-one else won on all four surfaces- Roddick’s resume lacks and indoor title, and three of Ferrero’s four titles came on clay. Federer’s all-surface mastery puts him, alone among players, on the front foot at every Grand Slam. “That’s what I think mentally is my big advantage,” Federer has said. It makes him, over the long course, the class horse.

The third part and I will post the final bits later.

Easy on the eye as an athlete and easygoing as a person, Federer plays for self-deprecating laughs, by trotting out his statistical lowlights, like the 0-11 record on clay he racked up in his first year as a pro, or his “special” first tournament match, the only 6-0 6-0 of his career. The punchline, of course, is that he was the loser.

At 22, Federer is young enough to recall the disappointment of being denied autographs as a ballboy in his hometown of Basel. These days, he is universally acknowledged for his generosity to his fans. At the ’03 Davis Cup in Melbourne, whether answering questions from the public while tiptoeing through cowpats at a Swiss reception, pulling on T-shirts for charity, posing for photographers while pretending to read a Japanese tennis mag, or signing endless caps, bags and bits of paper for young fans, Federer was more accessible than the Aussies.

Federer never seems ruffled, just endlessly surprised at how far and wide he is recognised, like beaches in Thailand and the Maldives. “You’re standing on the street corner in your jacket and hat,” says Federer, “you can hardly recognise yourself and suddenly someone comes up and says, ‘Can I have your autograph?’ You’re like, “What?’ Then you realise you’re a actually a star for these guys. That’s your job. It’s strange but I get used to it now. It’s no problem.”

Unlike former Swiss No.1 Martina Hingis, who was born in Slovakia, Federer is embraced by the Swiss as a genuine home-grown hero.

But apart from being multilingual and careful with money, he betrays few typically Swiss touches. He follows pro wrestling and ice hockey, prefers AC/DC to yodelling. In his decision to forgo tertiary education and concentrate on tennis, Federer is extremely unlike his incurably neat and conservative countrymen. But that is part of his appeal. Notes Christine Ungricht, president of the Swiss Tennis Federation,” His influence is great, he gives tennis another, attractive image.”

Former coach Peter Lundgren’s best advice to Roger was,” shut up on court.” Like the young Borg, Federer had a hair-trigger temper as a kid. “I was terrible,” he chuckles. “My racquet was flying in all directions. My parents were embarrassed to watch me play.”

“Sometimes it’s good to get the shit out,” Lundgren told him. “But one time- not 20 times.” Federer finally heeded the advice and played a match without tantrums and was successful. Suddenly a bemused Federer was bracketed with the iconic Swede “because I was ice-cold on the court”. Yet a couple of months before,” I was still like what I used to be like when I was ten years old.”

Of all the Wimbledon titans Federer was compared with- Sampras for the class on grass, McEnroe for inventiveness on the volley- he was most flattered by parallels with Borg, whom he considers the greatest ever “because he won five Wimbledons in a row, six French Opens and he only played till he was 25”.

Meeting Borg in Monte Carlo in 2001 was ‘the best”, Federer says, still sounding starstruck.” I wanted badly to meet him.” The next conversation was initiated by Borg.” When I beat Sampras at Wimbledon, he called Peter and told me how happy he was I’d stopped Sampras from winning five Wimbledons in a row.

In mid-2000, when the men’s tour recruited him for its cheesy “ New Balls, Please” marketing push highlighting the young Turks in the sunset years of Agassi and Sampras, the modest Federer was more intimidated than flattered.

“For me it was tough. I thought,” Am I good enough to be in this campaign?’’ he recalls. “There were Kuerten, Safin, Hewitt, while I was ranked 50. Yeah it put pressure on me.”’

In hindsight of course, it was an inspired choice. Three years on, Federer is front and centre in a line-up of the game’s stars- and the superstar among them. And now that the Sampras-Agassi rivalry is consigned to the video vault, the apparatchiks on the men’s tour are salivating at the budding Federer-Roddick rivalry as the one to sell the game in the next few years.

Not only is it a clash between a cool stylist and an expressive, go-for-broke hitter, it’s a melding of the two biggest tennis markets. Ferrero lacks the fluency (at the moment) in English to be a global personality, while both Federer and Roddick are infinitely more media-friendly than the litigious Hewitt, gone from the top ten and (in many quarters) unlamented.

While Ferrero and Roddick are his immediate rivals for No.1 Federer cops far more grief from two guys further down the rankings No. 8 David Nalbandian has him in a 5-1 headlock and Hewitt, who holds him an 8-2 edge. Their clashes have been standouts, with the Davis Cup classic, in which Hewitt staged his first two-sets-down comeback of his career- the most dramatic. Still, Federer ended up wearing Hewitt’s Wimbledon and Masters Cup crowns. What chance now of the Swiss swooping on Hewitt’s home slam, the Australian Open, the title he covets most?

In four campaigns, Federer has never done worse than the third round at Melbourne Park, and his AO record (10-4) is better than Hewitt’s (9-7). As Hewitt has slid down from No.1 to 18 in the rankings, it will be the Aussie who has to earn a shot at Federer, not the other way around.

If we (still) can’t get a native champion at the Australian Open, we can revel in the fine brushstrokes of a young master and a beautiful work in progress. “At least I’m playing for something,” Federer said about the elusive No 1 ranking. “I’m not stuck at No.3 or stuck at my ranking. I still have room to improve.

lunahielo
09-30-2004, 12:28 PM
Another great article. Thanks, Zetlandsk.

WyveN
09-30-2004, 12:45 PM
Thanks lsy, would have missed it otherwise!

lsy
09-30-2004, 02:00 PM
You are all welcome :wavey: hey...I did share my "personal email" from Rogi with you all....am I nice or what? hehe...yeah, I'm a deluded Rogi fan :o :lol:

Thanks Fedfan, I don't think I had seen you posted here before? Anyway hi! :wavey:

Thanks Zetlansk and GWH, that's a great article!

LCeh, if you're cheking out MTF before your email, you should know you're MTF addicted.

and btw...wyven, I suppose you're staring at scoreboard now? So you should know what you REALLY should be doing instead... ;)

squirrel
10-01-2004, 02:22 PM
look at this http://sipoy.secondthought.com/Post.do/archive/tennis/winner.html

babsi
10-01-2004, 03:06 PM
Thank you squirrel :) :)

There never was a choice, it simply had to be Roger!

Lalitha
10-02-2004, 08:50 AM
This article is from an Indian sports magazine.

http://www.tssonnet.com/tss2739/stories/20040925006300800.htm

Most divine of heirs

Roger Federer, at quick glance, bears a passing resemblance to Pete Sampras. Both men are from an older school of behaviour, their manner becoming, their emotions restrained, revealing little of the furnace that glows within them. At best in victory we see difference: Federer collapses to the court, Sampras it appears would never deign to sink to his knees before any man at any time, writes ROHIT BRIJNATH.

Sure, if you take Roddick's serve and Agassi's returns and my volleys and Hewitt's speed and tenacity, then you've probably got a good chance against Federer.

— A possibly only half-joking Tim Henman at the U.S. Open.

WHAT Pete must think? Barely has he gone, his legend still not dry in the record books, the cement not yet set on his pedestal, and already his majestic legacy is being challenged.

What players must think? Barely has it been considered safe to go out on court without fear of humiliation, just when the bruises embedded in their self-esteem by Sampras had begun to fade, and their dreams are in tatters again.

Tennis merely thinks it is lucky, for as coincidences go, Federer immediately following Sampras is somewhat unnatural. After all, it took 25 years or thereabouts for Sampras to arrive to challenge Rod Laver's place in history.

It appeared God did not want to spoil us, and thus his gifts to us (and Sampras and Laver were truly gifts) were measured; it seemed He wanted us to digest slowly the compelling feats of these extraordinary men before he produced another.

And so, when Sampras broke Roy Emerson's record of 12 Grand Slam titles in 2000, aware of how arduous, how disciplined his journey had been, he hinted that his record, while hardly unbreakable, would not be quickly bested. "The next person (who does it) might be eight years old hitting at a park somewhere around the world," he said. "You never know."

What we didn't know, what was beyond coincidence, was that the "next person" was perhaps that nonchalant fellow sharing the same locker room with Pete. Maybe God couldn't help Himself, maybe even He could not wait to see this triumph of his own construction, to see what havoc this Swiss fellow with the girlish clips in his hair could wreak.

Maybe the toughest player I ever play is Pete because he is guy that gives you only one or two chances per match and if you don't take those chance, you finish. But I still think Federer is the biggest talent from all the players I play. I don't know if he's going to win so many Grand Slams like Pete, but definitely he's the most talented player I play.

— Goran Ivanisevic, Wimbledon 2004.

WE are too quick these days to award greatness. Wayne Rooney plays a few matches and talk of another Pele begins. Sehwag swishes a few strokes and he is labelled the next Tendulkar. But Federer, even on reflection, has put forward a persuasive initial argument that if not one day the statistical equal of Sampras, then at least he is the most divine of heirs.

More tellingly, the very responses of Federer's peers have given legitimacy to the comparison. The Swiss has won four of the last six Grand Slam titles, and they admit, at present at least, he is beyond their reach, and that between Pete and Roger there is little to choose. These men must be listened to, simply because many have played both champions.

Federer, at quick glance, bears a passing resemblance to Sampras. Both men suffer from immobile faces in battle, their eccentricities limited to Sampras' lolling tongue and Federer's constant hair-dressing. Both men are from an older school of behaviour, their manner becoming, their emotions restrained, revealing little of the furnace that glows within them. At best in victory we see difference: Federer collapses to the court, Sampras it appears would never deign to sink to his knees before any man at any time.

But once the first shot is struck the disparities are obvious. In simple terms, the Swiss uses his racquet like a sculptor's chisel, the American like a grave-digger's spade; Sampras limited his caresses to the trophy, Federer's every shot seems to stroke the senses; the American's tennis sounded like martial music, the Swiss' like a hymn.

Sampras' preference was for efficiency, like a carpenter who nails coffins for a living. His game was built on an easy symmetry and clean grace, a man elegantly designed for destruction. As opposed to Federer who appears to tease and torture opponents, death by Sampras was clinical.

If Sampras' racquet spoke in monosyllables, Federer is more a conversationalist on the court. His languid style is easier on the eye, the points seem longer, he seems a fellow more taken by his craft, not so much playing the percentage shot but the shot he feels like (which usually turns out to be the right shot). But his touch disguises his efficiency and he is far more powerful than our memory after a match might suggest.

But there is more than a stylistic difference to these men. Federer can serve (rivals will tell you of his variations and placement) and volley (his repertoire is vast) and move in the forecourt (his balance is beautiful), though arguably not as finely as Sampras.

Everything else possibly Federer does better; no shot seems beyond his imagination, no stroke or angle or change of pace beyond his artful design. He can roll or slice his backhand, hook his forehand short, or hit it with a mix of pace and top spin that is formidable.

And it is this completeness of Federer in technique and variety and invention, his improbable marriage of finesse and muscle, that separates him somewhat from Sampras, that suffocates players into believing he has too many options for them. As Lleyton Hewitt said last week: "He's really great on all surfaces, (with) no real weakness."

This year, Federer won successive tournaments on grass, clay and hardcourt, a streak of stunning versatility. Now even Laver is inclined to believe he could be the first man after him to win the Grand Slam, all four in a year. "He has the potential to pull it off," said Laver. "I would think he can (win the French). Winning on clay is a mind game and he has the anticipation and knowledge when he plays the ball. He reminds you of the old guard."

Q: Do you feel like anyone today, with Federer like that, could have done much better than you in the U.S. Open final?

Hewitt: Well, I don't think anyone in the actual tournament. Maybe Pete Sampras.

BUT if Federer moves us with his all-round grace, then Sampras stirred us with his single-minded pursuit of history. We might be convinced he owned lesser gifts than the Swiss, but he expressed them completely. With him, over time, little was lost in translation; after all, they took him to 14 Grand Slam titles.

Marat Safin said this year: "Pete was mentally the strongest player on tour." Indeed, no one in modern times has grasped the idea of "winning" more completely than him. Whether cramping or vomiting or injured or faced with a big point, Sampras mostly found a way. His pressure was unrelenting, and as Andre Agassi put it: "Pete could always let one ball go from the baseline and it would get you in trouble right away, or he could come forward and make you hit a pressure shot in a crucial situation over and over again."

Federer has won four of four Grand Slam finals he's contested; in Sampras' prime, between 1993-1997, he won nine of 10 Grand Slam finals he had contested. He was the champion of the long haul, and as Jim Courier once said: "Staying No. 1 for six consecutive years is an incredibly demanding thing. Pete was able to stay healthy and hungry and continue to win in a very competitive time." And it is only here we are unsure of the Swiss. He has had the perfect year almost, winning nine tournaments so far (Sampras won eight twice, and 10 once), among them three Grand Slam events (Pete won two in a year four times). But can Federer stay the distance?

To over-reach Sampras, Federer may not require 14 Grand Slam titles. Twelve would do, if at least one is at the French. Still, he is so damningly good that his peers admit 14 is a possibility. Said Henman: "I wouldn't bet against it." Said Hewitt: "He's a got a chance."

But desire dries. The body rebels. Form hiccups. Riches spoil. Complacency comes visiting. Rivals bristle. Fame confuses. Great players have strode the stage and then fallen for so many reasons; in modern times only Sampras of Becker and Edberg and Lendl and McEnroe and Connors and Wilander has won over 10 Slams. It is a feat that is beyond overestimation but in Federer's presence we get so giddy we sometimes underestimate it.

We give thanks to Federer, for he has transported us on a tennis journey that is unique, for the times told us such a player was not possible. He is the most beautiful, the most complete, of practitioners with a racquet I have seen, but Sampras in the Open era is still the greatest to ever wield one. The Swiss has stolen our affection, but the ghost of the patrician American still strides the courts of the world. Pete Sampras will not be easily budged from his place at the head of the class.

Yoda
10-02-2004, 12:20 PM
Just PERFECT. :worship:

Thanks Lalitha :yeah:

*M*
10-02-2004, 07:29 PM
Agreed -- one of the best articles I've read. :yeah: Great comparison and analysis.

mitalidas
10-02-2004, 09:51 PM
"Federer's constant hair dressing", so sweet

Lalitha
10-03-2004, 08:47 AM
Thanks guys, this writer and this particular magazine has some good authors when it comes to tennis. A rarity in India where it is 500% cricket.

mitalidas
10-04-2004, 07:39 PM
I have noticed that Brad Gilbert never updates his online log after a roddick loss --I find that very odd (okay, okay so I do go to his website); would be much nicer if just as much as he beams/gloats/gleams after "Junior's" (his words not mine) wins, he would give his $0.02 on the losses.

Dirk
10-04-2004, 07:47 PM
I bet if he lost to Andre then he would but since its Rogi (whom he doesn't like) he doesn't.

mitalidas
10-04-2004, 08:03 PM
agreed

also, the rankings has not been updated since "Club Fed won Australian Open, Wimbledon and 23 matches in a row" and "it is Hard court season, Junior's time". Tsk, tsk.... Which brings me to the question --- Who do we think suffered more after the QF of the USO --A.R or B.G?

RogiFan88
10-04-2004, 09:03 PM
Federer's Perfect 10
Roger Federer added to one of the greatest seasons of the Open Era Sunday when he clinched his 10th title of the year by defeating world No. 2 Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0 in the final of the Thailand Open in Bangkok. Roddick, owner of the world’s fastest serve, had never before dropped a set to love during his pro career.

Playing his first tournament since winning a third Grand Slam title of the season at the US Open, Federer’s 10th title of the season also marked his 12th consecutive ATP final victory. Only two players – Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe – have won 12 consecutive finals in the past 25 years. Bangkok Sunday...

THAILAND OPEN
Bangkok, Thailand October 3, 2004
Federer Victorious Once Again

© Getty Images
INDESIT ATP 2004 Race leader Roger Federer clinched his 10th title of the season by defeating World No. 2 Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0 in the final of the Thailand Open in Bangkok.

Playing in his first tournament since winning a third Grand Slam title of the season at the US Open, Federer took just 57 minutes to register his eighth win in nine meetings against Roddick and his third against the American in an ATP final this season (Wimbledon, AMS Toronto).

Federer broke in the eighth game of the first set and only gave Roddick one more game throughout the rest of the match. Roddick, who endured a marathon battle against No. 3 seed Marat Safin in the semifinal before winning 7-6(1) 6-7(0) 7-6(2), was showing signs of fatigue. However, Federer looked sharp from the outset and pounced on any opportunities with dominating baseline play and strong return of serves. Federer maintained the momentum throughout the match as Roddick had no answer.

Federer, who already is assured of finishing the season as the year-end World No. 1, now has won his last 18 matches against Top 10 opponents and has won his last 12 consecutive ATP finals. Only two players – Bjorn Borg (1979-80) and John McEnroe (1984-85) – have won 12 consecutive finals in the past 25 years.

The Swiss star also became the first player to win 10 titles in a season since Thomas Muster claimed 12 in 1995, and his 21 career ATP titles (from 29 finals) also are third among active players behind Andre Agassi (59) and Lleyton Hewitt (23).

En route to the final, Federer defeated Nicolas Thomann, fellow Swiss Ivo Heuberger, Robin Soderling and local favorite Paradorn Srichaphan, the No. 4 seed. Srichaphan was the only player to take a set against Federer during the week.

Roddick, owner of the world’s fastest serve, had never before dropped a set to love during his pro career. He went into the final looking to end a three-match losing streak against Federer, and record his first win against the Swiss star since the ATP Masters Series in Montreal in 2003.

Roddick still leads the ATP circuit with 70 match wins this year (70-14) while Federer is second with a 69-6 record.

Roddick now has a 4-4 record in finals this year having won titles in San Jose (d. Fish), the NASDAQ-100 Open in Miami (d. Coria), Queen’s (d. Grosjean) and Indianapolis (d. Kiefer) to bring his career tally to 15 titles. Three of Roddick’s four losses in finals this year have come at the hands of Federer, while he also reached the final in Houston (l Haas).

Roddick, who was looking to claim his 16th career title from his 23rd career final, defeated Arvind Parmer, Jeff Morrison, Thomas Johansson and No. 3 seed Safin.

With Federer, Roddick, Safin and Srichaphan all in the semifinals, it marked the second time this year that the Top four seeds had advanced to the semifinals. In Chennai in January, No. 1 Carlos Moya, No. 2 Srichaphan, No. 3 Sjeng Schalken and No. 4 Tommy Robredo all reached the last four.

Federer also was going for a double scoop in Bangkok as he and fellow Swiss Yves Allegro faced Justin Gimelstob and Graydon Oliver in the doubles final. But it wasn’t to be for Federer, as the Americans came through 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 to claim their second title in three weeks after winning in Beijing. This was just the third ATP tournament for Gimelstob and Oliver, who reached the third round at the US Open before losing to eventual champions Mark Knowles and Daniel Nestor. They also reached the Challenger final in Beijing last week.

WHAT THE PLAYERS SAID:
Federer: "It's really nice to win this title. It's even more satisfying winning against the No. 2 player, Andy, who is always a tough match. He was dangerous at the start but I took control early and kept it like this throughout the whole match."

"He wasn't hitting his first serve, he was angling it so I know this wasn't Andy how we know him, so it gave me the opportunity to return well. I have been tired for the last two days, playing singles and doubles and playing on this surface. It's normal to feel tired after a good tournament but I look forward to a little time off."

Roddick: "I gave it a go out there today, but yesterday's match [against Safin] took it out of me and I had less than 24 hours from my arrival to my first round match, I was tired. I was playing with a bad record card against him and today I couldn't find a way to beat him. At the beginning of the week, if you told me I'd be in the final, I would have said you're crazy.

"I'm leaving tonight [Sunday evening Bangkok time] as I need to get home and rest my body. The way I would assess my year is as a great year, but without Roger in the picture I'd say it would be my best year."

Gimelstob: "It's not every day you get to play the best player in the world, Roger Federer. So this is a nice win. We've only played US Open and two Asian events, so it's been a great start as a new team. This is my 12th doubles title, which is now more than my girlfriend [WTA Tour player Corina Morariu]."

Oliver: "It's a pleasure playing with Justin. So far it's gone well for us, and as a team our styles compliment each other. We're very happy and Asia has been good to me."
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2004/bangkok_sunday.asp

Shy
10-05-2004, 12:51 AM
agreed

also, the rankings has not been updated since "Club Fed won Australian Open, Wimbledon and 23 matches in a row" and "it is Hard court season, Junior's time". Tsk, tsk.... Which brings me to the question --- Who do we think suffered more after the QF of the USO --A.R or B.G?
BG His ego is way bigger than Andy.

mitalidas
10-05-2004, 12:53 AM
I saw him (BG) collapse his head into his hands with an expression that was reminiscent of Goran's when Goran (the sweetheart) lost the third Wimbledon final. meanwhile, roddick looked yeah shocked, but not devastated like "Senior"

Billabong
10-05-2004, 02:01 AM
Thanks RF:)!

Skyward
10-05-2004, 02:06 AM
The way I would assess my year is as a great year, but without Roger in the picture I'd say it would be my best year."



Roger prevented him from winning Wimbledon and Toronto. But what about other 3 Slams and 4 TMS? He can't blame Roger for everything. :singer:

federer_roar
10-05-2004, 02:40 AM
Roger prevented him from winning Wimbledon and Toronto. But what about other 3 Slams and 4 TMS? He can't blame Roger for everything. :singer:

Actually I think Andy's trying to say he's doing not bad if not comparing him to Roger.... :)

Jimena
10-05-2004, 02:59 AM
I bet if he lost to Andre then he would but since its Rogi (whom he doesn't like) he doesn't.

I have a question. Has Gilbert actually said that he doesn't like Roger? I've seen it posted here a couple of times and I just want to know if Gilbert's that much of an idiot.

And does he really call Roger "Club Fed"? :rolleyes:

I personally find Gilbert one of the most annoying "personalities" in tennis.

Dirk
10-05-2004, 07:07 AM
Brad always puts down one-hander players. During the Andre match he said after Andre returned a serve up the line with his backhand. "No one hander could ever do that" Guess he never saw Guga play or Rogi. :rolls: He also put down Pete and Henin. He also called Rogi (before Wimbly 03) a "poor man's sampras" and said he was "all hype and no results" this was during Wimbly 03 when Rogi came into the event with a title on every surface that year and Andy only won two and never won a master series event.

mitalidas
10-05-2004, 11:17 AM
I have also observed that commentators (not b.g. only) keep talking about the best returner in the game as Andre. I think that was true, it was a fact. But I think the torch has been passed to Rogi --- it is not coincidence that roddick and other bigservers are often outaced or just have a low ace count when playing Rog

mitalidas
10-05-2004, 11:23 AM
I have a question. Has Gilbert actually said that he doesn't like Roger? I've seen it posted here a couple of times and I just want to know if Gilbert's that much of an idiot.

And does he really call Roger "Club Fed"? :rolleyes:


he does indeed call him that. its on his website --the blog that never updates after a roddick loss. Poor Brad Gilbert. He probably feels that this is deja vu all over again --how many times in his coaching lifetime is his guy going to be denied the Big Titles and the history books and be just second best. ;) At least with andre-Pete, it was not a 1-sided deal

Daniel
10-05-2004, 11:51 AM
Mitalidas,

u r so right, this is so funny how stupid Gilbert can be so blind so admit Roger owns Andy, not matter what he does, Roger still is much better than Andy, and it is sad coz i am sure this stupid and retarded mentality gets into Andy's head . Iam sure he would pay so much to see andy beating Rogi but that wont happen, well not in the near future.

Jimena
10-05-2004, 12:42 PM
he does indeed call him that. its on his website --the blog that never updates after a roddick loss. Poor Brad Gilbert. He probably feels that this is deja vu all over again --how many times in his coaching lifetime is his guy going to be denied the Big Titles and the history books and be just second best. ;) At least with andre-Pete, it was not a 1-sided deal

He must feel like its his destiny or something like that to be coaching the second best player of a generation. But truth be told, Agassi is far (far, FAR) superior to Roddick.

Gilbert is a fool for saying things like that about Roger (well, Gilbert is a fool anyway, but you get my drift...). I mean, for all we know, Roddick might turn the so-called rivalry around at some point, though it's highly unlikely it will ever be even. But right now it looks to me like Roddick is light years away from being the player Roger is, and his finishing #1 in 2003 over Roger looks like just mere luck. The least Gilbert can do is respect Roger. 'Cause he didn't and look at what happened. Ha!

Schadenfraude is a wonderful thing. :devil:

knight_ley
10-05-2004, 03:23 PM
He also called Rogi (before Wimbly 03) a "poor man's sampras" and said he was "all hype and no results" this was during Wimbly 03 when Rogi came into the event with a title on every surface that year and Andy only won two and never won a master series event.


are you serious? Gilbert is such a tool...... He honestly has to be my least favorite tennis figure ever.... *shakes head*

violet coley
10-05-2004, 06:47 PM
Came across this recent interview with Mirka Vavrinec


Roger! It’s match point for the ace
Lekha J. Shankar in Bangkok

Tennis champ Roger Federer enjoys love games even when he’s off the court. He has a swell reason: Girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec, once ranked 70th in women’s tennis. In a chat with HT City, Vavrinec talks of her world-beater boyfriend and more.

On Federer: I’ve known Roger for four years. Having been a professional tennis player, I’m able to help him. He’s been the same ever since. I tell his mother that she gave birth to a very happy boy. What I don’t like about Roger is that he simply won’t listen to me when he’s watching TV. What I like about him is his honesty.

Happy family portrait: I come from near Lake Constance, one-and-half hours away from Roger’s hometown Basel. I’m the only child, Roger has a sister. I love his mom — she’s a caring person.

Mirka Vavrinec, Roger Federer’s girlfriend, says she loves the tennis ace for his honesty
On a wavelength: We share interests. We both love music and beaches, and enjoy trying out different cuisines. I’m fond of Indian food and Ayurveda. We both love spending time at home. We also like spending time in a quiet hotel on a lush beach. Maldives is our favourite destination.
The champ in real life: Roger loves to eat Cordon Bleu with French fries and Cheese Fondue. Sparkling water is his favourite drink. He doesn’t touch beer, but sometimes enjoys a cocktail. He’s taking interest in fashion only now. Generally, he sports casual outfits, a jacket with jeans maybe. He likes to mix and match his clothes.

Bitten by the travel bug: Given his hectic schedule, we travel a lot. We love it because on long flights we are alone together. We hope to visit India when he retires.

Marriage can wait: Roger’s only 23, we’re in no hurry. But we are both family-oriented, and would love to get married and have children. Roger loves children — he does sports programs for them almost every second week.

crimson
10-05-2004, 06:50 PM
Thanks for posting that article violet. :) It's nice to hear Mirka's perspective on Roger. :)

RonE
10-05-2004, 07:01 PM
Thanks Violet. Mirka has always struck me as quiet, but active behind the scenes. It is nice to hear her opinions.